(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Colonial and Indian Exhibition, 1886 [microform] : official catalogue"

ADVKUTISKMKNTS. 



CO 



i 




K- 


5r 


1 *<J 




! uj 


K- 


! 


"^ 


^ 


O 




iJ 


cr> 


C^ 


K. 


«i. 


CO 


■^ 


^^^ 




-J 


^ 1 




<:> 




P. WHITFIELD & Co., 

66, I3:OI:j330I^"N" 'VI-A.IDXJCT, L02SrX)0 



N-, 



A.1TD 



^ 



OXFORD STREET, BIRMINGHAM. 






I 

! 




E X H i B I T i N 



ROAD 



P" K»4 "Bi'« WC^ W ► 







3 



« 
«» 



^ ^ 
^ 



? 2 5 



NCE 



o 
o 

Q 

d 

M 
6 

? 

h 

o 



8 



CO 



hH to 

r o 



55 

M 

CD 






H 
W 



H 






e 
o 

c « 



P 






O •! 



o 
o 



C ft) 

O 

t— I wj 

a ^ 






O 
O 

o 



00 

Co 
C5 



O 



J 



THB 



INTERNATIONAL FOR STORE, 

163, REGENT STREET, LONDON, 

T. S. JAY, Manager. 




Prize Medallists, 

International Health Exbibitlon. 



{%::vx "THE BEST AND CHEAPEST HOUSE IK 
LONDON FOB FUB GOODS OF 
EVEBT DESCBIjPTION." 



Telegraphic Address— 
FURRIER Y," LONDON, 
Telephone No. -3799. 



'S ■ ■ 



ONE PRICE ONLY. 
PLAIN FIGURES. 






THE FINEST FUB8 i 



THE WORLD PRODUCES. 



Ternis-CASH. 



163, REGENT STREET, LONDON, 




COLONIAL AND INDIAN 



EXHIBITION, 






1886: 



OFFICIAL 



'.<V."ii . 



CATALOGUE 



y V- 



LONDON: 

/ "WILLIAM CLOWES AND SONS, Limited, 

1886. 



i! 



^i5 



Advertisements. 



SPINK 8c SON, 

Goldsmiths and Silversmiths, 

?, GRAGECHURGH STREET {4 Doors from CORNHILL), 

LONDON, E.G. 

M 



I / 

EST-A.I3LlSlIEr> 



LA H>^l 



1. 'r r 3 . 



FINEST DIAMOND ORNAMENTS. ' 

CHOICE ANTIQUE d MODERN SILVER 
CURIOUS OLD COINS. 

BEST ELECTRO SILVER 



->^)C3(X- 



Of 1119 Highest Quality only, at moderate Cash Prioa^, and 10 Per Can 
Discount. Plate, Jewels, and Coins, ac3urately Valued or Purchased. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS, DIAMOND JEWELLERY, &c. 

BIRCH & GAYDON'S, 172, FENCHDRCH STREET, Off 

(On your way to the Eoyal Mint, Tower of London, Woolwich. Arsenal, and Docks.) 



ENGLISH LEVER WATCHES, with Dust- 
excliidlng Caps, Hall-marked Silver Cases, £ «. d. 
jspecially manilfacturcd for Colonial and 
rougliwiar 440 

ENGLISH LEVKU WATCH KS, in 18-carat 
•iolil Case-t, f om 15 15 

KX IJRELY ENGLISH KEYLESS. 18-carat 
Gold, H igh Class Watcllf^, withComptns.i- 
tion. from 18 18 

EN r I RELY ENGLISH KKYL'iSS, 18-carat 
Gold, Ladiiif, Irom 12 12 6 



KEY'LESS, 18-carat Gold, I^^dles and Gents., 
Koreljin manufacture, carefully exanitued 
and guaranteed, from 5 

RK(UJLAT01i CLOCKS, to go for 400 days 
with ouce tvindiug, excellent Timeiteepor, 

Iroin £6 15 to 8 8 

SILVER KEYLESS "HACK" WATCH, 
liigliiy recommended £2 10 O and 3 6 

18 CARAT, SOLID, HALL MARKED, GOLD ALBE 
CHAINS, Irom ,•'34 4 per Ounce. 



A Warranty given lor ovary Article sold; exchangred if not satisfactory. 

ESTABLISHED OVER FIi'TT YEAHS. 



MILITARY AND CIVIL 
UNIFORMS. 



e* 



?c- 



(V, 



INDIA AND 
COLONIAL 



^' ^?' c::^ ^^ 



^' /speciality 
/sHOOTINf 



AND 



OUTFITS. / ^ -^ \: 



^ ^ Cf^^ '^^ 






TWEEDS 

FOR ALL CLl]lIATl3 



I 



CONTENTS. 



PAQE 

Map of tlio World fhowing Britiih Pogsessiom 

Ground Plan of Exhibition Buildinga • Frontispiece 

Royal Commission v 

Committees to the Boynl ('Ommissiou ........ ix 

Executive Staff xiii 

Commissions appointed by tlie Colonial GovermueuU ..... xv 

Indian Empire — Executive Staff and Comraittcos in India. .... Ivii 

Executive Commissioners in London ........ Ixi 

Bcgulations Izv 

Colonial Views in Entrance Hall ......... Ixxiy 

Ship Models in Entrance Hall ......... Ixxy 

Complimentary List of Firms who have rendered special services to the Koyal 

Commission Ixxviii 

Garden Illuminations ........... Ixxxvii 

Illuminated Fountains Ixxxviii 

Old London Street Ixxxix 

Tho Aquarium xciv 

Pictures shown in Gallery of Royal Albert Hall xcvii 

The Empire of India 3 

The Dominion of Canada 91 

[New South Wales 149 

jVictoria 173 

^outh Australia . . , . . . 205 

Queensland , 227 

Testeru Australia ............ 249 

Tew Zealand . . . « 265 

fiji 287 

Cape of Good Hope 293 

fatal 311 

5t. Helena 318 

Lscension 321 

Ceylon 325 

[auritius 335 

?trait8 Settlements 343 

long-Kong 353 

Jritish North Borneo 358 

British Guiana 367 

Tamaica 383 

[Trinidad 891 

iBarbadoB 406 

IWindward Islands 415 

■Leeward Islands 481 

iBahamas 446 

iBritish Honduras 452 

West Africa Settlements 456 

Gold Coast . . . . . , 467 

jl^agos . 459 

lalta 46a 

proa 46? 

falkland Islandfl ............ 471 

a 2 






» ;.'.- 



: . I ■ .•« 






• -J .'.■'■\ '<-:i.'^ 
, ■ : ■c'l '■ ''. 



4 \...-\ ■- 



.1. 






IJatroiT. 

HER MOST GRACIOUS MAJESTY THE QUEEN. 

ROYAL COMMISSION. 

,^ , G(i!:ctted November i8///, 1884, 



6«tutibe IJrtsibcnt. 

Field-Marshal H.R.H. THE PRINCE OF WALES, 
K.G., K.T., K.P., G.C.B., G.C.S.I., G.C.M.G. 



Vice- Admiral H.R.H. The Duke OF Edinburgh, K.G, K.T., K.P. 

G.C.S.I., G.C.M.G. s • . ; ,.-: 

Major-General H.R.H. The Duke of Connaught and Strathearn 

K.G., K.T., K.P., G.C.S.I., G.C.M.G., C.B. 
Field-Marshal Commanding in Chief H.R.H. THE DUKE OF CAMBRIDGE, 

K.G., K.T., K.P., G.C.B., G.CS.I., G.C.M.G. 
The Duke OF Manchester, K.P. •' .-. : -• •', j : ;ai.' 

The Duke of Buckingham and Chandos, G.CS.I. ; ••- .> v .; 
The Duke of Abercorn, C.B. .. .1 . ..,1 . ,■ ;,;,r^) 

The Marquess of Lansdowne, G.C.M.G. ' ^^ ■ " • \ v/v; : ;>•. '.i:;;';,;! 
The Marquess of Salisbury, K.G. '..■£;■-: riv>- ''■■■ 

The Marquess of Normanby, G.C.B., G.C.M.G. 'i 
The Marquess of Ripon, K.G., G.CS.I. :-.-.':•:> ; 

The Marouess of Hartington, M.P. ;v/.; 

The Marquess of Lorne, K.T., G.C.M.G. 
The Earl of Derby, K.G. 
The Earl of Dalhousie, K.T. 
The Earl of Rosebery. 
The Earl of Carnarvon. 
The Earl Cadogan. 
The Earl Granville, K.G. 
The Earl of Kimberley, K.G, 



>■:■' ii. : J* ■ 



\ 



v! Colonial and Indian Exhibition.. 

The Earl of Dufferin, K.P., G.C.B., G.C.S.I., G.C.M.G. ' ^• 

The Earl of Northbrook, G.C.S.I. 

The Earl of Lytton, G.C.B., G.C.S.I. 

The Earl of Iddesleigh, G.C.B. : . 

The Viscount Cranbrook, G.C.S.I. 

The Viscount Bury, K.C.M.G. -^..i j" 

The Lord Reay. 

Field-Marshal The Lord Napier of Magoala, G.C.B., G.C.S.I. Vl) [ 

The Lord Aberdare, G.C.B. 

The Hon. Anthony Evelyn Melbourne Ashley. ^ 

The Hon. Edward Stanhope, M. P. V "^ f AVf^^l 

The Right Hon. Sir James Fergusson, Bar^, G.C.S.I., K.C.M.G., CLE. 

The Right Hon. HucH Culling Ear^-t^ey Childers. 

The Right Hon. Sir William Henry Gregory, K.C.M.G., F.R.S. , f . 

The Right Hon. Sir Lyon Playfair, K.C.B., M.P., F.R.S. 

The Right Hon. Sir Michael Ednvard I^icks Beach, Bart., M.P. '. .. 

The Right Hon. Anthony John Mundella, M.P. 

The Right Hon. Mountstuart Elphinstone Grant-Duff, CLE, 

The Right Hon. Sir Louis Mallet, CB. 

The Right Hon. the Lord Mayor of London (for the time being). 

The Right Hon. the Lord Provost of Edinburgh (for the time being). 

The Right Hon. the Lord Mayor of Dublin (for the time being). 

Sir Henry Thurstan Holland, Bart., G.C.M.G., M.P, ' :,.;<;.;►> 

Sir Daniel Cooper, Bart., K.C.M.G. , , " . • ; ^-^ 

Sir John Rose, Bart., G.C.M.G. , . ^ • : 1^ 

Sir Edward Birkbeck, Bart., M.P. ■, ;- 

Field-Marshal Sir Patrick Grant, G.C.B., G.C.M.G. 

General Sir FREDKP:»_tC PAUL Haines, G.C.B., G.C.S.L, CLE. 

Major-General Sir Henry Creswicke Rawlinson, K.C.B., F.R.S. 

Lieutenant-General oir Charles Henry Brownlow, K.C.B. 

General Sir Edwin Beaumont Johnson, K.C.B. 

Lieutenant-General Sir Henry Dominick Daly, K.C.B. 

Lieutenant-General Sir Samuel James Browne, K.C.B., K.C.S.I., V.C. 

Major-General Sir Peter Stark Lumsden, G.C.B., C.S.I. 

Sir Thomas Brassey, K.C.B., M.P. 

Sir Robert George Wyndham Herbert, K.C.B. 

Major-General Sir Frederick Richard Pollock, K.CS.I. 

Lieutenant-General Sir Harry Burnett Lumsden, K.C.S.L, CB. 

Sir Barrow Helbert Ellis, K.CS.I. 

Lieutenant-General Sir Dighton Macnaghten Probyn, K.CS.I., C.B., 

V.C. 
Surgeon-General Sir Joseph Fayrer, K.C.S.L, M.D. 
Sir Joseph Dalton Hooker, K.C.S.I., CB., M.D, 



Royal Commission. vii 



t ! \' '•/ 


'AT 


.U.h 


..I!.' V 


",^i 


Jlli 


!'■■.: .' 


-■.'i r 


.SUi 


•>.-M.'T 


m' r 


.IfJJ 


, ' " '* 


:,iil 

'" 




S.I., M.D.~' 




1 


. .*; I 




, -.lU 


;.;:•} 


.nil 


\\ • !/■ 


;;-u 1' 


■.•T.ii 


;.■ ' - 


•Mi 1 


. I ; M 


•. ,'•■.' 


•-■/••/ 





Colonel Sir Owen Tudor Burne, K.C.S.I., CLE. "■ . 

Lieutenant-Colonel Sir Robert Groves Sandeman, K.C.S.L 
Sir Lepel Henry Griffin, K.C.S.L ...;Vf v^iiif.iV. 

Colonel Sir OiiVER Beauchamp Coventry St. John, K.C.S.L 
Major-General Sir Andrew Clarke, G.C.M.G., C.B., CLE. .\: \ fiut^: 
Sir Charles Tupper, G.CM.G., CB. 
General Sir Edward Seluy Smyth, K.C.M.G. .;; • 
Sir Arthur Blyth, K.C.M.G. 
Sir Francis Dillon Bell, K.CM.G. ■•:Vl'l -••> it- 
Sir Saul Samuel, K.C.M.G. /,.f ■>-'•-!,'.'. - 

Sir William Charles Sargeaunt, K.C.M.G. 

.Sir Charles Hutton Gregory, K.C.M.G. . .> .. 

Sir John Coode, Knt. 

Sir George Christopher Molesworth Birdwood, C.S.L, I^I.D. 

Colonel Sir Edward Ridley C Bradford, K. C.S.L 

Sir Charles Mills, K.CM.G. .. -j ■.-, i i 

Major-General John Watson, C.B., V.C i ,.• 

Colonel LIenry Yule, CB. 

Major-General Martin Andrew Dillon, C.B., C.S.L 

Lieutcnant-General Charles John Foster, CB. 

John Arthur Godley, Esq., CB. 

Horace George Walpole, Esq., CB. - ' 

Lieutenant-General Richard Str.\chey, C.S.L .. „ , 

Major-General James Michael, C.S.L 

Colonel Arthur Edward Augustus Ellis, C.S.L ' ^ ^ ■ 

Robert Anstruther Dalyell, Esq., C.S.L 

Arthur Hodgson, Esq., C.M.G. 

Captain Montagu Frederick Ommanney, C.M-G. . , 

Robert Murray Smith, Esq., C.M.G. ' . . ^^ 

Augustus John Adderley, Esq., C.M.G. ,, 

James Fr.\ncis Garrick, Esq., C.M.G. 

The President of the Royal Academy of Arts (for the time 

being). 
The President of the Royal Geographical Society (for the time 

being). 
The President of the Royal Agricultural Society (for the time 

being). 
The President of the Institution of Civil Engineers (for the time 

being). 
The President of the Association of Chambers of Commerce for 

the United Kingdom (for the time being). 
Henry Coppinger Bekton, Esq. 
Ernest Edward Blake, Esq. 



viii Colonial and Indian Exhibition. 



Bertram Wouehouse Currie, Esq. >' - ■» 'fv»>> ' ■ 
Julius de Reuter, Esq. . ^ ;' - ' .:•■'.':•. 

Samuel MORLEY, Esq. • .'..;' ■.. .i .-r 

William George Pedder, Esq. • >* .<t>'j^'- 

John Pender, Esq. ..,.,..' . .. ' • * ' 

Also . '• 

H.H. The Nizam of Hyderabad. ; f '- 

H.H. The Maharajah (Gaekwar) of Baroda. • / >. ■.•'•"'* 
H.H. The Maharajah of Mysore, G.C.S.I. -^ ' '• ■ ^ 

H.H. The Begum OF Bhopal, G.C.S.I. ,-i : ' 

H.H. The Maharajah Scindia of Gwalior, G.C.B., G.C.S.I. CLE. 
H.H. The Maharajah Holkar of Indore, G.C.S.I., CLE. 
H.H. The Maharajah of Oudipore. 

H.H. The Maharajah of Travancore, G.C.S.I. ' ' \ - 

H.H. The Nawab of Bahawulpore, G.C.S.I. - '' 

H.H. The Maharajah of Jeypore. . ■ • j^/ 

H.H. The Maharajah OF Jodhporf, G.C.S.I. • 
H.H. The Maharajah of Patiala. ^^^ / '^^ 

H.H. The Maharajah of Benares, G.C.S.I. • 

H.H. The Thakur Sahib of Bhownugger, G.C.S.I. 
The Maharajah of Vizianagram. 

SECRETARY TO THE ROYAL COMMISSION. 

Sir Philip Cunliffe-Owen, K.C.M.G., CB., CLE. 

ASSISTANT SECRETARIES TO THE ROYAL COMMISSION. 

Edward Cunliffe-Owen, Esq., B.A. 

J. R. Royle, Esq. (for India). '•'" ' '' 

HONORARY COUNSEL TO THE ROYAL COMMISSION, 

Sir Richard Webster, Q.C, M.P. 

A UDITORS. 

Messrs. Lovelock & Whiffin, Chartered Accountants, 
19, Coleman Street, E.C. 



COMMITTEES TO THE ROYAL 

COMMISSION ..c, 

APPOINTED BY H.R.H. THE EXECUTIVE PRESIDENT. 

" , ', FINANCE COMMITTEE. v'r^.r;,,^;..; ,,. 

Sir John Rose, Bart., G.C.M.G., Chairman. ; • • :- 1 ^ :;J.i; 

Sir George C. M. Birdwood, C.S.I. -""• '" ' "' " ••<'.-'''> 

Sir Edward Birkbeck, Bart., M.P. * < •• » « ■/• i. , ;.: r ;.:(.I 

The Hon. Sir Ashley Eden, K.C.S.I., CLE. -t !<•.. -':;..;.{ 

Sir Barrow Helbert Ellis, K.C.S.I. : * 

A- W. Gadesden, Esq. - • • ■ ■ r - <. 

E. W. Hamilton^ Esq., C.B.' « ,>. /i lia 

Sir Henry Thurstan Holland, Bart., G.C.M.G., M.P. ' ' .u^:V^:> 

The Right Hon. Sir LYON Playfair, K.C.B., M.P., F.R.S. ' 

Sir William Charles Sargeaunt. K.C.M.G. 

■ ■ '•; ■•■:■ ''■■-■ ■ •:■■'.' ■■■; ■••■ .■•.■; I ■ .i'.t ■ f. 

LIGHTING COMMITTEE. '' - '^ Ti/ 



• ..' :• ;: I 



Sir Frederick Abel, C.B., D.C.L., F.R.S., Chairman. 

Colonel Sir Francis Bolton. 

W. H. Preece, Esq., F.R.S. (\\ ^^ s ,'; .; ;,s .-: . y/i i 



RECEPTION COMMITTEE. 



■'2 A '. ? ''I 



t- 1. 



«l>. 



The Duke of Abercorn, C.B., Chairman of Committee. 
The Earl of Cadogan, Vicc-Chairman of Committee. 
The Marquis of Lorne, K.T., G.C.M.G., Vice-Chairman of Committee. 
The Duke of Manchester, K.P., Chairman of the Colonial Sub- 
committee. 
The Right Hon. The Lord Mayor of London. 
Sir Daniel Cooper, Bart., K.C.M.G. 
Sir Charles Tupper, G.C.M.G., C.B. 



Colonial and Indian Exhibition. 



RECEPTION COUyilTTEE— continued 



Sir Thomas Brassey, K.C.B., M.P. 

General Sir Edward Selby Smyth, K.C.M.G. I, '[m*/* ; 
Sir Charles Hutton-Gregory, K.C.M.G. 

Sir John Coode. ' . 

Arthur Hodgson, Esq., C.M.G. j . ;. i , . .:.,-?v!'jA 
Samuel Morley, Esq. 

Field-Marshal Lord Napier of Magdala, G.C.B., G.C.S.I., Chairm;in 
■ ' .' of Indian Sub-Committee. 
Sir Ja:,ies Fergusson, Bart., G.C.S.I., K.C.M.G. ' '* 
Major-General Sir Peter Lumsl-en, G.C.B., C.S.I. , ' 

Major-General Sir Henry Rawlinson, K.C.B. .,,;, ;;■ ^ , .,^;{ 
Major-General Sir Richard Pollock, K.C.S.I. •,- .;; v. ;;., 

Lieutenant- General Sir Charles Brownlow, K.C.B. 
Lieutenant-General Sir Henry Daly, K.C.B. 
Lieutenant- General Sir Samuel Browne, K.C.B., K.C.S.I., V.C. 
Licutenant-General Sir Harry Lumsden, K.C.S.I., C.B. 
Sir Barrow Ellis, K.C.S.I. , j j,. 

Colonel Sir Owen Tudor Burne, K.C.S.I., CLE. ..,,•..,: 

Sir George Birdwood, C.S.I., M.D. - 

GENERAL SECRETARY. . ,. . 

Arthur Hodgson, Esq., C.M.G. ^- : :' 

SECRETARIES. - - -V.-m,' ■ - . . 

Lieutenant-General Henry K. Burne, C.B. ' ^^v '^ 

H. Trueman Wood, Esq., M.A,.:;^; p .- ? r .; 



CONFERENCE COMMITTEE. 



The Duke of Manchester, K.P., Chairman of the Council of the 

Colonial Institute, Chairman. 
Sir Frederick Abel, C.B., D.C.L., F.R.S., Chairman of the Council of the 

Society of Arts, Vice-Chairman. 
The Hon. Sir. C. Tupper, G.C.M.G., C.B., Executive Commissioner for the 

Dominion of Canada. 
Sir Alexander Stuart, K.C.M.G., Executive Commissioner for New 

South Wales. 
Joseph Bosisto, Esq., J. P., President of the Victorian Commission. 
Sir A. Blyth, K.C.M.G., Executive Commissioner for South Australia, 



Colonial Commissions. xi 



CONFEHI^NCE QOymilTEK— continued. 



The Hon. J. F. Garrick, C.M.G., Q.C., Executive Commissioner for 

Queensland. 
The Hon. Malcolm Fraser, C.M.G., Executive Commissioner for Western 

Australia. 
Sir F. D. Bell, K.C.M.G., Executive Commissioner for New Zealand. 
The Hon. James E. Mason, M.L C, Executive Commissioner for Fiji. "I 
Sir C. Mills, K.C.M.G., Executive Commissioner for the Cape of Good Hope. 
Sir W. C. Sargeaunt, K.C.M.G., Executive Commissioner for Natl. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Edmund Palmer, Executive Commissioner for St. 

Helena. 

A. N. Birch, Esq., C.M.G., Executive Commissioner for Ceylon. 
J. A. Despeissis, Esq., Executive Commissioner for Mauritius. 

F. A. Swettenham, Esq., Executive Commissioner for the Straits 
Settlements. -,-; /, 

Sir R. Alcock, K.C.B., Executive Commissioner for British North Borneo. 
Alfred Dent, Esq., Executive Commissioner for British North Borneo. 
William Kidner, Esq., F.R.I.B.A., Executive Commissioner for British 
North Borneo. 

G. H. Hawtayne, Esq., Executive Commissioner for British Guiana. - . j 

B. H. Jones, Esq., Executive Commissioner for British Guiana. ...,,, . 

A. J. Adderley, Esq., C.M.G., Executive Commissioner for the West Indies. 
Sir James Marshall, Executive Commissioner for the West African Colonies. 
Sir V. HOULTON, G.C.M.G., Executive Commissioner for Malta. 
Hamilton Lang, Esq., Executive Commissioner for Cyprus. 
H. Trueman Wood, Esq., M.A., Secretary of the Society of Arts, Secretary. 



INDIAN TEA COMMITTEE. 



General Keatinge, V.C, C.S.L, Chairman. 
Sir Philip Cunliffe-Owen, K.C.M.G., C.B. 
A. B. iNGi.is, Esq. 
George Seton, Esq. 
A. Thompson, Esq. 
J. Berry White, Esq. 
Henry S. King, Esq., ^^P. 
Ernest Tye, Esq. 



?i"i Colonial and Indian Exhibition, 



INDIAN COFFEE COMMITTEE. 



Frederick Clifford, Esq., Chairman. .. *.. 

Sir Philip Cunliffe-Owen, K.C.M.G., C.B. ''"^'^ ■ '^ •. 

F. G. ArbUTHNOT, Esq. • ."^ti-'..'i 

R. D, Buchanan, Esq. ' ' ' ,- 1'..-- •. • '.. . 

M. Mackenzie, Esq,. :'' 

H. Pasteur, Esq. ■•";'^';-";'- •■•■ ■ ; ''^-;';^'-' r - '-^'^ '' '^ .•^- • ■ 
James Whittall, Esq. -^ ^ -'"';<■ --^ y-i :/v«.vo^^J ^^l,,4iv> I . 
W. Maxwell Maynard, Esq. ;'-==^''^^*'-'- ■'■•" -^^'.-a- .^■'.•• 
Henry S. King, Esq., M.P. '•--•■•^^♦*- ,T■:-^^u,^. 



CEYLON TEA AND COFFEE COMMITTEE. 

A. N. Birch, Esq., C.M.G., Chairman. - * ' 

Sir Philip Cunliffe-Owen, K.C.M.G., C.B. •'* v''|.l»--^ 

T. J. White, Esq. --^ - j' ^ 

W, M. Leake, Esq. ' ■•^>;'-. .^ ^^, ■,.;.".:::* j;m 

H. Whitham, Esq. •" 

J. G. Smither, Esq. FR.T.B.A. ' ?' '; ■ ^ ' - r ' > ;^ 

A. ASHMORE, Esq. ..'i. ■>^'y;:o^j.lv; !;!-.. f . ;:- 

Henry S. King, Esq., M.P; ''^-^'\, ••■^'^ ■' -\' 



;{V:'';;. 






Executive Staff, 



xui 



■'^••^'f<i 



'.^,W'7 •:..-,.)■•, 



I I: 









€nt\\Bit Stuff to tijc S^o^itl Cammtssbir. 



^VrOi-r<:in MAiar 



.r'^r'.- ■■■ j't^j rtV'-l .••;*• fir vj;-^^•^!;^•;3'•: -vju'r 



SECRETARY TO THE ROYAL COMMISSION. ^ ' ''•' 

SIR PHILIP CUNLIFFE-OWEN, K.C.M.G., C.B., C.I.E. 

uretarial Department. '"v 'c: /:..•.■. ,;r<i-. i . -i y;: .-■ 

Assistant Secretary to the Royal \ t?^..,.-^ rtrvrippr Hvvfv 
CoMMissTON .. ...» . ,. . J Edward CUNLIFFE-OWEN. 

Frank Cundall. 



/. 



.It., kH 



■ i-^n 



f C. Joi 

. ,. < Cai'ta 

■ .'V ^ I E*. H. 

r F. N 

. < A. Pj 

( E. D 



Johnson. 
Cai>tain Grey. 
Lloyd. 



F. Northcott. 
Paul. 
Adcock. 



Chief Assistant 
Assistants • • 

Clerical Assistants 

yiPerintendence Department. 

Chief Superintendent . . . G. Gordon Hake. 

Goods Superintendents . . . ^ t' 9^^?>^' 

j £.. L. r>OX. 

Superintendent of Picture Gal- ? * «r 
lery .... \ Maskell. 

Superintendent of " Old London " T. Winter. 
Superintendent of Entrances . J. D. Dick. 



\lectric Light and Engineer's Department. 

Engineer 

Technical Assistant 

\Iu:ic and Refreshments. 

Superintendent . . , . 
Assistant, 

Catalogue Department. 

Assistant • . . , , 

Buildings Department. 

Surveyor and Director of Works 
Assistant Surveyor , 



J. H. Cundall. 
G. Schultz. ' 



J. RlCVIARDS. 

J. IIedley. 

H. Trendell. 

Wilson Bennison. 
J. Gibson. 



ir 



XIV 



Executive Staff^ 



Finance Department. 
Accountant 

Assistant Accountant . 

Officiat Agency. 

City and Official Aoent 
Chief Assistant 



G. F. Dickie. - 
E. J. P. Ebbs. 

J. R. SoMERS Vine, F.S.S. 
J. H. Kew. 



ItM \' t r.ii ,;. ,. (, 'j, ,'•■», J 7j ^v.pi 



INDIAN SECTION— 
The Secretary to the Royal Commission. 



Assistant Se'^retary to the Royal 

COMMIE5^!ON AND OFFICIAL AgENT 
TO THE GOVERNNtENT OF INDIA 



■•1 



ROYLE. 

Superintendent OF Economic Court Dr. G. Watt, M.B., CM., F.L.S. 
Chief Assistant to Mr. Royle . B. Plucknett. •., ^ , ,j« ■;•>, 

Assistants to Dr. Watt. . • | ^; ^ Se^"^'* '■'''" 

/ W. D. Freeth. 



1 -i;''''. 



' ! 



General Assistants 






D. S. Henry. 
A. E. Kemplen. , 
, I C. E. Lacey. 

' E. H. IiLOYD. 

W. G. Matchwick. 

J. SeDMAN. If 2.*' 

C. Sawyer. . 



\ 









, ;ix«:K.:. 



.i''r-.vr:i7r ,i 






•; V 



.W. .?f. 



.,i..,s:.n i">^* !:■':'.>(,)« '-^'.H'' ."i 



COMMISSIONS 

APPOINTED BY THE COLONIAL GOVERNMENTS. 



> I. THE DOMINION OF CANADA. *i'<I 

. u^.U/^lil 

COMMISSION IN LONDON. .. .\ ,.. -, 

-^ • PRESIDENT. ,^V .^. . K ,r..r:..f,.-.;3, 

The Marquess of LorNe, K.T., G.CM.G., Royal Commissioner. .-.Tit 

The Viscount MONCK, G. CM. G. ,.,.., ' i,'. '.';'.;• ii ,.rr 

EXECUTIVE '(^l^mrssrnnkR. 

The Hon. Sir Charles TupPEti, d.c.M.G., G.ft., High 

Commissioner for Canada in London, Royal Commissidner. 

(9, Victoria Chambers, S.W.) 

nOXORAR y COMMISSIOXERS. 

The Members of the Government bf thfe Dominion who may be in London 
during the Exhibition : — 

The Hon. Hector Fabre. 

yOINT SECRETARIES. 

Frederic J. S. Dore, Esq. 

Thomas Cross, Esq. »,-.,.•. 

ACCOUNTANT. . •' 

C. C. Chipman, Esq. 



II. NEW SOUTH WALES, 



COMMISSION IN LONDON. 

PRESIDENT. 

The Right Hon. Thte Earl OP Rosedery, Royal Commissiotter. 

VICB-PRESIDENT. 

Sir Daniel Cooper, Bart, K.C.M.G., Royai Comminionm 

EXECUTIVE COMMIS^WN^k. 

Sir Alexander Stuart, k.cm.g. 



xvi Colonial and Indian Exhibition. 



II. NEW SOUTH WALES— con finued. 



p COMMISSION 'in LONDON. 

MEAfBERS OF COMMISSION. " ' - -'^ 

The Hon. Robert P. Abbott, J.P. M.L.C. ' 

Thomas K. Abbott, Esq., J.F. 

' Frederick Clissold, Esq., J.P. oJv', 11/ OC :. T'T I 
Neville D. Cohen, Esq. _^. ■ 

Edward Combes, Esq., C.M.G., T. P. M.P. , . , 

Nathaniel Cork, Esq. ' ! 

1 Frederick H. Dangar, Esq '^''' ' *' *,> 

SiGMUND Hoffnung, Esq. ''^' '' •.>:.'.! ■!' 'f::':TC,vW t.' 

The Hon. Edward Knox, J. P., M.L.C. « ' 

The Hon. Sir Saul Samuel, K.C.M.G., Agent-General for the Colony of 

New South Wales, ^<y/a/ Cowwmww^r. \.>i^ 
Sir Francis TuRViLLE, K.C.M.G. ?-,rv*<i,'^ 'V 'j',-^ .ff'sfT ><' 
The Hon. John B. Watt, M.L.C. t, ^^.<tv,:.i ^,\: ^ij,^>a.*ll:,n:.r. 
George Alfred Lloyd, Esq. 
George Russell, Esq., of the Hoe House, the Hoe, Plymouth, England. 

■? ti'Vi ■fl", "!""•■;■*'. 'f,,-'''^'> 'I'll'' ' ' ,' '■ 

. , v. f* SECRETARY. , ►. » , 

Captain LoFi'US. ''*•" ^ 



COMMISSION IN SYDNEY. 

PRESIDENT. 

The Hon. Sir James Martin, Knt, Chief Justice. 

VICE-PRESIDENTS. 

The Hon. Sir Alfred Stephen, G.C.M.G., C.B., M.L.C. 

The Hon. Sir John Hay, K.C.M.G., President of the Legislative 
Council 

The Hon. Edmund Barton, Speaker of the Legislative Assembly. 

The Hon; Sir John Robertson, KC.M.G., M.P. 

Sir Patrick Alfred Jennings, K.C.M.G., J.P., M.P. 

Edward Combes, Esq., C.M.G., J.P., M.P. 

Sir Edward Strickland, K.C.B. 



Colonial Commissions. 



xvii 



11. NEW SOUTH "WPAJES—continued, 



:.i \ '•.» 



COMMISSION IN SYDNEY. 

EXECUTIVE COMMISSIONER. 

Sir Patrick Alfred Jennings, K.C.M.G., J.P., M.P. 



t'-W ' 



.V 



MEMBERS OF COMMISSION. 

Robert Dudley Adams, Esq. i , 

James Barnet, Esq., Colonial Architect. , . 

RUCSELL B\RTON, Esq., M.P. 

Alfred Bennett, Esq. " ' - , 

James Nixon Brunker, Esq., J. P., M.P. 
John Fitzgerald Burns, Esq., J.P., M.P. 
Michael Chapman, Esq., J.P., M.P. , . 
Henry Clarke, Esq., J.P., M.P. .; , ; 

William Clarke, Esq., M.P. 

The Hon. Henry E. Cohen, M.P., Minister of Justice. 
James R. Fairfax, Esq. ' 

Edmund Fosbery, Esq., J.P., Inspector-General of Police. 
Frederick A. Franklin, Esq., J.P., C.E. .-^ ^-^i,, - 
A.LFRED R. Fremlin, Esq. M.P. ... ^ i.{ ,,>, • I 
OHN HaRDIE, Esq., J. P. 

harles Hayes, Esq., Secretary of the Chamber of Commerce. 

obert G. Higgins, Esq., J.P. 

REDERICK T. Humphery, Esq., J.P., M.P. y ,.,,J ,. , :„ '. , •• 

ILLIAM A. Hutchinson, Esq., J.P. , .t- 'Yf .' ;;. . 

he Hon. A. H. Jacob, J.P., M.L.C. ^/^^ ,; 

ichard Jones, jun., Esq. ,r. f > ;;' 't: 

[The Hon. Philip G. King, J.P., M.L.C. /,,. .v, 

ENjAMiN W. Levy, Esq. 
Thomas Littlejohn, Esq., President of the Chamber of Commerce. 
Archibald Liversidge, Esq., F.R.S., Professor of Chemistry in 
University of Sydney. 

The Hon. William Macleay, J.P., M.L.C. 

William M'Millan, Esq. 

David Marks, Esq., f.P. 

George Merriman, Esq., J.P., MJ". 

E. L. Montefiore, Esq., J.P. 

Charles Moore, Esq., F.L.S., Director of the Botanic Gardens. 

Augustus Morris, Esq. 









^' ■ ; 



the 



xviii Colonial and Indian Exhibition. 



II. NEW SOUTH WALES--«;«//>/«<r//. 



,, i,r\t -l 



' 1'^ , :,; .::'. J .'■-»<)>,•': ; . •• ^;^ 



COMMISSION IN SYDNEY. 
MEMBERS OF COM MISSION— <9HUm(d, 

The Hon. Henry Mort, J.P., M.L.C. M^, i" r/ 

Henry Moses, Esq., J.P., M. P. 

William G. Murray, Esq. 

Louis Phillips, Esq., J.P. "'' " ' " " '' ' "-^ -• ''^" 

Robert M. Pitt, Esq. 

Thomas Playfair, Esq., J.P., Mayor of Sydney. 

John Pope, Esq., J.P. • = - ' ' ' ' ' ■'• ^ '• '■ ' ' ' 

John M. Purves, Esq., M.P ■ ' •• ^ 'fu'ii ;' ^ , • i - ;• J<..; 

Edward Quin, Esq., M.P. 

Charles J. Roberts, Esq., C.M.G., J.P., M.P. ' "• ^ '•' 

John See, Esq., J. P., M.P. ^ 

Thomas Slattery, Esq., M.P. 

ROBERT B. Smith, Esq., J.P., M.P. '" 'l ••• ■••'• -'iv •'"' '^' 

Charles F. Stokes, Esq., J.P. • '.-K ' ' rj-^-' •"v 'I 

The Hon. George Thornton, J.P., M.L.C. ^' '- i, /;.>.;!// 

The Hon. William J. Trickett, M.P., Minister of Publid IhSfnic!r6n. '^' 

Walter H. Vivian, Esq., J.P. _ \ 

John Walsh, Esq. • '" '"'"^ 't r ... ? •. x 

Richard C. C. Walker, Esq., J.P., Principal Under-Secretary. '■ '^ 

The Hon. James White, J. P., M.L.C. 

Robert H. D. White, Esq., J. P., M.P. 

Charles S. Wilkinson, Esq., F.G.S., F.L.S., Geological Surveyor. 

Harrie Wood, Esq., J. P., Under-Secretary for Mines. 

Edmund B. Woodhouse, Esq., J.P. 

The Hon. Francis A. Wright, J.P., M.P., Secretary for Public Works. 

John Young, Esq., J.P. ^^-^M. .r. 

Joseph Abbott, Esq. 

Philip F. Adams, Esq., Surveyor- General. 

The Hon. Geoffrey Eagar, Under-Secretary for Finance and Trade. 

William J. Lyne, Esq., M.P. 

Charles K. Mackellar, Esq., A.M., M.B., CM., Medical Adviser to th« 

Government. 
John Mackenzie, Esq., F.G.S., Government Examiner of Coal Fields. 
Edward P. Ramsay, Esq., F.L.S., F.G.S., Curator of the Australian 

Museum. 

Henry C. Russell, Esq., B.A., F.R.A.S., Government Astronomer. 
Robert B. Wilkinson, Esq., M.P. 

SECRETARY. 

Alex. Cumming, Esq. 



Colonial Commissions. xix 



.Ar JAIII. VICTORIA, vl 



COMMISSION IN LONDON. 

1 KXUCUTIVF. COMMISSIONKR. - -J 

The Hon. Graham Berry, Agent-General for Victoria. ♦ 

(8, Victoria Chambers, Victoria Street, S.W.) 

riiEninEirr of the victorias co.wMJss/oy. 

Josi:PH BosiSTO, Esq., J.P. .T,sf»/.-iv:ti .y-iiuji'. iH 

SECRETARF. 

James Thomsom, Esq. . ■ ,, ,. t /j ;.)io[ 

COMMISSION IN MELBOURNE. , ; j ,. .j/. .„ >; |^ 

rREsiDEXT. ... ,,..^;,r • Ai'-.trr 

JOSLPU BOSISTO, Esq., M. p., J.P. , / ^/; / •! rv" .T .a .H 

MEMliERX OF COMMISSION. ' '.^'I! " ' .''ull v/iT 

The Hon, Thomas Bent, M.P., J.P. ' ■ ' '• '•'■^l ''^T 

The Hon. John Woods, M.P. 

The Hon. Phillip Russell, M.L.C, President of the Ballarat Agricultural 
and Pastoral Association, 

The Hon. John A. Wallace, M.L.C. 

Thompson Moore, Esq., M.P., J.P. 

John McIntyre, Esq., M.P., J.P. 

John Nimmo, Et-q., M.P., J.P. 

Charles Smith, Esq., M.P., J.P. 

Alexander Young, Esq., M.P., J.P. 

Godfrey D, Carter, Esq., J.P., Mayor of Melbourne, 

Andrew Plummer, Esq., M.D., J.P., President of the National Agricul- 
tural Society, 

John Blyth, Esq., J.P., President of the Melbourne Chamber of Commerce. 

Robert Caldwell, Esq., President of the Chamber of Manufactures. .. 

Harry U. Alcock, Esq., J.P. ,, , ,, • 

Willl\m Glover, Esq., J.P. .... , ., . , ... 

David Mitchell, Esq., J.P. i. .„ jr » „,. • -^ 

' \ .K<.,>ilvJ eiiJ;i;n/.t; <:a:/ouT v.iyra : 

Andrew Rowan, Esq., ..P. . r ., . „ " 

William K. Thomson, Esq., J.P. ,. , ,, . . , ;.,/ 

Henry Borrows, Esq. 

JENKIN Collier, Esq. 

John B. Whitty, Esq. 

Peter B. Wallace, Esq., M.P. 

Henry Bell, Esq. 

George F, Morris, Esq. 

SECRETARY. 

James Thomson, Esq, v. 

6 2 



V'i..;^ ' \v. 


1 ■' > 


'\ 




\ . / '' , 


■ '■ '' ix'' { ■»! ; '.J, "J .iH 


.*•. ' ■ ■ 


1 -I ' f > 




'((I 1' . ' t-\:A j>.,ii VilT 




,) t\-A i ^.^l .\ ., .Jf -.At 



XX Colonial and Indian Exhibition. 



IV. SOUTH AUSTRALIA. 



COMMISSION IN LONDON. 

EXECUTIVE COMMISSIONER. 

Sir ARTHUR Blyth, k.cm.G., Agent-General for South 
Australia, Royal Commissioner. 

(8, Victoria Chambers, Victoria Street, S.W.) i; \; 

ASSISTANT EXECUTIVE COMMISSIONER. ' ' '" 

Sir Samuel Davenport. 

SECRETARY. 

John PuLKER, Esq. ,'.,;- 

HONORARY COMMISSIONERS. ^ ' - 

Jacob Montefiore, Esq. • - ..... .^j 

Thomas King, Esq. ' v ^s, 

H. B. T. Strangways, Esq. '.iv'! • '' 

The Hon. Richard Chaffey Baker, M.L.C. 
The Hon. Alexander Hay, M.L.C. :i t .^^ T r 



COMMISSION IN ADELAIDE. 

PRESIDENT. 

His Excellency Sir William C. F. Robinson, K.C.M.G., Governor of the 
Colony of South Australia. 

MEMBERS OF COMMISSION, 

The Hon. John CoLTON, M.P. '-.- 

The Hon, Richard C. Baker, M.L.C. ''' ' 

The Hon. Sir Henry Ayers, K.C.M.G., President of the Legislative 

Council 
The Hon. ROBERT D. Ross, M.P., Speaker of the House of Assembly. 
The Hon. John Wm. Downer, Q.C, M.P., Attorney-General. 
The Kon. John A. Cockburn, M.D., M.P., Minister of Education. 
Sir Thomas Elder, Knt, 

Sir Samuel Davenport, Knt., President of the Chamber of Manufactures. 
Edwin Thomas Smith, Esq., M.P. 
William Bundey, Esq., J.P., Mayor of Adelaide. 
John William Colton, Esq., J. P.,' Chairman of the Chamber of 

Commerce. ^ 

John Howard Angas, Esq., J. P. 

Hugo C. E. Muecke, Esq., J.P., Consul for the German Empire. 
Thomas Hardy, Esq. 
William Copley, Esq., M.P., President of the Farmers' Association, 

SECRETARY. 

John Fairfax Conigrave, Esq. 



Colonial Commissions, xxi 



V. QUEENSLAND. / i ^ 



COMMISSION IN LONDON. 

EXECUTIVE COMMISSIONER. 

The Hon. James Francis Garrick, c.m.g., q.c, Agent- 
General for Queensland, Royal Commissioner. 

HONORARY COMMISSIONERS. ' 

Sir James Cockle. . i . :.'>. 

William Hemmant, Esq. ,. . ;. / . ■, .' -■; H o-U' 

The Hon. William Henry Walsh, M.L.C. 'J . /-. .;' ui; i 

ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER IN CHARGE OF NEW CVINEA EXHIBITS, 

Hugh Romilly, Esq. 

HONORARY SECRETARY. ,,..... . - ,. ■> 

Charles S. DicKEN, Esq. , " '' ' ' •'" 



COMMISSION IN BRISBANE. :.r7 

MEMBERS OF COMMISSION. i'' ; 

The Hon. A. C. Gregory, C.M.G., &c. , , ,1 

Patrick R. Gordon, Esq. ; ; ,:)..i , , ; . - ; . .;» 

John Fenwick, Esq. .,.f ,■' ;; .:.;'.•.-.;..■ .: ,i; 

James Tolson, Esq. . , j , , ,, .. , .^ , , ,,.,,) 
Charles M. De Vis, Esq., M.A. 

F. M. Bailey, Esq., F.L.S. ' / . ' '^'' 

George Grimes, Esq. '"' ' " ' " ' ' "■' ^*-' 

John Little, Esq. *..->- ^t'-.^ ;^:-!i^'.v;^: ,. s m,.;.. ^ ,*■. r',:':x -\^ 

"JOINT HONORARY SECRETARIES, i'/f. '.''.;( ,-;}?/;. '.^|.\,'*4 

John Fenwick, Esq. .., .,,,,,/ 

p. R. Gordon, Esq. 

VI. WESTERN AUSTRALIA. '^ -'*^' - 

..J .H 

COMMISSION IN LONDON. 

EXECUTIVE COMMISSIONER. 

The Hon. Malcolm Fraser, c.m.g. 

ASSISTANT TO THE EXECUTIVE COMMISSIONER. 

Alpin Fowler Thomson, Esq. 



COMMISSION AT PERTH. 
Alexander C. Onslow, Esq., Chief Justice. 
The Hon. Malcolm Eraser, C.M.G., Colonial Secretary. 
The Hon. Alfred P. Hensman, Attorney-General. 



jfxii Colonial and Indian ExJiibition. 



VI. WESTERN AUSTRALIA- rw////;W. 



COMMISSION AT PERTH. 



MEMBERS OF COMMISSION. . , , ,. r rV^.TT , 

The Hon. Anthony O'Grady Lefroy, C.M.G,, J.P.. Colonial Treas«rer, 
The Hon. John Forrest, C.M.G., J.P., Surveyor-General and Commissioner 

of Crown Lands. ' • ,*.r isf^ft^ !»:Ti/. 

The Hon. J. A. Wright, M.Inst.C.E,, Engineer in Chief, Director of 

Public Works and Commissioner of Railways. ;■ ma Mar// ,Hpii ai. 

The Hon. Clayton T. Mason, J.P., C.E. a v7.ovv,t\\t.'iUn ■Vw.Ktv.xv. 

Sir Luke Samuel Leakf:, Knt, M.L.C., J.P. .;'-'f ,TJJ)M<>«jiau 

Stephen H. Parker, Esq., Barrister-at-Law, M.L.C. .,. '.i' . .„ ;. 

William E. Marmion, Esq., M.L C, J.P. 

William S. Pearse, Esq., M.L.C, J.P.,..i^,{j.v^ijj4[/(yj 

Samuel Mitchell, Esq., M.L.C., J.P. . \ '''.,» 

Charles Harper, Esq., M.L.C., J.P. :.0.K. J) ,<?«>;{ Ji:.> .;) .A .niM 4^ 

George Shenton, Esq., M.L.C, J.P. J'^'^f i'^O'.XffdO ..>! >i31»taH 

Henry Brockman, Esq., M.L.C., J.P. . - , ^^Jf^ ^^^:*^^^.^^^S. 

Charles Crowther, Esq., M.L.C., J.P. -^'^ ,Koi».tot r-\ u [ 

David A. Hay, Esq., M.L.C. *- '. ,, . 

' ^' -.^^J,''! ,4;kH .¥3.11/ I 

George Layman, Esq., M.L. C ,• 

Sir Thomas Cockburn Campbell, Bart, M.L.C, J.P. 

Septimus Burt, Esq., Barrister-at-Law, M.L.C. 

Maitland Brown, Esq., M.L. C, J.P. '> 

Alexander J. McR.\e, Esq., M.L.C 

McKenzie Grant, Esq., M.L.C 

George B. Phillips, Esq., J.P., Assistant Colonial Secretary, 

Alfred R. Waylen, Esq., M.D., J. P., Colonial Surgeon. 

Henry C. Barnett, Esq., M.R.C.S. Eng., J. P., Colonial Surgeon, Fremantle. 

His Worship GEORGE Randell, Mayor of the City of Perth. 

His Worship Barrington C Wood, Mayor of Fremantle. 

Rev. Charles G. Nicolay, Clerk in Holy Orders, Curator of the 

Fremantle Museum. 
Peter A. Gugeri, Esq., J.P. 
William T. Loton, Esq., J.P. 
James Morrison, Esq., J.P. 
M. C. Davies, Esq. 



Colonial Commissions. xxiii 



VII. NEW ZEALAND. 



COMMISSION IN LONDON. 

EXECUTIVE COMMISSIONER. 

Sir FRANCIS Dillon Bell, k.g.m.g., Agent-General for 

New Zealand, Royal Commissioner. . / 

(7, Westminster Chambers, S.W.) ■■<■ .!,.:(>•,•, \r .( .A 

COMMISSIONER IN CHARGE OF EXHIBITS. ; iJ rr;,! .(,' h:> 

Dr. Julius von Haast, C.M.G. -• j/:.'J ,., v> ,'^.> 1- •«') ..,' .|_ ,/. 

SECRETARY. <x-^X'Ai-,. A ..».:).!( .ri'-K .d'i' 
P. L. SiMMONDS, Esq. 

MEMBERS OF COMMISSION IN LONDON. ' ' " "" '" 

Sir Francis Dillon Bell, K.C.M.G., Royal Cotnmtssioner, President. 
The Marquis of Normanbv, G.C.B., G.C.M.G., Royal Commissioner. 
The Right Hon. Sir James Fergusson, Bart., K.C.M.G., CLE., Royal 
Commissioner. 

Sir Thomas Gore Browne, K.C.M.G., C.B. ''^ ■' *'•'»'''. •••''^ '''J' 

.Sir Penrose GooDCHiLD Julyan, K.C.M.G,, C.B. *>|^ 

Sir Edward William Stafford, K.C.M.G. , l, J^iy, ■ .,; ; 

Sir John Hall, K.C.M.G. .. .,. 'V, w ; wuii'-i JjT 
Sir Charles Clifford. ' '. , « ,. i j 

George Marsden Waterhouse, Esq., M.L.C. .,,,..,,, -. <( 
Thomas Russell, Esq., C.M.G. 



William Gisborne, Esq. 

j Alfred Domett, Esq., C.M.G. . i 

RoBKR-: Pharazyn, Esq., M.L.C. ' , ,. .,/>,.. 7 ^ r <? 



".I .-11 ■•.M«:i':^A''-i,jA 



[Walter L. Buller, Esq., C.M.G. 



^H ,.a ij'< .T,.W 



William P. Cowlish.\w, Esq. . ,l ,^,^ ';,,,, ,;: ;,( j^.j.jt, 

Frederick G. Dalgety, Esq. 

Wolf Harris, Esq. 

Falconer Larkworthy, Esq. 

Donald Larnach, Esq. 

Robert C. Reid, Esq. 

John Ross, Esq. 

Walter Kennaway, Esq. \. , ' , .r , j- 

Nathaniel W. Levin, Esq. ' ' 

Frederick W. Pennefather, Esq. 

Benjamin Petersen, Esq. 

John Macfarlane Ritchie, Esq. 

George Gray Russell, Esq. 

Frederic Young, Esq. 






xxiv Colonial and Indian Exhibition. 



VIII. FIJI. 

COMMISSION IN LONDON. ; • 

EXECUTIVE COMMISSIONER. 

The Hon. James E. Mason, m.l.c. 

HONORARY COMMISSIONERS. 

Victor A. Williamson, Esq., C.M.G. 

A. J. Malcolm, Esq. 

Charles Bethell, Esq. ' ■ - ■ ' ' Vr ,.,;;" 

A. J. L. Gordon, Esq., C.M.G. 
The Hon. H. G. C. Emberson. 

AGENTS. 

The New Zealand Loan and Mercantile Agency Company, 
Limited. 

...... .V. . .. COMMISSION AT SUVA. 

PRESIDENT. 

The Hon. John Bates Thurston, C.M.G., Admini.Urator of the Govern- 
ment. 

'GENERAL COMMITTEE. 

The Members of the Legislative Council. 

The Stipendiary Magistrates. 

Robert Robertson, Esq. 

P. S. Solomon, Esq. ■ ' 

Wm. Kopsen, Esq. 

J. Hendrie, Esq. 

Alexander B. Toske, Esq. ' 

P. T. J. Parfitt, Esq. 

W. T. Sturt, Esq. 

John H, Marrinon, Esq. 

B. G. Besse, Esq. 

C. D. Cuthbert, Esq. 
S. L. Lazarus, Esq. 
C. A. Huon, Esq. 
W. Salmon, Esq. 
N. Chalmers, Esq. 
R. B. Leefe, Esq. 
S. A. St. John, Esq. 
— Campbell, Esq. 
John Harris, Esq. 
Chas. W. Bucknell, Esq. 
R. L. Holmes, Esq. 
T. Burness, Esq. 
J. N. Randall, Esq. 



)r'^ 



Colonial Commissions. 



XXV 



VIII. Y\Z.\— continued. 



COMMISSION AT SUVA. 

GENERAL COMMITTEE—continued. 

W. Chapman, Esq. 
C. Ellis, Esq. 
F. H. DUFlY, Esq. 
F. Spence, Esq. 
James Turner, Esq. 

-— KOESTER, Esq. 
J. P. Storck, Esq. 
George Moore, Esq. ' 



\. 



John Fowler, Esq. 

Wm. Mune, Esq. 

H. Tucker, Esq. 

H. T. Waring, Esq. 

J. Wilson, Esq." 

James M. Borron, Esq. 

J. M. Lennox, Esq. 

D. Wilkinson, Esq. 

Donald R. Smith, Esq. 

Lieut. Langdale. 

W. M. Moore, Esq. 

James McConnel, Esq. 

Walter Hunter, Esq. 

Henry Reeve, Esq. 

Captain Moseley. 

Leslie J. Walker, Esq. 

John Langford, Esq. 

A. W. DuFTY, Esq. 

T. Blakelock, Esq. 

A. H. Simpson, Esq. 

W. Hennings, Esq. 

R. Milne, Esq. 

H. Eastgate, Esq. . 

R. L. Conacher, Esq. 

F. W. Witham, Esq. 

W. Fillingham Parr, Esq 

F. P. Blackmore, Esq. 

James Palmer, Esq. 

C. W. Drury, Esq. 

P. Hoerder, "sq. 

C. F. Smalt,, Esq. 











.. . 






■<-l 


MAI 




■ 














•i-V/ 


.{. " 














.p&.'J. 




',■ "\X 


;,:■' 














.u^':i 




















.pdvt 


,w 


i 






. 


I'JL* 


.'VX 
















t 


,"?' .- 


vT : 






-7CxyW'-'F% 


).: 


ivN, 


.r.Al 


'm ■ ' 


V ^ 




.:..: 




... 


4 


Vff! 


■,;>•'.' 


vflV'fo 






^ 


yf) 


•r 


'.tl.' 


rrt;iu. 


















.■■<::. '•_>>: /-.J .?i.'r>jj 


^nf■:Ai^Ui^i^^ 






ill i\'.'.> Irn: .'•'/(.■>'• 


:,/ ' / 


'.p^.-! -^ .>.■ .--M A/A 


JilV//'i[;;-i'I* 






••.[HITfi'-'^'J 


.'V 


a l/l.A t^jf/'/.t-fJ'^H srfT 



jiU 






■ i:>n:>.aoD 






xxvi Colonial and Indian Exhibition. 



■^ >ii 



vvUi 



VIII. FUl— continued. 
COMMISSION AT SUVA. 

MEMBERS OF COMMITTEE— tonlinued. 

William Ledingham, Esq. ./i'.^., .j,:. -. ' -r .^. 

Rev. A. J. Webb. . V. 

G. L. Griffiths, Esq. „ ,, ^' 

T. H. Prichard, Esq. 

George Smith, Esq. ' ' 

SECRETARY. 

The Hon. William McGregor, M.D., C.M.G, Acting Coloi^ial Secretary 
of the Colony. 

DISTRICT COMMITTEES. 
(All District Committees are appointed with power to add to their number.) 

Levuka and Lomaiviti. 

George Smith, Esq., Convener and Chairman. 

F. W. With am, Esq. .^ • 

Lieut. Langdale. 

Vanualevu. . fH^ixiiW .^ 

Hon. Captain Barrack, Convener and Chairman. 

R. L. Holmes, Esq. 

D. Wilkinson, Esq. ,' o v 

Wm. Graburn, Esq. 

Taviuni. 

The Hon. James E. Mason, Convener and Chairman. 

W. M. Moore, Esq. 

James McConnel, Esq. 

W. Hunter, Esq. 

Lau. 

J. M. BORRON, Esq., Convener and Chairman. 
J. M. Lennox, Esq. 
C. Hennings, Esq. 

Ba, Ra, Rakiraki and Nadi. 
N. Chalmers, Esq., Convener and Chairman. 
R. B. Leefe, Esq. 
— Campbell, Esq. 
R. F. Harris, Esq. 
S. A. St. John, Esq. 

Navua, Serua and Nadroga. 
• Hon. James Murray, Convener and Chairman. 
T. Laurie, Esq. 
James Wilson, Esq. 



Colonial Commissions. xxvii 



VIII. ¥1^1-^ conHnued, 



DISTRICT COMMITTEES— a>«//»«^^. 
Rewa and Tai Levu. 

Hon. James Robertson, Convener and Chairman. j -rfiiK^flW 

Rev. F. Langham. ^. , ^^.j^^^jv . ' 

W. MUNE, Esq. ^ J t^ \,^^^ ^^j..,.,^ T 

J. P. Storck, Esq. ' , sj ....'./ ,A,,,.it 



IX. CAPE OF GOOD HOPE. - ' >i ^^^ 

; -,i ,:j ifl;.-re', .7/ 

COMMISSION IN LONDON. .-4^! Vi.V'tfr .f .: 

EXECUTIVE COMMISSIONER. - l' (t 'i 

Sir Charles Mills, k.c.m.g., Royal Commissiomr. ;r.^-j .;-; 

(7, Albert Mansions, S.W.) ,,,.,; ^ ;,.,••/,.,';, 7/ 

SECRETARY. .,/ ' ,., , „.f 

Sydney Cowper, Esq. ' ''• • ' "^ '- ..-'-.i 

COMMITTEE. ■ ; r.vr.r.tl 

Sir Charles Mills, K C.M.G., Chairman, Royal Commissioner. -.hT 
Henry Mosenthal, Esq. ,7 ■. 



Thomas Bell, Esq. 
John S. Prince, Esq. 



.y-.j. ;Ai'A ■.'.'■■t ,K..[ 



William Dunn, Esq. ..::i . r./ ma// H .H 

William F. Savage, Esq. V,x^^ 

R. Ryall, Esq. 

J. M. Peacock, Esq. «v, ;,>>,: 

William G. Soper, Esq. vti^.5>\l '-..v.A .\ 

Adrian van der Byl, Esq. J.^\M .nru^'ir: .,,> .{. .aoH o,. . 

J. O. Borrodaile, Esq. ' !-!n.r>iHV>t5ir';a .1 .iuM »4T 

S. Ochs, Esq. ; uM .>: ^ .mil yir 

W. J. Anderson, Esq. {-''- . *-''•. -^U H .\ .noH r^. 

James Ansdell, Esq. " ' ' J:.,l.U ^,^^-3 ,mY::v^ 

Henry Collison, Esq. * -vai^^f 7,in/> iJ*. v 

Robert White, Esq. 

Sydney Cowper, Esq. ^...^^ x-i 



COMMISSION AT CAPE TOWN. 

CENTRAL COMMITTEE. 

The Hon. J. G. Sprigg, M.L.A., Chairman. 
The Hon. F. Schermbrucker, M.L.C. 
The Hon. John Miller^ M.L.C. 
The Hon. P. L. van der Byl, M.L.C. 
The Hon. J. X. Merriman, M.L.A. 
The Hon. H. W. Pearson, M.L.A. 
The Hon. J. H. Hofmeyr, M.L.A. 



xxviii Colonial and Indian Exhibition. 



IX. CAPE OF GOOD UOPE— continued. 



COMMISSION AT CAPE TOWN. 

CENTRAL COMMITTEE— continutd. ■ ^^ 

L. Wiener, Esq., M.L.A. ^'•'"" ' '' 

L. ViNTCENT, Esq., M.L.A. 

C. T. Jones, Esq., M.L.A. "^'^ 

P. J. Stigant, Esq., M.L.A. .j^M .'f^i 

C. D. RUDD, Esq., M.L.A. • ' " ' -• ' -"^ 

John Frost, Esq., C.M.G., M.L.A. ;/^-) .KK 

W. Sear LE, Esq. ., 

M. J. DE ViLLlERS, Esq. '^ ■' ^* >:OX^.^:;i J ' W ^ ' ') 

p. D. Hahn, Esq., Ph.D. '■ •''''•■'• ^ :' ' ;■ ••'■ ■ ■ . 

S. CRON-WRIGHT, Esq. <''^ ' f^^''^ ' ^ . '^^^^;-^.^^,; B^i,! « A H: 

W. Savage, Esq. ,'■ .i^/.-. If ;• w. _:-:ni.f •..'•) ' 

Jacob Duckitt, Esq. • . >. ,r,?,i -..'i't'wo" 

Baron VON Babo. • •• •"' 

Thomas Crowe, Esq. ' ' ' '• • '' ' ; ■ 

G. Whitaker, Esq. ' 

J. H. VAN Ryn, Esq. .^ v^ ,*U:i:! 

P. Marais, Esq. ■''" 

R. E. Wallace, Esq. 'V'''^ ^^^'''^^^ ^'•'^*'-^' '' 

SECRETARY. ;.' 'i »*..'/VAH ^^ UJ.\.\.\\ - 

Sydney CowPER, Esq. .jvj.U ? r^.vS? . 

SUB-COMMITTEES. ;;.:? . r';C"f/,-^l*i ,)/ ' 

7. Local Managing Coimnittee. , j^^,j,/,i- , 

The Hon. J. G. Sprigg, M.L.A., Chairman. ^ •:. ^-j ,;,u ,:, 14, 
The Hon. F. Schermbrucker, M.L.C. .^..^ ^,i.ju.icjj$viO« >A* 

The Hon. J. X. Merriman, M.L.A. 

The Hon. J. H. Hofmeyr, M.L.A. ; •- 

L. Wiener, Esq., M.L.A. '' < '' ;* 

W. Searle, Esq. . ?H , 

Sydney Cowper, Esq., Secretary. 

II. Finance Commiltee. 
The Hon. J. G. Sprigg, M.L.A., Chairman. 
W. Searle, Esq. 
L. Wiener, Esq., M.L.A. 
Sydney Cowper, Esq., Secretary. 

III. Sub-Committee for Wines, Spirits and Brandy. 
L. Wiener, Esq., M.L.A., Chairman. 
The Hon. P. L. VAN der Byl, M.L.C. 
Baron VON Babo. 



Colonial Commissions. xxix 



IX. CAPE OF GOOD HOPEr-con/inugd. 



■ f. '/ ■ 



y. 



COMMISSION AT CAPE TOWN. 

SUB-COMMITTEES— <0Htinued. 

III. Sub-Committee for Wines, Spirits and Brandy — continued. 
P. D. Hahn, Esq., Ph.D. .j,^ , ,,,,,^^,,,,. // 

P. MARAIS, Esq. .''I.;!'! ..iK-I'i ,'/»'!" " " 

J. Andrews, Esq. ' ,,,.-£ y,^,i^ 

P. C. LE ROUX, Esq. ' • ; .yn.f;;;;r.u;..y.^'! ,Vvn.MV)'> .;;.mAr... 

Thomas Crowe, Esq., Secretary. . ...... .,, 

JV. Sub-Committee for Woods and Vegetable Products other tj;i £' 

than Cereals. ,'■ ,\ •<■ „ •; .. ■ [ {\ j 
The Hon. F. SCHERMBRUCKER, M.L.C., Chairman. , /• •,,./.,.;,.( :; '\ 
The Hon. J. X. Merriman, M.L.A. j ,,,,, 

P. J. Stigant, Esq., M.L.A. .. •,, , , .;;'(••"?' .'f 

Comte DE Vasselot de Regne. , 

C. G. Akerberg, Esq. , . ' 

A G. Robertson, Esq., M.L.A. 
Alexander van der Byl, Esq. , ., , 

Viscomte DE Montmort. , ., . ! 

J. Storr-Lister, Esq., Secretary. "'" ' ' i . . , 

V. Sub-Committee for Cereals and Tobacco. 
L. Vintcent, Esq., M.L.A., Chairman. 
The Hon. John Miller, M.L.C. . t , ; . , _ •,..-• 

Jacob Duckitt, Esq. ■ i ? .. ,„ j . ,,^ | ,. .^ 

M. J. DE VILLIERS, Esq. y.v . . = . h'.> '■ . . > u.i'JA^'C 

H. STEPHAN, Esq. - .•! ^.;.i/ ^..«..,/. ^,j,,;;i ,:..>:; ,-.^,, .-Z,!^ 

J. W. Atwell, Esq. ^ - . -, s - a -^ 

Charles Becker, Esq. . , .. 

A H. Stockdale, Esq. 

K/". Sub-Committee for Wool, Feathers, and Animal Products -^i,.: 
L. Vintcent, Esq., M.L.A., Chairman. ^ j^ ? 

L. Wiener, Esq., M.L.A. us iki/'V ./ ; > 

C. T. Jones, Esq., M.L.A. ■ :*{Mn^V xmis^)":' 

Jacob DuGkitt, Esq, ,}<jw.id'^i ,:^ 

C. J. Manuel, Esq., M.L.A. ,j. 

W. Savage, Esq. 
H. WiLMAN, Esq. 
Carle Poppe, Esq. , 

VII. i^A^ Sub-Committee for Minerals. 
The Hon. F. Schermbrucker, M.L.C, Chairman. 
The Hon. J. X. Merriman, M.L.A. 



\'< \ ■.■*'•" 

' :i .VU V" 

^-I .■'•,,-v 



XXX Colonial and Indian Exhibition, 



IX. CAPE OF GOOD HOPE— con/inufd. 



•^A .;•) 



COMMISSION AT CAPE TOWN. 

SUB-COMAflTTEES—cenliniieJ. 

VII. (/I). Sub-Committee for Minerals— continued. 

W. Searle, Esq. - r '■ - •' 

p. D. Hahn, Esq., Ph.D. ' ' " '^ ' 

Thom.\s Bain, Esq. 

Charles Currey, Esq., Secretary. '"''• « 

{B.) Kimberley Local Committee, .S'^''^ J ^•>'«<" • 
The Hon. W. Ross, M.L.C. v-.-vm*) J^s\<:. M . 

C. D. RUDD, Esq., M.L.A. ■'i^'*''^-) vs,-..v. 

J. B. Robinson, Esq. -"ow..u(..j ,.'j, ) 1 : , ; .M:'Mr;u.<K.ii! )r: .'{ /tuH j/ i 
A. Davis, Esq. •:'•''■' .'V t. ;>r.^^r/ .X J.-u" 
F. Baring-Gould, Esq. '■ ^ f' .P''^ , J >:/ •!•... ., . 
J. Neumann, Esq. " '" ■"" ' '"^-" ^)< ^P' 

VIII. Sub-Committee for Miscellaneous Subjects. 
David Gill, Esq., LL.D., P".R.S., F.R.A.S., Chairman. 
The Hon. J. G. Sprigg, M.L.A. 

The Hon. F. Schermbrucker, M.L.C. '! ' '""' ' 

The Hon. John Tudhope, M.L.A. "''^"' '"^r 

The Hon. W. G. Atherstone, M.D., M.L.C. '••*''. .'i 
C. T. Jones, Esq., M.L.A. . ..\.U'. .. 

W. Searle, Esq. ' :"yd^i. .;i ..:^;,^. . 

P. D. Hahn, Esq., Ph.D. ■■:■"■■■. .j,;;.f ,tv= •>?' 

Thomas Crowe, Esq. .r:'<:>r^.^i:<i. 

J. G. Gamble, Esq., M.A., M.I.C.E. 

Sub-Committee for Miscellaneous Subjects. 
Abraham de Smidt, Esq. 
Thomas Bain, Esq., C.E. i 

John Noble, Esq. '' ' 'vH •v^.Xv,^ vu-.iv. 

J. M. Beck, Esq., M.B. - ■ ^ 'Z' -'^. 

C. A. Fairbridge, Esq. 
Roland Trimen, Esq., F.R.S., F.Z.S., F.L.S. 
Thos. E. Fuller, Esq., M.L.A. 
E. J. Dunn, Esq. 
W. Hammond Tooke, Esq., Secretary. 

CORRESPONDING MEMBERS. 

Rev. Dr. J as. Stewart, Lovedale. 
Major H. G. Elliot, C.M.G., Umtata. 
Walter Stanford, Esq., Kokstad. 
John Scott, Esq., Kenhardt. 



Colonial Commissions, xxxl 



IX. CAPE OF GOOD HOPVl-^confinue^. 



/ COMMISSION AT CAPE TOWN. . 

SECTIOyAL SUBCOMMITTEEH. . .. vw .. 

I /.I,. .V/ .H 

(A.) ZoologicaL ^ , ^ . ., , 'i ^i -• 

THOS. Bain, Esq, C.E. ^ ,.».!. ,Mi/.;irA'f.-l - 

Roland Trimen, Esq, F.R.S, &c. ,T»TiiMV.;':;,i ;/. .> .7/ .<ioH oiiT 

Rev. G. FisK, C.M.Z.S. - , >• - './I'ioa.T' 

W. Hume, Esq. . < ^ . ' '' <51 • ' "^ 

(B.) MnStoj^ical. .p^:-! .rjr-.'H an J-. 

A. DE. Smidt, Esq. , ',. ,• .. , 

John Noble, Esq. ' ■ ' • 

C. A. Fairbridge, Esq. ., , . ..;..,. .~— — 

John Scott, Esq. ' ,, 

THOS. Bain, Esq. /li. 

Walter Stanford, Esq. j ^/t i /_ (j, . ^, ■ | y.- *,/, r >. j 

Major H. G. Elliot, C.M.G. -. vyav. v/^ 

Rev. Dr. Stewart. ; s:-l.' : ■ r- H^.'' W/si.i i '. // 'U<i 

Captain Blyth, C.M.G. .v.U';u.t\v.>,v , > 

(C) BctanieaU , , 
H. Bolus, Esq., F.L.S. ' _.,;/;i ,-j!>..,'r. /. .J .1 
J. M. Beck, Esq., M.B. ^p-,^ _,...,•, ./^ 

Thos. Bain, Esq. 

The Hon. W. G. Atherstone, M.D, M.L.C. 
C. Lewis, Esq., M.L.A. 

(A) Fine Arts. •' 
A. DE Smidt, Esq. .M 

J. A. Fairbairn, Esq. i -l <^;. 

C. A. Fairbridge, Esq. ■I'J .(. 

Sydney Cowper, Esq. l 

(£".) Furniture. _ 
W. Searle, Esq. .0 ' 



A. DE Smidt, Esq. 

A. DE Smidt, Esq. 
Sydney Cowper, Esq. 



H, A. Ebden, Esq., M.D. 
G. H; B. Fisk, Esq., M.R.C.S. 
C. L. Herman, Esq., M.B., M.C. 
T. Douglas, Esq., L.R.C.P. (Edin.) 
J. Baird, Esq., M.D. 



(F.) Malay. 
(G.) Medical. 



xxxH Cole .ial and Indian Exhibition. 



IX. C^PE OF GOOD HOPE— continu^fd. 



COMMISSION AT CAPE TOWN. 

SECTIONAL SUB-COMMITTEES— coHttHMtd. 

(G.) Medical — continued. 
H. W. Saunders, Esq., M.B. 

T. F. Falkiner, Esq., L.K.Q.P.C.I. ." • , > ,^-1: ,v 

The Hon. W. G. Atherstone, M.D., M.L.C. ^ •{ ,|,; i ,;; if-,>i , 
T. J. Botha, Esq., M.B., M.C. (Paarl). . s, l/.-.i 

C. L. Herman, Esq., M.B., Secretary. , - 

(//,) Wall Diagrams. 
A. de Smidt, Esq. ., 

J. G. Gamble, Esq., M.A. V ,^. 

Sydney Cowper, Esq. 

X. NATAL. 

■ COMMISSION IN LONDON. 

EXECUTIVE COMMISSIONER. 

Sir William Charles Sargeaunt, k.c.m.g., Hoyal 

Commissioner. .0 

(Offices of the Crown Agents for the Colonies, Downing Street, S.W.) 

COMMITTEE OF ADVICE, 

J. Blackwood, Esq. 
'-'■ A. FaSS, Esq. ^*''^ •*' 

T. S. Flack, Esq. >'• ' "' 

T. W. Garland, Esq. 
M. Green, Esq. 
T. M. Harvey, Esq. 
P. Henwood, Esq. 
,. . ' R. J. Mann, Esq., M.D. 
. ■ -. J. McAlister, Esq. 

■ . '. r- i J- Payne, Esq. 
W. Peace, Esq. 
G. H. Rennie, Esq. 
D. Taylor, Esq. 
Daniel De Pass, Esq. 
George Reid, Esq. 

COMMISSION AT PIETERMARITZBURG. 

PRESIDENT. 

His Excellency Sir Henry Ernest Bulwer, G.C.M.G., Governor of Natal 

COMMISSIONERS. 

The Hon. Lieut-CoL Sir Charles B. H. Mitchell, R.M., K.C.M.G., 
Colonial Secretary, Chairman. 

The Hon. Henrique C. Shepstone, Sec»-etar}r for Native Affairs, 



Colonial Commissions. xxxiii 



X. NATAL — <ontinued. 
COMMISSION AT PIETRRMARITZBURG. 

COMMISSIOSERS—contiHutJ. , 

The Hon. Licut-Col. Alukrt H. Himi:, K.K., Colonial Engineer. , ^\f^ 

General Sir John J. Bisset, K.C.M.G., C.B. 

Sir Theophilus Shepstone, K.C.M.G. 

The Hon. John W. Akerman, Speaker of the Legislative Council. •■' * •"'''' 

John Robinson, Esq., M.L.C. ^.r, i 

Henry BiNNs, Esq., M.L.C. ..,,.,.. /.ri (^ Wf 

James L. Hulett, Esq., J. P., M.L.C. 

Edward Owen, Esq., Mayor of Pietermaritzburg. •;• 

Richard Vause, Esq., J.P., Mayor of Durban. ,, 

Dr. P. C. Sutherland, J. P., Surveyor-General. 

Gerardus M. Rudolph, Esq., C.M.G. 

Ashe S. Windham, Esq., M.A. 

Col. James H. Bowker, F.R.G.S., F.Z.S. 

George M. Sutton, Esq., M.L.C. 

James Schofield, Esq. ■'-■ 

John M. Wood, Esq. -'•«*,>*. ; 

Duncan MacColl, Esq. -.vi ' , ; 

Philip Norton, Esq. 

Pp:trus A. R. Otto, jun., Esq. 

Alfred Crawford, Esq. '"' ;' 

George Turner, Esq., J.P. ' *"' ' 

John Kirkman, Esq., J.P. •?;..-..'• 

DISTRICT COMMISSIONERS. 
Pietermaritzburg City, 
Sir Theophilus Shepstone, K.C.M.G. 
Sir C. Mitchell. _> . 

H. C. Shepstone, Esq. >{/' 

Lieut.-Col. Hime. 

Dr. Sutherland. ■ ~ -^l 

Mr. J. W. Akerman. "^ r 

Mr. Owen. ^ ' , , .v 

Mr. Windham. 

Durban Borough and Umlazi Division. 
Colonel Bowker. j 

Mr. Robinson. 
Mr. Vause. 
Mr. MacColl. 
Mr. Wood, 



xxxiv Colonial and Indian Exhibition. 



X NATAL — continued. 



Umvoti. 
Mr. Norton. 



DISTRICT COM MISS ION ERS~continued. 
Upper Umkomanzi, Ixopo, and Ipolela. 
Mr. SCHOFIELD (assisted by the City Commissioners). ''"*' '' ^ 

Umgeni Division. ,-,• :.-,Mu{':»ir; 
Mr. Otto (assisted by the City Commissioners). / a*/ ,,, | ..^ifbo? 

Lion's River. • \ ■■> ■ 

Mr. Sutton (assisted by the City Commissioners). ' ' '' ' 

,: '' i '-'H ..1 -MJ/.t. 

Inanda Division. ; •, ,v j-v.' < '.vi'X 
Mr. BiNNS. ,.. ■ .:', ■■■■■..i\n..vA 

Lower Tugela. - ^ ;; '1^ 

Mr. HULETT. , 'i''" ' '. "1 I',/' ;'.-> 

Newcastle. ' ;!.•••''*•"'■ ^^■'-f•'''f 

Mr. Crawforh. . , ■(■i-'-^j' 'f. '^'M-^l 

Klip River County. ":• ' ' '.■''. 

Mr. Rudolph. • '''"i'-*>^- -'lUr'i. 

Weenen County. , ,, ., >-/ ^ ,, ;,'r,,,jA 
Mr. Turner. . y-. ".,., ..■;,,. m^^^.,^^> 

Alexandra County. ' ' - "^ ^' ■ * • y^Bo} 
Mr. KiRKMA';. v\rv 

! Alfred Couni ,, l 

Sir J. BissETT. ,'.j>i> j.!^i.,v.nfTtiii 

SECRETARl'. .,i.: t ^.>i . WI ,3 

Mr. J.\MES SCHOFIELD. i :.^ "■ ! i.t;;-: .'J' 



XI.— ST. HELENA. 
With Ascension and Tristan D'Acunha. 



n- COMMISSION IN LONDON. 

EXECUTIVE COMMISSIONER. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Edmund Palmer, late Royal Artillery, 

(4, Perham Road, West Kensington, S.W.) 

ASSISTANT, 

Henry Palmer, Esq. 



Colonial Commissions. xxxv 



±tl. CEVLON. 



■>^e%':} fr . 



i ' ,„\h^x'v i ^^v- COMMISSION IN LONDON. 

t ' • ( ' ■ i ,t 

EXECUTIVE COMMISSIONER. / , , ; 

ARTHUR N. Birch, Esq., c.m.g. • .t i; 

(i, Old Burlington Street, W.) ' '' ' '' ' ' 

•••-•' ■■■■■■ A.t 

,^_ .^ . HONORARY SECRETARY. • 

W. E. Davidson, Esq., Ceylon Civil Service. 'l 



COMMISSION AT COLOMBO. 

GENERAL COMMITTEE. 

The Hon. Sir Arthur Hamilton Gordon, G.C.M.G., President. 

The Hon. Mr. Justice DiAS. 

The Hon. F. R. Saunders, Govem^ient Agent, Western Province. 

The Hon. P. A. Templer, Government Agent, Central Province. 

W. C. TWYNAM, Esq., Government Agent, Northern Province. 

W. E. T. Sharpe, Esq., Government Agent, Southern Province. 

G. S. Williams, Esq., Government Ajjent, North-Westem Province. 

Allanson Bailey, Esq., Government Agent.. Eastern Province 

F. C. Fisher, Esq., Government Agent, North Central Province. 

P. D. Anthonisz, Esq., M.D, 

J, L. Vanderstraaten, Esq., M.D. 

H. Trimen, Esq., M.B., Director of Botanical Gardens. 

A. M. Ferguson, Esq. 

The Hon. J. Van Langenberg, M.L.C. 

The Hon. F. M. Mackwood, M.L.C. 

The Hon. R. A. Bosanquet, M.L.C. 

The Hon. P. Ramanathan, M.L.C. " ' 

The Hon. A. L. De Alvis, M.L.C. ' 

The Hon. R. B. Downall, M.L.C. 

J. Wardrop, Esq., Chairman of the Chamber of Commerce. 

T. N. Christie, Esq., Chairman of the Planters' Association. 

C. H. De Sovsa, Esq., Chairman ©f the Agricultural Association. 

Captain Bavlev. v-,,, -' 

C. P. Dias Baudaranayeke, Esq., Maha Modhar. 

Ossen Lebbe Markur, Consul for Turkey. 

W. E. Davidson, Esq. 

J. J. Grinlinton, Esq. 

John Capper, Esq. 

c 2 



xxxvi Colonial and Indian Exhibition. 



XII. CE.YIJ:>U— continued. 



COMMISSION AT COLOMBO. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Hon. F. R. Saunders, Government Agent, Western Province, Chairman. 

Hon. R. A, BoSANQUET, M.L.C. 

H. Trimen, Esq., M.B,, Director of the Botanical Gardens. ;? 1 5T'i'?{.4 

P. D. Anthonisz, Esq., M.D. 

T. II. Christie, Esq., Chairman of the Planters' Association. 

C. H. De Sovsa, Chairman of the Agricultural Association. 

J. J. Grinlinton, Esq. ''.'*^ ' •' ^ • ^f 

W. E. Davidson, Esq. 

SECRETARY. ,•' 

John Capper, Esq. 



PROVINCIAL SUB-COMMITTEES. .', >, vr ..j-, 

Kandy. ; ' ? :.^ :ii -, ; i 

Hon. P. A. Templer, Government Agent, Central Province, Chairman. ?-^ 

\ HONORARY SECRETARY. . , . ■■/ i , .• //' 

L. F. Lee, Esq. . ■■.:- -,,^-- v ■ .7; 

Colombo. 

Hon. F. R. Saunders, Government Agent, Western Province, Chairman. 

JfOXORARY SECRETARY. 

W. E. Davidson, Esq. . ;u/fu'v /-a .(; /^ 

Galle. -•■'" ■-•■'• ••;vM/a7.J.' 
W. E. T. Sharpe, Esq., Government Agent, Southern Province, Chairman. 

HONORARY SECRETARY. '"*" " " 

E. M. DE Courcy Short, Esq. ;.ii... !,x"H'(!. 

■' "''U', ^v-.v"4 ;;.;/ h'.'l ./.al-i r>ri'' 
Jaflha, u i^i:t,,vf;.,, 5 / ..T t-,^\> 
W. C. Twvnam, Esq., Government Agent, Northern Province, Chairman. 

HONORARY SECRETARY. 

J. RUDD, Esq. 

Kurnnegala. 

G. S. Williams, Esq., Government Agent, North-Western Province, 
Chairman. 

„ ,, _ HONOdARY SECRETARY. 

S. M. Crawford, Esq. 

Anur^apura. 

F. C. FisHKR, Esq., Government Agent, North Central Province 
Chairman. ^ 

„ ,, „ , HONORARY SF,CRETARY. 

S. M. Burrows, Esq. 






Colonial Commissions. xxxvii 

- <- i XIII. MAURITIUS. ' "2 . n X 
. COMMISSION IN LONDON. 

EXECUTIVE COMMISSIONER. 

J. A. Despeissis, Esq. , ;,: . . ; x 

HONORARY COMMISSIONERS. \ ' ..i* ,. 

L. G. Adam, Esq., Chevalier de la Ldgion d'Honneur. ; , r y^ 

Henry J. Jourdain, Esq. • , i 



COMMISSION AT PORT LOUIS. ,'. , 

The Hon. John Fraskr, Chairman. 1' 

The Hon. Sir V. Naz, K.C.M.G. 

The Hon. F. H. Adam. 

The Hon. W. NliWTON. 

Dr. C. PouPiNEL DE Valence, President of the Royal Society of Aris and 
Sciences. 

A. Darutv, Esq., Superintendent of the Museum. 

L. DE ROCHECOUSTE, Esq. ' • 

H. B. Wilson, Esq., President of the Chamber of Commerce. '' 

J. HORNE, Esq., Director of Woods and Forests. 

J. A. Despeissis, Esq., Secretary. ,/ 

SUBCOMMITTEE IN SEYCHELLES. 

C. Dupuy, Esq. 
A. Duchenne, Esq. 
T. Petit, Esq. 
E. Savy, Esq. 
J. J. Sharp, Esq. 



XIY. STRAITS SETTLEMENTS. 



COMMISSION IN LONDON. 

COMMISSIONER. 

F. A. SWETTENHAM, Esq. ' 

ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER. 
N. p. Trevenen, Esq. ;; <r.' 



...UcJ 



COMMISSION AT SINGAPORE. 

CENTRAL COMMISSION. 

The Hon. J. F. Dickson, C.M.G., Chairman. »- ' 

The Hon. A. CURRIE. /\\/ ,.,.;'?'' 
The Hon. J. Graham. 

The Hon. T. Shelford. ,yrj,|j 






xxxviii Colonial and Indian Exhibition. 



XIV. STRAITS SETTLEMENTS— iwAw/e-^. 



COMMISSION AT SINGAPORE. 

GENERAl. COMMISSION. ''.■, 

The Hon. Seah Liang Seah. • '^t- .i"!-' 

Syed Mohamed Alsagoff, Esq. 

N. B. Dennys, Esq., Ph.D. v "' • 

R. W. HULLETT, Esq. 

J. Miller, Esq. 

W. A. Pickering, Esq., C.M.G. ' ' . : i ! 

T. Irvine Rowell, Esq., M.D. '.<.':'. 

LiM Tiang Wah, Esq. 

N. P. Trevenen, Esq. 

* j%*; SUB-COMMITTEES. 

'."•:'.• Ethnology, 

W. A. Pickering, Esq., C.M.G. ,, ,., 

N. B. Dknnys, Esq., Ph.D. 
J. Miller, Esq. 

Education and Science, 

W. A. Pickering, Esq., C.M.G. 

N. B. Dennys, Esq., Ph.D. 

J. Miller, Esq. 

Health. 
T. Irvine Rowell, Esq., M.D. 

The Dwelling. 
The Hon. A. CURRIE. 

The Hon. T. Shklford. 

Syed Mohamed Alsagoff, Esq. 

Fabrics and Cutware. 



■ ■ 


,rv. 


y,.'. :._) J. 




-■ ' V 


.1 '/!1KhH 


_;■•>■ 




' ■■■■'• 


/ '• J .i 1 


'H- 


.>;ff.^H M V 


r 


t!'/''' 


.:HiH -J«^' 


' , . ; 


' k 


...ioH ru,i:i'' 


M . '' 


.v/ 




, .^... /; 


J^i 


/i 


1 J • ' 


•K 


•I 


• ' i . , ,- 






■?•■' 


( 


\ip(.-\: .■' 


MK'i ,.i 


■>■■■:■' 


,;^.:>;i\A, 


■ 'T 


4 ■ •! 


,a.J*' .T 




..' "x 


/i-^L€ ^l 


i r -i 


n , 


'- •\.r^,'/^ ,1 _t'' 



1 ,! 7 •« .' 



The Hon. A. CURRIE. ry 

The Hon. T. Shelford. 

Syed Mohamed Alsagoff, Esq. itviiTT 

Natural History, 
T. Irvine Rowell, Esq., M.D. 
R. W. HULLETT, Esq. 

The Hon. Seah Liang Seah. 

Agriculture and Horticulture. 
T. Irvine Rowell, Esq., M.D. 

R. W. HULLETT, Esq. 

The Hon. Seah Liang Seah. 



Colonictl Commissions. xxxlx 



XIV. STRAITS SETTLEMENTS— <w;///«tt<wi 



COMMISSION AT SINGAPORE. 

• -V .ij;jKsUB-COMMlTTE]iS'-<oiHiHU€d. * 

■ ' Food Products. 

The Hon. J. Graham. 

The Hon. Seah Liang Seah. > • •'If .w-M yiiT 

Raw Products and Primary ManufactUriiA. • - ^ / ' s.u// 

The Hon. A. CURRIE. . ,.^^ja ; ■*>:/. i^Ii 

Animal Products. ■, ,i • ,\i£'u -; i\?.',:i;) 
The Hon. T. Shelford. ' , *. V; J ' ,; 

Mineral Products. ' * " ^ -■.^j-^ '■ " ^ ''• * 
Syed Mohamed Alsagoff, Esq. ' /*-' '''■- " ■' ', 

Locomotion and Machinery. ..tr^^y ..».'!;;> 

W. A. Pickering, Esq., C.M.G. "' •? •??-. i - " 

N. B. Dennys, Esq., Ph.D. " ' ' ? • ^^ V^i ' " ' 

J. Miller, Esq. ' ''•:iiJ.i.)' V 

LOCAL COMMITTEE IN PENANG. ''^i!^\iM iV 

The Hon. C. J. Irving, C.M.G. , . . ; ,i.-^'ir.'.r,:> 

The Hon. J. M. B. Vermont. , :^i .iij''^{\^ 

Captain M. A, Cameron, R.E. . ;,'.-,'vs^t!l 

A. B. McKean, Esq. 

Mr. Kho Bu Ann. 

Mr. Fu Tye Sin. . ' 

Mr. Kho Skang Tat. 

Mr. H. M. NooRDiN. 

R. N. Bland, Esq. 

LOCAL COMMITTEE IN MALACCA. 

The Hon. D. F. A. Hervey. 

E. Hogge, Esq. ' : . - ' - "' 

J. E. Westerhout, Esq. .r. -,',/. ... 

Mr. Chang Tek Cheang, J.P. "'^■' i'i -.'^ ■ • ■ 

Mr. Chi Hun Bong. '-'' • '" ' V ' . 

Mr. Wan Chilek. ;^-.. .-. • ;- 



foil.-- - 
•■ '• )' 



•I i 



J 



XV. HONG-KONG. ' ' ..;?.-•.. 



■ i 



i.> '-v, COMMISSION IN LONDON. .■ .j ,.:-.; i -MT 

EXECUTIVE COMMISSIONER. r^^'l ^.i'/ JaV/ 

The SECRETARY TO THE ROYAL COMMISSION. 

(Exhibition Offices.) 

[SPECIAL COMMISSIONER FROM HONG-KONG. 

Henry Ernest Wodehouse, Esq. 

ASSISTANT. 

E. H. Fishbourne, Esq., LLB., M.A. 



xl Colonial and Indian Exhibition. 



^iH^^ix. XY. HOUG-KOiiG—confinued. •^^^^v 



COMMISSION AT HONG-KONG. 

MEMBERS OF COMAflSSION^ :.\../,;i; .( .Tl<M :>tiT 

The Hon. William Keswick, M.L.C, Chairman. / :.: jw .:•: ,'>')H ••;•'•' 

William N. Bain, Esq. 'j. %y~ -■:■■' \ ..'.v-. n ■•■.',>. ■■■ v-,,\' ■ ; 

Emanuel R. Belilios, Esq. ' .»/..■,' .A .i.oH ^iif 

Charles D. BoTTOMLEY, Esq. % -^-'V '' 

CaTCHICK P. ChATER, Esq. .. \":,;,Vdy'.'S,\ 

James B. Coughtrie, Esq. j, ; ,(■,..;!•,:'. .. ■•.•.5v.>;*' •Ja'f^ 

Atwell CoxoN, Esq. \v-i;. . • . 

David R. F. Crawford, Esq. ■ ;. ; • ; ,..;•;.< 'a:v\ J?v .;W 

William Danry, Esq. j',; r »■. 'i,cr«""i .3 Vl 

William H. F. Darby, Esq. vi <.-».; '.iJ-'i .[ 

William H. Forbes, Esq. a '^ •■ •< 

Charles Ford, Esq. . 

David Gillies, Esq. ' ' ' / ' ',\ \. 

Heinrich Hoppius, Esq. ' .. ^ yr ., ,■ 

Ho Kai, Esq., M.D. ' ' J"'' ^j' '■' 

John D. Humphreys, Esq. '''-'^[: ■* ^ '/.^^ .. 

The Hon. Thomas Jackson, M.L.C. *' '^ ' , I'r 

The Hon. Alfred Lister, Colonial Trcasuior. ' '. ., ., 

, ^ ^ /; uiO'/. .I.'. .'.I -'*'• 

Li Shing, Esq. wv t ■• s^ 

Li Tak-ch eung, Esq. 

Alexander P. MacEwen, Esq. [, , ,^ H .iioH m»T 

The Hon. William H. Marsh, C.M.G., Colonial Secretary/ .^ ,^ 

Commodore George D. Morant, R.N. -jiv-rvy 'i i 

The Hon. Edward L. O'Malley, Attorney-General. 
The Hon. John Macneile Price, Surveyor-General 
Agostinho G. Romano, Esq. )>'i'n, 

William Ross, Esq. .,,..........,„ .,, t,.: ... . ..1 - ....-.-..>. 

The Hon. Mr. Justice Russell. ' // 

The Hon. Phineas Ryrie, M.L.C. If, 

The Hon. Frederick D. Sassoon, M.L.C. 

The Hon. Frederick Stewart, LL.D., Registrar-General. 

Wai Yuk, Esq. 

Colonel George E. L. Walker, R.E. 

Henry Ernest Wodehouse, Esq. 

The Hon. Wong ShING, 1\1L.C. 

HONORARY SECKETARV. ., 

Henry Ernest Wodehouse, Esq. 



Colonial Commissions. xli 



XYI.. BRITISH NORTH BORNEO COMPANY. 



COMMISSION IN LONDON. "' ;K:t -xiKU'T (T 

EXECUTIVE COMMISSIONER. 1-' 'i. 'i .'.i ,[ .til 

Sir RUTHERFORD ALCOCK, K.C.B. ^ '' ' ^ ''^^^ 

COMMISSIONERS. ,i . , , .ij- ,i ft 

Alfred Dent, Esq. ■; ' '" " '^* '^ •" 

William KiDNER, Esq., F.R.I.B.A. 

ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER. 

William M. Cro^jker, Esq. ' ';''"? ! 






COMMISSION IN BRITISH NORTH BORNEO. 
The Hon. William H. Treacher, Governor. 
Malcolm J. Brown, Esq., Colonial Secretary. 
W. B. Pryer, Esq., Resident of East Coast. ' ' ' 

G. L. Davies, Esq., Resident of West Coast. 



XVII. BRITISH GUIANA. 



COMMISSION IN LONDON. "' 

EXECUTirE COMMISSIONERS. ' ' ' ; 

George Hammond Hawtayne, E:sq.,F.R.G.s.,c.M.z.s., 

Administrator-General. .- , 

(i, Earlsfield Road, Wandsworth Common.) ,. i. ;'.» 

B.Howell Jones, Esq. .. : /'i 

,. COMMISSION AT GEORGETOWN. ' ' ''•^"' 

COMMITTEE. 

Royal Agricultural and Commercial Society of British Guiana. 

„ „ honor ary secretary. 

R. T. A. Daly, Esq. 



WEST INDIES. 



CA .i: f■.•ir^\j<)^Jk 



XVIII. JAMAICA. '■' ^ ; ^^' =' '' 

~~ ■.■- .r .K .7/ h 

COMMISSION IN LONDOxM. 

EXECUTIVE COMMISSIONER. 

Augustus J. Adderley, Esq., CM.G., Eoyal Cojnmissicner. 

HONOR A R y COMMISSIONER. 

Washington Eves, Esq. 

,, . ^ ^ ,., SECRETARV. 

Major G. E. W. Ma let. 



'i 



xlii Colonial and Indian Exhibition. 

XVIII. ^AMPilCPi.— continued. 
COMMISSION AT KINGSTON., - v /. 

MEMBERS OF COMMISSION. u ' : '^' 

D. Morris, Esq., M.A., F.G.S., Chairman. ^t' " 

Dr. J. C. Philippo. '^•'*" 

Hon. C. B. MossE, C.B., &c., Dep. Surg.-Gen., A.M.U. ,.', , . r, id ^':d 

Hon. H. J. Kemble. V'-. v.' iWJar'.i« irr! 

H. B. HOTCHKIN, Esq. *" " ' •' ' 

The Rev. Dr. Robb, D.D. * ' ''^ '' '^'f'^ " •'**"^ ' 

The Rev. John Radcliffe. '■•' il' ' r'' '''i^^t wai.uiV/ 

SECRETARY. .•',• 

H. Priest, Esq. ( ....... .r ....... ,r 

.'.d/;i,.;f XI X. TRINIDA D. ^,.^^.,.^^,,,^, 
• " . COMMISSION IN LONDON. i .n // uoH MiT 

EXECUTIVE COMMISSIONER. 

Augustus J. Adderley, Esq., c.m.g., Royal Commissioner^ 

ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER. • ■ ' , 

John McCarthy, Esq., F.I.C., F.C.S. ^^<i_M <l ,^ 

SECRETARY. .. .:.•... ^ 

Major G. E. W. Malet. 

COMMISSION AT PORT OF SPAIN. 

MEMBERS OF COMMISSION. - 

W. P. KiRTON, Esq., Chairman. , 

Peter Abel, Esq. , , , - 

S. DEVENISH, Esq. '^ ;; ,.,, _ ,; /^'^ „ ,^,^ .y , H:^Tl^^-^i3^ 

William HowATSON, Esq. f .< /.uv:./... i. .u>. ),...,.> 

J. A. Bulmer, Esq. }..::v,.u.1-u:n:\ui!m'\'h 

., Charles A. Fabian, Esq. • •:; .w .ih-jOi 1 .:,'.:r:;.:i ,» 

,The Hon. D. Wilson. , ?i .<'-J.-\] .M'.AVli .'; 

SECRETARY. 

•John McCarthy, Esq., F.I.C., F.C.S. 



«•';■ 



i.i'V.r 



XX. WINDWARD ISLANDS :— 



Barbados. ,„,| ,^.. 

COMMISSION IN LONDON. ' '" 



EXECUTIVE COMMISSIONER. 

Augustus j. adderley, Esq., G.M.G., Royal Commiisioner. 

HONORARY COMMISSIONERS. 

Sir George H. Chambers. 
Forster M. Alleyne, Esq. 
Colonel W. M. Lees (late B.S.C.). 

SECRETARY. 

Major G. E. W. Malet. 

MEMBERS OF COMMITTEE. ^ „ 

Sir George H. Chambers, Chairman. tA .t.- 

D. C. Da Costa, Esq. 
Augustine Caviller, Esq. 
Nevile Lubbock, Esq. 



CoUmial Commissions, xliii 



XX. WINDWARD ISLANDS— <w«A>i«^//. 



>rs Barbados. 

COMMISSION IN LONDON. - ^^^:^^<;^ 

MEMBERS OF COMMITTEE-coHtiuMtd. , r ,',) y i ;•.»(/ <1 

FORSTER M. Alleyne, Esq. . ■ " ' ; //ili U H 

Edward Chambers, Esq. . - ^ • '■^.%^^%.i' • ' ' | . V/ I V } 



.Kivtr,>„r,,.v.3_ 



The Hon. Archibald J. Pile. ' ■ . ,.v 

W. P. B. ShePHEARD, Esq. , ,^. •^^ps , ^]" .j ,.,'',;;] ? 

Thomas Scrutton, Esq. '"' '' ^,''* ,' -i.. if. ^q ./,;'. 

Robert Scott, Esq. V-^* • ' r { .'{ 

The Rev,, Canon Hinds Howell. r ' , . . , , \ : 
George Carrington, Esq. 

HON. SECRETARIES. ; , •; , ! 

Arthur WoRTLEY, Esq. ^,.,... 

James L. O'lLSON, Esq. i i'/''^' V< 



J ' 



«/ 






,7>^K .A 



COMMISSION AT BRIDGTOWN. 

•' *' "' HONORARY MEMBERS OF COMMISSJO.W. 

His Excellency The Governor. 

His Excellency The Major-General Commanding. • ■ ' ' y 

The Right Rev. The Bishop of Barbados. 

Sir John Sealey, K.C.M.G. • ►* ^ 

Sir Charles Packer. 

The Hon. Nathaniel Foderingham. 

Grant E. Thomas, Esq., M.D. v :'f% 

MEMBERS OF COMMISSION. 

The Hon. C. C. Knollys, Colonial Secietaiy, Chairman. 
The Hon. G. C. Pile. . • 

The Hon. W. H. Jones. ' '^■*>' - ■ 
The Hon. W. P. Leacock. 

E. T. Grannum, Esq. : i ' ' 
A. Bayne, Esq., M.D. ' ' '■ 
T. L. Gaskik, Esq., M.R.C.S.E. • ■ > 
The Rev. E. N. Thomas. •« ' • 
Professor J. B. Harrison. • < - ' ■ ri .) 
R. Bowie Walcott, Esq., M.D. ^, ' '•' ■ ' ' 
John Sealey, Esq., M.D. ^'^'^' . • ., , 

F. B. Archer, Esq., M.B.C.M. 
C. J. Manning, Esq., M.R.C.S.E. 

G. O. D. Walton, Esq., M.D. 

W. T. Armstrong, Esq. .' 

J. G. Austin, Esq. 
Louis Bert, Esq. 
J. B. Bovell, Esq. 
C. P. BOWEN, Esq. 
William Boxill, Esq. 
J. Kirton Browne, Esq. 



■' 


r 


■' 


'u: 


'J 


x\ 






' ^ 


v'i' 








;// 


-> 





,A :\ 



xliv Colonial and Indian Exhibition. 



1 ,., I .,,1. •;!'> M: 



XX., WINDWARD ISl^K^TiS—continuid. 
Barbados. 

MEMBERS OF COMMISSION— continutd. 

Robert Challoner, Esq. 

Darnley C. Da Costa, Esq. ' '''^ ivn" \,' ;• (./: 

H. H. Haynes, Esq. 

J. J. Law, Esq. 

E. J. Louis, Esq. ' "; ; ,. ,, • a., l .a 
James P. Massiah, Esq. , ; . , / ,:i ^ir'r 
A. P. Murray, Esq. ' •' . ! ,| . .^ 

R. F. Parkinson, Esq. . ," . - C, .i .vsM I'dT 

John Parkinson, Esq. , ,. , . ; ,; ...if.,; r . 
George Sealey, Esq. 

F. H. Sealey, Esq. •'■ , . , ., ..i .V ;.Knt;T«i?. 
J. G. Simpson, Esq. , .. , . .j 

W. H. Smith, Esq. . ■ •; 

E. K. Taylor, Esq. ,, , ' \ 

Walter A. Toppin, Esq. / , 

A. S. Waterman, Esq. • ^ 

SECRETARY. ' •. --: -'.'-^ '»" 

C. J. Lawrance, Esq. ./ ,. ■( • vj;.'/*:?:! ciH 

Grenada, St. Vincent, Tobago, St. Lucia. , >, ^ -tih 

Grenada. , - - ...^lAviLf (i- 

COMMISSION AT ST. GEORGE. ^'Tt- ^; 1' -il'j 

His Excellency W. J. Sendall, Chairnian. . 'UX'^y 

And others. 

."' • •.■ - ■. - '■,^.\- ' ...'ixX^nt 

St. Vincent. i^; ;• ' 

COMMISSION AT KINGSTOWN. v .:. 

The Hon. A. Kingdon, Chairman. ; .- .< 1 .: V' noVj ,,in 

The Hon. F. B. Griffith. 

The Hon. J. C. Denton. . - : 

The Hon. S. Arnott, M.D. ^ ..; \ < ;,h! .pi-'^l 

W. E. Hughes, Esq. '^ v .-ottT . 

C. E. Cloke, Esq. 

P. F. HugginS, Esq. 

SECRETARY. 

T. B. A. Musgrave, Esq. 

Tobago. 
COMMISSION AT SCARBORO'. 
The Hon. John McKillop, Chairman. 
The Hon. SiMON James Fraser. 
The Hon. LoRAiNE Geddes Hay. 
The Hon. Solomon Baber Isaacs. 
The Hon. James McCall. 
The Hon. Edward Keens. 
Charles Lloyd Abbott, Esq. 






Colonial Comtmssions. xlv 



XX. WINDWARD ISLANDS— ^tf«//««^//. 



St. Lucia. . 

COMMISSION AT CASTRIES. 
His Honour Edward Laborde, C.M.G., Chairman. 
P. J. K. Ferguson, Esq. 
D. G. Garraway, Esq. 

W. H. Hyndman Jones, Esq., LL.B. ' ' 

Charles Dennehy, Esq., F.R.C.S.E, '■' ' 

SECRETARl'. ' ... 

Robert P. Cropper, Esq. , ;, ' 



■r 



.( 



Tobago. 

COMMISSION AT ^Ck'RBOV.O'— continued. 
Thomas Newton Browne, Esq. v .' >' "^'^ T 

Robert Maxwell Clark, Esq., M.B.C.M. ' . .1 

The Rev. William Henry Engledew, LL.D. 'A. ': 'i 

The Hon. GEORGE William Gordon. , .;- , ' ' 

The Hon. Ebenezer Henderson. • .•■■ i . . ' i 'i i 

James Newton Macdougall, Esq. - .> 

Duncan McGillivray, Esq. ' « . : 

The Rev. Frederick Octavius Miller, . • ' ' 

William Allen Purser, Esq., L.R.C. P.I. 

The Rev. Thomas Walter Shields. , ,: 

The Rev. Canon Edward Rowland Smart, M. A. ■ ' i 

TheRev. Samuel Lawrence Thaeler. 

John Patrick Tulloch, Esq., M.B.C.M. ■ i 

The Rev. Edmund Ado LPHus TuRPiN. < "' ,' 

William Des Vignes Wilson, Esq. ■ '' 

James Frederick Witz, Esq., L.R.C. P.E. 

SECRETARY. , ' ' ' • 

R. B, Anderson, Esq., F.R.C.S. f i 



1' [ 
' . :■ A, 



: iji/. 



XXI. LEEWARD ISLANDS:— * 

Antigua, St. Christopher (or St. Kitts), Nevis, Dominica, 
Montserrat, Virgin Islands. 



COMMISSION IN LONDON. 

EXECUTIVE COMMISSIONER. 

AUGUSTUS J, ADDERLEY, Esq,, CM.G., Royal Commissioner. 

SECRETARY. 

Major G. E. W. Malet 



xlvi Colonial and Indian Exhibition. 

XXI. LEEWARD ISLANDS— r^A««rf//. 



,/. 


?/ 


/■ •■■'>. 


'/; 


.'"^ 


'^■.1 


!i:.-.f/ 


«*■< 




■ .' •• 


' ' ■ •'. i 


t'* 


•; 


! , 


, •• ■ / 




• -. 




'■ •!;'. 


. v 




> 


1. .. . .; 


V 

r 



Anttgua. 
COMMISSION AT ST. JOHN'S. 
The Hon. Henry O. Bennett, Chairman of General Committee. 
The Right Rev. C. A. Branch, D.D., Coadjutor Bishop of Antigua. 
The Hon. Arthur W. Holmes d'Court. 

S. L. ATHim Esq. ," :;■ .." <m 

The Hon. Henry O. Bennett. ; ;.: - ' 

F. A Braithwaite, Esq. i • 

David Buownf, Esq. 

The Hon. Patrick Burns. *j '. ' , t ■ 

Frederick S. Cassin, Esq. .«,,.; : 

The Rev. Fr. Clemens. 
William H. Cowie, Esq. • ' 
The Rev. M. J. Drinkwater. 
The Hon. W. H. Edwards, F.R.C.S. 
Arthur E. Edwards, Esq., F.R.C.S. 
The Rev. Patrick Fogarty. ' ' •<■■ '•' • '■ '-•'' 

His Honour Thomas D. Foote. " .'- '^ ^ « 

William Forrest, Esq. 

Tohn Freeland, Esq., M.R.C.S. . - '^rir^/ n >' 

The Hon. Stephen H. Gatty. 
The Hon. George Holborrow, ' v 
OCTAVIUS Humphry.s, Esq. ' ,- 

Edgar H, Lane, Esq. • , «... i '■ .■ < i 

John S. McDonald, Esq, ' , . 

Alexander G. McHattie, Esq., F.R.C.S. '...,. 

James Maginley, Esq. , 

William H. Moore, Esq. '\ V , I ' ,. 

The Hon. Sir Oliver Nugent. 
Oliver Nugent, Esq. 

George E. Pierez, Esq., M.B., CM. ■ ' ' 
The Hon. Neale Porter. -^ ,,..-. 

William T. Proudfoot, Esq. 
Daniel W. Scarville, Esq. 
Charles A. Shand, Esq. 
The Hon. John F. Wylde. 

TREASURER. 

William W. Heath, Esq. 

SECRETARfES. 

William H. Whyham, Esq. 
Thomas Baynes, Esq. 
Christopher Musgrave, Esq. 



Colonial Commissions. xlvH 



XXI. LEEWARD ISLANDS— r^«/mi/<r</. 



St. Christopher— Nevis. 

>•. '• ■ ■ ■ ) • 

COMMISSION AT PLYMOUTH. ^^yA f.Hu\i\t.) 

Samuel Aurott, Esq. .\\\ '':,•'. • ..'::jI jm .v.M ■«H 

J. D. Adamson, Esq. " .1' '•,'.• li' .It! M .n o/IT 

The Hon. J. H. H. Berkeley. . < ;•.: < ■ / n .;/ .'i.,a .n^'V 

T. P. Berridge, Esq. .ir- . f .•.",;{ 

C. Beard, Esq. .^ >iMi:/, . '-i.^^X 
William Berridge, Esq. '..-i ,n ^nd .5 .1 

D. S. Blake, Esq. •, \ .• ,, -vMr .7/ .;; 
A. P. Boon, Esq., M.D. .■ V v «.i i 
W. J. Branch, Esq., M.D. ' i • ".?/w.;:i 
Joseph Briggs, Esq. ;,! , / ■■.'.v\'i 
Walter Bucke, Esq. * . . , , ."/;i? 
Kev. T. M. Chambers. ./ 'i:; ■/" 
Ernest Connell, Esq. ' ! :< 
Rev. Wm. Cowley. 



>t 



n I ■ I 



B, S. Davis, Esq. 

Gust AVE Delisle, Esq. ' ' /. 

E. S. Delisle, Esq. ,',,.? 
Dr. Dinzey. . ; j; 
J. M. Dan AVAL, Esq. I ... SI 
The Hon. C. M. Eldridce. 
Edward Evelyn, Esq. 

The Hon. E. A. Faille. 
Frederick France, Esq. 
J. W. C. Gordon, Esq. 
J. R. tiOULD, Esq. 

F. GUNTON, Esq. 
Charles C. Gre.wes, Esq. 
Vcn. Archdeacon Holme. 

G. Horne, Esq. 

Rev. H. B. Hughes. ' ' ' " ' 

Dr. P. T. Huggins. 

J. Kearne, Esq. 

L. M. Kortright, Esq. 

J. L. Lake, Esq. 

Thomas McNish, Esq. 

The Hon. A. W. MoiR, C.M.G. 

W. Padmore, Esq. 

The Hon. Edward Pogson. 



. '• 1 


' :• i 


'»'' 


«, ' ■ • • 


, •' ' 


-n .' '>,. '.:•, 


■' . 1 i 


' •i''-.:».'ui:.'.il 


•f i-,: 


:■- :<. ■...■ur\ 


►.)?I ... 


.' ) '^Uh ..liiJXKiW 


1 : • 


■u .i J. i;-:xiii> 


•- '•-' . . 


■ ''Id'.ri.-.'c.vK 


!• , U- 


. \ ■.,C(1 


' -1 . •. 


' \si .J ■• 


''■'.; ■ : 


i'- ^ K^Cf: .'fTi.i 



xlviii 



Colonial and Indian Exhibition. 



XXI. LEEWARD ISl^AJiTiS— continued. 



St. Christopher— Nevis. 

COMMISSION AT VhYUOVlU— continued. 
Captain A. Roger. 

His Honour Judge Semper. ' .! i" 

The Hon. Dr. Semper. ■ . 

The Hon. W. D. AUCHINLECK. i ! ' I 

Rev. Fr. Smith. i, * ' 

Robert Smith, Esq. 

J. T. Thibou, Esq. ; > 

J. W. Thurston, Esq. 

Percy Todd, Esq. • ' 

Edward Todd, Esq. ' • , 

Ernest Watley, Esq. * '^ 

Francis S. Wigley, Esq. - 

Paget Wade, Esq. : r ' y-. 

Rev. H. F. Uh. 



!-'/.. 



Dominica. 
COMMISSION AT ROSEAU. 
His Honour J. S. Churchill, Chairman. 
The Right Rev. The Bishop of Roseau. 
The Very Rev. Father A. Fort (Vicar-General). 
His Honour Judge Pemberton. 
Henry Hamilton, Esq. ' 

Honourable Wm. Macintyre. ' 

James W. Bellot, Esq. 
Honourable G. L. Bellot. 
George B. Blanc, Esq. 
Honourable A. C. Potter. 
Francis P. Latouche, Esq. ^ .; -< 

James C. Fillan, Esq. v 

Rev. Abb^ Couturier. 
Wm. Callender, Esq. 

HONOR. -IR Y SECRETAR K. 

H. A. Alford Nu;holls, Esq., M.D., F.L.S. 



tfl 



r;:.;M 

J...V 

■ 1 . I ; 



■ '■ ■r-'J 

; >. 



1 . «.* 

,'■ "f 



/ ;'V. 



■ i 









Montserrat. 

MEMBERS OF COMMISSION. 

The Hon. J. S. Hollings, C.E., Chairman. 
The Hon. B. JOHNSON. 
H. B. Fox, Esq. 



>• 



I 

Colonial Commissions. xHx 

XXI. LEEWARD ISLANDS— r^«///i»^^. 



Montserrat. .♦ T.;)..>,a -.A'l 

MEMBERS OF COMMISHJOA-cpntinued. f /y A fto'i 'jiM' 

Frederick Driver, Esq. : ', , \. ' ,,^^^ ^^.^. 

Henry Dyett, Esq. ,. ,, ^^ 

K. P. Pencheon, Esq. 

G. H. Irish, Esq. " 

VVm. H. Wilkin, Esq. 

Burke, Esq. 
iev. A. U. Jamison. 
lev. K. M. Gillie. 
lev. T. H. Bailey. 
RANCis Watts, Esq. 
^^M. West, Esq. , - . .i, , >, . .: 
lev. Fr. Cooke. .;■ • ' '..>.: :'[ r. 

H. Mapleton, Esq, 

W.Howes, Esq. . v- - , 

UCHARD Hannam, Esq. •" ^"' ^^ ■ ' ' • ' ^ • > • • ■ • ' • - 
. J. Hannam, Esq. 
I'. H. Field, Esq. \ 



■■■■■' ;. -■. ' ..; .f 



The Virgin Islands. '^' '^'> -.. A 

COMMISSION AT TORTOLA. 
he Rev. Hugh Semper. ^''*' ' V .1.1 j 

OHN A. Foreman, Esq. .r* \ j : 

DSEPH D. Romney, Esq. • ^ ' ' • ' ' 



XXIL BAHAMAS. > .hT ..v,h lii-i: 

COMMISSION IN LONDON. 

EXECUTIVE COMMISSIONER. '. ., \ 

.UGUSTUS J. ADDERLEY, Esq„ C.M.G., /^oyal Comnisstouer. 

r • /- I- ^17 ,, SECRETAKV. 

ajor G. E. W. Malet. 



COMMISSION AT NASSAU, 
is Excellency H. A. Blake, Chairman, 
le Hon. E. B. A. Taylor, C.M.G. 
Je Hon. O, D. Malcolm. 
le Hon. R. H. Sawyer. 



Colonial and Indian Exhibition. 



A**«.ft XXII. 


BAHAMAS— continued. ^ -,x 


COMMISSION AT NASSAU— f<7«//««^<i 


The Hon. G. T. R. Kemp. 


vyl-.j iior^i 


The Hon. R. W. Farrington. ^ ' 


i ''^ " ■ ■i.'tv!':'.\i . 


The Hon. S. O. Johnson. 




..■ A ,ii.i.-.;.<J'v<ut 


The Hon. William Kirkwood. 


.vt^t^l ,Tiv-vr 


George Adderlky, Esq. 




,;;.'J, :rx>^^'. 


James Young, Esq. 




■ v^'^ / 


E. Hall, Esq. 




.^ ;-■"■? ^AxAMii 


H. Rahming, Esq. 1 






The Rev. R. DUNLOP. 




.!'i .'M . \ .'.. 


F.Alburv, Esq. 




.?Ui(i' ■ 


J. S. George, Esq. 




' V .H'.'i ._ . 


H. Lightbourn, Esq. 




,..-{ ,;tTv. 7/ ■ 




SECRETARy. 


S. P. Saunders, Esq. 






XXIII. . 


BRITISH 


HONDURAS. 



COMMISSION IN LONDON. 

EXECUTIVE COMMISSIONER. 

Augustus J. ADDERLEY, Esq., C.M.G., Royal Commissioner, 

COMMISSIONER. 

Chief Justice William Anthony Musgrave Sheriff 

SECRETARY. 

Major G. E. W. Malet. 

COMMISSION AT BELIZE. 
J. E. Mutrie, Esq., Chairman. 
The Hon. The Colonial Secretary. ^ 

The Hon. The Colonial Treasurer. 
The Hon. Alex. Williamson. 
The Hon. J. C. Darby. 
Alex. Hunter, Esq. 
F. Andueza, Esq. 
Benjamin Fairweather, Esq. 
William Neal, Esq. 
The Rev. W. H. Atkin. 
The Rev. J. Jackson. 
The Rev. W. J. Oldfield 
The Rev. S Di Pietro. 
J. ROBKRTSON, Esq, 



Colonial Commissions. li 



XXIII. BRITISH HC DURAS--<ottlinu<d. 



I ."i.'iii.imfA 



COMMISSION AT BELIZE— coM^ttued. 

D. Gentle, Esq., M.D. 
Thomas Simmons, Esq. :■ 

H. C Usher, Esq. '-^f^^ i ' ■'''' '^^^ 

William Burn, Esq. ••• ''"'■-».. , l;"^\>>*o;I .". -u-J'.rj 

C. MeLHADS, Esq. . ' .:>'c'fi^<C .V .[..Jl'via 

L. Stansmore, Esq. .^i?iiA\A^{}7 T'^y.l 

E. Craig, Esq. . - :i ,;i'^>.>)r;. ^ <* "' 
A. E. MORTAN, Esq. " : • *'■<" -^ 

F. H. Parker, Esq. 
R. Q. Smith, Esq. 
T. M. Cuthbert, Esq. .• 
Charles Peters, Esq. V',' ■'•- • * ., ^. 
W. Agar, Esq. •■ ■.;,'. -i-./^ /wTr", 
Chief Justice R. F. Sheriff. , .. . ,. i .. .' .Cf .\.,' 

, . , r^f .■; .7/" 

SECRETARV, . . 

F. Gahne, Esq., M.D. ' .• 



WEST AFRICAN COLONIES. 



,5.^,..- 



-"»i.!» 



COMMISSION IN LONDON. ^ , 



i/ ! 



(PoR the West Africa Settlements; Gold Co.\st: and Lagos.) 

* KXECUttVH COMMISSIONER. 

Sir JAMES MARSHALL. 

(Richmond House, Roehanipton, S.W.) 

COMMITTEE. \K ./ •• i :i .: u{ • 

The Right Hon. Lord Aberdare, G.C.B., Chairman, Jioyal Commissioner. 

A. W. L. Hemming, Esq., C.M.G., Head of the African Department, 
Colonial Office. 

Sir JaiiEs Marshall, Member of the West African Trade Section 
Committee ot the London Chamber of Commerce. 

F. SwaNZV, Esq., Vice-President of the West African Trade Section of the 
London Chamber of Commerce. 

E. G. Banner, Esq., Member of the West African Trade Section Committee 
of the London Chamber of Commerce. 

T. RisELEY Griffith, Esq., Colonial Secretary, Sierra Leone. 

W. H. QuayLe Jones, Esq., Queen's Advocate, Gold Coast. 

Kenric B. Murray, Esq., Secretary of the London Chumbsr of Commetx:e , 
Secretary. 

a 3 



m Colonial and Indian Exhibition. 



AXXIY. WEST AFRICA SETTLEMENTS. 



•^ COMMISSION IN SIERRA LEONE. 

COMMITTEE AT FREETOWN. 

Robert E. Pownall, Esq., Colonial Surveyor, President. 

The Hon. T. J. Sawyerr, M.L.C. 

David P. Ross, Esq., M.D., Colonial Surgeon. ..,4 ';l u. 

Lieut. J. N. CoMPTON, R.N. ,. . ,(;,?i 

Ernst Vohsen, Esq. ..^^\ ^. 

George Zochonis, Esq. 

Moses S. Boyle, Esq. ,^.| 

Daniel Jarrett, Esq. 






Sherbro District. ; ^.^, 
The Commandant (for the time being). 

J. B. Wright, Esq., J.P. .lic. • ^: :{ .>t -..ji 

W. H. Davison, Esq. 

J. A. Williams, Esq. .• - - , 

J. T. Alldridgk, Esq. 

2nd Eastern and Quiah Districts. 
W. M. HUGGINS, Esq., J.P. . . , 

Western District. 
J. M. Metzger, Esq., J.P. 

SECRETARY. 

Enoch Faulkner, Esq. 



COMMISSION IN GAMBIA. 

" ^ PRESIDENT. 

His Excellency C. A. Moloney, C.M.G., Administrator. 

COMMISSIONERS AT BATHURST. 

The Hon. James Topp. 

The Hon. J. D. Richards. 

C. Beving, Esq. 

E. Allegre, Esq. 

H. C. Goddard, Esq. 

A. Dubois, Esq. 

T. B. Evans, Esq. 

G. Verdier, Esq. 

S. J. Forster, Esq. 

G. N. Shyngle, Esq. . • 

P. JOUF, Esq. 



Colonial Commissions. liii 



XXIV. WEST AFRICA SETTLEMENTS-rt7////Vi«/^^. 



COMMISSION IN GAMBIA. 

COMMISSIONERS AT BATIIURST—CDniinued. 

E. F. Noel, Esq. ,!iv ju'.jri -lOT-uy •jie 

J. D. Attred, Esq. -1 ..,!,. rj^ ,.^. 

E. A, M. Smith, Esq. ;, . /.,\. v: - 

J. H. FiNDEN, Esq. - " •[ , •;; :/ 'V V;* .>,.:- 3 ' 

HONORARY SECRETARIES. , 

Captain W. P. RocilE, Government Secretary. '>■' 

Dr. W Allan, Assistant Colonial Surgeon, 



XX Y. GOLD COAST.- -^f-' - '• ' 

COMMISSION AT ACCRA. ' ^'* ' 'f>' J-;' 

COMMITTEE. > ' ' 'JtlV Yxf^T; 

John Pagan, Esq., Colonial Surveyor. ;.:-__...' 

Dr. Easmon. 

SCHINDLER, Esq. ^'' .ITlV.O 

i^DMUND BaNNERMAN, Eso. 

.Gauger, Esq. . . V . ...c i 

. F. Cleland, Esq. ■^■'•''•" ■ • ■ 

^ . NATIVE COMMITTEE. 

ing Tackie. ' - . 

^hief Ajauben Ankrah. .' • '' '• l ■ •'• '-. • :i. .:;.>.,» 

hief John Quartev. ' ^ . ' > /■■ .A \ ■ :trtin') 
hicf Ackromah. 



XXVI. LAGOS. ' '"^ 



i<i .' 



HCr !^^J .A if .-: .J .,;{?' ^ 



COMMITTEE AT LAGOS. .J,,;," ,' '.; '";; ' 

[r. Justice Smalman Smith, Chairman. * '■.;'""'. 

r. Consul HoOD. • " * •■•*'' ''^ 

r. Consul Heldbek. 

J. George, Esq. 

D. Fairley, Esq., Secretary. 

R. Elliott, Esq. ' 

I J. Thomas, Esq. 

A. Payne, Esq. 

. Shitta, Esq. 

W. Neville, Esq. 



t 



Hv Colonial and Indian Exhibition. 



XXYII. MALTA. 



. COMMISSION IN LONDON. 

EXECUTIVE CO»fM/SS/ONE/!. . >- ' 

Sir Victor houlton, g.cm.g. 

(26, Eccleston Street, Chester Square, S.W.) 

ASSISTANT EXECUTIVE COMMISSIONER. 

Edward T. Agius, Esq. * 



' COMMISSION AT VALETTA. 

MEMBERS OF COMMISSION. 

The Hon. E. L. Galizia, Chairman. 

The Hon. C. M. Muscat. . • 

Baron Calcedonic AZOPARDI. (\J<>%) 7 X X 

Marchesino Testaferrata Olivier. 

Edward V. Ferro, Esq. » ,/, . » 

SECRETARY, 

Henry Vella, Esq. 

XXVIII. CYPRUS. 



COMMISSION IN LONDON. '*^'"'^'^' 

EXECUTIVE COMMISSIONER. 

HAMILTON Lang, Esq. '** 

ASSISTANT COMMISSIONERS. 

George Gordon Hake, Esq. 
Captain G. K. Wisely, R.E. 

-'■ ■• COMMITTEE AT NICOSIA. 
His Excellency Major-General Sir R. Biddulph, K.C.M.G., CD. 
The Hon. Colonel Falk. Warren, C.M.G. 
The Hon. W. R. Collyfr. 
The Hon. S. Brown. 
The Hon. Dr. Heidenstam, C.M.G. 
W. Taylor, Esq. 
M. King, Esq. 
C. D. COBHAM, Esq. 
R. L. N. MiCHELL, Esq. 
Captain A H. Young. 
H. L. Thompson, Esq. 
Captain E. R. Kenyon. 
The Hon. D. Pierides. 
The Hon. T. Peristiany. 
The Hon. E. Constantinides. 



Colonial Commissions. Iv 



XXVIII. CYPKVS— continued. 



COMMITTEE AT NICOSIA— w///««^<ij -J^J 'qHH QT 

P. G. MICHAELIDES, Esq. 

His Eminence HussEiN Effendi. " .VIUHUP 2H f 

The Hon. Mehemet Ali Effendi. . , 

Ahmet Khouloussi Effendi. 

SECRETARIES. ,^^ ^lOM MKif 

Captain H. M. SINCLAIR, R.E. ^ % 

G. Smith, Esq. ! 



^-i 



XXIX, FALKLAND ISLANDS. 



COMMISSION IN LONDON. 

EXECUTIVE COMMTSSTONER. ':^ '•^ v^. "^ ' 

The Secretary to the Royal Commission. 

(Exhibition Offices.) 






G. M. Dean, Esq. 
F. E. Cobb, Esq. 



COMMITTEE. 



ciaX '/-J HO 



•H *•■■•• r f^. r i>i 



i: vT a ■ /:.. T ^ C^T 



Advertwmenta. 




TO HER MAJESTY -OTW!^^^^ ^° ^'^'^' ^"^ 
THE QUEEN. %^^IMi^^ PRINCE OF WALES. 



Q.E.FRODSHAM&G"' 



S 



Celebrated 



't,- 





ONLY ADDRESS 

Bl Gracechurc)i Street, E.C. 



est-a.blish[e:i> lyoe. 



SEE PAGE 147. 

Manufacturers and Finishers of the finest 
Watches in the World. 



INDIAN EMPIRE. 



EXECUTIVE STAFF IN LONDON. 

Al the request of the Secretary of State for India in Council, and with 
the sanction of His Royal Highness The Prince of Walks, 
Executive President of the Royal Commission, all the arrangements 
for the Indian Section of the Exhibition are entrusted to the Secretary 
to the Royal Commission. 1 • : , ( 

J. R. ROYLE, Esq., Assistant Secretary to the Royal Commission and 
Official Agent for the Government of India. ... ... .. 

George Watt, Esq., M.B., CM., F.L.S., Assistant in charge of Imperial 
Economic Court. ^- .xi^'^t 

COMMISSIONER FOR INDIA. 

E. C. Buck, Esq., C.C.S., Secretary to the Government of Ir.dia in the 
Revenue and Agricultural Department. ..i,r:T>r 



Colonel A. Le Messurier, Commissioner for H.H. the Maharajah of 
Mysore. 

Major Nevill, Commissioner for H.H. the Nizam of Hyderabad. 

M. M. Bhownuggree, Esq., Commissioner for H.H. the Thakur Sahib of 
Bhownugger. 

Official collections in India are made under the general administration and 
direction of the Revenue and Agricultural Department of the Govern- 
ment of India : — 

I. ECONOMIC PRODUCTS. 
By the following officers : — 
George Watt, Esq., M.B., CM., F.L.S., Bengal Educational Department. 
B. RiBBENTROP, Esq., Officiating Inspector-General of Forests to the 

Government of India. 
Babu Trailokya Nath Mukharji, Revenue and Agricultural Department 
of the Government of India. 

Assisted by the Exhibition Committees appointed by the Bengal 
and Bombay Governments and the Chambers of Commerce at 
Calcutta, Bombay and Rangoon. 



Iviii Colonial and Indian Exhibition. 

If. ARTWARE AND FABRICS. 
By the following Committees and special officers appointed by the 
Governments of the various Provinces in India, or the Rulers of 
Native States : — 

Bombay. 

COMMITTEE. 

The Hon. F. FORBES Adams, President. . i • 

E. C. K. Ollivant, Esq., C.S. , , 

Major A. B. Portman. 
Dr. D. Macdonald. 

Haji Karim Mahomed Sulleman, Esq. 
E. T. Leith, Esq., LL.M. 
Nanabhai Byramji Jijibhai, Esq. 
Vrijbhukhandas Atmaram, Esq. 
J. Griffiths, Esq., Secretary. ' " ' 

Madras. 

COMMITTEE. 

Colonel H. P, Hawkes, Deputy Commissaiy-General, President. 

Dr. G. BiDiE, M.B., C.I.E., Deputy Surgeon-General and Sanitary 
Commissioner. 

E. B. Havell, Esq., Superintendent School of Arts. 

Bengal. 

COMMITTEE. 

H. A. Cockerell, Esq., C.S.I., President. 
D. Cruickshank, Esq., Vice-President. 
H. Berger, Esq. 

Surgeon-Major D. D. Cunningham. 
M. Finucane, Esq. 
Henderson, Esq. 
C. R. Hills, Esq. 
J. J. J. Keswick, Esq. 
Dr. G. King. 
H. H. Locke, Esq. 
R. Lyall, Esq. 

The Hon. A. P. MacDonnell. 
J. D. Maxwell, Esq. 
The Hon. R. Miller. 
T. Murdoch, Esq. 
A. Pedler, Esq. 
T. Ralli, Esq. 
H. H. RiSLEY, Esq. 
A. SiMSON, Esq. 

The Hon. Colonel S. T. Trevor. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Waterhouse. 
M. Jackson, Esq., Member and Secretary. 



Indian Empire. Hx 



North-Western Provinces and Oudh. 
D. M. Smeaton, Esq., C.S., Director, Department of Agriculture and 

Commerce N. W. P. and Oudh. 
Lieutenant-Colonel D. G. Pitcher, B.S.C, Assistant-Director for Oudh. 

North- Western Provinces and Oudh Agricultural Department. 

•tJAfl C.I 1 

Punjab. .1^ KWOA«y 

J. L. Kipling, Esq., Principal, Mayo School of Art, Lahore. 

Central Provinces. 
J. B. Fuller, Esq., B.C.S., Director, Department of Agriculture, Central 
Provinces. 

British Burma. 

C. E. Bernard, Esq., B.C.S., C.S.I., Chief Commissioner of British 
Burma. 

Assam. 
H. Z. Darrah, Esq., B.C.S., Director, Department of Agriculture, Assam. 

•• • Coorg. 
Colonel A. Le Messurier, Consulting Engineer, Bangalore. '• '""'' 
W. McHUTCHiN, Esq., Executive Engineer, Mysore State Railway. 

Rajputana States. 

Colonel Sir Edward Ridley C. Bradford, K.C.S.I., M.S.C., Agent to the 

Governor-General Rajputana, Royal Commissioner. 
R. S. Whiteway, Esq., Settlement Officer, Ajmere, Merwara. 
Surgeon-Major J. P. Stratton, M.D., Resident, Eastern Rajputana States. 
Surgeon-Major T. H. Hendley, Hon. Secretary to the ^^ugeum Committee, 

Jeypur. 
Colonel P. W. Powlett, S.C, Resident, Western Rajputana States. 
Lieutenant-Colonel H. P. Peacock, Political Agent, Ulwar. 
Captain W. H. C. Wyllie, C.I.E., B.S.C, Political Agent, Kotah. 
Captain A. C. Talbot, S.C, Political Agent, Bikanir. 
Lieutenant-Colonel W. J. W. MuiR, S.C, Political Agent, Harowtee and 

Tonk. 
Colonel C K. M. Walter, S.C, Resident in Meywar. 
Lieutenant-Colonel C. B. EUAN SMITH, CS.I., Political Agent, Bhartpur 

and Kerowlee. 

Central India States. 
J. Johnstone, Esq., Principal of the Residency College, Indore. 



Ix Colonial and Indian Exhibition. 

.„ ^^ . 

Baroda 3tate. 

COMMITTEE. 

Captain J. HAYES S.VDLEB, Aissistant'Agcnt to the Governor- General, 

President. 
Major F. H. Jackson. 

Rao Bahadur Laxman Jaoannath. • 

Rao Bahadur J. S. Gadgil. ' 

T. S. Tait, Esq. 
P. Reynolds, Esq. 
Addas S. Tyadji. ' 

Rao Bahadur Raoji Vithal. 
Rao Sahed Hapoovandas Dwarkadas. 
Ambalal Sakarlai. Desai. 
DiNSHA Ardeshir Talearkhan, Hon. Secretary. 

Hyderabad State. 

Colonel C. J. O. Fitzgerald^ Commanding 3rd Cavalry, Hyderabad 
. Contingent, Hyderabad. 

Mysore State. 

Colonel A. Le Messurier, Consulting Engineer, Mysore, Bangalore. 
W. McHuTCHiN, Esq., Executive Engineer, Mysore State Railway. 

Nepal State. 
Surgeon G. H. D. Gimlette, Residency Surgeon, Nepal, Katmandu. 

Kashmir State. 

Colonel Sir Oliver Beauchamp Coventry St. John, K.C.S.I., R.E., 
li.S.C, Resident, Kasl nir, Royal Commissioner. 



LIST OF 

EXECUTIVE COMMISSIONERS 

IN LONDON. 



COLONIAL EMPIRE. 



I. Dominion of Canada. 

The Hon.Sir C.Tupper,G.C.M.G.,C.B. 9, Victoria Chambers, S.W. 
J\0)'al Commissioner. 

II. Now South Wales. 
Sir Alexander Stuart, K.C.M.G. . Exhibition Offices. 

III. Victoria. ;i n -. v ,. 

The Hon. Graham Berry ... 

IV. South Australia. » 

Sir A. Blyth, K.C.M.G. . . . 8, Victoria Chambers, S.W. 
J^oj^al Commissioner. 

V. Queensland. 
The Hon. J. F. Garrick, C.M.G., Q.C. i,VVestminster Chambers, S.W. 
Royal Commissioner. 

VI. Western Australia. 
The Hon. Malcolm Fraser, C.M.G. Exhibition Offices. 

VII. New Zealand. 

Sir F. D. Bell, K. C.M.G. . . 7,Westminster Chambers, S.W. 
Royal Commissioner. 

vni. Fyi. 
The Hon. James E. Mason, M.L.C. , Exhibition Offices. 

IX. Capo of Good Hope. 
Sir C. Mills, K.C.M.G. . , .7, Albert Mansions, S.W. 
Royal Commissioner. 

X. Natal. 
Sir W. C. Sargeaunt, K.C.M.G. • Office of the Crown Agents 
Royal Commissioner. * for the Colonies. 



Ixii Colonial and Indian. Exhibition. 



XI. Sti, Helena. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Edmund -Palmer 4, Perham Road, West Ken- 
(late Royal Artilleiy) • sington, S.W. 

.•XII. Ceylon. ;. 

A. N. Birch, Esq., G3I.G. . . i, Old Burlington Street, W. 

XIII. Mauritius. 
J. A. Despeissis, Esq. -. T / T rx f » ' T o 

XIV. Straits Settlements. 

F. A. SwETTENjiA;a,'Esq. V f:r.jni';tr.a •• 

\ XV. Hong-Kong. 

The Secretary to the Royal 

Commission .... Exhibition Oflices. 

• * — - 

/. XVI. British North Borneo. 

Sir R. Alcock, K.C.B. . . . 4, Thro^morton Avenue, E.G. 
Alfred Dent, Esq. 
William Kidner, Esq., F.R. LB. A. ,?. . 

XVII. — British Guiana. 

G. H. Hawtayne, Esq., F.R.G.S., i, Earlsfield Road, Wands- 
C.M.Z.S. worth Common. 

B. H. Jones, Esq. . » . 

. WEST INDIES. 
A. J. Adderley, Esq., C.M.G., Royal Commissioner. 

XVIII. Jamaica. 
A. J. Adderley, Esq., C.M.G. . . Exhibition Offices. 

XIX. Trinidad. 
A. J. AorJERLEV, Esq., C.M.G. . . Exhibition Offices. 

XX. Windward Islands. 
A. J. Adderley, Esq., C.M.G. . . Exhibition Offices. 

XXI. Leewafd Islands. 
A. J. Adderley, Esq., C.M.G. . . Exhibition Offices* 

XXII. Bahamas. 
A. J. Adderlbv, Etq., C.M.G. . . Exhibition Offices. 



Executive Commissioners. Ixiii 

XXI ir. British. Honduras. 
A. J. AdoerJ,ev, Esq., C.M.G. ;^ ■.... Exhibition Office*. 

' XXIV. West Africa Settlements. 
Sir James Marshall , , . Richmond House, Roe- 

hampton, S.W. 

■ * >''»«» XXV. Gold Coast, 
Sir Jamks Marshall . . . Richmond House, Roe« 

XXVI. Lagos. ' # '^ 

Sir James Marshall . . . Richmond House, Roe- 

hampton, S.W,.^ » 

XXVII. Malta. '^*^'' 

Sir V. Houlton, G.C.M.G. , . 26,EccIeston Street, Chester ; 

Square, S.W. 

XXVIII. Cyprus. 
Hamilton Lang, Esq. . . . Exhibition Offices. 

XXIX. Falkland Islands. _,^ 

Thb Secretarv to the Royal 

Commission , . . . Exhibition Offices. 



'0. 






INDIAN EMPIRE. _ 

#r| 

At the request of the Secretary of State for India in Council and 
with the sanction of His Royal Highness, The Prince" of 
Wales, Executive President of the Royal Commission, all the 
arrangements for the Indian Section of the Exhibition are entrusted 
to the Secretary to the Royal Commission. 



Executive Staff in London. 
The Secretary to the Royal Commission. 

J. R. RoYLE, Esq., Assistant Secretary to the Royal Commission and 
Official Agent for the Government of India. 



XIV ~- Advertisements. 



a 



55 



A LUXURY 

U N KNOWN IN ENGL AN D. 

BAPBER & COMPANY'S 

SEE THAT YOU HAVE NONE OTHER. 

u^L FRENCH COFFEE. pa'rV 

IN ITS HIGHEST PERFECTION. 

TENPBNCE PER POUND. 

This Is the choicest and most carefully selected Cofl'ee, " Roasted on the French Principle, and 

iiiiAcd with tho Finest Bruges Chicory." 

SUbs., in Tins, sent by Parcels Post to any Post Town in the United Kingdom 

and Channel Islands for 2s. 4d., or 5lbB , in Tins, for 5s. 6d.; 81bs., 8s. 6d. 

BARBER & COMPANY, 

274, Kegent Circus, W.; 61, Bishopsgato Street, City; 11, Boro' High Street, S.E.} 

102, "Westboume Grove, W. ; 42, Great Titchfield Street, W. { Zing's Cross, N. 

Also Brighton, Manchester, Bristol, Liverpool, I'reston, TMruiingham, and Hastings. 

WOOD WORKING MACHINERY, 

FOR COLONIAL REQUIREMENTS, 

CAN BE SEEN IN OPERATION AT 

A. RANSOME & CO.'S WORKS, 

STMLEY WOEKS, KING'S ROAD, CHELSEA, S.W. 

{Eight minutes' wUk from tho Colonial and Indian Exhibition.) 



-"■-:: /IS. ■„. 



V r 




INOLESt CHAIN FEED SAW BENCH. THE "WHEKLWRIQHT." 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOOVES FEEE OH APPLICATIOK. 
Tclegrams-RANSOME, LONDON. Telephone-No. 8,578. 

▲ppointmonts o«& lie mad« by Telvphons from Bxhibitton OaU Itoonw. 



( Ixv )^ 

"" .11. ...-I 1 III W ■■ ■ ■> III 11. I > ,.. f ■ . .,. II ■ I 1 !.■! ■ ,. I 1 I ■■■ ■ -III - ■■ 

■:. v« .^^^ }■■■ .' 

REGULATIONS '"'i;^;::°;:2' 

ISSUED FOR THE GUIDANCE OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMISSIONERS. 



'■' I ' 



: !■ 



GENERAL REGULATIONS. 

t. The Exhibition will be opened on or about the ist May, i886, and will 
remain open for a period of about six months. 

2. Subject to the conditions stated in Regulations 3 and 4, the objects to 
be exhibited are left entirely to the discretion of the Governments participat- 
ing, in so far as they illustrate the resources, products and manufactures of 
the Colonies and the Indian Empire. For reasons stated elsewhere, no 
Classification has been attempted by the Royal Commission ; but each 
Government is invited to classify its own collection. 

3. All fulminating and explosive substances and all dangerous substances 
are absolutely forbidden to be sent, but they may be represented by models 
or dummies. _ ;',:ir;eu« ; ,•' " > '-^^ 

4. Spirits, oils, essences, corrosive substances and generally all substances 
which might spoil other articles or cause inconvenience to the public, can 
only be received in substantial and suitable vessels of small size. 

5. There will be no charge for space. « i^*' . «;-t*^ iS • i '• .. j 

6. Motive power and water will be supplied free of cost, provided that 
notice by letter or cable is given before the \st January, 1886. Foundations 
can be laid, under the superintendence of the Secretary to the Royal Com- 
mission, upon requisition from the Executive Commissioners, with their 
order for payment. The work will be done at the expense of the Commissions 
requiring it ; and full particulars of the size, character and intended position 
of machines should be given. 

7. As the allotments of space have in most cases been already notified to 
the Colonial and Indian Governments, no further applications can, except 
under special circumstances, be entertained. Applications to exhibit from 
any individual or firm will be referred to the Executive Commissioners for the 
various Colonies and for India. 

8. The Executive Commissioners appointed by their respective Govern- 
ments will have the entire control of the arrangements of the goods 



Ixvi Colonial and Indian Exhibition. 

exhibited in their respective sections, subject to the conditions stated in 
Regulations 9 to i6. 

9. At least one main passage of not less than fifteen feet must extend 
throughout each Court from end to end ; and, where doors or openings occur, 
passages of not less than ten feet in 'dth must be provided communicating 
with the m.iin central passage. The necessity of providing adequate space 
for allowing the proper inspection of articles exhibited need scarcely be 
insisted upon. 

10. Signs or name-boards should be placed parallel with the main 
passages, that is, parallel with the frontage of the respective stands. It is 
suggested that they should be black with gold letters. Care should be taken 
to prevent any interference with the electric? lighting arrangements. 

11. All handbills, printed matter, &c., connected with exhibits, and 
intended for gratuitous distribution, should be duly authorised by the 
Executive Commissioners for each country, who will find the Secretary to the 
Koyal Commission ready to co-operate with them. 

12. It is specially requested that no cases or goods should exceed the 
height of ten feet : this rule is not intended .to prevent the erection of any 
special trophies ; but designs to scale of all trophies should, previous to their 
erection, be notified to the Secretary to the Royal Commission. 

13. As the Exhibition Buildings are leased by the Royal Commission, no 
alterations afTecting the structure of ihe buildings as regards the floor, walls 
or roofing can be permitted without special application to the Secretary to 
the Royal Commission. 

14. Executive Commissioners will be required to provide all necessary 
attendance for keeping the stands and exhibits in their sections properly 
cleaned and in good order : all stands should remain uncovered during the 
hours the Exhibition is open to the public. 

1 5. It is probable that the hours during which the Exhibition will remain 
open to the public will be from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. on all days except Wednes- 
days and Saturdays, when the hour of closing will be 11 p.m. These 
arrangements are, however, subject to alteration. The Exhibition will not 
be open on Sundays. 

16. No Exhibit may be removed from the Exhibition Buildings until the 
close of the Exhibition, without the permission of the Executive Commis- 
sioners, countersigned by the Secretary to the Royal Commission ; and 
consequently no selling, with a view to removal prior to the close of the 
Exhibition, should be allowed. 

17. No article exhibited may be photographed, drawn, copied or reproduced 
in any manner whatsoever, without the special sanction of the Executive 
Commissioner of the section ; this sanction should be notified to the Secretary 
to the Royal Commission. 

18. All packages containing goods intended for exhibition must have 
painted on them the distinctive mark C. I. E., together with the name of the 
Colony from which they are sent. They must in all cases be consigned to 
the £lxecutive Commissioner of the Colony from which they are sent. 



General Regulations. Ixvii 



19. All goods intended for exhibition should reach the Exhibition buildings 
on or before the 31st January, 1886 ; and, if convenient to Executive Con>- 
missioners, they can be received from the ist January, 1886: it is hoped 
that everything will be reported as ready for inspection at least fourteen days 
previous to the end of April. 

20. Cases should be unpacked with the greatest possible dispatch, and 
when empty should be removed immediately from the buildings. The 
Secretary to the Royal Commission will have pleasure in recommending 
places of storage for empty cases ; but it must be distinctly understood that 
all arrangements for the unpacking, removal, storage and bringing back of 
cases must be made, and the expenses borne, by the various Colonial and 
Indian Commissions. "'■:' ■'"' 

21. All expenses connected with the installation and d.- "lay of exhibits 
will be defrayed by the Colonial and Indian Commissions. • 

22. The Royal Commission reserves to itself the right of refusing to admit 
any exhibit. 

23. The Royal Commission reserves to itself the sole right of publishing 
and selling a General Catalogue, and General Guide and Plans of the 
Exhibition, and for this purpose requests that a descriptive list, duly classified, 
of the goods intended for exhibition maybe forwarded to the Secretary to the 
Royal Commission by the respective Commissions not later than the ist 
December, 1885. Each Commission will, however, be at liberty to publish 
and sell through the official publishers to the Royal Commission a special 
Catalogue of its collection. It is hoped for the sake of uniformity that the 
size of all such publications may be the same size as that of the General 
Catalogue, known as Demy 8vo. (8 J in. x sj-in.) 

24. A Colonial Dining Room will be organised, under the superintendence 
of the Royal Commission, to which Exhibitors are invited to send, through 
their Executive Commissioners, Colonial preserved food and wines for con- 
sumption by visitors. Special Regulations have been prepared for this 
department {see page 68). 

25. Ari'angements will be made for the sampling of Wines ; and an officer 
will be appointed to superintend this department. Cellarage accommodation 
will be provided. Special Regulations have been prepared for this Depart- 
ment {seepage 66). 

26. No Refreshment or Tasting Bars will be allowed beyond those arranged 
for by the Royal Commission. 

27. It is proposed to organise a Fruit and Vegetable Market, at which 
Colonial and Indian produce will be on sale. Special Regulations will be 
framed for this section of the Exhibition. 

28. It is proposed to hold an Exhibition of Living Animals from the 
Colonies and India. Special Rules will be framed for its regulation. 

29. The upper Gallery of the Royal Albert Hall has been set apart for a 
collection of pictures of British Colonial and British Indian subjects, and by 
colonial artists. Special Regulations have been prepared {seepage 69). 

e 2 



Ixviii Colonial and Indian Exhibition. 

30. The right to add to, alter, amend or expunge any of these Rules is 
reserved by the Royal Commission. 

31. The Royal Commission, while talcing every precaution for the protec- 
tion of .articles in the buildings, cannot hold itself resix>nsible for their loss or 
damage from whatsoever cause arising. 

32. If any damage or injury shall be caused or occasioned during the Exhibi- 
tir>n by any exhibited machine, implement, or article to any visitor or other 
person .or to any officer, servant, or others then and there employed by the 
Roya Commission of the Colonial and Indian Exhibition, 1886, then the 
Executive Commissioner in whose section such machinery, implement, or 
article may be placed shall indemnify and hold harmless the said Royal 
Commission from and against all actions, suits, expenses, and claims on 
account or in respect of any such damage or injury which may be so caused 
or occasioned . 

33. All communications should be addressed to the Secretary to the 
Royal Commission, Exhibition Buildings, South Kensington, London, S.W. 



: WINES, SPIRITS, LIQUEURS, &c. 

1. The Royal Commission will provide, free of charge, space in the base* 
ment of the Royal Albert Hall (which building will form part of the Exhibition) 
where colonial wines, &c., can be sampled by visitors. 

2. The Royal Commission will only entertain applications for space from 
Executive Commissioners, who are to be responsible to the Royal Commission 
that all ex bits are exclusively of British Colonial or of British Indian 
produce. 

3. Applications for space in this department must be made to the Executive 
Conkmissioner of the Colony to which the applicant belongs. 

4. No Applications for space will be received by Executive Commissioners 
after February 1st, 1886. 

5. In no other portion of the Exhibition Buildings will Exhibitors be 
permitted to sample alcoholic drinks. 

6. As all wines, spirits, &c., for exhibition will, by permission of Her 
Majesty's Customs, be brought in under bond, it is strictly forbidden to sell 
any portion of such exhibit, for delivery out of stock until after the close of 
the Exhibition, when duty will have to be paid for all wines, &c. Duty will 
also have to paid on all wines sold or given away for consumption on the 
premises. Executive Commissioners are earnestly requested to assist the 
Royal Commission in preventing any breach of this regulation. 

7. Wines, &c., that remain at the close of the Exhibition must be removed 
at the Exhibitor's cost to a bonded store, or the duty must be paid wtthiQ 
seven days after the close of the Exhibition. 



- Regidatiofts. Ixix 



8. An Office for the registration of orders will be established by the Royal 
Commission, and an experienced officer and ccllarman will be specially 
charged with the arrangements ; official order books will be provided bv the 
Executive Commissioners in which all orders will be entered with full 
particulars of the transactions. The expenses in connection with this office 
will be charged to the Executive Commissioners pro rata on the amount of 
space occupied by them. : i' • • • ^-, • » •) r 

9. Every sale must be notified at the Office and a return made daily to the 
officer in charge, who will be forbidden to give information to an>- person, 
except the Official Accountant of the Royal Commission, as to the business 
transactions of the Exhibitors. 

10. As space in the basement of the Royal Albert Hall can only be 
granted to extend four feet from the walls, exhibits must be kept carefully 
within these limits. The ceUars will be opened to the public at 1 1 a.m. and 
closed at 8 p.m. under the Customs' lock. Samples can only be shown 
between these hours. 

11. Executive Commissioners may put locks on the taps and take any 
precautions they consider necessary for the security of the goods, subject to 
the approval of the Royal Commission. 

12. All Fittings, Counters, &c., must be provided at the expense of the 
Exhibitors and will be subject to the approval of the Royal Commission. 

13. The Glasses used should be approved by the officer in charge. 

14. Executive Commissioners are earnestly requested to ase every pre- 
caution to prevent the distribution of samples being a cause of disorder, and 
they are most earnestly requested to forbid the supply of drink of any kind 
to persons employed in the building by the Royal Commission or the 
Executive Commissioners. 

15. If any person be found in such a condition that he may be considered 
by the police or a responsible official to be suffering from drink, the space 
allotted where such person was last supplied with alcoholic drink will be with- 
drawn fiom the control of the Exhibitor, so far as sampling is concerned. 

16. The Royal Commission reserves to itself the right to close any exhibit 
if it considers that irregularities are caused by the Exhibitor or his 
Attendants. 

17. In making an Application for space to exhibit in this Department, 
intending exhibitors are particularly requested to carefully fill up the form 
which is supplied to them for giving information as to the name of wines, 
position of the vineyard, date of formation, and other particulars of a similar 
character. The information so suppHed will be published in the Special 
Catalogue, and must also be displayed on the exhibit. 

18. The Royal Commission reserves to itself the right of altering or adding 
to these regulations. 



Ixx Colonial and Indian Exhibition. 

NATIONAL TRAINING SCHOOL OF 

COOKERY. 

His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales, Executive President of the 
Royal Commission for the Colonial and Indian Exhibition, having accepted 
the proposal made to His Royal Highness by the Council for the National 
Training School of Cookery that the School should undertake, on behalf of the 
Royal Commission, the management of the Dining Rooms devoted to the 
purpose of bringing to public notice Colonial and Indian food products, the 
ollowing Regulations for the realisation of this scheme have been issued. 

1. Suitable Rooms for this purpose will be provided by the Royal 
Commission at the Exhibition. 

2. These Rooms will be managed by the National Training School of 
Cookery, who will, as far as is possible, prepare the food. 

3. The Colonial or Indian Executive Commissioners, who desire to 
have their produce consumed in the Dining Room, should undertake to 
keep ready for use an ample stock of the articles in which they are 
interested. 'i{ «.'^ 

4. The Executive Commissioners are requested to arrange for the 
supply of Food Products and Wines to the School on the most liberal 
terms. 

5. The Colonial wines on sale will be supplied by the Executive 
Commissioners of the Wine Producing Colonies. Payment will be made 
to the Executive Commissioners weekly for the wines used. Wines, &c., 
remaining unsold at the close of the Exhibition, will be accounted for 
and returned to the Executive Commissioners by the SchooL 

6. A portion of wall space in the Dining Rooms will be available for 
advertising Colonial produce and goods used in the Dining Room ; a 
charge of 20s. per square foot (in favour of the Funds of the School) will 
be made for advertisements, which must be obtained through the 
advertising Contractor to the Royal Commission. 

7. The following arrangements with regard to prices are required to 
be observed : — 

(d.) A dinner at td. per head, to consist of a portion of hot meat or 
fish, with bread and potatoes. 

(^.) A dinner, at i j., of hot or cold meat, with a sweet and cheese. 

(<:.) A Room, to be known as the Colonial Hall, will be available for 
Luncheons or Dinners of not less than 24 persons at one day's 
notice. When not so engaged, Dinners ii la Carte will be 
served. 



(</.) Colonial or Indian Tea 


• 


• 


id. per cup. 


„ „ Coffee . 


• 


• 


2//. „ 


„ ■ „ Chocolate 


• 


• 


3a. 1, 


Cocoa . 


• 


• 


^ » 



Regulations, Ixxi 



PICTURE GALLERY 

{In the Royal Albert Hail). 

I. The following Pictures only can be admitted : — 

a. Pictures of all kinds, painted by bond fide British Colonists. 

b. Pictures representing views in the British Colonies, painted 

by British subjects. 
C, Pictures representing subjects bearing on British Colonial 
History, painted by British subjects. 

3. All Pictures exhibited must be approved by the Executive Commissioners 
of the respective Colonies. ^ 

3. The Royal Commission can accept no responsibility with regard to 

receiving, unpacking, insuring or returning the pictures. 

4. All Pictures exhibited should be framed, and all water-colour drawings, 

glazed. The frames should, as far as possible, be rectangular, as oval 
or circular frames are inconvenient for purposes of arrangement. 

5. Every Picture should have securely fastened to its back a label giving the 

following information : — 

a. The name of the Colony whence it is sent. *1 

b. The name and address of the Artist. 

c. The Subject 

d. The Price, if for sale. 

6. All Pictures should be delivered, at the Royal Albert Hall Entrance to the 

Exhibition, by the 31J/ March at the latest. The descriptions, for the 
Official Catalogue, should be forwarded to the Secretary to the Royal 
Commission at the same time. Each description should bear a 
distinctive number, which n'.mbcr should also appear on the label at 
the back of the picture. 

7. Every possible care will be taken of works sent for exhibition ; but the 

Royal Commission will not hold itself responsible in any case ^of 
injury or loss. 



Ixxii Colonial and Indian Exhibition, 



PROTECTION OF PATENTS. 

The following Letters and Certificates have been received from the 
Board of Trade :— 

' ■ " ^ Board of Trade, 

.. ' ' *• T- I2th January, \%%(>. 

Sir, 

Referring to your recent letter, asking, on behalf of the Royal Com- 
mission for the Colonial and Indian Exhibition, for information as to the 
protection that will be granted by this Department to Colonial Inventions to 
be exhibited, I am directed by the Board of Trade to state that the only 
protection that can be afforded to such Inventions is that prescribed by 
Section 39 {copy herewith) of the Patents, 6r*c., Act, 1883. 

// may, however, be suggested that the attention of the Colonial Commis- 
sioners should be drawn to the question whether Colonists exhibiting 
inventions unpatented in the Colonies might possibly deprive themselves of 
the right to obtain patents in their respective Colonies. 

.V * I am, Sir^ 

Your obedient Servant, 
{Signed) HENRY G. CALCRAFT, 
The Secretary, Royal Commission for the Colonial 

and Indian Exhibition, South Kensington, S, W, ,' 



» Board op Trade, 

/ ■ isth January, 1S86. 

Sir, 

J am directed by the Board of Trade to acknowledge the receipt of 
your letter of the \i\^h instant; and, in reply, to transmit^ herewith, a 
Certificate of this Board, as required by the Patents, Designs and Trade 
Marks Act, 1883, in respect of the Colonial and Indian Exhibition to be 
held this year at South Kensington. 

I am at the same time to enclose copy of sections 39 and 57 of the 
PatentSj &*c.. Act, and to draw attention to the steps that will have to be 
taken by intending exhibitors who wish to avail themselves of the protection 
afforded by these sections of the Act. 

lam, Sir, 

Your obedient Servant, 

HENRY G. CALCRAFT. 
Sir Philip Cunliffe-Owen, K.C.M.G., Royal Commission 
for the Colonial and Indian Exhibition {London^ 
1 886), South Kensington, S. W. 



PATENTS, DESIGNS AND TRADE MARKS ACT, 1883. 
Upon the application of Sir Philip Cunliffe-Owen, K.C.M.G., &c. &c., of 



Protection of Patents. 



Ixxiii 



South Kensington, made to the Board of Trade, on the fourteenth day of 
January, 1886, the Board of Trade do hereby certify that the Colonial and 
Indian Exhibition proposed to be held in the year 1886, at South Kensington, 
in the county of Middlesex, is an Industrial Exhibition. 

Signed by order of the Board of Trade, this fifteenth day of January, 1886. 

HENRY G. CALCRAFT, 
Assistant Sicrttary^ Board of Trade. 



Part II. 
PATENTS. 

Exhibition at 
induMrial or 
international 
exhibition not 
10 prejudice 
|Mient rights. 



Kxhibition at 
industrial or 
inteni>.(ional 
exhibition not 
to prevent or 
invalidate 
registration. 



PATENTS, DESIGNS AND TRADE MARKS ACT, 18S3. 

39. The exhibition of an invention at an industrial or international 
exhiliition, certified as such by the Hoard of Trade, or the publication 
of any description of the invention during the period of the holding of 
the exhibition, or the use of ihe inventicn for the purpose of the 
exhibition in the place where the exhibition is held, or the use of the 
invention durine the pariod of the holding of the exhibition by any 
person elsewhere without the privity or consent of the inventor, shall 
not prejudice the right of the inventor or his legal personal repreacnta- 
tive to apply for and obtain provisional protection and a patent in 
respect of the invention, or the validity of^ any patent granted on the 
application, provided that both the following conditions are complied 
with, vi«. : — 

(a) The exhibitor must, before exhibiting the invention, give 

the Comptroller the prescribed notice of his intention 

to do so ; and 
{b) The application for a patont must be made before or 

within six months from the date of the opening of the 

exhibition. 

The Hotict rt/trrtd to in (a)mHti b* made upon Form O of tht 
Pattntt Rul . ; and tht application /or a • '^atent (b) tuhich may 
be mad* eitktr btfort tht kxhibition is ofir < or suhttqutntly, but 
not a/ter 6 months from the date of tht oputiiig upon h'ortnt A 
and B or A and C cj the $amt Rules, 

57. The Exhibition at an industrial or international exhibition, 
certified as such by the Board of Trade, or the exhibition elsewhere 
during the period of the holding of the exhibition, without the privity 
or consent of the proprietor, of a design, or of any article to which a 
design is applied, or the publication, during the holding of any such 
exhibition, of a description of a design, shall not prevent the design 
from being registered, or invalidate the registration thereof, provided 
that both the following conditions are complied with, viz. : — 

(<7.) The exhibitor must, before exhibiting the design or 

article, or publishing a description of the design, give 

the Comptroller the prescribed notice of his intention 

to do so ; and 
(^.) The application for registration must be made before or 

witmn six months from the date of the opening of the 

exhibition. 

Th« notice referred to in [fi) mutt be made upon Form L of tht 
Designs Rules ; and tht application for a Design (4) which may 
be made either before the Kxhibition is ofen or subsequently, but 
not after 6 months frotti tht date of the opening upon Form E »/ 
tht same Rules. 



Izxiv Colonial Vieu <• in Entraucs Hall, 



The platttor cast in the Entrance Hall ia that of tho Statue in Bombay of 
Albkit 13dwaud, Piuxce of Walf , K.G., O.C.S.L, in commemoration of tho 
visit of lis Koyal Highness to India, 1875-76. Sir Albert Sassoon, C.S.I., Kt., 
preseiitecl this statue to his fcUow-tuwnsmon of tho Royal City of Bombay. 



COLONIAL VIEWS IN ENTBANCB HALL. 



NEW SOUTH WALES. 

Wynyard Sqouro, Hy<lnoy. 
By duey Harbour. 

VICTORIA. AUSTRALIA. 

Viow of Melboumo iu 1839. Founded 1835. 

Yiuw of the Capital Melbourne in 188U. Population, 325,000. 

SOUTH AUSTRALIA. 

Adelaide. Founded 18.S9. 

Aduluido. View (from Victoria Square) of Post OfBoo, Landu' Office, uud Towu UaU. 

QUEENSLAND. 

View of the site of Brisbane in 1839. Founded 1859. 

View of Brisbane in 1880. . '^ ' 

WESTERN AUSTRALIA. 

View of Perth. ^ V«- " 

/ NEW ZEALAND. 

Middle Island. Milford Sound, Western Fiords. 
North Island, the Pink Terrace, Lake Botomahana. '^ 

NATAL. 

ViewoftheTownof Durban, the Bluff and Lighthouse. Population, 418,700. 

CEYLON. 

Tiow in Kandy, the mountain capital of Ceylon, showing the Temple of the Soorcd Tooth. 

CAPE OF GOOD HOPE. 

The Graving Dock, Capo To?m. Length on Keel Blocks, 600 feet. Population, including 
Natives, 1,350.000. 

DOMINION OF CANADA. 

Province of Quebec, City of Montreal. Population, 173,000. 
Province of Ontario, City of Toronto. Population, 125,000. 
Province of Quebec, City of Quebec. Population, 65,000. 
Province of Nova Scotia, City of Halifax. Population, 40,000. 
Province of Ontario^ City of Ottawa. Population, 31,000. 
Province of New Brunswick, City of Saint Jolin. Population, 30,000. 
Province of Manitoba, City of Winnipeg. Population, 25,000. 
I Province of British Colnmbia, City of Victoria. Popuhttion, 9,000. 



( J!5lj! 

— .»— —^^— —.».... ^ ii ., „ - .Ill, I , I ■ 

SHIP MODELS IN ENTRANCE HALL. 



PENINSULAR AND OEIENTAL STEASI NAVIGATION COMPANY. 

Thb Poniiuular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company exhibit the following ^lodels, also 
Paintinga and Photographa representing their fleet of flfty-ono ftdl-pow.orud Ooeau Bteamers, 
employed in carrying t)io I^Iaila and PuHBongira to India, China, and Auittralia : — 

Oaii 1. — A ftill-rigg«9d Model of u. " Maasilia," aa a type of tome of the Liteak additions 
to the Company's fleet. Length, 420 ft. ; breadtli, 45 ft : deptli, 37 ft. Tonnage, VMS. Uotho- 
power, 5000. Thin veasol and the " Rosetta " were recently chartered and fitted up by Her 
Majesty's Qovernment, and employed as armed cruisers for Colonial Defence. 

Oabk 2. — Half models, reprcbentativo of three other Classes of the Company's vessels :— • 

f«rt. feet. ft. ia. Tonnage. ^^^^^ 

Rome and Carthago . 1' « 480 44 36 5013 5000 

Taamanhi and Chusan . . 400 45 31 6 4488 4200 

Ganges and ButleJ ... 890 42 35 4196 4S0O 

Clyde 390 42 85 4124 4500 

Case 8.— Full Model of as. "Poonah." Length, 395 ft ; breadth, 41 ft. 8 in. ; depth, 80 ft. 
Tonnage, 3130. Horso-power, 2600. This vessel has been and is now employed by Her 
Majesty's Qovernmout as u tran8i>ort. 

Case 4.— Full Model of as. "Teheran" and "Thibet.' Length, 3G0 ft.; breadth, 36 ft.; 
depth, 29 ft. Tonnage, 2593. Uorse-power, 2000. This Model is a type of the small class of 
vessels in the Company's fleet. 

The Pictures and Photographs are portraits of the Company's earliest and latest steamshipi. 

BOYAL MAIL STEAM PACKET COMPANY. 
BoYAL Mail Steameb "Ounoco." 

Built of steel by Messrs. Caird & Co., Greenock ; not yet la ;nohed. Length 390 ft. on 
21 ft. foot-line ; 417 ft. over all ; extreme breadth 45 ft ; depth 33 it 4 in. ; about 4000 tons. 
Deck-houses with smoking room, officers' cabins, and handsome staircases from companions ; 
three masts, foremost square rigged ; triple expansion ; three cylinders ; dimension of 
oylinders, 42 ins., 62 ins., and 96 ins. ; Jength of stroke 66 ins. ; about 5000 indicated horse- 
power : speed 16 knots ; eight boilers ; twenty-foTir furnaces ; steam pressure 150 lbs ; about 
1650 tons cargo. Accommodation for 240 firat-clasa, 28 aecond-claas, and 30 third-class pas- 
sengers. Commander, 5 officers, surgeon, purser, and assistant purser, 6 engineers, 1 boiler maker, 
and 100 crew. Mail service. 

This vessel will bo fitted throughout with the electric light. Her life-boats and steam launch 
will be on davits, worked by screws, whereby they can be put out and lowered in a few 
seconds. She will have steam steering gear, windlass, and cargo winches of the newest 
description. Cabins will be fitted with spring beds. Thero will bo bath-rooms in large 
numbers, with hot and cold water; and all modern appliances generally, for the comfort of 
the passengers, will be fitted. 

The Royal Mail Steam Packet Ca for whom the " Orinoco" is being constructed, was inoor- 
poratetl bj Royal Charter in 1839, and is engaged in conveying the mails under contract with 
Hot Miyesty's Qovernment, to the West Indies, Brazil, and the River Plato. 

UNION STEAM SHIP COMPANY. 

Rotal Mail Stkameb "Kaikocba." 

i)(m«n«toM.— Length 12 ft, width 4 ft, height 7 ft 

Liu of i>0totb.— Built of steel by John Elder & Co. ; engines by John Elder A Co. ; launched 
October. 1884: length 430 ft.; breadth 46 a; depth 32 ft; registered tonnage 2885 tons; 



Ixxvi Ship Models in Entrance Hall. 

barque rigged; fitted with compouud inverted engines; two cylinders; length of stroke 57 ins. ; 
SOOO horse power; speed 14 knots; throe boilers; 18 furnaces; steam pressure 110 lbs.; 
accommodation for 160 first and second-class, and 300 tliird-class passengers ; capacity for carry- 
ing 3iXK) tons cargo ; number of offlccrd and crew 120. London to New Zeuland, culling at 
Bladein and Capo uf Good Hope; New Zealand to Loudon, calling at Itio de Janeiro. 

The Koyal Mail Steamer " Kaikoura," and sibtor steamers, forming the New Zealand Shipping 
Co.'s Lino, are uU filteil most luxuriously for i)a88ongcrB. They are lighted with the elcctrio 
light, and have spacious dock state-rooms, smoking and bath-rooms, promenade and shelter 
decks. They are also fitteil with refrigerating chambers to curry frozen moat as cargo and 
firosh provisions for the entire voyage. 

In 1884 the Colonial Government entered into a contract with the New Zealand Shipping 
Co. for the carriage of mails every ftmr weeks, alternately with the California service. By this 
contract the tikuo is limited to 45 days out and 42 days homo, the passages being usually 
accomplislicd in about 40 days out and 3G days homo. 

"Mararoa" and "No. 30G." 

Steombhip "Mararoa," built of steel in 1885 by Messrs. Wm. Denny & Bros., Dumbarton, for 
tho Union Steomsuip Company of New Zealand, Limited, and now employed in the mail and 
naasenger bcrviie between Dunedin, Sydney, and San Francisco. She is 320 ft. long, iK^tween the 
perpendiculars 42 ft. broad, and 2(i ft. depth moulded, and registers 24(i6 tons gross. Her 
bottom is constructcti <m the cellular principle for water ballast, and her hull is subdivided by 
water-tight bulkheads into bix separate compartments. She has upper, main, lower, promenade, 
and roof deeks ; the upiH-r deck being plated with steel throughout, and tho main deck and 
promenade deck for 120 ft. of their length. She has accommodation fur 145 first-class and for 
110 second-class passengers in largo and elegant saloons and in state t oins fittoil with every 
convenience. Accommodation is provided for 33 seamen and firemen ana 20 ofiicers, engineers 
and stewards. She is fitted throughout with the electric light, and with hydraulic in place of 
steam appliances for steering, and for working cargo, anchor, boats, &c., on the system introduced 
by Messrs. Brown, Bros. & Co., of Edinburgti. The vessel is fitted with direct-acting surface 
condensing en<;ines on the triple expansion principle by Messrs. Denny & Co., Dumbarton. 
They have three cylinders, 31 ins., 51 ins., and 84 ins. diameter ; eoch with a stroke of 4 ft. 6 ins. 
■team, at a working prcMur of IGO lbs. per square inch, is supplied ft tm two cylindrical double- 
ended and two single-ended tubular boilers of steel, having twelve corrugated furnaces in all. 
The *' Mararoa " on trial indicated 3500 horse-power, and steamed at a mean speed of 15| knots 
per hour. 

8.8. "No. 806," built of steel by Messrs. William Denny & Bros., Dumbarton, to class 
HI* in red with the Liverpool Underwriters' Begistry, and launched from their works in March 
of the present year. Length between })erpendiculars 410 ft., breadth moulded 48 ft, deptli 
mouldixl ?2 ft, tonnage gross register about 5200 tons. Vessel hae three complete decks, tho 
upper and main decks bi-ing plated with steel throughout their entire length, and a citadel 
deck amiddhi|t8 also laid with steel. Vefsel has six watertight bulkheads to upper deck, and 
her construction meets tho requirements of the Admiralty for vessels eligible for employment 
in times of war. She is fitted throughout with the electric light, and with hydraulic in place 
of steam appliances for steering;, working cargo, anchors, &c., on the system introduced by 
Messrs. Brown, Bros. & Co., Edinburgh. Aocommodntion is provided for 87 first-class and 30 
second-class ixissengcrs, and for officers, engineers, iwtty officers, and stewards to thn number of 
26 : berths are provided for a crew of 47 seamen i 'd 27 firemen. 

The veesel is fitted with Brook's patent quadruple expansion engines by Messrs. Denny & 
Co., Dumbarton, having font cylinders 30 in., 42 ins., 30 ins., and 84 ins. in diameter, all 
with a stroice of 5 ft The vessel and machinery are designed for » mean sea speed of 12^ knots. 

Steamship "Moor." 

Li$t of Detaik.— Built of fron by J. ft G. Thomson, Clyde Bank Foundry, Glasgow ; engine 

by J. & G. Thomson ; launcbe<I 23rd December, 1881 ; lengtn 365 ft. 8 ins. ; breadth 46 ft. 1 in. ; 

depth 28 ft. 9 ins.; 368' ^7 gross tontiage, 2352-30 net; spar dock with forecastle 45 ft., and 

hurricane do?k 150 ft. ; i...-e masfs, c<,-tJooner rig, no yards or square sails; oomi-ouud surface 



ship Models in Entrance Hatl. Izxvii 

condensing engine; two cylinders, 51 ins. and 90 ins. diameter; length of stroke GO ins.; 4^00 
horso power ; speed 15" 191 knots ; 6 boilers; 18 furnaces; m :rking pressure 85 lbs. per sq. in.; 
2000 tons cargo. Aocoinraoilation for IM flrst-clasa, 72 aecond-clasa, and 108 third-class 
paasengera. Commander, 4 ofHcers, surgeon, 5 engineers, and 81 crew. 

The " Moor " is employed in tlio Union Steamship Company's Mail Service between England 
and the Capo of Good Hope and Natal. The route is from Southampton to Plymouth, where 
mails are embarked to Cape Town calling at Madeira, also at St. Helena at stated intervals. 
At Cape Town the mails arc landed and the Xatal innils tratishipped to an Intercolonial steamer. 
Tlie " Moor " then goes on to Port Eliza1)etli and East London to land and ship cargo, return- 
ing to Cape Town to receive homeward Natal and Cape Mails in her proper turn, which are 
conveyed to Plymoutli, the ship calling at Madeira, also at St. Helena or Ascension as the case 
may be. The voyage ends at Southampton. 

The "Moor" has made the fastest voyages l)etweeu between Plymouth nnd Cape Town, and 
vice vend. Tlio outward voyage having been made in 18 days 10 hours, and the homeward 
voyage in 17 days 21 hours, net steaming time, after deducting stoppages in eacli case. 

Owing to her great speed, the " Moor " was cliarterod by the Ciovcrnment in April last year 
(1885) to act as an armed cruiser for the defence of the Capo Colony, was supplied with an arma- 
mint of G guns, and a crew of 110 officers and men, principally members of the Royal Naval 
Reserve, and was the only merchant vessel which actually hoisted the pennant or was commis* 
sioned under the command of a naval oiHoor. 

The " Moor" was taken on a cruise up the east coast of Africa under the oplers of Bear* 
Admiral Sir W. J. Hunt Grubbc, K.C.B., the Commnnder-in-chief on the South African Station. 

. ., .; . , ^ CASTLE M'AIL PACKET COMPANY. 

i;' ' ' ' Casti.e Ocean Mail Steamship " RosLiN Castle." , 

Bnilt of iron by Messrs. Barclay, Curie & Co., of Glasgow, in 1883. Length, 380 ft. ; breadth, 
48 ft. 3 in. ; depth in hold, 31 It. 4 in. ; tonnage, 1280 gross, and 2476 nett. The vessel has 
three decks with a forecastle, bridge, and cahiii house ; is rigged as a brig with iron lower 
masts and yards, and carries 10 boats of large capacity. 

The engines are of tho direct acting vertical compound type, constructed by Messrs. 
Biirclay, Curie & Co., of Glasgow, with two cylinders, 50 inches and 90 inches diameter 
respectively, and 60 inches stroke indicating 2800 horse-power, and steaming at the rate of 
13| knou per hour; there are three steel boilers and 9 patent corrugated furnaces, with a 
working pressure of steam of 80 lbs. per square inch. 

The vessel carries 3000 tons of cargo and fuel for 25 days' steaming at full speed. 

Tho main uck is entirely devoted to passenger accommodation, having capjicious, handsomely 
decorated end furnished dining, smoking and retiring saloons. Also conmmdinus sleeping 
apartments for 325 passengers, divided into 1st, 2nd, and 3rd classes; each class having kitchens, 
pantries, batln and lavatories, &c., all provided with a continuous water supply. Fresh foo<{ is 
always available by mians of a freezing chamber nnd refrigerating engine. Klt-rtric lighting 
is also provided by u separate engine am' dynamo machine. Independent steam engines 
being carried for the pumps, the steering gear, the windlass, and cargo winches, &c. &c. 

The officers, engineers, crew, nnd servants, number about 100, and are all suitably berthed 
in accordance with their rank. The doctor, the parson, stewards, and stewardesses being con- 
tinually in attendance on tho passengers. 

The voyage from London to Cape Town, Africa, calling at Dartmouth for tho mails, and 
alternately at Lisbon, Madeira, St. Helena and Ascension, is generally performe<l in 21 days, 
passing through delightful climate and oxi^eriencing beautiful weather at Cape Town. Passen- 
gers and mails are transhipped into the coastal steamers of the company for Algoa Bay, Natal, 
Mozambique, and the East African ports, nlso for Mauritius and Madagascar. 



( Ixxviii ) 



o-# . 



COMPLIMENTARY LIST. 



.'.UK 



TuE SoTAL C0UUI8810N is indebted to tho following firms for Si)ccial Serriocs rendered. 



AITOLO • AMERICAN BRUSH - 
ELECTRIC LIGHT CORPORATION, 

Limited (THE), Lambeth, aE., Imvo 
carried out by moans uf their appnratns the 
Klt'ctrio Ligbtiii;:; of tho North, Middle, and 
South CourU, the Clieup Dining Rooms, tlio 
Hcliool of Cookery, Kost Arcade, East Oullery 
and East Annexes, Chinese Pavilion, Orchid 
House, Kouth Proraonado (three masts), Colonial 
Markets, Duval Dining Room and Main En- 
trance. Arc lamps of 2000 (.'.P. nominal each 
arcf in uso for this puriwse, tho lampa iK'ing 
placed on bis conducting circuits, supplied 
with electricity by Brush - dynamo electric 
machines. Of Ihcso lliero aro'eight, four of 
whicli aro cu|)ablo of supplying — on a single 
circuit of wire, extending if necessary over a 
distance of several miles — 35 arc lampa of tlio 
above-mentioned |xiwer, while four of a slightly 
smaller ])ntteru an; in readiness to supply 25 
such lum|>s each, in a similar manner if desirtd. 
Tho lighting of the Gardens is also partially 
cfffx;ted by means of apparatus supplied bv 
this Corporation, for which its "Victoria** 
dynamos and lamps aro employed. These 
Victoria incandescence lami>s are capable of 
giving a ligiit equal in brilliancy to five candles 
caoli, while each of tho two Victoria dynamos 
supplied is capable of maintaining 2S00 of such 
Inmps. 

BENHAM & SONS, Wigmore Street, 

v., have supplied and er««ted in tho Council 
oom (1) An EU-ctro UronziKl Edwards Smoke 
touauming Hlow Combustion Urate, with haud- 
painted China tilo panels. (2) A Carved 
Walnut Wood Chimney-piece, with overmsjatels 
and silvered glass panels (8) An Encanttio 
Tilo Hearth. (4) A Black Marble Fender. 
Also in tho Secn-tary's Ofllce (6) Kdwurds 
Hmoko Consuming 81ow (Jitmbustiou tirate. 
(6) A Marblo (.'liimntivpiecc (7) Fender. 
(^ Encaustic Tile Heartb. Also in two other 
offioes (0) Two Improved Office Btovei on 
Tilo Hearths. 

BENSON, P., 50 Upper Street, Islincr- 
ton.— The Colonial V/iues are stored in tho 
East and West Vaults under the ^oyal All>ert 
Hall and in the Coloninl Hull IWtrs in Iron 
Bins, manufacturiHl and supplic^l by him. 
They are of several different tvpcs, tho larger 
quantities being stored in what are known 



as tho Wrought Iron Bins with movable 
shelves, affording great economy of space. The 
wino is binned with, tho lath in: tlie uii:al way. 
Tho sides of tho Vaults are fitted with the 
French Pattern Bins, both single and double tier, 
also tho Cellular Pattitrn, some being made with 
doors to lock up. The great advantage of these 
bins is that a bottle can be taken from any part 
of the bin without disturbing the rest. They 
aro also very portable, as they can be folded np 
for transit to any part of tho world. 

BOYD. D. O,, 19 Maddox Street, W. 
— Boyd's Stove, fixed in tho Surveyor's Office, 
is simply an adaptation of his Hygiaiitio Venti- 
lating Grate. Tiie Stove illustrates tho Hy- 
giastic priuciplo only, without any attempt at 
urnamont. 

BREW & CLARIS, 64 Finsbury 
Pavement, E.C.— No. 5. lieceplim liiwm.— 
Suite in Old Mahogany, consisting of Settee, 
Two Arm CliairH, Six SmuU Chairs covereil in 
leather. Wall Mirror, Cabinet, One Table, One 
Writing Table, One Writing Chair, Tapestry 
Curtaius, Axminster Carpet, "all old English 
in Htvle. " No. (5. CU-rM Uffiee.~-Ono Writing 
Table, Two Desk Slopes, Six Wood Shaped Scat 
('hairs, Two Writing Chairs, Cocoa Matting. 
No. 7. Exchange Uoorn. — One Centre Carved 
Oak Table, Eight l.eather-covered Chairs {en 
mite). Four Assorted Easy Chairs, Ono Oak 
Cabinet, Tapestry Window Curttiins, Axminster 
Carpet 

CAMERON, JOHN, Oldfleld Road 
Iron Works, Manchester, has placed at 
tho disposal of the lioyal Commission one of 
bis High Sptiud Qiiadruplo Vertical Steam Fire 
Pumps, for use should necessity require. The 
pump, which is fixed in the Eh ctric Light Shed, 
has two 10 in. steam eylinders, working a pair 
of G in. double-acting pistons in brass-lined 
pump ; it will start in any position. Tho pump 
occupies a small lloor area in proportion to itii 
power, the columns of the main frame beiug 
used as air vessels. The working si>eGd is 225 
revolutions pi^r minute, and will discbarge 
40,000 gallons of water an hour (with the 
available steam uresaure), or four 1 in. jets oun 
Ite thrown 00 ft. iiigh at a considerable ilistanoe 
from the )>Hmp. 



Complimfniary List. 



Ixxix 



CHUBB & SON'S liOCK AND SAFE 
CO.» Iiimitad (Makers to the Queen), 
128 Queon Victoria Street, London; 
also liiverpool, Manchester, Wolver- 
hampton, Olasgow, &c.— Hi)) lioyal Hig)i« 
ne8s the Prince of Wales (Executive PrrHitlent) 
Iiiu bot-n plea8e<l to nppi)iiit Messrs. Cluibb as 
the Makers of Strong RoomB, Safes and Locks, 
to the Roynl Commission. (1) Patent Fire and 
Thief-lierittinrf Strong Ro<nn». — Used by the 
[ndian Executive HtafT fur securing the most 
valaablo of the native exhibits; also by the 
Executive Commissioners for the Ctipe, Aus- 
tralian and other Colonies. Special features 
of Chubb's Steel Strong Rooms are their portn- 
biliJy: the siiving of space from tiieir walls 
being so much thinner than masonry walls for 
Mjuivnlcnt i)rot«efion from fire; and their su- 
perior thief-resiBting qualities to any other fonn 
of strong room. (2) I'atent Steel Safen. — These, 
of various qualities —" New Patent," ''Steel 
Door," " Bankers," and " Engineer " — are in 
use in the various Official Departments of the 
Exhibition; also are solely used by the Com- 
missioners for the following Colonial Sections : 
—Victoria, South Australia, Queensland, Cape 
of Good Hope. Natal, Ceylon, Hong Kong, 
West Africa Settlements, Gold Coast, Malta, 
Cyprus, Ac. (3) LocA-n.— After comparison with 
other locks, Chubl»'a New Patent Push and Pull 
Loelm were selected by the Executive for use 
throughout the offices and buildings of this 
Exhibition. In all 400 locks have been made 
for these doors, in eight series or " suites," all 
differing, but with muster keys for each series 
or "suite," and grand master keys that will open 
any of the 400 doors. The locks upon the outsitio 
d«M)rs of the various buildings are fitted with 
Chubb's Push, Pull, or Turn Locks, which 
enable the handles to be used with either the 
old twint movement, or tlio new push or pull, or 
with both oombiiicd. (4) Chuhh't Museum Lock* 
are tA^n in use in large numbers for the various 
show cases in the Indian and other Courts. 

CLARKB, BUNNETT, til CO., 
Limited, Rathbone Place, W., have 
supplied and fitted lifts to the Staff Dining 
Rooms, the Committee Uuoms, and the Prince of 
Wal'Js'a private rooms. Tiiese lilts are Utted 
with a novel arrangement of friction roller gear, 
vbich renders them practically noibelcss in work- 
\^^. The Queen's Gate Eutmnce is closed with 
om~ of this tlrm's Patent Noi&cless Self-Coiling 
Stet' Shutters. 

COALBROOKDALE CO., Limited, 
Victoria Embankment, BlackfHars 
Bridge, E.C., as on the occasion of the pre- 
ceding Exhibitions, have contributed to the 
ornamentation of the Grounds by the loan of 
sundry Fountains, Vases, Figures, &c., and to 
the comfort ot the Visitors by the loan «»f a 
large number of their Ornamental Cast-iron 
Heats. The Fountains in the New Zealand 
and Queensland Courtfl are also lent by tbii 
Cuuipiiuy. 




Master Key to the ExHinmoN, controlling 
nearly 500 Chubb's New Patent Push and 
Pull Locks, affixed to the Exhibition doors, — 
mtulo by Mesbrs. Chubb & Sons, and presented 
to Her Majesty the Queen, at the opening 
ceremony. . 

CONOLLY, HENRY, St Co., Hamp- 
stead Road, Drummond Street, and 
Tolmers Square, London, have designed 
and carried out tho Stained Glass Window* 
and roof of ILo Council Chumber, which are 
in tho ReTwiiHjai.^c manner, also Windows and 
Fanlights of the Indian Palace, which are of the 
early Indian Period. Antique brass chandeliera 
and brackets are tixed in the rarious ofBoes and 
club rooms belonging to the Exhibition, and 
have been spevially designed for that purpose. 



Ixxjt 



Complimentary List. 



COOFEfi & BOIiT. 48, 48, ft 60 
Bunhill Bo\7, RC, have, with the approval, 
nf His Royal Highness the Executive President, 
HtUd up the suite of rooms on the first 
tl<ior of the " Old London " Buildings (on the 
right cf entry through the old gateway) with 
Furniture, Fireplaces, and Decorations for the 
uae of the Executive Coramiasiouera for the 
Colonics and India, a« well as thoae for the use 
of the Colonial Ofllee, the India OtHce, and thu 
I'rtiwn Agents for the Colonies. N.B. — The 
w hole of the above Httings, d:c., will be for sale 
at the close of the Exhibition. 

CROMFTON, B. K, & CO., Electric 
Light Engineers and Contractors, 
Chelmsford 6c Xiondon, have supplied 140 
Arc Lamps, which huve been usetl for illumi- 
nating thu following Courts : — East Quadrant, 
r»; Conservatory, 14; Eatt Refroihment 
Pavilion, 5; North Central Annexe, 4; 
Central Gallery, 23; West Central (ialleries, 
18; Central Annexe, 9 : East Central Galleries, 
20; South Central Galleries, 22 : Gardens, 10; 
< )ld London Street, 2 ; Indian Palace, 7. The 
lamps are each provided with double carbons 
for sixteen hours' burning. Tliey are steady 
in action, and very simple in construction. 

Messrs. Crompton have also supplied twelve 
dynamo machines, which arc fixed in the 
Electric Light Shed for supplying current to the 
above lamps. 

>HWOOD, ARTHUR, & CO., 
XiL ,d. Sycamore Horticultural 
Works, Wimbledon. — ITjc small ornamen- 
tal roof covering the porch at the Queen's Gate 
Entrance has been erected by this Company, 
wlio arc the Contractors for the Conservatories 
attachid to the following Courts, vi«. the Cape 
of Good Hope (adjoining it), Queensland, Vic- 
toria, and New South Walci*. This roof is con- 
structed on their imiierishable shutter-bar system 
of glazing. 

DAVEY, PAXMAN, & CO., Engi- 
neers, Colchester. — The steam power 
provided by this fiim for the present Eihibi- 
tion amounts to 1200 horse-jwwer. and is 
supplietl as follows : — No. 1 engino is a Cora- 
pound Semi-Fixed Engine plac«d beneath the 
boiler, and capable of developing 120 horse- 
power. The two largest engines, Nos. 2 and 
6, are of the Coupled Horizontal High Pressure 
type, and capable of deveJoping 700 horae- 
piiwer if nquired. Fixed l)etwien these are 
tluee Compound Engines, Nos. 3, 4, and 5, 
No. 3 being of the Coupled Compound Girder 
■ystem, whilst Nos. 4 and 5 iire of the Horizontal 
Compound Receiver type. Nos. 7 and 8 engines 
are new Vertical Compound quick speed 
engines, which can be employed for driving 
dynamos either direct or otherwise. All the above 
engines are provided with Paxman's Patent 
Autumatio Cat-off Gear, worked uirect from 
tne goTemors so as to ensure venr steady and 
even ruaning. The advantage oi^ this syitem 



is that only just sufiBcient steam required for 
the duty is admitted to the cylinder at each 
stroke of the piston. Steam is supplied to the 
Semi-Fixed Engine by its own boiler, while that 
for the remaining engines is generated in eleven 
steel boilers of the lyicomotivo type, each having 
610 sq. ft. of heating surface, and working at 
120 lbs. steam pressure. The fireboxes are of 
Davcy, Paxman & Co. 's improved mild steel, 
which has given such excellent results. Above 
the boilers is placed a wrought-iron receiver, so 
as to ensuro perfectly dry st^m. In addition to 
the above the firm has supplied to the Queens- 
land Commission an 8 HP. Horizontal Engine 
fitted with Paxman's Automatic Expansion 
Gear, for working Gold Stamps; also to the 
South African Commission a Paxman & Allen's 
Patent Machine for Extracting from the soil 
Diamonds and other precious stones, together 
with a 4 HP. Standard Vertical Engine for 
driving the maciiine. All the boilers and 
pijHis mentioned above are covered with BeU's 
asDcatos non-conducting material. 



DECAUVILLE, Petit Bourg, Franoa 
(Technical Agent^ L. DECLE, '7 Idol 
Lane, E.C.), have laid the 16-inch tramway 
with ft. rails, running from the Aquarium 
steps to the Boiler House. 

DICK RADCLY7FE & CO., 128 ft 
128 High Holbom, W.C., have supplied 
the following :—(l) Rockwork in the Great 
Fountain Basin. (2) Itobiuson Crusoe Cave, 
West Indies. (3) Rockwork at entrance to 
Malta. (4) Aviaries, New South Wales. (6) 
Aviary and Fountain • Conservatory, Queens- 
land. (6) Shell-fountain and Garden Decora- 
tion, Queensland. (7) Fountains, New South 
Wales Conservatory. (8) Fern Gulley, Vio- 
torian Conservatory. (8) Native Huts and 
Natural History Specimen, Victoria. (10) 
Fernery and Caverns, Now Zealand Conser- 
vatory. (11) Turtle Tanks and other tanks, 
heated by hot-water pipes, new principle, 
National Fish Culture Association. (12) Turtle 
ILitcliing-liouse with bevel and Ccmservatory, 
also Rockwork at Entrance to National Fish 
Culture Association. 

DOULTON 86 CO., Lambeth Pottery* 
Albert Embankment, London, 8.B. — 

The decoration of the wall of the entrance hall 
in the Exhibition Road is by paiiels in Irapaslo 
ware, and forms an entirely new departure in 
ceruuiics. The paintings are executeil m coloured 
clayH, which become incorporated with thu body 
of the material in the subsequent firing and 
glazing. These panels are formed of siubs of 
large size, and the joints follow the leading lines 
of the design as in stained gloss, thus avoiding 
the unsightly straight jointing which is a neces- 
sity of ordinary tile panels. The subjects of 
tlio (let-oration are as follows : Two panels with 
a broatlly decorative treatment of peacocks, 
eagles, so., suggested by ESastcm art ; two 
Pilaster panels of Indian design', and three la* 



r- - 



I «* 



> INDIAN EXHIBITION. 




>AXMAN hC^. 

ICINCERS 
CHESTER 



fli-if'. v: 



IR ^m 



•1 ./*iii»aA' -"> I » « 



H'lM Kn \»»»i 



I O^BI» ft.- -.ill 



«,-'! -^ jr> .-^a.,: f"i l'^ 'ii . T9I " 



m.- «» 






1 

1 


if* 

1 


•I -' 


i 



I ' ! 



^ S A.. > 



.-.-s ' 



X V \^ 






nV^ IV 






v!^..,; 



t=.-.v 



.::.f)EK«*. 



^V? ' 



u^d^mss^ 



cTiTivn MAciiivrnY sum. 



'TT. 



Cmnplinientanj IA»i. 



Ixxxi 



netto panels witli appropriate border uiid Hpiin- 

driils, repreHonting in iiguro siibjoots, Englund 

in her manufuctureH, Australia iu bor agriou- 

ture, and India in her pottery ; the wliolo being 

in rich tones of colour. Ecutem Fountain in 

Durbar Hall: Thin fountain is in Lambeth 

faience, and is a, faosiinilo both in colour and 

design of an old fountain in tho Mogul style, 

particnlarB of which have been kindly supplied 

DV 0. Purdon Clarke, Esq. Fountain in Doulton 

Ware in We.»t India Court : This novel design 

by Mr. George Tinworth introduces various 

i)ancls, each illustrative of a text of Hcripturo 

iuiving reference to water. The material of which 

it is composed is imftervious to atmnspherio 

iind all other influfncos, and pcnuauiiitly 

retains its brilliancy of colour. Tieo Tea Ilounes 

u ijarden adjoining Durbar llall : The faience 

It'coration to houses consists of columns and 

pandrils to arch openings, panels to friezes 

ind pilasters, string courses, galleries, &c., the 

)ainting executed in rich tones of colour cha- 

uctoristic of Eastern art; the Indian carvers 

unima and Mohamiued Baksh having suppliitl 

uodols for all tlie ornumental work ; the plan 

t tho whole is by C. Turdon Clarke, Esq. This 

rni has also supplied tiie wholo of the sanitary 

nd lavatory arrangements and llttings to H.U.II. 

i.o Prince of WhIcs's apartments, to JKuml room, 

oilloes throughout the £xhil>ition buildings. 

lid for tho use of the native Indian workmen 

ngaged in the bazaar. Tho staves and mantlo 

iooes in glazed pottery to committee room, socre- 

iry's office, and various other offices throughout 

10 ICxliibilion. Silicon treads to nosings of stone 

:cps at main entrance in Central Gallery and 

iglit of steps adjoining Old London, &c., Sus. 

DOW1J13Y, W. & D., 61 Ebury 

treet, S.W., in conjunction with the 

OODBUBY COMPANY, 157 Great 

ortiand Street, W., have been appointed 

ffieial Photogmphers to the Uoyal Coiiimis- 

n. For the convenience of Visitors Messrs. 

wney have erected a Studio in tho grounds 

the entrance of tho Maltese Court, which will 

oi)ened <laily. Applications should 1ki made 

tho stalls in the Eastern Arcade, Queens- 

d, or No. 1 Old Loudon. 

[EDISON, SWAN, & GENEBAIi 

InITBD EliEOTRIC LIGHT CO., 

limited, 67 Holbom Viaduct. E.C., 

uply the Currnnt for the Incandescent Lamps 

|tbiu the Building by eight Dynamo Machines, 

Four EilisoM-H ipkinson shunt wound 

inumos fach for 551) lii-enudle jrawor 105- Volt 

pips at. 75t) revolutions: two simdar maeliines 

>h for 800 Iniups of tlio same candle p )wer ut 

BO fevoluti' ns ; idso two of the Some machines 

}h fur *^50 16-candle power 55-Volt lamps at 

revolutions. All these machims have a 

imercial efficiency of from 92 to 94 per cent 

e following parts of the Building are lighted 

the Edison & Swan Incandescent Lamp : — 

itb Dmiuj; Boonis, Subwa7 and Offioea, 



Vestibules, In«lian Court, Old London^ Upper 
Tea Gardens, Ceylon 'J'ea Booms, &o. 

BIjBCTRICAIj POWER 8TORAGB 
CO., 4 Great Winchester Street, B.C.— • 

Secondary Batteries. There are threo separate 
and distinct sets of Accumulators used in con- 
nection with the incandescent Lighting of part 
of tho Exhibition. Tho lirst of these is situated 
in the quadrant under tho dining-rooms, and 
supplies about :i.'>0 lights for the lighting of the 
Quadraut Dining BiMtms utid Befroslinunt 
Booms. The cells are nianufucturod by the 
above firm, and contain thirty-one of their L 
typo plates. Each cell discharges at a normal 
rate of sixty amiteres ut an electromotive force 
of two volts, and they are coupled three or 
more in parallel, so as to give the current 
reqiurod fmm each battery. In the Quadraut 
Battery there are in all 220 cells, capable 
of giving 120 Volts by 240 amperes at normal 
rate of discharge. In the batttry used tor tho 
lighting of tho Chinc^se Pavilion, and situated 
ontsidc in a shed built for the purpose, there are 
105 cells for about 200 lights. Tlio third bat- 
tery supplies al)out;5.')0 lights in the suhwaynnd 
offices, and consists of a total of 220 colls. At 
tho normal rate of discharge, theso cells will, 
if required, supply the lights for upwards of 
ton hcmrs, but us a general rule they are not 
oitllcd upon to supply more than four hours 
lighting in ono evening. Tho accumulators oro 
all charged in tho daytime from tho Edison 
lIopkin8<m and Elwell, Parker & Co.'s Dynamos 
in tho machinery room. 

BLWBLL-PARKEK, Limited, Wol- 
verhampton. — Improved two-polo Electro 
Dynamo Machine, or motor; giving about twelve 
horse-power ou tho break, ut GOO revolutions ; 
shunt-wound and self-regnlutiug within 5 per 
cent, under varying loads; commercial efficiency 
90 per cent. This Motor is driving tlie Diamond 
Cutting Mills of Messrs. Ford and Wright in 
the South African Section, and takes its current 
from un Elwell-Parker Dynamo in the ma- 
chinery dopartmi'Ut. The Motor is of similar 
construction to the large dynamos lighting tho 
ganlohs, with two poles only instead of four. 

EXCHANGE TELEGRAPH CO.. 
LIMITED, 17, & 18 Cornhm,B.C.-Tho 
niqtaratus plocetl at intervals throughout the 
Exhibition for Electrically conveying an alarm 
of Firo to (ho Fire Brigade, and indi<-atiiig at 
tho same time tne position from whii-h the 
alarm is given, are the Davies & Higgins' 
Sysiem of the Exehau.'o Telegrapli Co., and 
are similar lo tho o used for the same purpose 
by the Motropohtau Firo Brigade. 

GAI VSFORD & CO.. 161-7 Borough. 
B.E. — This tlrm have placed at the disposal 
of the Royal Commission the Furniture, Car- 
pets asd Accessories (specially designed) for the 



Ixxxii 



Complmentary LUt. 



room wt Apart for H.R.H. tlie Prinoo of WaW, 
K.O. ; tho AnU» Iloom, tho 8<rorctiiiy'ii Re- 
mption Itooin, thu India Offluvn, the I'reM 
Buoiua aud the Gvueral OfllcM. 

OAIiliOWAT, W. de J., & SONS. 

Knott Mill Iron Works, Manchester, 

l»av« furuUlitwl four of th«'ir well known («ul- 
loway Uoilurs niadu entirely of steol |)lat«-H, 
oupalilo of giving aulHoiuiit atoam fur HOO 
indicattnl horsc-powor. AUo one of tlutir patent 
Twiu ('otnitonntl Euginos of 120 indicated 
horao power, having cylinders H in. aud 24 
in. dlanieltr, l»y 2 ft. «i in. etroko. This 
Engine, together with all tiie ucccsdary gearing, 
is at work iu the Cauadiau ilachintry Court 
Messrs. Galloway have also executed the whole 
of tho work in oonnootiou with the illumination 
of the Gardens and Fountain display ; this in- 
Htaliatiou includes three of their Patent Coni- 
pountl Knginos, siJeciiilly con«truete<l for running 
at high Hpeed and for driving dyuauion, Ixjing 
massive iu ilosigu and gfinvrally of substantial 
oliaracter ho as to insure great durability. 
Thew Engines are driving four Elwell-Parkers 
4-polo 50 unit (nominal) Horizonul Dvua- 
mos, and two Anglo-AnKirican Ilrash V B, 
6-pole pattern comiwnnd wound dynamos, thf se 
six dynamos providing ttlectrio current for 
10,000 incauileiicent lamps, which are fixed 
on various pnrts of tho buildings and grounds, 
and also for the arc lights, a number of which 
are placed on two wrought-iron masts erected 
in tne gardens, and which have also Ixjen con- 
tributed by MoHsrH. (lalloway ; tho remaining 
arc liglits are uaod for illuminating tho foun- 
tains with vurioiM coloured lights. 

OHjLBTT & CO., White Horse Boad, 
Croydon.~In CMiuroh Tower of "Old Lon- 
don," a Turret Clock of highest fluish, and 
all latest improvements, striking hours on a 
half-ton bell, also chiming the quarter hours 
un eight other bells. A peal of eleven bells, 
weighing together al)out 8 tons, the largest, 
12 cwt. A patent Carillon-Machine, playing a 
variety of tunua autonmtieally at stated times, 
the machine btiing let-off by tho clock, and 
only requiring to be wound up Ov^caisionally. 
An "Ellacombe" Chiming Apiwratus tltted 
up on one side of the Tower for playing tunes 
or ohauges on the bolls by hand. 

OIIiLOW St CO., Deoorator& x» the 
Queen, 406 Oxford Street, London, 
Liverpool, Lancaster, and Manohcister. 
— The decorative furniture of tho oHlces of Ihe 
Royal Commission at the (!olonial and Indian 
Exiiibition, and one of the Rooms set apart for 
the ubo uf the London, Provincial and C«ionial 
Press. 

GLOVER, WM., & SONS. Eagle 
Works, Warwiok., have placed at the 
disposal of the Royal Commission the Water- 
ing Carts for use iu the Gardens. 



HARDBN "STAR" HAND ORE- 
NADB riRB BXTINOUISHSR CO., 
Limited, 1 Holbom Viaduot, B.O.— Loan 
of Hand Grenades for protection of Exhibition 
Buildings from lire. 

HXLLIWBLL, T. W., 6 Westminater 
Chambers, S.W. ; Works, Brlghouse 
Yorkshire. — (tables of East and West 
GallerifH, glazed by his |Hitent systt*m witliout 
putty. The bars are mode of zinc, copinir steel 
or galvaniztnl iron, aud have double chauuels. 
the glass being held in its placo by metal caps 
screwed down from the outside. All tVam0work 
of roof is covered, thus saving all outside 
painting. There in no breakage from expahsion 
and contraction, no drip from condensation, and 
broken squares are easily replaced. Suitable 
for every description of roof and hortiouUura i 
building. 






HINDLEY, B. 8., 11 Queen Viotorlj 
Street, E.C.— Vertical Hteam lioiler hoaU'il 
by gas. In this boiler tho heating surface if 
nlmoHt entirely broHS, the tubes Inking so pliioni 
that tho steam is well dried, ro8ulting in (Hxinoin 
in gas. Tho humors are on tho liunson prin 
ciple, and are arrange<l so that u greitttT or Ici 
numlx^r may bo in uso at a time according a 
more or less steam is required ; this is accom 
plifhed very sirajjly and emcicntly by regulatiu| 
cooks. 

HOLLAND «c SONS, 24 Mour 
Street, Orosvenor Square, W. — Shm 
Cases for tho Indian Htction, similar to thoi 
supplied by this Urm for the Huuth Keusingto 
Museum. 



HUDSWELL, CLARKE, & CC 
Railway Foundry, Leeds. — Rodge 
Patent Wrought Iron Pullev, mode entirely 
wrought iron, rim arms and \)oss. Used excl 
sively for driving the whole of the eleetrin li; 
machinery in the Colonial aud Indian Exhi 
tiou. Perfectly balanced, turucd, aud iiniitb 
true in a latho. Can be mode any odd size 
to a ft. wide. 

HUMPHREYS, J. CHARLTOl 
Kensington Road, Knightsbrldge, H] 
Park, 8.W., has Im en apixiintod by the Rojj 
Commisuion sole contractor for all the 
Ituildiiigii and Galleries required for the Colo 
and Indian Kxliibition. • Mr. Humphreys 
also constructed for tho Royal Commission Iij 
Houses and Galleries, Cottages aud Huts i 
the Indians, and a Colonial Market and Cant 

IMPERIAL STONE CO., Limit 
East Qreenwioh.— Imperial stone i^ 
HI tide UHcd for the niainifncture of steps, la 
ings, inivings, copings of various designs, ( 
guucrally for stonework clressings connec 
with buildings. This stone is composed 
crushed grauito and Portland Cement, tho b 
tural dust being very carefully eliminated 
washing before being mixed with the oen 



i 



COLONIAL AND 




INDIAN EXHIBITION. 




"^ 



■?^- 



, 'i'-^"^^ 'O'^i 



Complimentary List. 



Ixxxiii 



be material ia then placed in moulds and com~ 
ressed by machinery. It baa been found that 
tone made artificially in this manner stands 
the severe test of a London atmosphere success- 
fully. It is in some instances mixed with 
various pigments in order to obtain the colour 
ontrasts desired by the architect, great care 
being exercised to use only such as will not 
injure the cement. The stone is in all cases 
subjected to a bath of silicate of soda and other 
indurating processes. .. <" 

JSFFBEY & CO., 64 Essex Boad, N., 

have, at the request of the Royal Ck)mmis- 
jsiou, supplied the Wall Decorations for their 
' ifidces, and for the private offices of the €om- 
issioners for South Australia, the Cape, 
,nada, Queensland, New South Wales, Vic- 
ria, and New Zealand, as well as for the 
Colonial and Indian Beading Booms in " Old 
London." The Decorations in Flocks for the 
lyal Balcony are by this finn. Messrs. 
effrey and Co.'s Wall I'apers hsive also been 
used in the dining-rooms of the National Train- 
ing School of Cookery and in the Colonial Hall. 

JUDSON & CO., 58 «b 77 Southward 
Jtzreet, S.E.— The Conduit in « Old London " 
\a fitted with one of this firm's Perfect Purity 
4'ilters, and ia a faithful reproduction of 
ie f-imous " Olde Water Conduit," called the 
jltaadard, erected in 1582 at the junctions 
K Bishopsgate, Gracechurcb, Leadenhall 
Streets, and Comhill, and demolished about 
|603. The water was supplied by meiins of 
rooden pipes laid under ground, communi- 

uting 'with a spring at some distance off, and 
lowed from the mouths of four grotesque 

nasks, supporting figures of prentices and 

iiids. Tbe standard was the point from which 
lisLances of localities around London were 

len reckoued. 

KIMBERLET, AIiBEBT, Banbury, 
las placed in the kitchen of the Staff Club, 
^nd albo in the lavatories of the Exhibition, 
lis wood blocks. I'hese blocks are made to a 
aiform thickness of 1^ in., and can be arranged 
|o almost any pattern. They are prepared by 
I special process to resist dry rot. being laid on 

solid bed of concrete 6 in. thick. They are 
noiseless, and are especially suitable for the 
loors of basements, churches, and bchools, and 
ilso because of their impervioueness and 

onomy in cost of laying. 



ItAHTEi, H., &; SOU", The Nurseries, 
3reat Berkhampstead.— Collection of Bho- 
iodendrons. 

LASCEUiES. W. H.. & CO., 121 
Btmhill Bow, E.C., have executed in Ame- 
-ioan Walnut the Entrance Doort«, Boom Doors, 
^Vrebitraves, and Overhead Pilasters with Carved 
Caps, Moulded Skirting and Surbase Moulding 



liE GBAai) & SUTCUPF, 100 

Bunhill Bow, E.r. — Norton's Improved 
Patent Eegistering Tnmstiles, first introduced 
for the entrances of the Crystal Palace in 
1855, and improved to their latest form by the 
patentees. They are adapted for accurately 
recording the number of persons entering or 
leaving any exhibition, pier, or other place of 
resort, and are constructed with a view to 
strength and lightness, and for facility of trans- 
port ; all the uprights aro of tubular iron. Tbe 
arms are designed so as to render the passage 
through them quite free, while the indicators 
are without springs or other complications. 



MEBBTWEATHEB & SONS, 
Greenwich Boad, S.E.. and Long Acre, 
W.C, have placed at the disposal of the Boyal 
Commission a powerful Stationary Steam Fire 
Engine for charging the whole of the fire mains 
in the Exhibition, having a sufficient pressure for 
fire extinguishing purjwses, the supply being 
taken from the water company's pipes. The fire- 
mains are fitted at intervals with hydrants, and 
by this arrangement from one up to eight jets 
can be delivered simultaneously, the greater 
number throwing 100 gallons per minute, each 
at a water pressure of 100 lbs. per square inch. 
There are also connections fitted to the engine 
for working several lines of hose direct. The 
engine is known as Merryweather and Sons' 
Double-Cylinder Steam Fire Engine, Green- 
wich pattern. Messrs. Merryweather and Sons 
also lend for fire protection purposes. One Colo- 
nial Curricle Hand Fire Engine, Two Universal 
Pattern Hand Fire Engines, with metallic cis- 
terns as used in India, over 60 Portable Hand 
Fire Engines of various patterns, including 
" London Brigade," " Toxcr." " Corridor," Ex- 
tinctors, &c., and 100 Fire Buckets. 

MOOBE, & CO., 88 Southampton Bow, 
Bussell Square, W.C. — A great many of th« 
windows in the officfs of the Boyal Commis- 
sion have been fitted up with stained glass 
by the above firm. In the Secretary's Boom is 
a window of twelve panels (six transom and six 
lower lights). This contains a light and deli- 
cate style of work, consisting of Italiar orna- 
ment, with central trophies of musical instru ■ 
ments on a richly-coloured ground. In the 
Assistant-Secretary's Boom is a window of eight 
panels (four transom and four lower lights). In 
the transom panels are subjects representing 
the arte oi music, poetry, painting, and sculp- 
ture, while the lower ones consist of tinted 
geometrical lead-glaiing, with painted border* 
of Italian omnment. In the Press Boom are 
windows, containing ornamental designs with 
central medallion portiaitsof eel* brated p-dnters 
In the Ante-ro<jm to Council Chamber is a win- 
dow of somewhat similar character to that Ia->t 
described, except that in the transom pands are 
shields containing emblems of EugLmd, Soot- 
land, and Ireland (the Bose, Shamrock, and 
Thistle)- In the Screen in Passjige between the 
offitws is a large semi-cii^qla^ headed {window, 

/2 



Ixxxiv 



Complimentary List. 



oontaining tropical foliage treated on a light 
grey grotrnd, with birds, insects, &c., introduced, 
the whole being surrounded by a border of 
Benaissance ornament. 

MOOBE. JOHN, & SONS, 38 & 39 

Clerkenwell Close, E.C., have supplied on 
loan. (1) A Striking Clock and Bell of 3 cwt., 
showing time on 8 ft. dial. This clock is fixed in 
the clock-tower facing the conservatory, and is 
Buitabloj for a church. (2) A Striking Clock, 
showing on five dials the time at Greenwich, Cal- 
cutta., Madras, Cape Town, and Ottawa. This 
clock faces inner garden, and is suitable for 
a town hall or any public building. (3) A 
Turret Timepiece with 5 ft. copper dial. This 
is fixed in the Grand Entrance, and is suit^ible 
for any building where a striking clock is not 
desirable. (4) A Small Turret Timopiece, 
showing time on a 4 ft. 6in. dial. This is fixed 
in the Canadian Section, and is suitiible for 
village school or public institute. (5) A Striking 
Clock in walnut case, specially designed for 
overmautel of His Eoyal Highness tiie Prince of 
Wales' Room. (6) An Ebonized and Gilt 
Striking Clock for the Secretary's Room, and 
other Clocks for the Staflf Club, &c. 

MOORE, JOSIAH, & SONS, Seck- 
ford Works, St. James's Walk, Clerk- 
enwell, E.C.— This firm have fitted their 
Patent Improved Glass Louvre Ventilators in 
the windows, &c., of various parts of the Build- 
ings, amongst which may be mentioned the 
Eastern Arcade on right of chief entrance ; in 
Committee's Smoking and Dining Booms in 
Old London ; in the New Council Chamber and 
Boofs of Gentlemen's and Ladies' Lavatories in 
Gardens, by which the admission of air is 
directed upwards oi* difi'used, thus causing a 
continuous circulation of air, at the same time 
excluding rain. They can be regulated at 
pleasure to any degree by means of a simple and 
efficacious arrangement worked by a single cord, 
and are self-closing ; being made chiefly of glass 
they offer no obstruction to light. 

NEW IRON BUILDING COM- 
PANY, Harbour Road, Camberwell. — 
Providing the New Patent Roofing to the 
Canadian Bar and the Indian Bullosk House. 

PEARSON, R H. & J., Notting Hill 
Oate, W.— The Combined Open and Close 
Pire Kitchenrr, provide I by the above firm for 
the kitchen of the Staff Club, is a rnodifiontion 
of their Patent Kitchener. It is constructed to 
roast in front of fire, as well us in the roaster, 
to bake piistry, and boil or stew on the hot 
plate with an open fire. The Grill Stove in this 
kitchen was also provided by the above firm. 

PHIIiIiIFS, W., & SON, 10 Baker 
Street, W., have carried out the arrangement 
of the decoration of the Council Boom of the 
Boyal Commission. 



PIIiSEN JOEL AND GENERAL 
ELECTRIC LIGHT CO., Telegraph 
Street, E.C. — This Company is lighting the 
Queen's Gate Section, the western gallery, 
western annexe, and part of the engine shed 
by 100 Pilsen Arc Lamps of the well-known 
P type. These are maintained by six Pilsen 
Dynamos of the newest type, and comprising 
all the latest improvements made by the com- 
pany, their efficiency being thereby greatly 
Increased. The armatures, instead of being 
clamped between two brass plates as fonnerly, 
are now supported by a strong gun-metal hub, 
the hoop iron core being wound in the four 
forked arms projecting from the centre. 

ROYAL BOTANIC SOCIETY OP 
LONDON, Regent's Park. — Large 
typical growing Specimens of Trees, Plants, and 
Shrubs, illustrative of the Floras of the Aus- 
tralian and South African Colonies, &o. 

SCOTT, CUTHBERTSON, & CO., 
Whitelands Works, Chelsea, S.W., 
have supplied the wall decorations of the fol- 
lowing rooms in Old London : — No. 1, Photo- 
graphers to the Boyal Commission. No. 5, 
Royal Commission Beeepticn Boom. No. 6, 
Commission Office. No. 7, Boyal Commission 
Committee Boom. No. 22, Ambulance and the 
Old Cock Tavern. „ . . 

SHAND, MASON, & CO., 75 Upper 
Ground Street, Blackfriars Road, 
S.E., have supplied a number of fire ex- 
tinguishing appliances for use in case of an 
outbreak of fire, amongst these being an Im- 
proved Patent Equilibrium Steam Fire Engine, 
capable of discharging 900 gallons per minute; 
aiso a London Bri>;ade pattern Vertical Steam 
Fire Engine, capable of discharging 350 gallons 
per minute. Both of these Engines are fitted 
with their Patent Inclined Water Tube Boiler, 
in which steam can be raised in from 6^ to 7j 
minutes, and they will be fcsed in connection 
with the firemains and hydrants fitted np by thigj 
firm in the Exhibition building. Also a numbe;' 
of London Brigade pattern Hand Pumps, Cor- 
ridor and Hall Fire Engines, Tozer Pumps, 
Chemical Engines, &0i, to be distributed in 
various parts of the building, kept filled with 
water, always ready for immediate use. 

STARKIE, GARDNER, & CO., 28 
Albert Embankment, Laml:>etli, S.E.— 
This firm has constructed the veraiidali or 
shelter in the south-west angle of the garden,| 
commanding u view of the fountains an 
grounds; this is of wrought-iron, except thei 
finely modtdled cast pilasters. The style ie, 
Italian, and it is intended either as a veran 
dah-terrace or balcony, arranged with vases fo; 
growing plants and for pendant lamps. Th 
gilded lamps in the Durbar Hall are in copper 
and brass, from special designs, and the mediao- 
val lanterns and old grille work of Old London 



Complimentary List, 



Ixxxv 



jHre contributions by the same firm ; as are also 
the cmamental gas brackets in the Press Rooms 
ind the iron staircase leading to the Smoking 
loony. 

TAYLOR & CO., 19 Hatton Garden, 
S.C., have supplied the Lamp Shades in the 
sfreshment department. These shades have 
en made to special designs, and are made of 
paper, cut by hand, illuminated with colour 
(hue and red), and lined with white silk for the 
purpose of reflecting the light to tlie greatest 
extent, as also enhancing the decorative eflFect. 

TBELOAR & SONS, eS, 69 & 70 

judgate Hill, E.G. — The door mats in use 

^t the Exhibition are made of unbleached 

'^ociia Nut Fibre by this firm. The pattern 

I'hich has been specially designed is registered. 

T R O T M A N, J., HoUoway, N.— 

iThb Summer Houses furnished by this firm 

for the use of the Royal Commission, are 

(lade of wood especially prepared, and coated 

nth patent indestructible solution, they are 

bubstantial yet portable, being made in separate 

panels, so that any one can screw th^-m together 

pr remove them anywhere. 

UNITE, J., 291 Edgware Road.-- 
'roviding all the covered ways and stands for 
^he opening ceremony. 

UNITED ASBESTOS CO., Limited, 
jondon and Birmingham (CHARLES 
lOUNTPORD, Patentee). — The paint 
ised for the decoration of the Exhibition 
Juildings by this compiiny is the New Deco- 
rative Asbestos Oil Paint, wliich resists fire 
and water. This paint is manufactured from 
the pure Italian asbestos, and, cogether with 
other ingredients, is ground with oil and spirits 
and resists water. At the same time its che- 
nical combination is such that the presence 
of fire immediately hardens the paint. As the 
paint ia capable of being ground perfectly 
smooth, and readily mixes with almost any 
bolour, it is in every way suitable aa a deco- 
rative paint for indoors or out. 



VERITY BROS., 137 Regent Street. 

W. — The large Repousse wrought and polirhea 
brass centre Electrolier and the four Electric 
Sunlights in comers of vestibule near entrance, 
together with the tlireo Electric Pendants in 
Royal Pavilion, were designed and manu&ctured 
by the above firm. 

VICTORIA PATENT STONE CO., 
283a Kingsland Road, W.— The Patent 

Victoria Stone, laid down by this Company in the 
Colonial Market, ia the same material as that 
now in the Entrance Hall, which was laid down 
for the Fisheries' Exhibition. It is composed 
of finely-crushed and washed granite, mixed 
with best Portlantl cement, obtainable and 
silicated by tlie Patent Victoria Stone Co.*g 
process. 

WARD, ROWLAND, P.Z.S., 166 

Piccadilly, W., hot. executed for the Royal 
Commission an elaborate tropliy representing 
Jungle Life in India ; also the Trophy of Kooch 
Behar formed by His Highness the Maharajah 
representing a Tiger Hunt. Trophies by Mr. 
Rowland Ward are also in the following courts : 
Ceylon, South Africa, Canada and Queensland. 

WARE, T. S., Hale Farm Nurseries, 
Tottenham, N.— Collection of Dahlias and 
other Plants. 

WHITE, JOHN, AND SONS, 
Park Road Leather Works, Bingley, 
Yorkshire. — Supply for the Electri j De- 
partment Six Treble Main Driving Belts. This 
firm also suppiy 10 in. and 12 in. strong single 
of great etrective driving power. 

WILKES'S METALLIC FLOOR- 
ING CO., 17 Devonshire Square, have 
paved the Old London Street, the Courtyard 
of the Indian Palace, and the Central Avenue 
between tlieso with Wilkes's Patent Metallic 
Paving. The advantages claimed for this floor- 
ing are that it is exceedingly hard and durable, 
readily repaired, very strong, and never wears 
slippery. It is suitable for stables, carriage 
sheds, footpaths, fire-proof floors, &c. 

YOUNG, MAURICE, Milford Nur 
series, Godalming. — Collection of Rhode 
dendrons, &c. Garden and Prince's P avilion . 



j ■ H-' 



•. K-' 






7rp '-■-'■: 



( kxxv'i ) 



GABDEN ILLUMINATIONS. 






The Grounds of the Exhibition are lit up by about 9700 electric glow lamps of 5 and 10 
candle-power, with a few 20 candle lampa en the Band Stands and on the vemndah of the 
Conservatory. 

These lights, many of which are brilliantly coloured, have been placed partly on the per- 
manent Museum buildings and on the Conservatory, bo as to bring out the tracery of tl>e8e 
buildings, and to give an appearance of vaatness tu the grounds, and partly on the balustrades, 
round the flower beds, and in the trees and ornamental water of the gardens, tlie general effect 
being a charming arrangement of light and colour. Tlie lights can bo turned on or off instan- 
taneously either by sections or altogether. 

Messrs. W. & J. Galloway & Sons, of Manchester, are the conti-actors for the installation and 
maintenance of the whole of tiiese garden illuminations. 

The installation consists of 23 circuits, each of wliioh is made up of eight parallels of lampa 
connected in series, the electromotive force of the 5 and 10 candle-power lamps being 25 volts, 
and that of the current at the machines 220 volts. 

Each of these circi'.its is connected to the main leads from the dynamos by means of a 
large switch-board, specially designed to allow of any circuit being connected to any dynamo 
machine. :v ■:■ .-v ; •■■■■■■'i i.j-." .:■; !■'■ ■^■.■ .^■•' .--:j...- 

The lamps are distributed as follows : — . .", il ' 

I. Conservatory . , . '■ '".' ' ^ ' ' - ^./.t .^ 1500 lamps. 

II. East and West Quadrants 1600 „ 

III. Upper Gardens, Trees and Balustrades and Band Stands. 1550 „ 

IV. East and West Arcades, and Trees .... 2200 „ 
V. Lower Garden, Centre Pond, Side Ponds, Beds and Pendants 2500 „ 

VI. Albert Statue 3G8 „ 

The total current required is about 800 amperes. 

The current is obtained from four of Messrs. Elwell-Parker's self-regulating dynamos, each 
of which can supply a current of 250 amperes with an electro-motive force of 250 volts when 
running at 300 revolutions. 

The power required to drive these machines is supplied by a pair of compound horizontal 
engines, placed at the west end of the Canadian Court. These engines will each develop 
200 H.-P., at a speed of 110 revolutions, and have been specially designed I y Messrs. Galloway 
to meet the requirements of electric lighting. 

The three large Siemens' dynamos, which were used during the Invention Exhibition, and 
the Goodfellow's and Mathews' three-cylinder engines, have also been retained, and will form a 
reserve in case of any accident to the new plant. 

Besides the glow-lamp illumination, 15 arc lamps have been placed on throe masts, so placed 
as to light up the whole of the grounds, even should the general illumination be put out. These 
arc lamps are new, from a Victoria Brush F. 3 dynamo, driven by a third Galloway engine, 
similar to the pair used for the glow lamps, and which is placed in the West Quadrant. Thia 
engine also drives the dyiiumo for the fountain lamps. 



Ixxxviii Uledric Lighting. 



y' THE ILLUMINATED FOUNTAINS. 

In the Ornamental Water, in the Grounds, Fountains of various designs have been arranged, 
which are illuminated after dark by means of powerful olectric arc lamps. 

The foUowiug is a description of the means by which the effects shown by the Fountains are 

produced: — i .^Mttinur^ ,'•; , ">' .1 : !■ -• 

The water for supplying the Fountains is delivered direct from the West Middlesex Water 
Company's Hammersmith pumping station. Tlie main enters the Exhibition Grounds from the 
nortli-west, and is conducted to the four water-meters, on the western side of the centre basin, 
which register the quantity of water consumed. From this point •» large main leads to the 
central " island," wliere the principal jeta rise. Tho water is supplied at a pressure of about 
seventy pounds to the square inch, which is sufficient to carry it to a height of 120 feet. 

The island is reached by means of a subway, and through this are laid the cables for the 
electric current and the signalling wires. 

Tho whole of the jets are worked by scrow-valves and levers placed inside the island. 
Tho Fountain display is directed from tho clock tower at the south side of the Garden, the 
" operating-room " being below tho dial of tho large clock. Tho operator controls not only the 
working of the jets, but also the colour and power of the lights, by a series of electric signals, 
arranged on a key-board with HO keys, in five rows of 12 each, which communicate with bells 
and indicators inside tho island. 

The machine-room inside tho island is an apartment 21 feet square. Its roof being only 
5 feet 8 inches from tlie floor, renders it difficult for the operators to stand upright in it ; and 
there is au outer passage all round which is only 4 feet G inches high. 

Tlio Fountains are set in action by screw-valves fixed vertically on the different branches 
attached to tho water main. Tlie large jets, which send the water to the greatest heights, are 
worked by plug-valves and levers, so as to allow an instantaneous start and stop, which causes a 
shower of spray. There are, altogether, eleven wheels and six levers. 

In the roof are seven circular skylights of very strong glass, one of them being exactly in tho 
centre, the others forming a hexagon about it. Under each of these skylights is a wooden stand, 
on which is fixed a hand arc lamp of 8000 candle power. Over each arc is a lens, which concen- 
trates the light on the jet. There are also eight windows in the roof of the outer passage under 
each of which is an arc light and reflector. When the order " Lights on " is received, the five 
arcs are set going, the result being to powerfully illumine the jets of water internally, while the 
dropping water or spray is illuminated externally by the surroxmdlng beams of light, thus pro- 
ducing a glistening-efl'ect. There is also a lamp opposite the cascade, the light being concentrated 
by a plano-convex lens. Tiic current for these lamps is supplied by a Victoria Brush machine, 
driven by the Galloway engine in the West Quadrant. The usual staflf is fifteen — one man to 
work the valves, thirteen to attend to the lights, and one to watch and reply to the bells. They 
cannot see what is going on outside, their only means of knowing that all is right being the 
signals from the clock tower. The quantity of water sent up averages 70,000 gallons an hour ; 
but when all the jots are gouig at onco, 1000 gallons are used in fifteen seconds. 



( Ixxxix ) 

THE "OLD LONDON" STEEET. 

DESCKIPTION OF THE STREET REPRESENTING "OLD LONDON" IN THE 
COLONIAL AND INDIAN EXHIBITION AT SOUTH KENSINGTON, 1886 
(ERECTED FROM THE DRAWINGS AND UNDER THE SUPERINTENDENCE 
OF GEORGE H. BIRCH, ESQ., A.R.I.B.A., LATE HON. SEC. LONDON AND 
MIDDLESEX ARCH^OLOGICAL SOCIETY). , 

Ting street is composed of various houses grouped together to form a quaint and picturesque 
thorouglifare of the normal width of an Old London street, the dates of the various huildings 
being as diversified as are their size and appearance, and the object that has been held steadily 
in view, is to show the City of London as it existed before the Great Fire of 1666 swept it from 
off the face of the earth. These houses are no pasteboard and painted canvas delusions, but 
honest structures. They represent no fanciful restorations from written records, but are faithfal 
delineations from actual drawings derived from authentic sources. 

A reference to the accompanying plan will enable the visitor to identify the different houses 
and structures which are numbered as in the following description. 

Entering from the Central Avenue immediately in front of the Pavilion of His Royal 
Highness the Prince of Wales, stands one of the City gates — Bishopsgate, reduced in proportion 
and flanked by the City wall ; this gate (not one of the original gates of which there were but 
four) was broken through the ancient walls, the peculiar Roman manner of building with courses 
of tiles being shown on the lower part ; these wails might have been built during the 400 yeai's 
of Roman occupation, but more probably after their withdrawal and before the tradition of the 
Roman manner of building had died out ; above the arch on each side are the arms of the City 
of London and the arms of the Bishopric, and immediately over the gate in a niche stands the 
statue of one of the bishops, William the Norman, to whom the City was particularly indebted, 
for by his good offices, all those rights and privileges and immunities which the City had 
inherited from Roman times and \vhieh had been confirmed and strengthened under the Saxon 
Kings, were reconfirmed by the Conqueror. Once a year the City fathers went in solemn 
procession to his tcii.b in St. Paul's Cathedral, and testified by this act their grateful recognition. 
Above, on the to\yei8 which flank the gateway, are the statues of Alfred who wrested the City 
from the Danes, and of his son-in-law, Aldred Earl of Mercia to whom he committed the govern- 
ment thereof. 

Passing through the gate the corresponding statue, that of William the Norman, is seen 
representing St. Erkenwald, the Fourth Bishop of London, a.d. 675, after the re-constitution 
of the see und re-establishment of Christianity by St. Augiistine. Tliis Erkenwald was a great 
favourite with il:he Londoners, and after his canonization, his shrine at St. Paul's, one of the 
richest in the kin£;dom, was for many centuries an object of great veneration. The ground floor 
on each Bide thows on the right a debtors' prison, and on the left an ordinary luck-up, and 
beyond are the staircases to the flrst-fioor. After passing through the gateway, the firtt house 
on tite left is the " Rose Inn " (No. 1), Fenchurch Street, curious as having its front covered with 
small cut slates, instead of the ordinary lath and plaster and timber construction usual in London. 

The next house (No. 2) stood in Leadenhall Street, and was known as the " Cock Tavern," 
the representations of this house, of which ther&are many, represent it after the gable had been 
removed, and a flat coping substituted, but in this instance its pristine condition has been 
reverted to. Following in order is a block of three houses (Nos. 3, 4 and 5) formerly existing iu 
Fleet Street, towards Temple Bar, on the south side, and known by the name of the " Three 
Squirrels," now Messrs. Gosling's Bank. This system of the houses being known by certain 
signs irrespective of the avocations, or change of owners, was universal. The " Mai7gold " at 
Temple Bar, Messrs. Child's Bank, The "Grasshopper" in Lombard Street, Messrs. Martin & 






OJ. 



LU 
UJ 
CC 

I- 



z 
o 
o 

z 
o 



o 

-J 
o 



UJ 

X 




I, « U F< t! 

S t) Q H B 

H a Jj CO 

S g 2 a 

:S C S SfE 



cs . . . . 

0» O r- M M 




«'){«>< 






»»;!■.;)■ 



■IV© i^oHsia ono ihx 



Old London. xci 



Ga, and the ** Golden Bottle," Fleet Street, Me«fln. Hoaro's, are all initances of a snrriTal of 
a aomenclatnre the origin of which has been ao entirely at Tariance with the avocationi of 
the mbaeqnent owners. v ■*, i 

The houae (No. 6), is a copy of the one which stood at the otner of Fleet Street and 
Chancery Lane, and was traditioually known oa the " Isaac Walton's House." " Vir et Piscator 
optimuB," but there is a doubt that tradition is this case was tradition only, as the actual house 
was two doors further to the west; but apart from this, the house itself was a magnificent 
specimen of an ordinary citizen's house in Elizabeth's reign, and was for many years a conspicnous 
ornament to Fleet Street, and in close contiguity to those well-known haunts of the wits of that 
period, the *' Apollo" and the " Devil " Taverns. 

Set back a little from tlie main lino of the street in order to give prominence to Walton's 
house, and to give it the appearance of a comer house, are two unpretending wooden structures 
(Kos. 7 and 8) which formerly stood hard by the ancient church of St Ethelburga, Bishopsgate 
Street, and were the ordinary type of hundreds of others in the old city, a shop below, and a 
solar or chamber above. 

Standing prominently in advance of these is the old tower of a church, which, although not 
strictly modelled from that of All Hallows, Staining — differing only in having a larger traceried 
window — resembles in its general form and outline many others in which our forefathers were 
wont to worship; most of these churches were small, for the parishes attached to them were 
also diminuiive, and this tower type, with bold octagonal staircase turret on one side, was 
almost universal ; there were exceptions in which the towers hod lofty pinnacles at each comer, 
like the present St. Sepulchre's, Holbom, or the more modem re-buildings by Wren, of 
St. Michael's, Cornliill, and St. Mary Aldermary; and the curious arched superstructure 
with its five lanterns of St. Mary-le-Bow, or de Arcubus, and the very fine spire of St. Lawrence 
Pountney ; but the generality of the churches possessed towers similar in character to the one 
depicted here. 

The water conduit (erected by Messrs. Judson & Co.), the pillory, and the stocks placed in 
the open space in front of the church tower are quaint and interesting features of the everyday 
life of our forefathers. This conduit stood at the junction of the four ways, Comhill, Bishopsgate, 
Leadenhall Street, and Gracechurch Street, and was known as the " Standard upon Comhill," 
and a well-known point for calculating distances from. The original had eight jets of water 
proceeding from the top of the Corinthian capital, but as the space at dispoeal was so limited these 
extra jets had to be omitted. 

Next to the church, and fronting down the street, is a portion of Middle Row (No. 9), which 
stood in the Strand, just outside Temple Bar, and was known as Butchers' Row ; these houses 
well represent the overhanging of the stories so prevalent in London where the groundfloor 
space was very limited, additional room above being obtained by these means at the expense of 
light and air. Butchers' Row itself and its quaint structures were swept away when Alderman 
Pickett, with a public spirit far in advance of his times, made one of the first piiblic improve- 
ments by widening this portion of the Strand, leaving the Church of St. Clement Danes 
Related in the midst of a large oval. These houses are historically interesting, as in one of them 
the Gunpowder Plot conspirators met. 

Elbow Lane. — The site at this point considerably narrows, from 70 to 30 feet, and the 
houses are not continued on parallel lines, in order to break a perspective which would have 
been too long for a picturesque effect, and also in order to obtain that sinuosity so characteristic 
of London streets. 

Next on the left is a fine large house of two gables (No. 10), which stood in this Middle 
Bow, Strand, and was known as the French Ambassador's house, or the Duke of Sully's, also 
Monsieur Beaumont's, both ambassadors here from the most Christian King to the Court of 
St James'. This Duke de Sully was the famous Henri de Bethune, the wise and popular 
minister to Henri Quartre, King of France and Navarre. That this house was probably occupied 
by him there can be little doubt ; not only from the commonly accepted tradition, but from the 
fact of its being decorated with badges of the De Bethunes, the French crown and fleur-de-lis 
and two hands grasping one another in a trae " entente cordiale." 

The next (No. 11) is a low straotnre of wood and plaster, and hM been modelled fnm an 
old engTBTing representing a pcnrtion of Bishopsgate Street. 



xoii Old London. 



Beyoud this is an old house (Nos. 12 & 13) which was in Goawell Street, of the date of 
Elizabeth's reign. The windows are mullioned and transomed, and show one peculiarity very 
general in old London, in carrying on the upper lights continuously. 

No. 14 is a timber house with carved bargeboard, which stood next to Blue Boar's Head 
Yard, King Street, Westminster. The tradition as to its being formerly occupied by Oliver 
Cromwell was verified in 1833 by an inspection of the parish books of St. Margaret's, "West- 
niinster, where it was found that Lieut.-General Oliver Cromwell was rated for and occupied this 
house some time anterior to his taking possession of Whitehall Pulace. 

The last bouse (No. 14a), decorated with medallions of the Roman Emperors in plaster, 
stood on Little Tower Hill. There is nothing remarkable iu the building beyond that the roof 
line is level and was chosen as a contrast to the all-prevailing gable. 

At this point (No. 15)— the termination westward of the street — the entrance thereto is 
masked by one of the galleried fronts of an old London inn. The " Oxford Arms," Warwick 
Lane, was chosen as a typical specimen ; but there are still remaining iu Bishopsgate Street, 
Holbom, ai:d more especially the Borough, several examples of these. 

The house beyond (No. 16) was on the west side of Little Mcorfields, Finsbury, and 
war. a very fine specimen of plaster work. It was not removed until the commencement 
of the present century. A low building connects this with two houses (Nos. 17 & 18) 
pobsegsing considerablo interest; they stood at the south comer of Hosier Lane, Smithfield, 
over against the famous " Pye Corner," where the fearful conflagration of 1666 was arrested, 
after having laid considerably more than three-fourths of the City in ashes ; they were not 
removed until 1800. 

Another gateway here arrests our steps ; this was the entrance to the famous Priory of the 
Holy Trinity, Aldgate, founded by Queen Matilda, and whose Prior, by virtue of his office as 
representing the Knighten Guild v/ho had made over to this priory their lands and soke, was 
admitted as one of the Aldermen of London, of the Ward of Portsoken. According to custom, 
he eat in court, and rode in scarlet, or such livery as the other aldermen used. The Priory, 
at the dissolution, was granted tci Sir Thomas Audley, whose daughter, marrying the Duke of 
S'orfolk, gave the name to the house built by Audley out of the ruins of the Priory, — " Duke's 
Place." Beyond the gate (No. 19) is the inn called the " Fountain " in the Minories, which, 
notwithstanding its heavy projecting stories, was so strongly framed, that when it was attempted 
to remove it, cart-horses had to be employed to pull tho beams apart ; on one of them was found 
the date 1480. 

Beyond this (No. 19a) is tlie gable end of the Hall of the Brotherhood of the Holy Trinity 
(which is reached by ascending the staircases to the first fioor) in Aldersgate Street, near to Little ■ 
Britain. This Hall has been selected as a typical example of the Hall of a Guild or Livery, of 
which there were many within the boundaries of the ancient City. It was a guild possessing 
property, and connected with the neighbouring church of St. Botolph's, Aldersgate Street, and 
after the suppression was purchased by some of the parishioners as a place of meeting. It was 
not removed until the end of the last century, and very eccurate drawings by Capon and Carter 
exist in the Gardner Collection. Tho Right Hon. John Staples, F.S.A., Lord Mayor of London 
for the present year (a member of the committee originally charged with the construction of the 
buildings), has given the history of this Guild in his * Notes on St. Botolph's, Aldersgate.* The 
ancient stained glass with a figure of St. Blaise, and several ancient shields which existed in 
1611, and were not iced by N. Charles, Lancaster Herald, have been faithfully reproduced. 

The house beyond is one of the most remarkable in this street (No. 20), remarkable not only 
for its extreme richness of decoration, but as being connected with Sir Richard Whittington, 
famous in song and in story. It was situated four doors from Mark Lane in Crutched Friars, 
or Hart Street, up a courtyard, and was described iu old leases as Whittington's Palace. 
Although the house from its style and ornamentation could not possibly have been of his time it 
is possible that the front only had been ornamented and altered, for iu general outline and 
arrangement it resembled houses of that date — it was richly ornamented with carvings of the 
armorial bearings of the city companies, which stamped it as being the house of a remarkable 
personage and one whom tho City delighted to honour. It was impossible to reproduce the 
extreme richness of its decoration. The ornamentation has therefore only been painted, the 
original havfng been entirely carved and painted and gilt. Very accurate prints of this court- 



Old London. xciii 



yard exist, and several views of the elevation more or less mutilated are in the European 
Magazine. An original drawing showing its gables is in the Gardner collection ; from which 
this representation has been taken. 

The next two houses (No. 21) were drawn by Mr, Gwilt before they were removed ; they were 
Bitnated in Bankside, and are picturesque examples of plaster decoration and open balconies. 

The last two bouses (Nos. 22 & 23) in this street on the left before aniving at the gate 
at which we entered were also from the Gwilt collection (now in the Gardner) and stood in 
the High Street, Borough ; they were only removed of late years, and were drawn and 
measured by Mr. Gwilt. 

As to actual size the whole of the buildings have only been slightly reduced, but this has 
been done in proportion, although such reduction is not to a uniform scale, but has been adopted 
in the different cases to suit the uniformity of tho plan and arrangement of the whole. The 
interiors, it must be recollected do not in all cases correspond in size with the exteriors. 

The foregoing notice is written from particulars furnished by Mr. Geo. H. Birch, the 
architect, and is not intended to be more than a very brief description of tho examples selected 
to represent " Old London." 

The buildings were designed and constructed as bearing upon and connected with the 
special objects of the International Health Exhibition, 1884, to which the Corporation of the 
City of London and several of the Livery Companies liberally subscribed. 

The Eoyal Commission has placed at the service of the Colonial Commissioners the whole 
of the upper rooms of this street. 

On the right side of Old London will be found the rooms set apart for the use of the Colonial 
and India OflSces, and also those for the Crown Agents of tho Colonies ; all these rooms lead into 
the Colonial Commissioners' Club. The Banqueting Hall, &c., furnished by Messrs. Cooper & 
Holt, of Bunhill Row, and on tho left side the Offices of tho following Colonial Commissioners : 
Queensland, New South Wales, South Australia, Canada, Victoria, West Indies, and New 
Zealand. 

On entering tho ground floor of Old London, No. 1 is allotted to the Official Photographers 
to the Royal Commission, Messrs. W. & D. Downey, and the Woodbury Company. No. 2 is the 
General Post Office. Nos. 5 and 6 are appropriated for the Eoyal Commissioners' Colonial 
Reception Committee ; and No. 7, Colonial Tea and Coffee Committee Room. Nos. 5, 6 and 7 are 
furnished by Messrs. Brew & Challis, Finsbury Pavement, and decorated by Missrs. Scott & 
Cuthbertson, Chelsea. No. 9 is occupied by, and under the supervision of, Messrs. Cook & Son, 
as Colonial Exchange and Writing Rooms. No. 12 is tiio Office for the Commission for Ceylon, 
and No. 18 that for Western Australia. No. 14, British and Foreign Bible Society. Nos. 19 & 
19a are reserved for tho Central Railway Booking and Tourist Offices of the Royal Commis- 
sion, with " ye Railway Lounge " attached. Nos. 20 & 21 Messrs. SpicrD & Pond for light 
refreshments. No. 22 for St. John's Ambulance, and No. 23 for the Fire Brigade. 

The street is now illuminated at night by electricity. Both arc and crystal glow lamps are 
used ; of tho former kind, five lamps of 2500-candle-power each are so arranged as to 
produce the picturesque effect of moonlight in the street and narrow lane and alleys, while 
the rooms upstairs are lit with several hundreds of incandescent lamps. fi:-) i?'..^ 



■••Jf v->ii-> ■\-'--l^ ■>.hi'" •..'■V.i:.'VA,-A •'.■:;;i;-' ; .I..','' taHK^ik-/ ■:j.:!i "a. i; 



i.'»:U'-. n 



( xoiv ) 



THE AQUARIUM OP BRITISH PISHES. 

Thu popular and interesting section of the past ami present Exhibitions is situated in the 
Western Arcade, and comprises ten sea-water tanks, nine fresh-water tanks, twenty table-tanks, 
and twelve oyster-tank*-. Since the International Fisheries Exhibition the control of the 
Aqoariam has been in the hands of the National Fish Culture Association, whose President and 
Chairman is the Marquess of Exeter ; its Vice-President Sir Edward Birckbeck, Bart., M.P. ; 
wid its Director and Secretary, W. Oldham Chambers, Esq., F.L.S.: while the following 
noblemen and gentlemen constitute its Executive Council : — 



The Mabquis of LonxE, K.T. 

THB EaBL Of ROMNET. 

Twa Eabl or Axsesley. , 

The Earl or Donocghmobc. 
Majob-Gex. Loud Abingeb, C.B. 
The Bight Hos. Sib W. Hart-Dyke, 

Babt., M.P. 
Sib Johx St. Aubyn, Bart., M.P. 
Sib p. De Gbey Egertos, Babt. 
The Pbimb Wabdes or the Fishmongers' 

COMPASV. 

The Maclaise of Lochbcy. 

R. Babclay, Esq. . . 

C. Bates, Esq. 

J. Bbcntos, Esq., M.D. ' . ^ 

W. BcBDETT-Courrs, Esq. ' ^ 

LlECT.-CoL. CcSTAJfCE. " 

H. Ffennhll, Esq. 

Fbancis Francis, Esq. ' [ . .' . 



C. E. Fbyeb, Esq. * 

P. Geek, Esq. 

Db. Glntheb, F.R.S. 

Pbofessob Huxley, P.P.R.S. 

A. G. Jabdine, Esq. 

IL Lee, Esq., F.L.S, 

Rev. J. J. Manley, M.A. 

T. J. Manx, Esq. 

O. T. Olsen, Esq., F.L.S. 

Sib a. Eollitt. 

J. L. Sayeb, Esq. 

LlECT-COLONEL SeDDON. 

W. Sekiob, Esq. 

S. B. Shabfe, Esq. 

T. Spbeokley, Esq, Chairman Thame* 

Angling Preservation Society. 
Rev. C. J. Steward. 
J. Willis Bcnd, Esq. 
Captain Vipan. 



Throughout the late International Inventions Exhibition the Aquarium was crowded with 
visitors, taxing to the utmost its accommodative capacity. There ia always a fascination in 
wtiiching the graceful, silent movements of the denizens of our waters; and whatever form an 
exhibition may take, a glimpse into the Aqueous Kingdom through the medium of Aquaria is 
always heartily welct)med by everybody. Althoagh the exhibitions that have succeeded that of 
the International Fisheries liave beeu of an entirely ditforent character, the Aquarium has 
always maintained its position of iutereat ; and this is particularly the case m ith the present 
Exhibition, when an opportunity will be afforded to Colonial visitors of inspecting tlie various 
fish indigenous to this country. 

The Council of the National Fish Culture Association have done their utmost to heighten 
the attractiveneus of this department ; and preparations have been in course of progress since the 
commencement of the prcaent year for bringing to perfection the necessary preliminary arrange- 
ments whereby to ensure the successful retention of fish in captivity. During tbe winter the 
Aquarium was carefully maintained, so that the collection now »hown to the pnblio includes 
many well-seasoned and matured specimens. In order to render the freeh and sea-water as clear 
and bright as podsible, it has been clarified by Maignen's " Filtre Rapide." Elaborate arrange- 
iXkents have been made for replenishing ihe tanks with marine and fre:>h-water fish, and with 
this la view special fishermen and naturalists are being employed on all parts of the coast to 
capture and forward specimtos. so that tbe Aquarium may always be replete with selected fishes, 
forming a unique display so far as London is concerned. The specimens on view include the 
turbot, sole, halibut, brill, pLuoe, flounder, dab, pilchard, shod, cod, haddock, whiting, hake. 



Aqunrium of British Fishes. - xcv 



BturgeoD, dory, red gurnard, bass, mullet, sea-bream, wmss, skate, monkfish, lamp 68b, great pipe, 
conger, salmon, tront, grayling, charr, smelt, perch, ruff, pike, carp, tench, golden tench, daoe, roach, 
rudd, chub, bream, barbel, roacli, gudgeon, minuovr, stickleback, and lampre;'. In addition to the 
foregoing are to be seen a large collection of crabs, lobsters, crayfish, and a\ sters, together with a 
diversified display of sea-anemones. The Directors of the Brighton Aquarium are rendering 
valuable assistance in forwarding specimens of fish captured off the South Coast, so that many of 
the fish familiar to those ^rho have visited that popular place of amusement and instmotion will 
be found amongst the occupants of the marine tanks a^ South Kensington 

In order to intensify the interest attaching to the coileotion of live fioh, the Lords of the 
Committee of the Council on Eduratiou have again given their consent to a portion of the Buck- 
land Museum Collection being exhibited in the Aquarium. Thus a wide and diversified 
collection of interesting and edifying objects are presented to the public conjunctively with 
the live fish, all of which embrace an important and popular combination of exhibits relating 
to FiBh, Fisheries and Fish-culture. 






I. 



'/: ."V'li 



'■ ■^. ■ ■ .. ■ a vy • •■■ H/ ■ ■ '■-•" 






( xcvi ) 



t fl«fc[o- .C-K'-^ , jt,.-,-» .^3(5^ ,t]iis ,rr.i-.*i .IImj-- .rtiuf I 

INDIAN AND COLONIAL AQUABIUM ANl) FISH- 
yuHs* CULTURE SECTION. 

ly order that spcouuens of fish indigenous to the \raters of India and the Colonies might be 
displayed at the present Exhibition, the Council of tho National Fisb-Culture Association were 
requested by tho Royal Commissioners to form a special Aqiiarium for the same. The Asso- 
ciation being anxious to do everything in their pov/er to impart fresh information to the public, 
and at the same time further tho cultivation of Colonial fishes, readily acquiesced, and, as will be 
Boea, have provided the requisite accommodation not only for fishes but amphibious animals as 
■woU. 

The new Aquarium is located in the western annexe parallel with the old one. It comprises 
twelve tanks for tropical freeli-v.ater fish, and a Luge habitat for turtlus. In addition to tiiese a 
hatchery has been erected *"or incubating the ova of these reptiles, which will be undertaken by 
Mr. W. Oldham Chambers during the season. Tho most complete arrangements have been made 
to ensure the success of this experiment, which is fraughi, with much interest. In contiguity to 
tho turtle tank is a miniature beach, upon which tho turtle may disport themselves when out of 
water. The water in each t;iuk is heated in accordance with the natural necessities of both 
tropical and inter-tropical fish, the apparatus for this purpose being so arranged as to be abso- 
lutely compilable to regulation. Tho water in tho turtle tank is salt, but that in tha other tanks 
is fresh. The various species exhibited will be referred to in a later edition. The tanks and 
other works have been designed by Mr. W. Oldham Chambers and constructed by Messrs. 
Dick liadclyffe & Co. 

FISH-CULTUEE DEPARTMENT. 

The Fish-Culture Section is situated in tho above Aquarium, and stretches as far as the 
Canadian Court. During tho winter and spring this department was the scene of lively activity 
on account of the hatching seaBon, when hundreds of thousands of fish eggs were successfully 
incubated, tho fry being transferred to public waters and to the Establishment of the Association 
at Delaford Park, Iver, Bucks. It is to be regretted that, owing to tho time of year, tho public 
were prevented from viewing tlie operations, which were of a very interesting and instructive 
character. 

In tills department there is a very fine display of mature Salmonidaj and yearlings, besides the 
various apparatus uud appliances used in the work of breeding and rearing fish. These apparatua 
consist of hatching boxes, tearing and feeding boxes, invented by tho Marquess of Exeter and Mr. 
W. Oldhura Cliambers. His Lordship also exhibits models of an oyster-culture establishment 
and fish ponds. The remaining exhibits are from the Buckland Itluscum Collection, and 
comprise a series of Canadian and American fish-culture appliances, and a model of Billin(;sgate 
Market, designed by Mr. J. L. Sayer, and a model of a fish-culture establishment by Mr. W. 
Oldham Chambers, F.L.S. 

A wide and diversified combination of exhibits relating i Fish, Fishing, and Fish Culture 
»re thus brought together in thio Section, which will doubtless prove highly interesting to the 
general public. 

Tlie Council of the National Fish-Culture Association are desirous of acknowledging the 
following speoial services that havo been r«ndereil in the Aquarium and Fifh Culture Depart- 
ment by Professor B lird, United States Commissionc r isf Fish and Fisheries ; Mr. William Burgess, 
Malvern Wells; Mr. J. S. Charles. Lower GiosVL-nor PIbcj; Tlie MacLaine of Lochlmry; Mr. T. 
Andrews, Guildford ; Messrs. Dick Radclyffe & Co., Holborn ; Mr. P. A. Muiguen, St. M«ry-at- 
Hill, E.G. ; Messrs. Poland Bros. ; Mr. W. H. Williamson, Lower Thames Street, and Mr. Hois<:« 
Overton, VictorLi Buildings, Belgravia. 

For further^particulars anent the Aquaria and Fish-Culture Section, see Handbook, price 
One Penny. 



( tcvil ) 



piottTres shown in gallery Of 

ROYAL ALBERT HALL. 



;nv 



INBIA. 



Portrait of His Highness Bahadar of Patiala. 
(Oil.) 

Portrait nf His Highucss Mahraja BauLir 
Singh. (Oil.) 

Evening. By Miss E. 31. Lamb. (Oil.) 

View of Snowy Range. By Miss E. M. Lamb. 
(Oil.) 

Indian Fruit. Bv Alfred Palmer. (Oil.) 

Indian Bull and Keeper. By Mrs. Nora 
Scott. (Water-colour.) 

A Nasik Mussulman. By Mrs. E. O. Bell 
Irving. (Cil.) 

■ Morning, Thai Ghaut. By Mrs. F. F. Baker. 
(Oil.) 

Bombay Scenery. By Horace van Buith. 
(Oil.) 

IMahomedan Buildings near Golcondab. By 
Major-General Hay Camplx;!!. (Oil.) 

A Hindoo Bride. By Mrs. E. O. Bell Irving. 
(OU.) 

Camels. By Major-General A. G. Shortt. 
(Oil.) 

At the Temple Door. By Horace van Kuith. 
(Oil.) 

Kathiavar Minstrels. By Horace van Buith. 

(Oii.y 

The (Jobra Feast. By Horace van Buith. 
(Oil.) 

A Party of Dancers. By Major-General A. G. 
Shortt. 

City of Golcondah. By Major-General Hay 
Campbell, B.A. 

Bombay Hack Conveyance and a Money- 
lender. By Horace van Buith. 

A Gardener. By Horace van Buith. 

A Tailor from Gujcrath. By Horace van 
Buith. 

A Smoker with Cliilam. By Horace van 
Buith. 

A Fakir Smoking Opium. By Horace vaa 
Buith. 

A Smoker with Hookah. By Horace van 
Buith. 

A Toddy Drawer. By Horace van Bnilh. 

A Bomlmy Fisherman. By Horace van Buith. 

A Dak Bungalow. By Mrs. T. A. Petman. 

The Dewar of Palnmpora and his Son. By 
Major-Gteneral A. G. Shortt. (Oil.) 

Peer Muda Ghat. By Mrs. T. A. Petman. 

Segar Pass. By Mrs. T. A. Petman. 

On the Edge of the Karachi Desert. By E. 
Fisher. (Water-colour.) 

View of B(»nb»7. By E. Fisher. (Water- 
colour.) 



Street in the Fort, Bombay. By E. Fisher. 

A Madras Female Attendant By Hontce 
van Biiith. 

A Cotton Cleaner. By Horace \an Buith. 

Head of t ic Thul Ghaut Bailwav. By Mrs. 
F. F. Bakp.. (Oil.) 

Down the Ghauts. By Miss E. O. Btll 
Irving. (Oil.) 

A Madras Grass Cutter. By 3Iajor-General- 
Hay Campbell, B.A. (Oil.) 

Evening in the Himalayas. By Mies E. M. 
Lamb. (Oil.) 

" Morning " Kidemath Banges. Bv Miss E. 
M. Lamb. (Oil.) 

On the Poonah High Bead. By Miss E. O. 
Bell Irving. (Oil.) 

An Indian Highway. By Mrs. Nora Scott. 
(Water-colour.) 

Morning on the Jumna. By Miss E. 31. 
Lamb. 

Moonlight in the Himalayas. By Miss E. M. 
Lamb. 

Bhnwa A-hkl Tower (Crystoleun). By Mrs. 
L. E. McCaim. 

Bombay Bazaar. By Horace van Buith. 

Morning in South India. By Major-General 
Hay Campbell, B.A. (Oil.) 

(Jroup of Tombs at Golcondah. By Major- 
General Hay CampbidI, B.A. (Oil.) 

Chuttras of the I^aos of Cutch at Bhooj 
By Major-General A. G. Shortt. (Oil.) 

Portrait of His Highness the late Bao Prag- 
malji Cutch. By H. Griffiths. 

A Hindoo Devotee. 

Bust of a Jew. By K. Palmanabhan 
Thuinby. 

Tigers. By Bobert St*rndHle. 

Painted Photograph of His Highness the 
Maharaja Sayajirao. By V. H. Oiintaman. 

Portrait of the Nuwab Sadio Mohamed Khan 
Abasi. By 

Bombay Harbour. By Miss Mary Frere. 

Bnddhi£t Caves of Ajunta. By Miss Mary 
Frere. 

Sunset from Matheran Hill. By Miss Mary 
Frere. 

View at Mahablesmcra Hills, fij Miss Mary 
Frere. 

Indian Birds. Ey Mrs. Petman. (Porcelain 
plaque.) 

Chini, Himalayas. By Mm. G. A. F. 
Honchen. (Water-colour.) 

Near Chini. By Mrs. G. A. F. Hoaoben. 
(Water-colour.) 



Xcviii 



Pictures shown in Qallery of Hoyat Albert Salt. 



'J\L 



View near Rogi Cliff, By Mrs. G. A. F 
Houchon. (Water-colour.) 

A Village Car, Madras. By Huntly P, 
Gordon. (Oil.) 

Landscape. (Oil.) 

The Gateway at Baroda. (Oil.) 

A Nautdi Girl. (Oil.) 

Indian Women. (Oil.) 

Portrait of His Higlmess the Begum of Bho- 
pal. (Oil.) 

Indian Prince. (Oil.) 

An old Nagpoot. By Mrs. L. Greenfield. 
(Oil.) 

A Worker in Bamboo. By T. Giitfith. . 
(Water-colour.) 

A Tanmyati, a religious mendicant By T. 
GriflBths. (Water-colour.) 

Some Drawers of Water. By T. Griffiths. 
(Wator-colour."; 

Bunjp.ri Women, ijy T. Griffiths. (Water- 
colour.) 

A Priest. By T. Griffiths. (Water-colour.) 

The Delhi Durbar. By T. Griffiths. (Water- 
colour.) 

Preparing to Start. By T. Griffiths. (Water- 
colour.) 

Study of a Balhiua Head. By T. Griffiths. 
(Water-colour.) 

A Group of Snake Charmers. By T. Griffiths. 
(Water-colour.) 

A Street in Bombay. By T. Griffiths. 
(Water-colour.) 

A Rohilla Sentinel. By T.Griffiths. (Water- 
cnlonr.) 

Midday Sun. By T. Griffiths. (Oil.) 

Soonabhace. By T. G iiffiths. (Oil.) 

The Green Girl. By T. GnffitLb. (Oil.) 

A Woman Carrying Water. By T. Griffiths. 
(Water-colour.) 

A Glimpse of Ciiinese Tartasy. Dy Mis.^ 
C. F. Gordon Cumming. (Water-rolour.) 

The Snow Range, Simla. By Mias C. i'. 
Gordon Cumming. (Water-colour.) 

Hindoo Temples at Hurdwar. By Miss C. F. 
Gordon Cumming. (Water-colour.) 

The Secundcrabagh Gate, Lucknow. By 
Miss C. F. Gordon Cumming. (^^'ater-colour.) 

A Temple in Machar Forest. By Miss C. F. 
Gordon Gumming. (Water-colour.) 

Suttee Clioura Ghaut, Cawnporo. By Miss 
C. F. Gordon Cumming. (Water-colour. ) 

Two Pen-and-ink Drawings. By T. Bur- 
gess. 

Study of Cedars at Rogi. By Miss C. F. 
Gordon Cumming. (Water-colour.) 

The Sutlej in Flood. By Miss C. F. Gordon 
Cumming. (Water-colour.) 

An Indian Garden in Allahabad. By Miss 
C. F. Gordon Cumming. (Water -colour.) 

The Great Khylua and Raal Deeng Peaks. 
(Water-colour.) 

Three Pen-and-iv.k Drawings, By J. Bur- 
gess. 

In Poinder Forest. By Miss 0. F. Gordon 
Cumming. (Water-colour.) 

A Oftve in the Island of Elcphanta. By Miss 
C. F. Gordon Cumming. (Water-colour.) 



A Gorge on the Sutlej, below Cawnpore. 
By Miss C. F. Gordon Cumming. (Water- 
colour.') 

The Taj Mahal and the Pat Agra. By Miss 
C. F. Gordon Cmnminr'. (Water-colour.) 

Bazaar on the Way to Elysium. By Miss C. 
F. Gordon Cumming. (Water-colour.) 

A Group of Tombs, Old Delhi. By Miss C. 
F. Gordon Cumming. (Water-colour.) 

The Taj Mahivl Agra. By Mies C. F. Gordon 
Cumming. (Water-colour.) 

The Kootub Minar, Old Delhi. By Miss C. F. 
Gordon Cumming. (Water-colour. ) 

Tomb of Habucha Nawab, Meerut. By Miss 
C. F. Gordon Cumming. (Water-colour.) 

Bazaar at Hurdwar. By Miss C. F. Gordon 
Cumming. (Water-colour.) 

Native Bazaar al Landour. By Miae 0. F. 
Gordon Cumming. (Water-colour.) 

Bazaar at Simla. By Miss C. F. Gordon 
Cumming. (Water-colour.) 

Camp at Umballa. By Miss C. F. Gordon 
Cumming. (Water-colour.) 

An Old Fort &t Allahabad. By Miss C. F. 
Gordon Cumming. (Water-colour.) 

Suttee Choura Ghaut, Cawnpore By Miss Q. 
F. Gordon Cumming. (Water-colour.) 

Crossing the Sutlej by Rope Bridge. By Miss 
C. F. Gordon Camming. (Water-colour.) 

A Glimpse of Chinese Tartary. By Miss C. 
F. Gordon Cumming. (Water-colour.) 

The Plains from Vincent's Hill. By Miss C, 
F. Gordon Cumming. (Water-colour.) 

Nachar Faust. By Miss C. F. Gordon Cum- 
ming. (Water-colour.) 

MarVle Rocks on the Nerbudda River. By 
Misc 0. F. Gordon Gumming. (Water- 
colour.) 

B.J Tipore on the Sutlej. By Miss C. F. Gordon 
Cumming. (Water-colour.). 

Roman Catholic Cathedral, Sirdhana. By 
Miss C. P. Gordon Gumming. (Water- 
colour.) 

The Jiimna, Musjid. By Miss C. F. Gordon 
Cumming. (Wuter-colour.) 

The Cedar Wood Temple near Panji. Bv 
Miss C. F. Gordon Cumming. (Water- 
colour.) 

The':-?acred City of Hurdwar. By MiasC. F. 
Gordon Gumming. (Water-colour.) 

The Residency of Lucknow. By Miss C. F. 
Gordon Gumming. (Water-colour.) 

Hills between "Bombay andPoonnh. By Miss 
C. F. Gordon Gumming. (Water-colour.) 

Rhodendrons, Simla, By Miss C. F. Gordon 
Cumming. (Water-colour.) 

A View of Bonaros. By Miss C. F. Gordon 
Gumming. (Water-coloup.) 

Persian Water-wheel, Saampore. By Miss C, 
F. Gordon Cumming. (Water-colour.) 

The Taj Malial, Agra. By Miss G, F. Gordon 
Gummiag. (Water-colour.) 

The Hooskro Buch or Tombs of the Rajah. 
By Miss C. F. Gordon Gumming. (Water- 
colour.) 

A View of Benares. By Miss C, F. Gordon 
dimming. (Water-colour.) 



Pictures shown in Oallery of Boyal Albert Hall. 



xcuc 



Beet House for Travellers at Narkunda. 
By Miss 0. F. Gordon Gumming. (Water- 
colour.) 

The Summer Palace of Akbar Sbah. By 
Miss C. F. Gordon Cumming. (Water- 
colour). 

Cedars near Panji. By Miss C. F. Gordon 
Cumming. (Water colour.) 

Portrftit of His Highness the Maharaja of 
Travancore. By K. Pulpanadhan Thumby. 
(Oil.) 

Portrait of the lato Maharaja of Travancore. 
By C. M. Erishnaswais Naida. (Oil.) 

Procession of Akbur Ulwur. By Ulwur Dur- 
bar. (Three water-colours.) 

A Tailor at Work. By Earn Lai. (Oil.) 

Portrait. By F. A. Philips. (Oil.) 

Photograph of His Highness the Maharaja 
of Ulwui, By Ulwur Durbar. 



Four sets of Photographs in Frames. By 
Lala Deen Deejal. 

Prayer Niche in the Adina Mujid. By G. W. 
Austin. (Photograph.) 

Temple of Buddh Gya. By G. W. Austen . 
(Photographs.) 

Ruina of Buddh Gva. By G. W. Austen. 
(Photograph.) 

Panorama. By Lieut.-Genernl Wray, C.B. 
(Water-colour.) This sketch is interdrd to 
represeut the march in Bsij-pootana (Central 
India), during Iho Mutiny of 1857-58, of a 
column of 10,000 tioops of all arms ; with a 
sieg€ train, engineer park, &c., &c. The Fi it 
Brigade and Headquarters are encamped : the 
Second Brigade being shown as entering the 
Camp and preparinj, to take up their ground 
fortbeday. ^ ;.i,i ..,. ^. 



CANADA. 

Class 1, 

Oil Paintings and Water Colourt. 



HER ROYAL HIGHNESS THE PRINCESS 
LOUISE, Mabchioness of Lobne, London, 
England. 
Niagara Falls— Canadian side. 

Abkin, H. H., London, Ontario. ;, > 

DeadMallard. / 

BuBNECH, G. R., Toronto, Ontario. 

Autumn on Shadow River, Muskoka. 
Indian Camp on the Ottawa River. 

BlEBSTADT. 

Montmorenci Falls, Quebec. Lent by the 

Marquis of Lome. 
Quebec Citadel. Lent by the Marquis of 

Lome. 
View from Government House, Ottawa. 

Lent by Her Royal Highness the Princess 

Louise. 

Bbymneb, W., R.C.A., Ottawa, Ontario. 
"The day is done." 
Early Summer, 

Bale St. Paul, on the St. Lawrence. 
Portrait. | 

Wild Berries. ; 
Crazy Patchw«f/k. Lent by the Canadian 

Government,' 
A Wreath of Flowers. Lent by the 

Canadian Government. 

Cbesswell, W. N., R.C.A., Seaforth, Ontario. 
Lake Huron. Lent by J. Labatt, Esq., 

London, Ontario. 
Sheep. Lent by J. Labatt, Esq., London, 

Ontario. 
Cattle. Lent by A. Cleghome, Esq., 

London, Ontario. 



Day. F., R.C.A., Kingston, Ontario. 
On the Nouvelle River, Quebec. 
Cariboo Hunting in Nova Soctia. 

DiGNAM, Mrs., London, Ontario. 
Peonies. 

Edson, Allan, R.C.A., 39 Clifton Gardens, 
Maida Vale, W., London. England. 

Landscape. Lent by J. B. Wilson, Esq., 

Montreal, Quebec. 
Mount Maurice at Sunset, Winter, with 

Canoes. Lent by E. Atkinson, Esq., 

Rose Bank, Fowey, Cornwall. 
The Ice Palace, Montreal. 
The River St. Lawrence, Winter. 
Landscape in the Eastern Townships. 

Lent by Her Majesty the Queen. 

FoBBKS, J. C, R.C.A., Toronto, Ontario. 
Mount of the Holy Cross, Colorado. 
Rocky Mountain Canon. 
Mount Stephen. 

The Village Forge. Lent by Allan Gill- 
raour, Esq., Ottawa, Ontario. 

FowLEB, D., R.C.A., Amherst Island, Ontario. 
Canadian Dead Game. Lent by J. Spooncr, 

Esq., Toronto, Ontario. 
Canadian Hare in Winter Coat. 
Partridges. Lent by J. Spooner, Esq., 

Toronto, Ontario. 
Evening. Lent by J. 

Toronto, Ontario. 
Gladioli. Lent by J. 

Toronto, Ontario. 
Grapes. Lent by J. Spooner, Esq., Toronto, 

Oatario. 



Spooner, Esq., 
Bpooner, Esq., 



Pictures shoum in Oallery of Boyal Albert Hall. 



Cactus. Lent by J. Spooner, Esq., Toronto, 

Onttirio. 
Sweet Willinm. Lent by J. Spoouer, Eaq., 

Toronto, Outario. 
Canadian Dead Gaiue. Lent by J. Spooner, 

Esq., Tornutn, Ontario. 
Canadian Dead Game. Lent by J. Spooner, 

Toronto, Ontario. 

Fbaser, J. A., R.C.A., Boston, U.S.A. 

A Sliowery Day in the Passu des Monies 

de St. Urbuii:. 
At Perce, Quebec Province. 
A Salmon I'ool on the Restigouche. 
Senside Idyll. Lent by O. Rowland, Esq., 

Toronto, Ontario. 
Breezing October. Lent by Geo. Iliigiic, 

Esq., Montreal, Quebec. 
Landticape. Lent by II. B. Angus, Esq., 

Montreal, Qu ibec. 

Friend, W., London, England. 

The Fulls of Niagarn, Summer. :_.., " 
Sherbrook, Eastern Townships. 
Lake Mcmphremn'i'rig. 
TheSlraitsof Belle Jslo. ^,, 

Showanagau, near Quebec *■ 

Shooting the Kapids. 

Gux, William, Halifax. Nova Scotia. 
Edge of Dyke Lands, Grand I're. 
Ei.trance to Village ot Grand Pre'. 
Uncultivated Covuer of Grand Pic'. 

GoRPoy, y. C, GclbournG, Ontario. 

Washing Day. -ihiu' j 

Griffiths, J., II.C.A., London, Ontario. 
Ilcses and Phlo.K. 

Harris, R., R.C.A., Montreal, Quebec. 

By the Shores of Gaspe'. 

Indian Squaw and Papoose. 

Pruirie Indian, N.W. of Canada. 

Meeting of Trustees of a Back Settlement 
School, Canada : The Teacher Talking 
them over. Lent by the Canadian Go- 
vernment. 

Habvey, George, A.R.C.A., Halifax, Nova 
Scctia. 
In the AnnapoliB Valley. 

JcDSON, W. L., London, Ontario. ' 
Chrysanthemums. 
Fruit. 

Kbeigboff. (Deceased.) 

Death. Lent by Thoe. Cross, Esq., Ottawa, 

Ontario. 
On the Look-out. Lent by Thos. Cross, 

Esq., Ottawa, Outario. 
French Canadian "Habitant." Lent by 

James Baiue, Esq., of the Department of 

Railways and Canals, Otta.va, Ontario. 

Miles, J. C, A.R.C.A., St. John, New 
Brunswick. 
A New Brunswick Landscape. 

MoEvoY, H., London, Ontario. 
Eugene Falls 



Martin, T. M., R.C.A., Toronto, Ontario. 

Red-head Ducks. Lent by His Excellency 

the Mnrquis of Lansdowno. 
Rosseau Lake, Muskoko.' 
Old HouEO at Aucasler, Ontario, 
A Back-Country Koad. 
Duoks. Lent by Jiimcc Smith, Esq., 

Toronto. 
Canadian Game. 
Fir Trees. Lout by Her IMajesty the 

Queen. 

O'BiiiEN, L. R , P.R.C A., Toronto, Ontario. 
Voyage' on the St. Maurice. Lent by L, 

P. Bruiieau, Esq., IVIontreal, Quebec. 
Septaniber on the Saguenay, Lent by His 

Excellency the IMarquia of Lansdowne, 
Fort Chambly. 
Sunrise on Lake St. John. 
He Maligne, River Sagnenay. 
Ouiatchowin Falls, Lake St. John. 
P(>rlage at Chutc-au-Diabie, I'eribonka 

River. Lent by Col, Oswald, Montreal, 

Quebec, 
■ Outlet of Lake St, John by the Sagnenay, 

Lent by Col. Oswald, Montreal, Quebec, 
lia Tuque, St. Maurice River, 
La Roche Perce. 
Mount Eboulement. Lent by C. H. Nelson, 

Esq., Toronto, Ontario. 
View of the St. Lawrence from Quebec 

Terrace, 
Lake Scenery, Cape Carleton, Province 

of Quebec. Lent by Her Royal High- 
ness the Princess Louise. 

Peel, Paul, A.R.C.A., London, Ontario, 

Coven t Garden Market, London, Ontario. 

Awaiting his Return. 

Admiration. 

Good-bye. 

Return of the Harvesters. 

Papa's Boat. 

Return of the Flock. 

Ferre, H., R.C.A., Toronto, Ontario. 

Canadian Oak, Early Autumn. Lent by 

J. GriiBtbs, Esq., London, Outario. 
London, Ontario. Lent by Her Royal 

Highness the Princess Louise. 
River Scene, 

Raphael, W., R.C.A., Montreal, Quebec. 
An Amateur. 
L' Enfant du Sol. 
Never too Late to Mend. 
Potatoes in Bloom. 

Reid, G. a., A.R.CA., Toiwnto, Ontario. 
Where the Crane Feeds,? 

EcBL, W. H., A.R.C.A., Rj^de, Isle of Wight, 
England. 
View of Halifax. 
A Quebec Timber Ship. 

Sandhajj, H., R.C.A., Boston, U.S.A. 
Un Habitant. 
Gathering Seaweed. Lent by George 

Hague, Esq., Montreal, Quebec, 
Tobogganing. 



Pictures shovm in Oallery of Boyal Albert Hall. 



m 



ScHBiEBEit, Mrs., Toronto, Oatorio. 
Stumping in Canada. 

Sbelet, Miss F., New York, U.S.A. 

Kosoa. Lent by His Excellency the Mar- 
quis of Lansdowne. 

Smith, F. M. Bell, A.R.C.A., Lundon, On- 
tario. 
Laughing Eyes. 
Fog Clcuriug. 
liSiht Ituyn. 
Bay of Fundy. Lent by L. E. O'Brien, 

E.-q., Toronto, Ontario. , i 

Rainy Day, St. John lUvcr. 

Vebneb, F. a.. 2 Edith Villas, West Ken- 
sington, W., London, England. 
Nature's Mirror. 

Buffalo. ••('. 1 

High Water. r . . •■. 

Indian Encampment, . ^ , ,- . , _,-j 
Wigwams on Rainy River. , ,',, , ^ - ' 
Elk at Rest. '' ' " 

Nepigon River. 

Parliament Buildings, Ottawa, from the 
River. 

VoGT. (Deceased.) 

tJow. Lent by J. Rankin, Esq., Montreal. 
Cattle Drinking. Lent by J. R. Wilson, 
Esq., Montreal. 

Watson, Homer, R.C.A., Doon, Ontario. 

The Saw Mill. Lent by J. W. H. Waits, 

Esq., Ottawa, Ontario. 
Frosty Morning in October. Lent by Geo. 

Hagno,Esq., Montreal, Quebec. 
Gathering Storm. Lent by J. W. U. Watts, 

Esq., Ottawa, Ontario. 
Ploughed Field. 

Landscape. Lent by the Marquid of Lome. 
River Turrent. 



River Torrent. Lent by the Marquia of 
Ijorne. 

Woodcock, P. F., R.C.A-, Brockvillo, Ontario. 

Tho Abandoned Nest. 
litturning from the Well. Lent by the 
C'nuatlittu Government. 

WiCKSON, r. G., Paris-, Ontario. 

Tiio Yoiiii}.; -Vrtist. licnt by His Excel" 
loncy the IMarquis of Lanailowne. 

Class V. 
Sculpture. 

Beullac, R., 1674 Notre Dame Street, Mon- 
treal, Quebec. 
Religious Statues. 

Hebebt, L. p., 83 Bury Street, Montreol, Que- 
bec. 

Statne of Sir Hector Langcvin, Minist^T of 
Public Works in Canada. 

'^ ' ' Class 3. 

Engravingx on Stfel and on Wood. Etchiivjs. 

Flewwelling, C. H.. St. John, Now Brunswick. 
Engravings on Wood, with Book of I'rinta 

from tho Engravings, 
Engraved Blocks. 

JojJES. J. L., Toronto, County York, Ontario. 
Wood Engraved Blocks, finished. Speci- 
mens of Wood Engraving and Designs. • 

KoppEL, C. W., 187 St. James Street, Montreal, 
Qiiebec. . , ^.^ 

Wood Engraving. " '" 

RoLrii, Smith, & Co., Toronto, Ontario. 
Wood Engraving. (See No. .) 

Wiseman, James L., 1G2 St. Jamea Street, Mon- 
treal, Quebec. 
Wood Engravings, Portraits, Views, &o. 



NEW ZEALAND. 

Oil Paintings. 



v.: 



U ■'■:.^li ,. 



Ball, Thomas, Auckland. 
View of Kauri Bush. 

Beetham, Richabd, R.M., Ohristchurch. 
In the Hollyford Valley— West Coast. 
Samoan Landscapes, with Cocoanut Palms. 

Bloomfield, Chables, Auckland. 
Rotonxahana, from Pink Terrace. 
Full Front View of the Great White 

Terrace. 
Boiling Cauldron and Crater of the White 

Terrace. 
View from the Top of the White Terrace. 
Giant Butress and Venus' Bath. 
Venus' Bath. 

Sunset on the Whito Terrace. 
Talooed Ba.sins, White Termce. 



Lower Pools, White Terrace. 

Front View, Pink Terrace. 

Side View of Pink Terrace. 

Hot Baths, Pink Terrace, 

Rotomahana, from Geysers of Terahopsro* 

terangi. 
Mud Flat. 

Bbandon, Eustace de Bathe, Moleaworth St., 
Wellington. 
Entrance to Milford Sound. 
Among the Ranges, Wakatipu. 

Bbanfell, B. a., Nelson. 

After a Long Day on the Sheep Run. 
Sheep-shearing on the Waimea Plain. 

BuLLEB, Dr. W. L , C.M.G., F.R.S. 
Portrait cf a Lady, by Lindauer.* 



di 



Pictnrea shown in Oallery of Boyal Albert Hall. 



. 'i 



BuLLOOK, Mrs. Margaret, Wanniiiui. 

Two Portraits of Moorig Chief and Chief- 
tainess. 

BuROHER, Kathkrine, Auckland. 
Whangnrei Heads. 

Clarke, Mrs. J. McCosu, Auckland. 

Summer Evening near Auckland. 
Cooper, Thornhill, Christchurch. , j 

Benaros. 

Himalayas from Jellapahan. 

Drummond, Thos. L., Auckland. 

Manukau Harbour, Sunsot. ' 

Elliott, George H., Christchurch. 

Uclmcs Bay, Banks Peninsula. _^ 

Pigeon Bay, Banks Peninsula. "^ 

FoDOR, Geo. ¥., Duncdin. 

Flock of Merino Sheep. ; ,,. >., , .y^ 

GiBB, John, Christchurch. t- .. i 

Lyttelton Harbour, N.Z., inside the break- 
water. 

Lyttelton Harbour, N.Z., outside the break- 
water. 

A Stiff Breeze, Cook's Straits. '■^'- " ' • 

Springtime, Canterbury Plains. 

White-baiting on the Avon, Christchurch. 

Flood in Otira Gorge. '^^ ' ' '-'-o'- ' 

GiBB, W. M., Christchurch. .'-.-. 

In the Fields near Christchurch. ■ ''*■ ' 

Deans, John, Kiccarton, Christchurch. 
Throo Portraits of Prize Cattle. 

GilTORD, Edward A., Auckland. 

Mount Cosmos and the Valley of the Dart 

from Kinloch, head of Lake Wakatipu. 
Showery weather in the Otira Gorge. 
Lake Ohau. 
A heavy Sea on the East Coast of New 

Zealand. c-jj b- vi'',' 

Merritt, Thos. E., Wellington. 

Wellington Harbour in 1841, after Major 

Heaphy's Sketch, 
Taupo Bange near Seventy-mile Bush. 

MooRHOUBE, Miss Jessie, Wellington. 
Flowers on Plaque. 

Moultray, J. Douglas, Dunedin. 

Mount Earnshaw from Bichardson's 

Mountain at head of Lake Wakatipu. 
The Remarkables from Franktown Road, 

Lake Wakatipu. 
A Bush Fire in the Valley of Leith, 

Dunedin. 

OunrwAiTE, Miss Isa, Auckland. 
Parkanae, Hokianga, Auckland. 

Power, Peter, Dunedin, 

A New Zealand Homestead. 

A Shady Nook, 

A View on the Waters of Leith. 

Payton, Edward W., Auckland. 

Nganruhoe, from the heights above the 

King Country. 
A Bend of the Wanganui. 
Ti and Pnkatea Trees, Wangnnui. 



Pkelb, Jahes, Amberley. 

Spring Morning: a farmer taking his croBs* 

bred ewes with early spring lambs to 

market. 
Summer, Noon : a Merry Christmas on the 

ocean beach ; a farmer's family spendiug 

their Summer holiday. 
Autumn Altornoon: The Wheat Harvest, 

with Bclio.il children coming home. 
Winter Evening: Sou'wester coming up; 

ploughmen knocking off work; girl re- 
' turning with thf cows. 

Phantom Ship — Flying Dutchman. 

Wreck of the Hespt-rus. 

Pack Train, Ocean Beach, Westland, 

Richardson, Miss F. E., Wellington. 

Three Flower Paintings : Double and 
Single Poppies; Bragman's; Roses on 
Terra Cotta. 

Ryan, Thomas, Auckland. 

Swamp near the townsliip of Taupiri on 
the Waikato River. 

Sherripp, George, Wanganui. 
A Victim of the Keits. 
The Land of the Moa. 

Sferry, Eleanor Catherine, Wellington. 
1. Portrait. 2. lone. 3. A Wellington 
old Identity. 4. Maori Picture, Ani 
Kuli. 5. My Pussy. G. Raika. 7. 
Devotion. 

Symons, John, Auckland. 

Oil Painting, A Settler's Homestead, 
Sunset. 

Temple, Edwyn F., Capt., Geraldine. 
View on the Rangitata River. 
Gorge in the Two Thumb Range. 
View in Rangotikei, 

Wilson, Lawrence W., Dunedin. 
Milford Sound. 

There is a Happy Land, Far, Far away: 
Sketch in Canterbury. 

Watkins, Rennett, Auckland. 
The Haunt of the Moa. 
Antumnal Evening, Waikato River. 
Mount Egmont at Sunrise. 
Maoris rafting Kahikatea, Waikato River. 

Various Paintings and Drawings. 

AiDEN, Francis Hamar, New Plymouth. 
View of Mount Egmount from Tapuae. 
View of Mount Egmont from Tatarimaka. 
View from Urtnui. 

Atcheyley, H. M. L., Christchurch. 
Maori Gateway, Hawkes Bay. 
Maori CanoeEi, Hawkes Bay, 
Pataka or Maori Store-house, Hawke? Bay, 
Maori Church with Carved Pulpit, Otaki, 
East Coast. 

Blair, David (Head Master, Canterbury 
College School of Art), Christchurch, 
Set of Paintings and Drawings — illastrating 
work done by the pupils. 



Fiduree shomt in Gallery of Royal Albert Sail. 



oiii 



BeANnLL, B. A., Nelson. 

On tho ekiitii of tlio Foreat Ngatimoti. 

Barraud, Cuarleb Dm Wellington. 

Mount Cook from the Tasman Valley. 

Duaky Round, West Coast. 

North Er)d of Wellini^ton Harbour. 

View of West Coaat Scenery, N. I. looking 

towards Mount Kgmnnt from Niikuinaru. 
Ranrakeft, Maori Settlement on Wanganui 

lliver. 

Barracd, William Francis, "NVellington. 
Sinclair Head, near Wellington. 
View near Head of Lake Tekapi). *^ ''' 
McKenzie Country, from Grampians 
Station. 

Barratjd, Noel, Wellington. 

View on the Derwent Kiver, near Hobart, 
Tasmania. 

Best, Samuel, Dunedin. 

Crayon Portriiit of Hon. K. Stout, Premier 
of New Zealand. 

Cane, Thomas, Christchurch. ' ' ' ,' .' 
Mount Somers, Alford Forest. 
Head Waters of Waimakariri, West Coast 
Road. 

Cheeseman, Emma, Miss, Auckland. 

New Zealand Flowers: Group of Scarlet 
Kowlmis ; Group of Yellow Kowlmis. 

Cousins, T. S., Christchurch. 
On the Dart River, Otago. 
In tho North Branch of the Otira River. 

Cooper, Thornhill, Christchurch. 

Rock Temple, Elaphanta. v • . - 

Kutub Muinr. 

Elliott, George H., Christchurch. 
Holmes Bay, Bank's Peninsula. { .■• 
Old Mill near Christchurch. 
Phormium Tenax, Christclmroh, N.Z. 
New Zealand Gullv, Bank's Peninsula. 
On tlie Upper Heath cote, near Clirist- 

church. 
One of the Early Mansions of Canterbury, 

erected 1852. 

Fereday, Richard W. 

Mount Somers, from Taylor's Stream. 
Flanagan, Fred. W., Wellington. 

Pen-and-ink drawing: The Lord's Prayer 
in fifteen Languaget;. 

Grant, Thos. M., Wellington. 

Ten-iind-ink drawing : Lettered Table. 
Illuminated Quotation. 

Gully, John, Nelson. 

North West Gale, South Beach, Kaikoura ; 

Kaikoura Mountains. Exhibited by His 

Lordship the Bishop of Nelson. 
Camping Ground, Lake Wakatipu, — 

Evening. 
Waimea Haverling. Nelson District. 
Western Coast of Tasman Bay. Exhibited 

by the City of Nelson. 
Two belonging to Larkworthy ; Entrance 

to Kulpore. 



HoDOKiNS, Wh. M., Dunedin. 

Harvest Timo in the Dome Pasi, 8outh> 

land. 
A Bush Settler's District at Purakanui, 

near Dunedin. 

Hetley, Mrs. G. B., Auckland. 

New Zealand Flowers — Eight Piotures. 

Jervois, His Excellency Sir William 
Drummond, G.C.M.G., C.B., Wellington. 
Lake Rotomahuna. 

Lloyd, Henry G.. Dunedin. 

Jlilford Sound, Evening. , ,\ 

Mount Cook, VVest Coast. 

Otiva Gorge (in rata bloom), Hokitika 

Road. 
Port Chalmers, Mooijlight. 
Forty Sketches from Nature. 

McCardell, James Francis, Chriotchurch. 
Illuminated Musical Calendar. 

Maxwell, Mrs. E. B., Wellington. 

Flowers Painted on Satin for Tabel 
Borders. 

Moreton, Samuel, Invercargill. Exhibited by 
Moreton Picture Co., Invercargill. 
Double Cone ; Remarkable Mountain's 

Morning, from Ben Lomond. 
Mount Eiirnshaw, from Head of Lake 

Wakatipu. 
Mitre Peak, Milford Sound. 
Spurs of Mount Cook : Evening ; from the 

Mile Track, Webtlaud. 
Walter Peak : Evening, Lake Wakatipu. 

Palmer, Robert G., Foxton, Manawatu. 
Horowhenua Lake : Sunrise. 

PowNALL, Robert W., Wanganui. 

Mount Egmont. from Nolan's Stockade: 

A Relic of the Old War. 
Mount Ruapehu at Sunset. 
A quantity of Water-Colour Vignettes of 

New Zealand Foliage and Scenery. 

Richmond, J. C, Nelson. 
The Takaka Valley. 

Ridings, Kate, Auckland. , j ,. , 
New Zealand Flowers. 

Robertson, G. S., Wnnganui. 
New Zealand Sketches. 

Scott, John S., Dunedin. 

Boulders on the Beach, Moeraki. 

Stoddart, Margaret O., Christchurch. 

Paintings of New Zealand Flowers : Monn- 
tain Daisies; In the Bush; Yellow 
Kowai ; Native Clematis ; Native Colts- 
foot. 

Stuart, Helen, Auckland. 
Eight Maori Portraits. 

Symons, John, Auckland. 

Pirongia: a Mountain in the Waikato 

District. 
Foul Weather; a Cornish Fishing Boaii 

running for Shelter. 



OIV 



Pictures ahoion in Gallery of Hoyal Albert Sail. 



TiZARD, Mr8. Kdward F.. Thames. 

Piotares of Native Flowers. 
Tbipp, HAimiET L. M. 

Painting in Water-Colours, on Satin : 2 
CuabionB, 2 Urackct Drnpos, 1 Fan. 
WiiiTB, Louisa, Auckland, New Zeulaod. 

BirdB on Maori Mats. " '' 



WufPKRis, MiBS J., Port Clialmert. 

Mount Alta and tho Aspiring Bango, from 

Waniika East. 
Views of Duncdin. 
A Winter Morning. 
Ktudy of Rimu, near Parakanui. 



MALTA. 



Old Friends. IJy Qoorgn Bonavin. (Oil.) 
A Htrngglc for Liberty. By Ocorgo Bonavia. 

(Oil.) 

Jack in OflBce. By George Bonavia. (Oil.) 
Ave Slaria. By (ieorgo Bonavia. (Oil.) 
Prize) BoacH ut ChristmaB-tiinu. By tJeorge 

Bonavia. (Oil.) 
Spring R(d08. By Gonr~e Bonavia. (Oil.) 
A Maltese Lady in Mantilla. By Oeorgo 

Bonavia. (Oil.) 
Judith and Holoforos. By Oeorgo Bonavia. 

(Oil.) 

TuBBo Reciting Ida Poem lu Eleanor del 

Este. By G. Bjnnici. (Oil.) 
Puuoramu. By Mrs. Mtinche'. (Oil.) 
Death of St. Aiigustiuo. By O. Cepail. 

(Oil.) 

La Pergola. By. G. Bonavia. (Oil.) 
The Assiissins. By Annotta Gaini. (Oil.) 
A View in Switzerland. By Mrs. Maucli6. 

(Oil.) 

Autumn Roses. By G. Bonavia. (Oil.) 
The Death of Abel. By L. Piaani. (Oil.) 
A Maltese La<'y. By Favre Carravaggio. (Oil.) 
The Death of St. Joseph. By Arena. (Oil.) 
St. Raphael tho Archangel. By G. Calliga. 

(Oil.) 

Landscape. By Mrs. Manche. (Oil.) 
Susanna and the Elders. By Carlo T. Cortio. 

(Oil.) 

A View in Sicily. By James Ellis. (Oil.) 
St. Julian "s Bay. By .James EIUj". (Oil.) 
A Fountain. By F. Wnssalo. (Oil.) 
A Street in Cairo. By G. Giainii. (Oil.) 
View oCtlio Entrimce ot'tho Grand Harbour. 

By F. WasMilo. (Water-colour.) 
Calabrese Costume. By Mrs. Monche. (Oil.) 
Eiias the Prophet. By G. Cepail. (Oil.) 
Miiria Seala. By G. Schranz. (Water- 
colour.) 

Orta dclla Marina. By F. Wassalo. (Water- 
colour.) 

A Maltese Lady. By Favre Caravaggio. 

(Oil.) 

John Moore. By C. Callija. (Oil.) 

A Mill by Moonlight. By Miss Andrews. 

(Water-eolour.) 

Ta Gain Hadid Tower. 

(Water-colour.) 

The Grand Harbour. 

(Water-colour.) 

The Custom HouBe, Malta. By J. Sdirauz, 

(Water-colour.) 



By F. Wassalo. 
By J. Schranz. 



By J. Sobranz. 

By a. Calleja. 

By C. Ullo. 
By G. Galleja. 
By G 



A Landscape. By Mr?. Manclx'. (Oil.) 

Tho (rroat Storm of 1852. By J. Schranz. 
(Water-colour.) 

Tho Shipwreck, By J. Schranz. (Water- 
colour.) 

Tho Afarsa Race-course. 
(Water-colour.) 

A Road at Casal Kirkop. 
(Water-colour.) 

Marsamuscetto Harbour. 
(Wuler-colour.) 

Tlio St a by Moonlight. 
(Water-colour.) 

Tlie Old English Ccmotery, Malta 
Callejn. (Oil.) 

Crayon Portrait. By E. Biissntil. (Oil) 

Sliyiock and Jessica. Bv F. Manio. (Oil.) 

Tlie Wedding-ring. By F. Manio. (Oil.) 

An Old Friend. By F. Manio. (Oil.) 

St. Julian's Bay. By Victor Micalleff. 
(Water-colour.) 

Tho (Jreut Exhibition ofl85L By G. Gal- 
lejn. (Water colour.) 

A Madonna. By G. Bonnici. (Water 
colour.) 

A Crayon Portrait. By Reginald Bernard 
(Water-colour.) 

St. John's Church, Malta. (5 Photographs.) 

St. Julian's Bay. By V. Miohaleff. (Water- 
colour.) 

A Mythological Subject. By Oarbonars. 
(Oil.) 

Water-colour Drawings. By F. Manio. 

Illuminated Address to Sir Henry Storks. By 
F. Manio. 

Crayon Portrait of Dr. P. Nani. By Pan! 
Carabolt. 

Head of Christ. Crayon, by A. Pizzuto. 

St. Julian's Bay. By J. Calleja. (Water 
colour.) 

Charles II. Knighting the Loin of Beef. B; 
F. Manio. (Oil.) 

Romeo and the Apothecary. By F. Mania 
(Oil.) 

An Egyptian Donkey Boy. By G. Bonnia 
(Oil.) 

An Ejyptian Woman Spinning. By Q. Bott 
nioi. (Oil.) 

A Day in the Desert By G. Giani. (Oil.) 

A Night in the Desert. By G. Giani 
(Oil.) 

Vie-w of Corfu. By Giovanni Schranx 
(Water-colour.) 



Picture* shown in Oallery of Royal Albert Hall. 



or 



The Holy Women at Jena Christ's Tomb. 
By Oui»3pp« Callejn. (Wator-oolour.) 

The French Crock, Malta. By Guiseppo 
Cklieja. (Water-colour.) 

Coloured Photograha. By F. Man in. 

A Small Heatl in Fresco. By F. Manio. 

Pencil Drawinf^. 

A Piece of Ohl Gobelins Tapestry restored. 

Teni|)era Painting. By F. Manio. 

Designs for Inlaid Work. By Giovanni 
WasMlo. 

The Lyceum at Malta. By Guisoppo Cesaroo. 

Pictnie on SUto. By G. dello Notti. 

Mill at Casal Zgurrico. By G. Cnlieja. 

View from tho Vaulted Koof of St. Jolin's 
Churrh, Malta. By Mihs C. Currugia. 

The Life Boat. By John Spenitiza. 

Crayon Drawing. By G. Calleja. 

Hair Work. By O. Sappiano. 



Crow-stitoh Work. By Mrs. E. Role Kerry. 

Uiin<l-|>ainted Cards. By Miss F. E. Cowley 
(Wattr-colouru.) 

Street Soene in Malta. By Antonio Favru. 
(Oil.) 

An Ascension. ByG.Hycler. (Oil.) 

The Holy Family. (Engraving). By P, Car- 
milo Canoh^. 

Funeral I*rorH»«8ion of Admiral Angolo Emo. 
By Siiverio Truisi. 

The Staircase. By G. Frcnds. (Water- 
colour.) 

Woolwork Cushion. By F. Delall. 

Embroidery. By Puhlivius. 

Woolwork Cushion. By F. Delali.'! 

Bemlwork. By C. Folica. 

Embarkation of the b<xiy of Admiral of tho 
Fleet, Angelo Emo. By Suvcro Troisi. (P'^n- 
and-ink Drawing.) 



' 'lo'fij xoa to 



t.n.i> 



^•f'r;ti,?ri^ 



'^^Oi7v . i 




J « .-^ J , > ^ y 

liililOrrr oi 5is AVI- I ... ., ,,- .!:, . i.T . ..Nv/ h^i-V 

0.3 .HOaMOJ .Ti33ilT8 OOOVv' ,00 ^ 



CVl 



Adverttaementa. 



*.-. 



^ 




cc 




Facsimile 



Ooi 



^M; 




"^ 



of Box Label. 



* CUFFS, ♦ VK 



OH"^^ 



&lO' 



3I^HESE Goods are made of LINEN Enamelled by an IMPROVED PROCESS 

'^ with CELLULOID, whereby they are rendered IMPERVIOUS to 

MOISTURE, at the same time retaining the appearance of the FINEST 

LAUNDRY LINEN. They do not discolour or lose their shape, but can be 

INSTANTLY CLEANED by the WEARER with a Nail Brush and Soap, 

and Dried with a Towel. They are INVALUABLE to TOURISTS and 

TRAVELLERS as well as for EVERYDAY WEAR. 

N.U.— Id onler to avoid wortbless ImiUtions which discolour and become brittle, pleiiBe ftslc for, and we that 

ea:h Article In :3Un]ped, " 1->bku(.kan," aad that tlie above L<ib«l In on tlis top of eacli Box. 

Sole Manufacturers: Tlie ''E«lM"COLLAR AND CUFF Co., 
100, Wood Street, London, e.g., 

Of TThom SAKEFIiES and P&ICBd may be obtained. 



Ta 












:.^W' 






,' >(A>. 



CHART OF THE WORLD SHEWING TH 




London; Wm. Clo-wes ic S^ 



SHEWING THE BRITISH POSSESSIONS 




n: Wm. Clovres Se Sons, Ld. 



Stanfords Qeagr. Establ. 



iSIONS 




Starr^da Geogr. Establ. 



-^ 



'r:^. 






THE EMPIRE OF INDIA. 






Bj Boyal Warrant 



By Boyal Warrant 




Beedimeu to 
H. M. the 
QUEEH. 



8«edi>men to 
H.B.H. the 
Prince of 
Wales. 




Priced 

Lists 
Pc3t Free 
on applioation 



Priced 
Xiists 
Post Free 
on application. 



SUTTONS GOLLECTIONSOFSEEDS 



\M 



^mmM?,'^ 



rv JT Qu ia -j 



■tsssir:?!! 



— issir 



SUTTONS BOXES OF VECETABLES FLOWER SEED TO MEET THE REQUIREMENTS OF SMALL Ic Lf AQE BUY 



DAPI/Cn 'N HERMETICALLY SEALED DH Y C"Q 
r MUlxIlU ORNAMENTAL DOUBLE LID DU^LO, 

ORIGINATED BYSUTTQN& SONS FOR THIS BRANCH OF THIEIR TRADE 



BOXES, 



y 



Visitors to the Indian and Colonial Exhibition are invited to vi it 

Messrs. SUTTON'S SEED ESTABLISHMENT and EXPERIMENTAL 
aaoU'N'DS; dis ant One Hour's ride from Faddington Station, Qreat 
Western Bailway. 



STTTTOIV & 90irS, Eoyal Berks Seed Establie^ment, Reading, Emdand. 



SI 



( 3 ) 



THE EMPIRE OP INDIA. 



vrr^-Ji HISTORICAL RETROSPECT. ' '' '^^ ^^ 

Firat East India Company, 1600. — The English East India Company, which 
commenced and consolidated our Empire in the East, had its origin at the close 
of the 16th century in a difference with the Dutch regarding the price of pepper. 
The cost of that article had hitherto been about 3». per pound; in 1599 the 
Hollanders raised it against the English to 6». Thereupon the merchants of 
London held a meeting, with the Lord Mayor in the chair, to establish 
an association for the purpose of trading direct with India. On the Slst of 
December, 1600, the English East India Company was incorporated by Royal 
Charter, under the title of " The Governor and Company of Merchants of London 
trading to the East Indies," with 1 25 shareholders, and a capital of £70,000. This 
sum was raised to £400,000 when voyages to India were first undertaken on 
the joint-stock account. Those voyages were at first chiefly voyages of experi- 
ment, and profitless. The Portuguese would not allow any interference with their 
trade on the western coast of India, and hostilities ensued ; but in 1615 Captain 
Best with four English ships won a great victory over the Portuguese squadron 
at Surat, and succeeded in obtaining a treat} from the Emperor Jehangi, by 
which an ambassador from the Court of England was permitted to reside at the 
Court of the Great Moghul, and other privileges in furtherance of the 
Company's trading interests were accorded. The Ambassador, Sir Thomas Roe, 
was sent out immediately by King James I., and gained other trading ctn- 
cessions. James's successor being in need of money, gave a new Charter to a 
new Company of merchant adventurers, to the prejudice of the previously- 
existing rights granted by the Charter of Queen Elizabeth. For a time this 
caused the utmost disorder to trade. "Interlopers," as they were called, 
availed themselves of the 'opportunity to speculate upon their own account, and 
established a system of European piracy in the Indian Seas, which frightened 
and harassed the natives, and brought all legitimate trade to the very verge of 
ruin. The strong hand however of Cromwell was put forth in time to save 
utter commercial collapse. The rival companies combined ; the Navigation Act 
gave an impetus to fresh trade ; concessions were obtained from the European 
maritime powers which laid broader foundations for the commercial prosperity 
of Great Britain ; while the general credit of the English traders — notwith- 
standing certain "piratical" exceptions — for probity began to make a duo 
impression in India. 

Madras Founded, 1639. — The first territorial possession which the English 
icquired was a strip of land on the co;iBt below Masulipa+am, six miles long 
md one mile inland, purchased from one of the Hindoo rajahs of the Penin-ula 
la 1639. Here they built a factory with a surrounding wall, which, surmounted 
with some cannon, they called Fort St. George. In 1653 this settlement oi 
M-jdras was created an independent Presidency. 

?2 



Tlie Empire of India. 



Bombay Founded, 1668. -On the west coast the English had established a 
factory at Surat as early as 1612. In 1661 the island of Bombay was given by 
Portugal to Charles II. as part of the dowry of his bride, Catherine of Braganza ; 
but it was not made over until 1665. Three years afterwards the "Merry 
Monarch " sold his rights over it to the East India Company for an annual 
payment of £10. In 1687 the Company withdrew their factory from Surat, and 
Bombay became the seat of the Western Presidency. 

Calcutta Founded, 1698.— It was not until 1634 that the Company obtained 
permission from the Moghul Emperor to trade in Bengal, and in 1640 the first 
English factory was established at Hughli. In 1681 Bengal was declared a 
separate Presidency ; but the Company, although holding certain subordinate 
factories at Cossinbazar, Patna, Balasore, Malda and Dacca, had not yet acquired 
any territorial possessions as in Madras and Bombay. In 1696 the Nawab of 
Bengal ordered the confiscation of all the English factories. The merchants at 
Hughli retreated twenty-six miles down the river to a village amid the swamps. 
Here they laid the foundations of the original Fort William, and purchased 
from the son of the Emperor Aurangzeb the three villages of Sutanati, Kalikata, 
and Govindpur. This was the beginning of Calcutta, the city of palaces, and 
the capital of the British Empire in Hindustan. 

About this time another rival association, with a capital of two millions 
sterling, and calling itself the " Scotch East India Company," was incorporated, 
and issued licenses for free trade in the East. Over-trading was the result of 
this rivalry. The English markets were glutted with Indian produce, while 
the English manufacturers, feeling the eflfects of the excessive importation of 
calicoes and silks, petitioned for their prohibition, or for increased import 
duties. A compromise was, however, effected in 1708 through the arbitration 
of Earl Godolphin, and all the English Companies were finally amalgamated 
under the name of " The United Company of Merchants trading to the East 
Indies " under the charter granted by Queen Anne. 

The United East India Company.— Ijx 1744 war broke out between the Englioh 

and French in Europe. Dupleix was then governor of the French Settlement 

at Pondicherri, and Clive was a young writer at Madras. In 1746 that town 

surrendered to a French squadron, but by the peace of Aix-la-Chapelle, two 

years afterwards, it was restored to the English. Dupleix, notwithstanding 

the existing European peace, endeavoured to destroy the English influence in 

India, but he was no match in the field for the young writer, who had then 

exchanged the pen for the sword, as the surprise and subsequent defence of 

Arcot by Clive proved. The story of the capture of Calcutta by Siraj-ud- 

Dowlah, and the tragedy of the Black Hole needs no repetition, Clivu, who wae 

at Madras, sailed at once with Admiral Watson's squadron, and speedily 

recovered the city, and on the field of Plassey gained a victory which has been 

accepted in history as fixing the date of the true foundation of the British 

Empire in India. The Nawab surrendered the tract of country round Calcutta 

known as the Twenty-Four I'arganas— an area of upwards of 800 square miles 

To this four years afterwards was added the grant of the three districts o 

Bardwdn, Midnapur, and Chittagong, estimated to yield a ret revenue of hal 

a miUibn sterling. In 1765, aft«r the revolt of Mir Kasim had been put down 

he Comirtiny obtained the fiscal administration of Bengal, Behar, and Orissa 



TJie Efnptr6 of India. 



The immediate successor to Clive was Warren Hastings, the first and greatest 
Governor-General of India. It was his ambition as an administrator to 
consolidate the territory acquired by his soldier predecessor. Ho found himself, 
however, forced into wars with the Mahrattas and with Mysore. Although he 
bettered the finances of Bengal to the extent of a million sterling a year, nlmoet 
tbe only territory acquired during his administration was the suzerainty of 
Benares, for of the conquests made in the Mahratta war, only Salsette and 
Elephanta and two other small inlauds were retained by the English. 

The first war with Mysore way concluded by a peace with Tipu in 1784 on 
the basis of a mutual restitution of all conquests. But on the close of the second 
Mysore war, in 1792, when Lord Cornwallis, then Governor-General, led the 
British Army in person with the Nizam of the Dcccan and the Mahratta chiefs 
as allies, Tipu was made to yield one half of his dominions to be divided between 
his conquerors, and to pay three millions fiterling indemnity. 

At the close of the 18th century the English power was paramount in 
Lower Bengal, and was further consolidated from the sea-board to Benares high 
up the Gangetic valley. In Southern India the Company's possessions were 
chiefly confined to the coast districts of Madras and Bombay. 

In 1798 Lord Mornington, better known as the Marquis of Wellesley, 
arrived in India as Governor-General, bringing with him the determination that 
England must be the one paramount power in the Peninsula, and that the 
native princes could only retain the insignia of sovereignty by surrendering 
their political independence. In 1801 the Nawab of Gudh, who had agreed 
to pay a subsidy of £760,000 a year for the aid of British troops, but who was 
ahvays in arrears, made over to the Company m lieu of a cash payment the 
district of Eohilkhand and the fertile tract between the Ganges and the 
Jumna, known as the Doab. This made the English territorial rulers as far as 
tiio centre of the present North-Western Provinces, and established their 
political influence in Oudh. In 1799 a third war broke out with Mysore, Tipu 
having been discovered intriguing with the French. At Seringapatam, where 
his capital was stormed by the English, he died fighting in the breach, and his 
territories, with the old State of Mysore, were portioned between the English 
and their allies, the Nizam of Haidarabad and the Mahrattas. About this time 
the Camatic and Tanjore were placed under direct British administration, thus 
constituting the Madras Presidency aluiost as it has existed to the present 
(lay. In 1800 the English torritorial influence iu the Bombay Presidency was 
increased by the grant of districts made over by the Peshwa of Poena— an act 
which so incensed the other Mahratta chiefs that it led them into war against 
the British. This second Mahratta War was made famous by the successes of 
Sir Arthur Wellesley and General Lake, the former winning the decisive 
victories of Assaye and Argaum and capturing Ahmednagar, and the latter 
heing equally successful in the pitched battles at Aligarh and Laswari, and 
taking the cities of Agra and Delhi. The French troops of Sindhia were 
scattered, and he himself to secure peace ceded all claims to the territory north of 
the Jumna, his companion in arms and misfortune, the Bhousld Kaja of Ndgpur, 
making submission too, and forfeiting Orissa to the English. 

This campaign brought the North-Westeru Provinces under British rale. 



d The Empire of India. 



The new districts were amalgamated with those previously acquired from the 
Nawab of Oudh into the " Ceded and Conquered Provinces." 

It was not until the succession of the Earl of Moira, better known as the 
Marquis of Hastings, to the Govomor-Generalship that there was any further 
increase to the Company's territorial possessions in the East ; but during the two 
wars in which ho embarked, viz., the campaign against the Gurkhas and that 
against the Mahruttas, these possessions wore considerably extended. The 
defeat of the former gave to the English the much- coveted hill sanitaria of 
Naini Tal, Massuri, and Simla, and that of the latter added the dominions of 
the Peshwa to the Bombay Presidency. The overthrow of the Pinddris, which 
took place in the same year (1818) secured the torritorj* which formed the 
nucleus ' of the present Central Provinces. At the same time the States of 
Rdjputami accepted the position of feudatories to the paramount British Power, 
the only exception being the district of Ajmere, made over by Daulat Rao Scindia 
in 1818, and the tract known as Mairwava, annexed in 1820. From this time, 
until the accession to power of Lord Dalhousie, the boundaries of the Britisli 
Empire in India remained substantially unchanged. •-.■"'' ' 

But a conquest in another direction was made in the meantime under Lord 
Amherst, who in 1823 had succeeded the Marquis of Hastings. The insolence 
of the King of Ava, accompanied by a series of encroachments upon the British 
districts of Bengal, forced tho Governor-General to declare v.ar against Burma 
in 1824. Tho first Burmese campaign lasted for two years, causing a loss to tho 
British of 20,000 lives, chiefly from disease, and an expenditure of £14,000,000, 
but giving England possession of the Provinces of Arakan and Tenasserim, the 
King of Ava abandoning also all claim to Assam. 

in 1833 the Charter of tho East India Company was renewed for 
twenty years, but on condition that the Company should abandon its trade 
entirely and permit Europeans to settle in tho countiy. Lord William Bentinck 
was then Governor-General, and his seven year.s»' rule was an epoch of 
administrative reform, signalised by only one act of annexation, that of the little 
territory of Coorg, which was taken under British sway " in consideration of the _ 
unanimous wish of the people." 

In 1842 Lord Auckland was superseded by Lord EUenborongh, during whose 
brief administration the great Province of Sind was annexed after the overthrow 
of the Ameers by Sir Charles Napier at the desperate battle of Miani. In 
June, 1844, Lord Ellenborough was recalled by the Court of Directors, and was 
succeeded by Sir Henry (afterwards Lord) Hardinge. At that time there was 
but one remaining Hindu power in India — that of the Sikh nation. In 1845 
war was declared by the Governor-General, the Sikh army numbering 60,000 
men with 150 guns having crossed the Sutlej and invaded British territory. 
"Within three weeks four pitched battles were fought, at Mudki, Ferozshahr, 
Aliw&l, and Sobraon, ending in the driving back of the invaders and the 
surrender to the British of Lahore and the Jalandhar Doab, or tract between 
the Sutlej and the Ravi, a British force being left to garrison the Punjab for eight 
years. In 1848 Lord Hardinge returned to England, and was succeeded by the 
" greatest of Indian Pro-consuls'* — Lord Dalhousie. During his eight years* rule 
as Governor-General the policy of annexation may have said to have culminated. 
The treacherous assasBination of two British officers at Multau led to a general 



The Empire of India. 



rifling in tho Punjab, and the Sikhb again took the field. M61tan foil before the 
British arms, and at tho battle of Gujrat tho Sikh ]K)wer waw utterly deetroyod. 
The Punjab was proclaimed a British Province on tlio 29th of March, 184U. 

Throe years afterwards fresh insults and ill-treatment towards Europeans 
by the King of Ava brought about another Burmese War. The whole Valley 
of the Irawadi, from Rangoon to Promo, was occupied in a few monthc by British 
troops, and as the King refused to treat or make reparation it was annexed under 
the name of Pagu to the Provinces of Arakan and Tenasserim, which the Company 
had acquired in 1826. 

The policy of Lord Dalhousio towards the native feudatory states was 
that misgovemment or lapse of natural successor should cause such state 
to I .pse to the British Government, on the maxim that tho good of tho 
governed should be the first consideration. Accordingly the State of Sdtdra in 
1849, and that of Jhansi in 1853, became British territory, and on the death 
of the last of tho Mahrattu Bhonsliis of Nagpur, his territories were annexed, 
and Ijecame tho Central Provinces in 1853. In that year tho Nizdm of Haidar- 
^biid was induced to hand over to British administration tho district known 
ns the Berars, as a territorial guarantee for hie arrears of subsidy. But 
tho culminating act of annexation was that of the Kingdom of Oudh 
in 1866— an act which had been resolved upon only after long and painful 
hesitation on the part of tho Court of Directors, and after repeated friendly 
warnings to the Oudh Government, which was one of tyranny and oppression 
to the people. The proclamation was issued on the loth of February, 1856, 
and Oudh was annexed to British territory without a blo^v or the shedding of 
a drop of blood. Lord Dalhonsie, who returned to England almost immediately, 
but only to die, was succeeded by his friend Lord Canning, whose Viceroyalty 
was clouded by the storm of the Mutiny, which burst forth in the Sepoy Army 
h. May, 1857. The fate of the British Empire in India— at stake for a moment 
—was decided by the valour of Englishmen— soldiers and civilians, aided by 
the loyalty of native soldiers and chiefs, who remained faithful to their "salt" 
and treaty obligations. 

But the Mutiny decided tho fate of the East India Company, which had 
then existed for two and a half centuries, and whose charter had been 
renewed for the last time in 1853, but only for a period at the discretion of 
Parliament. On the let of November, 1868, at a Grand Darbdr held at Alla- 
habad, Lord Canning announced that the Queen of England had assumed the 
entire government of India. On January 1st, 1877, at another and more 
magnificent Darhdr, held by Lord Lytton on the " Ridge " at Delhi, overlooking 
the ancient capital of the Moghals, and attended by all the great feudatory 
princes and chiefs throughout the land, Her Majesty was proclaimed Empress 
of all India. 

In 1786, when Lord Cornwallis landed at Calcutta as Governor-General, the 
British Empire in India comprised only Bengal and Behar in Eastern 
Hindustan, a very little area round Bombay in Western Dekhan and a 

somewhat larger area round Madras, in the Eastc. a Peninsula. In 1886 the 
British power is paramount over an area of more than a million and a half 
of square miles, containing upwards of two hundred and fifty millions of 
inhabitants. 



8 



AdverfiMmcnit. 



Our 8t«el Oaatlnga ara of special advantage i.>- Colonial 'and Forolgn Users, on account of their 

;*--*• •■..'. litgUtnoaa, BtrenRth, and DnrabllUy. *• | 



WWjyiijyUUW aBlWBHBB ili li l l IliiW 



SHAVING rnoM oNC or HAoricioa btkcl CAtTincs 3o-ccct long. 




^T'-'" / (.FN[RAl(:4STINr,s\ ' ^ ., "■f't 

I Mtc-»L w Yv ryn^v :,i,v !;•!■, :..\\ iMf^*!-' «; 



^^^w::'^^^ 



K VA^- 



TU REPLACE 



f/(p/^'^^yS W 'WfidllCHT IRON -SlFEl | >^ ,sl^«A(;(/^„~^ 
#^r;N[WH[(i.FMRrs^ FORGINI.S /A ^ . '^ ' 

ii/v iv^o^^/* CYLINDERS ti'riAiLhiNi 




r«^*i«M5ilii^ 



/|;;^-yhll.lL WHilLi, *. GlNTREb.-A \'^/^, , ,„ 
£//_ KUit ■.UtHAR'i.MCnnN P1ATES^\ '■AMiNi.s 

. |-» ,'(M'i''KSf.Rii'SHi»C''WilNIV 






,.,... 'S. GLANDS y 



l)f AIL CLASSES, 




•MACHINE 



OREROM FULL PATTERNS v'/ 



1/ 'HECU' WHEELS 

" 'km IIAirWHM!T0!;iASl "l*W#/\u Ifr, V OR EROM ElILt PATTERNS v| 

A POINTS, . /' CA\ . '^^^ A \VITltsrK\I(.HTK.\i[l»i''f / /j 



UJyl HOME* INDIA 
m"fcCOL0NIALG0Y!! 



/ J- rJ 



^; AWAhu] 1 . 1 I |)S, \\| I S ,v / M^A'P,' , ^L;^ 



toLONUL RAiLnmrs 

TT-ADMIRAITY 
"Aa DEPARTMENTS 



^^ 



MANUFACTURERS 

ONLY OF THE 

HIGHEST & BEST QUALITY 

OF OAST §TEEL CASTINGS of 



(SPECIALSOUNDNESSTOUGHNESS&DURABILITy )l I- i— 



OUR UNHAMMERED STEEL CASTINGS; AS i RECENTLY 
TESTED BY H-M GOVERNMENT STAND TENSILE STRAINS 
OF 34 TO 65 TONS PER SQUARE 'INCH 
|(VARYINC ACCORDING TO TXE PURPOSE REQUIRED) j 
AND UP TO 20 % ELONGATION. ~ ' 



f-arBMCiiT • 
»■tt^vma 

SiaMOEt 



The Empire of India, 9 



. . INTRODUCTION. ' . 

The Colonial ami Indian Exliibition iH primarily doe to the. initiative of 
H.B.H. the Prince of Wales, whoHO earnest desire and object it has been that 
the series of Exhibitions should culminute finally in one groat Imperial 
display, of the resour jm and industries of the Empire of India, and of the 
Colonies that constitute what has been well called Greater Britain. His Koyal 
Highness, as Executive President of the Koyal Commission, at the first meeting 
of the Commissioners, held on March 30, 1885, said that the project was essen- 
tially one of a national and imperial cluaracier, differing in this respect from 
former exhibitionn, in which the elements of trade rivalry and profit largely 
predominated. 

At the B£ime meeting the Earl of Kimberley, the Secretary of State for 
India, indicated the purpose and method of the Exhibition in the following 
words : — " There is, perhaps, nothing more desirable for India, than that its 
products and industries should be well known in this country, although wo have 
much more to learn from than to teach them. Their beautiful manufactures 
which tbey have produced for so many ages have proved that there is a know- 
ledge of many branches of art, which it would be a thousand pities should be 
diminished under our rule. I have often been struck with the calamity of the 
introduction of our taste into Eastern arts and manufactures, for their taste is far 
Letter than ours, although we have no doubt engineering knowledge and skill, 
and the command of capital ; and I cannot conceive of any advantage greater than 
that tlie two countries should be brought together. The Government of India 
will undertake the collection and management to a great extent of what is to be 
sent to this countiy. You will see from the immense size of our Indian Empire 
and the position of the Government there, that it is much better tbis should be 
taken in hand by the Government." 

In order to thoroughly carry out the idea, so far as India is concerned, and 
to ensure a thorough and complete representation of her arts, industries, and 
resources, the Secretary of State for India not only guaranteed a sum of 
i'20,000 to the guai'antee fund, but also authorised the expenditure by the 
(rovemment of India of about 100,000 rupees, practically equal to about 
£7,500, in providing a collection of the natural history, ethnography, and social 
economy, administration, raw products, and primary manufactures of India. 
It was further arranged that the Imperial and provincial collections, which 
were being prepared for the projected Bombay Exhibition, should be forwarded 
to South Kensington. 

Mr. Buck, Secretary to the Government of India in the Eevenue and 
Agricultural Department, and Commissioner for India, describes the scheme 
tmder which the collections of exhibits provided by or through the agency of 
the Government of India' have been arranged. *' These collections, made with 
the assistance of the Grovernments of Presidencies and Provinces and of the 



10 The Empire of India. 



Bulers of Native States, are distributod in three main divisions over the spaces 
allotted to the Government of India. 

The divisions are : — I. The Art-ware Courts, containing specimens of art-ware 
and ornamental fabrics from each Indian Province or State. II. The Economic 
Court, in which are placed economical products and exhibits of agriculture 
and ethnology from the whole Empire III. The Administrative Courts, con- 
taining exhibits cotitributed by administrative dopurtinents. The primary 
arrangement of the division which comprises the Art-ware Courts is geo- 
graphical, and not, as has hitherto been the case in all Exhibitions to 
which India has contributed, technical. In other words, Art exhibits arc 
primarily divided with reference to locality, and not with reference to classi- 
Hcation. It is true that, in the descriptiv^o labels attached to each exhibit, 
an uniform classification has been followed in accordance with a classified list, 
which will be found in the Special Catalogue, but the primary arrangement has 
reference to the place of manufacture, and not to the place wliich the exhibit 
occupies on the classified list. The cause of this departure from the usual 
system is to bo found in the circumstance that in India the Art manufactures of 
any one place are, as u rule, so ditferent in character from those of any other 
place that they ought not to bo confounded by being brought under the same 
group. It is no exaggeration to say that a particular kind of Art-ware is often 
manuficturod by ono or two lamilies only in a single locality. The absence, 
until a very recent date, of free communication throughout the country, the 
fact that the introduction of many Art trades in India is due to the importation 
by some ruling prince of ono or two workmen from a country beyond the 
frontier, or from another State or Province, and the custom, consequent on a 
caste system, of passing on every trade from father to son, are among the causes 
which have helped to maintain a practice so singularly conservative. 
■^ The geographical arrangement which has been followed ?'n the Art-waro 
Courts has the further adva'uu'^o of indicating with considerable clearness the 
changing complexion and v,. . xcter of Art manufacture as we pass from ono 
part of India to another. It is easy to observe, for instance, the greater effect of 
Persian influence on many of the Art manufactures in the Punjab, when these 
are compared with those of Provinces further south ; this circumstance being 
due to the fact that the Punjab has always been from its position the first 
province to be overrun bj^ successive inroads of invaders from beyond the North- 
West Frontier. It is easy again to notice that many of the Art matiufaoturcs of 
large cities are of such a kind as could only have been supported by the 
patronage of a luxurious Court, such as that which existed under the Mogul 
Emperors at Delhi ; or to form the conclusion from an examination of the Art 



THRESHER & GLENNY, 

EAST INDIA AND G E N E R A I. OIJIPITTERS 

To H.B. a. n> PHaet cf WuIm. To B.R. H. IIu nal* of ComoMgU. To Ou Bight Ron. Ot Oowmnr-r' ntf i ' «/ ImUa, M« Oownwr <if 
Madrtt, th» iloonmnr of Bimihnf, Iht Uormmr <if < >yf<m, Ikt Quvtm-r n/ Ou Oaff of OikuI U p«, lo , ifa. 



THRESHER'S KASHMIR SHIRTS. | 



0ATALUQUE8 POST FREE ON APPLICATION TO 1HRt8HER 4i QLENNV. 

NEXT DOOR TO SOMERSET HOUSE, LONDON. 



The Empire of Tndia. 1 1 



specimens contributed by the capitals of decayed principalities, that the decline 
of much Indian decorative Art is due to the fact that manufacturers have now to 
work for a class of purchasers far poorer as well as less luxurious in habit than 
the wealthy nobles and princes of the courts of anoiont times. * 

It will not bo out of place to take advantage of the preceding remarks to 
explain that one important decorative Art has still survived with encouraging 
symptoms of vitality under the support of the wealthy members of the middle 
classes ; this is the decoration of temples and house exteriors. The tendency in 
the present day is for wealth to accumulate in the hands of bankers and 
merchants, and the custom still prevails for men of this class to spend some part 
of their surplus wealth in decorating the houses of themselves and of the gods 
they worship with carving in wood and stone. It was thought desirable, there- 
fore, that this living type of decorative Art should be given suitable prominence 
in the screens ^Vhich form a double facade in front of the Provincial Courts. 
The idea of thus illustrating the decorative carving which ornaments so many 
of the streets and temples of India was originated on a small scale in one or two 
of tlie Courts of the Calcutta Exhibition of 1883, whic^h were enclosed by carved 
balustrades on the level of the ground. But in order to avoid interference with 
the free passage of the i)ublie, it was decided by the Eoyal Commissioners that in 
Loudon the carved work must be raised on arches, and it is satisfactory to know 
that this plan has rendered possible the imitation Avith greater closeness of the 
architectural stylo prevailing in India, whicli confines the richest part of the 
carving to tho arches of door-ways and to verandah bjilustrades. The carved 
screens have been construe' ed from a grant specially made for tho purpose by 
tho Eoyal Commissioners, and they form a conveniont frame-work to the Courts 
containing the exhibits of each Province and Native State. 

The arrangement of the Economic Court is not, like that of the Art-ware 
Courts, geographical, but follows tho scientific arrangement adopted in tho 
cla3sifi«jd list. The conditions of a collection of products ditler much from those 
of a collection of Art-wares. Had any attempt been made to exhibit soiwirately 
tho products of each Province and each Native State of tho Indian Empire, tho 
undertaking, besides entailing groat expense and trouble, would have involved 
the unnccessaiy reduplication of a very largo quantity of material. Very few 
products are confined to a single Province, and a very large number are common 
to all. It would, therefore, have been plainly undesirable to entail Tipon each 
separate Government the labour and expense of providing a separate collection 
of products from each separate geographical area, merely in order to crowd tho 
rooms of tho Economic Court with repeated specimens of the same exhibits. 
Those who desire to learn the geographical distribution of any one product will 
imd any information they may require in the scientifically arranged ledger to 

THRESHER & GLENNY, 

EAST INDIA AND G E N F. R A L OUTFITTERS 

THRESHER'S INDIA TWEED SUITS. \ 

CATALOQUE8 POST FREE ON APPUCATION TO IHREtHER A QUENNY 

NEXT DOOR TO SOMERSET HOUSE, LONDON^ 



12 The Empire of India. 



which reference has already been uiade, and copies of the first volume of which 
can be obtained at the office of the Economic Court.* 

In arranging the disposition of the area allotted to economic products, it was 
found convenient that the Court should comprise also collections of Ethnological 
and Agricultural exhibits. The object of the former is two-fold : in the first 
place to give to the people of England some practical idea of the variety of races 
which are found in different parts of the great continent of India, as well as of 
the various manners in which ornamental fabrics are utilised as articles of 
dress; in the sec-ond place, to encourage an art which seems capable of 
attaining considerable excellence in India — that of clay modelling. The clay 
modellers in more than one Province of the Empire are in some respects equal 
to the best terra-cotta workers in Italy, and the system for the first time 
adopted in connection with this Exhibition of reproducing their v/ork in plaster 
of Paris f seems likely to give prominence and encouragement to the plastic 
art of the coimtry, since it will now be possible to meet any demand which 
may arise for such work Avith less risk of breakage and at a much smaller 
cost. 

The object with which the collection of agricultural implements has been 
nmde is also two-fold : first, to give to the English public some insight into the 
agricultural methods and practices of the countr}^ and secondly, to invite the 
attention of manufacturers to the class of implements required by Indian agri- 
cnlturists. The series is sufficiently complete to show that what the Indian 
agriculturist wants are simple and easily-handled implements, and that in this 
direction only is there any hope that the manufacturers of England can find 
any extensive outlet for agricultural machinerj'. 

The third section of the space allotted to the Government of India is 
occupied by the Administrative Courts. With few exceptions, the exhibits in 
this class offer from their nature little attraction to the eye, yet the series of 
records and reports which have been provided will enable any persons who 
desire to make themselves acquainted with the details of the internal adminis- 
tration of India to ascertain the sources from which the best and most complete 
inibrmation is obtainable. The presence too of the Administrative Courts in 
the Exhibition building will help to give some practical notion of the vast 
machinery required for the administration of the Indian Empire, and in this 

* The " Dictionary of the Economic Producta of India," compiled under the direction of 
the CrOTemment of India io the Bcvenue and Agricultural Department, by Dr. G. Walt, M3., 
F.L.S. 

t A system developed by Hr. J. Scfaaomberg, artist, attached to the Geological Surrey 
Departing at of India. 

THRESHER A GLENNY, 

EAST INDIA ANI> OENERAL OUTFITTERS 

TmUJLM.rhtPrimtitaf Wilm. ToB.JLH.OieVmkt of Camm^U. To Ou BigM lion. Ou aocenor-amerat of India, th$ a o mn arif 

MiiArir Ou tfovoracr tf himUwf, Iht (.'ownwr q< Ctflim, flk* <}vtemor of Iht Oafit qf Good Hope, *e , to, 

\ THRESHER'S INDIA GAUZE WAISTCOATS. 



CATALOGUES POST FREE ON APPLICATION TO 1HRE8HER li QLENNY. 

NEXT DOOR TO SOMERSET HOUSE. LONDON. 



The Empire of India. 13 



view the contents of these Courts hold a significant position among the 
exhibits provided by the Government of India. 

The plan of the Indian Section shows that it has been arranged on the lines 
laid down by Mr. Buck, viz,, a series of Art Courts, c Court devoted to Economic 
Products and Agricultural and Ethnological Exhibits, and a space set apart to 
give some idea of the several chief departments of Grovemment. There is also 
a Court occupied by private Indian exhibitors, and another for the display both 
to the eye and to the taste of Indian teas, coffees, and tobaccos. Beyond and 
independent of these is the magnificent structure which will be known as the 
Indian Palace. 

The Vestibule is draped with the most superb examples of the finest chintzes 
of Kashmir, and from Kot Kamalia in the Punjab. The care and taste of Mr. 
Pardon Clarke, and the ready co-operation of the Maharaja of Kashmir, secured 
the special manufacture of these unequalled fabrics. Bound the vestibule stand 
on guard portrait-znodels of representative soldiers and native officers of the 
Indian army, showing the dress, arms, and accoutrements of the principal native 
raiments of the Indian Empire. Lieut.-Col. Coker, under whose supervision 
the models were made by order of the Military Department of the Government 
of India, has furnished a most interesting detailed list of the individual soldiers, 
and the history of the twenty-five regiments represented. The stalwart Lance- 
Naick of the Governor-General's Body Guard, contrasting with the sturdy little 
Gurkha, an example of the brave men who fought side by side with our own 
gallant Highlanders — the Bengal infantry and cavalry, the Madras and Bombay 
armies, the Sikh soldiery once our deadly foes, but who, from the mutiny down 
to the Soudan campaign, have stood side by side with the English soldiers 
in rivalry of faithful and valiant service — all are here represented. 

From this stretch away the Economic Court on the left, the Administrative 
Gallery, and the Courts of Private Exhibitors and of Teas and Tobaccos on the 
right ; and in front is the entrance to the successive Art Courts, with their bewil- 
dering display of Indian splendour and cunning handicraft. The order naturally 
adopted will be to take the Art Coui-ts first. That, too, will be the order observed 
in these pages ; then the Imperial Court of T ionomio Products, to be followed 
in order by the Administrative Galleries, the Court of Private Exhibitors, and 
the Court of Teas and Tobaccos. Tl ^ndian Palace — the ultimate goal and the 
crowning work of the Indian Exhibition — will close the brief description. 

: THE AET- WAKE COURTS. .' ' 

The purpose of tho pages devoted io the successive divisiouK of the Indian 
.Vrt Ware Courts is to give a necessarily succinct description of the principal 

THRESHER & GLENNY, 

EAST INDIA AND GENERAL OUTFITTERS 

UU^B. Tke rrlm'4 af W.Jn. To Jl.SM. Ihe Dukt of Ccmwuihl. To On Uioht /Ton. Ou Gortrnin^antnl af Im4la, f&« Oi 

tl-dr't, Ihe luyvfmor oi llmulmy, iht Ouvtmi'r i\f < eylmt, llu 0-ittr»r of Iht Oaiit i^ OuoJ tlofn. S» , tt. 



THRESHER'S JUNGRA SHOOTING SUITS. 



CATALOGUES POST FREE ON APPLICATION TO IHRESHER & OLENNY. 

NEXT DOOR TO SOMERSET HOUSE. LONDON. 



14 The Empire of India. 



arts and manufactures displayed. It is impossible to do more than indicate the 
principal groups, and direct attention to the more prominent objects in these 
groupa. The Bpecjal catalogue of the Indian Section must be referred to by 
those who wish to make a thorough examination of the large and varied col- 
lection which has been got together by the Government of India through 
the instrumentality of special officers, appointed in each province or state. 
Much has br -n purchased, much has been contributed by the munificence of 
the native rulers and aristocracy. The reasons for adopting the geographical 
arrangement, in lieu of grouping together the examples of the same branch of 
art industry from every centro, in a comparative display have been fully given 
in the preface. It may, however, bo useful to indicate somewhat roughly the 
places or districts which hold a higher place than others in the principal art 
industries. 

I'or gold and silver work the Punjab has ever held a high reputation. 
Separate from it in the Exhibition will be found the exquisite parcel-gilt, 
silver, and chased gilt work for which Kashmir is distinguished. Lucknow in 
the North- Western Provinces was formerly famous for its vessels of mixed gold 
and silver, and also for parcel-gilt silver, similar to that of Kashmir. In Bengal, 
Dacca is at present the seat of the manufacture of excellent gold and silver plate. 
The goldsmiths and silversmiths of Gujerat, especially of Dholka, Virumgam, 
and Ahmedabad, of Gutch and of Sind must be looked for in the Bombay Court. 
The Madras gold and silversmiths still retain their ancient manipulative 
dexterity in pierced and hammered plate, and the characteristic swami work 
is well known. The iiniversal use of sacred and domestic utensils in brass and 
copper makes the Avidespread manufacture of such articles an absolute 
necessity. 1\\ the Punjab, however, Karnul, Amritsar, and Iiahore take the 
lead in this metal work. In the North- Western Provinces, Benares is first 
in India for the multitude and excellence of the sacred images, and all sorts of 
brass work, both religious and domestic, which will be found in this Court. In 
Bengal tiiere are several places noted for their metal work. Every kind of 
domestic utensil in brass and bell-metal is made especially at Murshidabad, 
Muldah, and Shahabad. At Kagniari in the Dacca Division, bi-ass, iron, and 
white metal work are produced on a large scale. Homeliness of form dis- 
tinguishes the work of the braziers of JSagpore and Chanda, and other places in 
the Central Provinces. In ttie Bombay Presidency, Nasik, Poena, and Ahmed- 
abad are foremost for their copper and brass work. In the Madras Presidency 
the brass work ot Madura and Tanjore surpasses all other work, not onlj' in the 
South but in the whole of India. The beautiful damascening in gold, called 
koft work, is cairied on in Kashmir at Gujerat, Sialkot, in the Punjab, and 
also in Hyderabad in the Deccan. The hidri ware, as damascening in other 

THRESHER & GLENNY, 

KAST INDIA AND G E N F. R A L, OUTFITTERS 

TollJLB. TKi Prmrt o/ W.,lt3. To n.lt.Il. the /.'uU of r,m»,iwihl. Tn «,« lUgM Ham. Ifu (lonrH-T-Omeml of r»dia,a» 

N'uir •§, the llotrrmtr of lioiiUn'D, iht Oui<nii>r of < ft/Inn, Iht Oi.irrHr of 0\t Oii|t ui iiouit llo\'r. te , it. 



I THRESHER'S REGULATION TRUNKS? 



CATALOGUES POST FREE ON APPLICATION TO IHRtSHER & QLENNY. 

NEXT POOR TO SOMERSET HOUSE, LONDON. 



The Empire of India. X5 



metals is called, from Bidar in Hyderabad, its original home, is said to have 
been invented there by one of the Hindoo kings. Purniah and Mnrshidabad in 
Bengal, and Lucknow in the North-West Provinces, are the most notable 
seats of this art industry. Costly ornamented arms are made at Lahore, Sialkot 
in the Punjab, and also in Kashmir. Monghyr in Bengal supplies also good 
arms. Nagpore in the Central Provinces is noted for its steel weapons. 
Tumkur in the Madras Presidency has a hundred and twenty forges at 
work, employed in the manufacture of arms and cutlery, and " good swords, 
spears and daggers " are also made at Kutwar and Yizianagram, the superbly- 
mounted arms of the latter place being chiefly used in pageantry. ,..-,4, 

In jewellery, Kashmir and the Punjab produce the finest gemmed and 
enamelled ornaments. The old court jewellers of the imperial and royal cities 
of Delhi and Lucknow, though by no means as prosperous as their forefathers, 
still maintain, though in diminished measure, their hereditary reputation. In 
Bengal, the exquisite filigrain work of Cuttack, Murshidj^bad, and Dacca, and 
the gold and silver jewellery of Monghyr are well known. In the Bombay 
Presidency, Ahmedabad and Surat produce in the highest perfection the 
massive and archaic Gujarati golden ornaments, and Sawantwadi produces the 
best repousse gold jewellery in mythological designs. Tumkur in Mysore, 
Yizianagram, Vizegatapara, and Tanjore, are all famous for their gold and silver 
ornaments, and the Trichinopoly chains, necklaces and bracelets, are 
universally known. The best enamelling on gold is produced in Rajputana, 
especially at Jeypore, but the Sikh enamellers of the Punjab, from whose' 
ancestors the art was learned, still maintain the excellence of their work, 
especially in silver enamelling. 

The Indian lacquer work, which is now common enough in English houses, 
falls into diflferent divisions, both according to place and character. The 
lacquered papier-maohe work of Kashmir holds the highest place; then the 
Punjab boxes, distinguished by their purple lac, the Eajputana boxes, the 
Bareilly black lacquered furniture, and the lacquered work of Kamul, are all 
liverse. Admirers of sandalwood carving will find the best examples, differing 
in design and character, iu the Bombay and in the Mysore and Coorg Courts, 
rhe Surat and Bombay work is in low relief with foliated ornaments, while the 
Uunedabad work, while in flat relief, is deeply cut and the subjects are mixed, 
rhe Kanara and Mysore work is in high relief, with mythological subjects. 

Wood-carving, especially architectural, and ivory-carving are practised 
ironghout India. The best modelled dolls or clay figures appropriately dressed 
rill be found respectively from Krishnagur and Calcutta in the Bengal, from 
.ucknow in the North-West Provinces, and from Poena in the Bombay Courts ; 
mt some of the most interesting specimens of modelling human figures must be 

^_^ THRESHER & GLENNY, 

%»r_-T I ^1^1'^ AND GENERAL OUTFITTERS 

Unir't. tt. uovencr of Uv^l^t, iS, Omwim- rf Ltflcm, lh» <;.«n. ~ o/ ft, Qap. of O00.1 ,1^ , ^, , dT^ '"-rw of 

THSB&HBS'S complete List of every necessary for an Outfit, w 
_ on »ri>Uc«ion 10 Thresher & Olenny, Meat iiuor to Somerset k< 



with Pried Oitaltinufi, 
House. London. 

CATALOGUES POST FREE ON APPLICATION TO IHRtSHLK tt GLtNNY 

NEXT DOOR TO SOMERSET HOUSE, LONDON. 



16 The Empire of India. 



looked for in the Court devoted to the economic products, where they illustrate 
the habits and customs of everyday life in Northern India and in Bengal. 

In every Court the textile fabrics, whether in cotton or silk, will be found, 

and it is impossible to do othervnse than quote the summary description taken 

from Dr. Forbes Watson's " Classification of Cotton Piece Goods," as given in 

the '* Industrial Arts of India." Among piece goods the first place is given to 

Dacca muslin, abratoan or " running water ;" hafthowa, " woven air ;" suhhanam, 

" evening dew ;" all plain white webs, the poetic names of which convey to 

the reader a truer idea of their exquisite fineness and delicacy, and of the 

estimation in which they are held, than whole pages of literal description. 

These fine muslins are all classed under the generic term of mulmul khaa, or 

" kings' muslins," Plain muslins are made not only at Dacca and Patna, and 

other places in Bengal, but also at Hyderabad in the Dakhan, and at Cuddapah 

and Ami in Madras. Striped muslins, or dorias, are made at Dacca, Gwalior, 

Nagpur, Hyderabad, Ami, and other places. Checkered muslins, or charhana, 

are chiefly made at Dacca, Nagpur, Ami, and Nellore ; and figured muslins, 

jamdani, at Dacca. Dr. Forbes Watson describes them as the chef-d'onuvre of the 

Indian weaver. At Calcutta embroidered muslin is called chikan (needle work). 

Muslins woven with coloured thread, and striped, checked, and figured, are 

made at Benares, Arni, Nellore, and Chioacole in Madras ; printed muslins at 

Trichinopoly, and gold and silvdr printed muslins at Jaipur and Hyderabad 

in the Dakhan. The process by which this mode of decoration is accomplished 

is by stamping the desired pattern on cloth with glue ; the gold or silver leaf, as 

the case may be, is then laid on, and adheres to the glue. When dry, what has 

not rested on the glue is rubbed off. In Persia, in the rare Ispahan chintzes, the 

gold is sprinkled in the form of dust on the pattern previously prepared with size. 

The Calicoes. — Dr. Forbes Watson classifies as (a) plain calicoes, bleached 

and unbleached, made all over India ; (6) calicoes woven with coloured thread, 

comprising first, susis and hesis, striped cloth of brilliant hue, made largely in 

the Punjab and Sindh, and also at Surat, Palamcottah, Cuddalore, and other 

places in Madras, and used chiefly for trouserings ; second, also striped, 

manufactured in Nipal and Pegu and used for skirts ; and third, checks and 

tartans, used also for skirts and petticoats, and manufactured at Ludian^h, 

Baroach, Tanjore, Cuddalore, Masulipatam, and other places in Madras ; and (c) 

printed calicoes (chintzes, pintadoea) ; fiist, on a white ground manufactured at 

Fattehgarh, Masulipatam, and Arcot, &c. ; second, printed on a coloured ground 

manufactmed at Shikai-pur, Aj^ra, Fattehgarh, Bijapur, Bellary, Ai-cot, and 

Ponneri in Madras ; and third, the celebrated palampores, or " bed-covers," oi 

Masulipatam, Fattehgarh, Shikarpur, Hazara, and other places, which in poin 

of art decoration are simply incomparable. x\s art works, they are to be classec 



Don't 



buy an ENQINE of any kind, for any work or any Country, 
without seeing HO 11^ W BY 'W KWClIWKEBi 

CATJkXOOIJlbi, with full pariiculars and Illustrations 
of Portable and Semi-Fortable, Simple and COMPOtlND 
Vertical and Horizontal ES^GINES and BOILERS; Irrigating Plant ; Qenera 

Farming Maohinery» dec. 

K. nUilWDDl a DUUb, Limtea, and 84. LOMBARD STREET. LOHrPOFT^ 



£ 



The Empire of India. H 



with the finest Indian pottery and the grandest carpets. Lastly, Dr. Forbes 
Watson classes together the miscellaneous cotton fabrics, chiefly made for Anglo- 
Indian use, such as the pocket-handkerchiefs of Nellore, the damask and diaper 
table-cloths, napkins and towels of Madras, Salem, Masulipatam, Ouddalore and 
Baroach, and the counterpanes and quilts of Karnul, Hyderabad in the Dekhan, 
and Ludianah. 

In silk manufactures the gorgeous and beautiful hinJehaha and gold brocades 
come from the looms of the holy Benares of the North- Western Provinces, 
Murshidabad, the whilom capital of Bengal proper, and still the residence of a 
titular Nawab, and Ahmedabad ; while Surat in the same Presidency comes close 
upon them with its productions, so much prized in Further India. The poetical 
names given to some of these fabrics, such as " moon and stars," " ripples of 
silver," " sunshine and shade," " pigeons' eyes," " nightingales' eyes," " peacocks* 
necks," suggest a marvellous variety of richness and beauty. The silks mixed 
with cotton which are designed to assist devout Mussulmans in obeying the 
precept of the Koran, are made in the Punjab and Sind, at Hyderabad in 
the Dekhan, at Tanjore and Trichinopoly. Silk-weaving fe still a prosperous 
industry in the Punjab, and in several divisions of Bengal. In the Madras 
Presidency silk of rich texture and costly pattern is made at Bangalore, and 
throughout Mysore silk is manufactured ; but these will come under considera- 
tion in their resj)ective Courts. 

Carpets. —It would be tedious to notice the carpets which drape the walls, 
as they separately occur. A few general remarks may suffice. The Indian 
Carpets are of two kinds, cotton and woollen. The former are known as daris, 
or durries, and aatrangis or rugs and carpets. These fabrics, of which examples 
occur throughout the Courts, are the original form of Indian carpets. Their 
patterns, consisting of stripes usually of blue and chocolate, or red or white, with 
occasional variations by the introduction of squares and diamond shapes, and 
even gold and silver ornamentation, are of the oldest Indian art designs. They 
are chiefly made in Bengal and Northern India, but the manufacture, as will be 
seen in the various Courts, is in nowise confined to the territories included under 
these heads. The Pile carpets came in with the Mussulman invaders. The 
principal seats of the manufacture by the regular weavers were around the 
Mahommedan centres, and are enumerated by Sir George Bii dwood as Cashmere, 
the Punjab and Sind, Agra and Mirzapur, Hyderabad and Warangal in the 
dominions of the Nizam, the Malabar Coast, Masulipatam, and the Coromandel 
Coast. Velvet pile carpets were also made at Benares and Murshidabad, and silk 
pile at Tanjore, Salem, and Warangal. 

The exquisite design and harmonious colouring of the Indian carpets of olden 
time are incontestable, and need no further praise. But the experts and lovers 

MARINE MACHINERY AND STEAM VESSELS 



DlN04N'S PATENT PROPELLER and VALVE REVEJiSIXG LAUNCH ENGINES. 

ROSS & DUNCAN, 

WHITEFIELD WORKS, GOVAN, GLASGOW. 



18 The Empire of India. 



of Oriental art find grave deterioration in the productions of the present day, 
both in design, texture, and colouring. This has been attributed to the intro- 
duction by the Government of India, about twenty j-ears ago, of carpet-weaving 
as an occupation for the prisoners in the Indian Jaiis. The carpets exhibited 
not only in the Art Courts but also in the Court of private exhibitors, are almost 
all wrought on the jail looms. It must bo admitted that dining the first years 
of the now industry, the productions of the jail looms, both by the xise of 
unsuitable aniline dyes, and the ill-ndvised introduction of European patterns or 
fancied imi)rovement8 on the native designs, merited in i great degree the oppro- 
brium heaped upon them by connoisseura in Indian art. < v- 

The influence of the Government Schools of Art at Bombay, Lahoie, and 
Madras, is being steadily exercised to restore and uphold the standard of pure 
colours and true Oriental designs. A great improvement is noticeable in many 
of the carpets selected for exhibition, especially those chosen by Mr. Purdon 
Clarko, CLE. Among these may be specified the copies of the Jeyporo Durbar 
carpets made at Agra and Delhi jails, and the copies of the carpets in the Asa 
Mahal Palace at Bijapur made at Poona and Tanna jails. Tho Velloro carpets 
are also to be commended, as well as those of Ijahore and Ajniere jails, where 
good copies are made from the Jeypore Durbar carpets. The free weavers of 
Warangal spoil the excellence of pattern and weaving by aniline dyes. 

The necessary influence of European, and mainly of English commerce, must 
doubtless affect with change, not only the produf'ts of Indianlooms, but other 
branches of native art. The Art Ware Courts throughout exemplify this, 
although the collection of art objects mude in India by Mr. Clarke presents 
examples and types of tlie best modes, and justifies the claim made on behalf of 
the Exhibition to be more than a gathering of commercial wares, however 
beautiful and costly, and to afibrd a thorough survey of the highest, as well as 

the more ordinary products of the arts of India, . 

• -■"-'■■• 

The musical iustrumcnts, which will be found in almost every Court, are 
best represented in the complete collection sent by Raja Sir Sourindro Mohun 
Tagore, Kt., Mus. Doc, CLE. to the Bengal Court, and described by him in the 
Special Catalogue. The pictorial contributions will be found in the gallery of 
the Royal Albert Hall. , 

The Art Ware Courts are entered through p, gateway, contributed by His 
Highness the Maharaja of Jeypore, and carved by his subjects, The gateway 
is surmounted by a Nakarkhana, or Drum^house, such as is usually found over 
the entrance to royal residences or temples in which musicians play at stated 
intervals, and in regular order, certain tunes in honour of the sovereign or god. 



Is I'uoGRKss, Demy 6vn., clolh. 



SACRED BOOKS OF THE EAST. 

TRANSLATED BY VARIOUS ORIENTAL SCHOLARS, 

And Kdlted by F. MAX MUIiLSB. 
•«• The FIRST SERIES, consisting of 24 Volumos, has been completed. The SECOND SERIES will consist <rf 

'.24 VolumcB in all, i liree of whicb bave Just been Publisbed. 

V Complete Prospectus, ffiviuK full particular*, on applioatloti. 

LoNDOs: HENRY FUUWDK, Clarendon Trcsa Warehouse, Amea Corner, E.0* 



( 



'( 



01 



^ The Empire of India. 19 

In the kiosk on tho top are arranged all the musical instruments which are 
usually played in a drum-house. On tlie front of the platform has been carved 
tho Shamsha, or picture of the sun, which is symbolical of the descent of the 
lords of Je^pore, and of tho Kajput chiefs of the solar race. . ' V* /^*/""' V" 

On the opposite side will bo found a repiesontation of the moon from which the 
Indrabaui, the other gieat branch of the Kajput race, represented by the Rajas 
of Jaisalmir and Karauli, are said to liavo sprung. On tho same beam below 
tho cornice on the front of the gate is engraved the motto of tho Jeypore house, 
" Yato dharm stato Jaya" in Sunskirt with Latin and English versions. The 
Latin "Ubi virtus ibi victor" better expresses the meaning of the original 
than the English " Where virtue is— is victory." On the corresponding beam 
at the back, the motto, "' Ex Oriente lux,"— from the East comes light,— has 
been carved. 

The banners on the rails are respectively the jpancli-rang or five-coloured flag 
of Jeypore; a small copy of the standard given to the late Maharajah at the 
Imperial Assemblage at Delhi by Her Majesty the Queen Empress ; the Mahi 
maratih or symbol of the highest nobility given by the Moghal Emperors, which 
Was much prized. It consists of the golden head of a fish and two gilt balls, all 
borne on separate poles. 

lUJPUTANA COURT. "'•^'!'.J^^f''i''^ivnhHiiU.>a 

The collection of twenty States, forming tho aggregate agency under the 
Governor-Geneial, known by this name, occupy eibout 130,000 square miles 
with a population of ten millions, forming a block stretching from the Central 
India Agency to Sindh, and from Gujarat to the Punjab. The Aravalli Hills 
iivide this int.j Eastern and Western Rajpntana. The British District of 
>\jmere-Mhairwara, the States of Jaipur or Jeypore, Bhartpur, Karauli and 
Dholpur, Western Rajputana including Jodhpur and Ulwar, Kotah and 
Bikanir, &c., occupy sub-courts separate or conjointly, and are contributors to 
he series of screens which on either side begin tho vista of carved screens 
iT^hich line tho central avenue. "• •* '---—... lioiii-u y,v ui-ti. ■ 

The Jeypore Screen. — The general design is the modified Saracenic in v6^^ 
u Up2)er India andRajputana. The only instructions issued to tho wood-carvers 
vere, that as great a variety of patterns should be employed as ]x»8sible, the 
•rnament to be purely Indian, and no attei7ipt to bo made to Work on other 
ban the traditional lines. The men draw rough outlines with a pencil or oven 
he grayer, and each carver has done what was right in his own eyes, subject to 
he approval of the mistri or master-workman, who had to judge whether the 
i^hole work would be in harmony or not. 

, CLARKE'S New Patent 

FAIRY" LAMPS AND "FAIRY" LIGHTS 

'or Ornamentally Liffhting: DRAWINa and BAIjL BOOKCS, CONSSBV aTORIBS. 
EVENINO- FETBa TABLE DBCOBATIOn!^, &rf. ' 

These Lamps are mmle I ntirely of G lag* and fitted with Opil Stcdt-s. Tbe Patent " Fairy " IjlKhtS bare 
OBble Wl«k», i^vlug a beautiful soit, steady liKbt. The Ust bour'b burnlnis is as baUiant ai» (lie Brat, aDd are nut 
rwted l>y the btroiiKeMt d>-auKht. They burn 10 buarx. 

AMUBL CLARKE, Patent Pyramid and Fairy Lamp and Light Works, 

CHILD'S HILL, LONDON} a&d NBWARK, NBW JERSEY, U.S.A. 

C 3 



20 The Empire of India, 



Bhartpur, KarauU, and Dholpur Screen. — Tho front consists of a red sand- 
stone architrave and false arch, supported on carved pillar:?, and surmounte 
by a perforated Randstone screen, 10 ft. long by 2 J ft. high. Above tbe 
screen, and to break tho monotony of a horizontal lino, are placcil in the centre 
a perforated imitation of a nearly semi-circular fan-light, and at the two ends a 
couple of small turrets surmounted by cupolas. Tho stylo of architecture 
cannot be exactly defined, as tho screen in reality is a mixtui-o of copiod of parts 
of several local buildings, fitted to the dimensions required ; thus the pillars, 
false arch, and architrave are taken from the interior of the Khan was Mahal 
(now used as the Residency) : the perforated work is a copy of similar 
works in the masjid at tho VVazipur gato of the city ; the central bit is 
borrowed more or less from a semi-circulai* fanlight in the city, and the cupolas 
on tho turrets placed at tho ends are similar to those used to cover portions of 
the palace. Generally speaking, the screen is a representation of local archi- 
tecture in details, but not as a whole. It is made throughout of red sandstone 
procured from the celebrated quarries in the immediate vicinity of the city of 
Karauli, and has been constructed entirely by local stonemasons and stone- 
carvers, under the general supervision of the State Public Works Department 

The Jodhpur screen is of carved teak wood ; it was designed and made at 
Jodhpur by Jodhpur artists and workmen The architecture is the modified 
Delhi adopted in Rajputana. 

The front of tho Ulwar screen consists of panels of white marble, perforated 
and carved in relief, fitted in a frame-work of black maible and teak wood, and 
supported upon three boantifully-carved white marble pillars, 8 ft. high each. A 
decorative design of glass-work, on which the crest and arms of His Highness 
the Maharao Eaja are emblazoned, surmoujits this portion of the screen. 

The side portions of the screen consist of panels of red sandstone carved on 
both sides. The designs of the pillars and panels are taken from carvings 
existing in the Ulwar Palace, and are of pure Hindu style. The glass-work 
decoration is also taken from the Ulwar Palace, three rooms in which are 
entirely ornamented with work of this description. The screen is altogether of 
Ulwar workmanship, and the marble is from the celebrated quarries of Makrana 
Sajputana. 

The screen for tho Kotah section of the Eajputana Court consists of a front 
and aide piece made of Sbisham wood {Dalbergia Siau) and inlaid with ivory, 
This style of work is much practised in the town of Etawah in the Kotah State 
The architectural design is Hindu, and has been copied from old buildings ii 
the City of Kotah. 

One of tbe screens is designed to represent a sample of the ordinary stree 
architecture in the Ajmere city. Tho archways or arcades are similar to the 

£«taWw/ied in iRtis.] SCHOOl- OF [As'obtwAed in 186* 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND SUBMARINE TELEGRAPHY 

12, Princes Street, Hanover Square, London, W. 
Manager.— W m. LANT CARPENTER, B.A., B.Sc, F .G.S., A.SM 

Open dtilyi except Saturday, from 10 to S, tbrougliout the year. Pupils can Join at any time. Upwards of 3^ 
feave already pusseJ tlirongh the course. Copies of Testimonials from some of the must Kmlneut SclentlflO •! 
riaclical Electris'oQfi of tbe d»j, as well lut m T^ry fall Prospecltu, may be had on applkatiou t9 tbe SeoRUu7. 



The Emfme of India. 



deecription UBual in verandahs of houses, acraia, shop fronts, &c, These aroadea 
TO often surmounted by a system of ornamental bracketing and open carved 
work, supporting upper balconies; The materials generally used in street arohi- 
tecture of this kind are a mixture of cut stone and stone masonry and plaster 
work, the whole being either whitowoshed or decorated by painting in bright 
water-oolonrs. In some cases the entire work is of cut stone or of marble. 
This model is carved in wood and painted white to represent the original typo 
M nearly as possible. 

The Bikanir ornamental screen is a wooden structure, oonstructed to show 
to the best advantage a stylo of decoration applicable to wood, stone, earthen- 
ware, ivory, and glass, and believed to bo peculiar to Bikanir, of which the 
following is a brief description :— On the surface of the wood, which had beeu 
previously well scrubbed with liquid clay and allowed to dry, the outlines of 4 
flower pattern were stencilled with a bag of powdered charcoal through 
perforated paper. Successive layers of liquid clay were then applied with small 
squirrel's-hair brushes within the outlines of the pattern, each layer being 
allowed to dry before the next application, until a raised surface bringing out 
the stalks, leaves, and petals with sufficient distinctness had been produced. 
The whole surface was then fixed by a coat of paint, and when this was dry 
gold leaf was applied over all. The ground-work, black, with a red border, on 
the portion intended to face the central avenue and the adjacent Courts of 
Central India and Ajmero, and red with a black border in the interior of the 
Bikanir bays, was then painted in, the flower pattern standing out in gilt 
relief. • 

Immediately on entering the Jeyporo Court is seen a collection of carefully 
executed models representing the variouij inhabitants of Joypore, and having 
two full-sized figures, one of an armed Rajput and the other of a royal domostio 
standing as it wore on guard on either side. 

Decorative art as applied to architecture, which will throughout the Art- 
ware Courts be shown in ever-varying forms, according to the special country 
or district to which it belongs, U nowhere more remarkably displayed than iu 
the ancient cities of the land of the Eajas or Eajputana. The white marble 
from Jodhpur and the red sandstone of Bhartpur were the marbles of which 
the Taj-Mahal, the Dehli and ^gra forts and mosques and the Fatehpur Sikri 
palaces were constructed. The exquisite coloured marbles of Jeypore and 
Ajmere and the limestone of Jaisalmir were employed in decorating them. In 
this Court will bo found examples from the diflferent States, not only in the 
special portions of the screens contributed, but also in trellis-work screens 
from Karauli, and the ornamental sandstone screen work of Dholpur. The city 
of Jeypore is in this, as in all matters of art, the most active of the Bajputana 



& CO.. WINE MERCHANTS, LONDON. 



SHERRY. 



Pale, Pale dry, 
Superior Pale. 



81/- to 42/- 



Gold, Brown, 
Amber. 



24/- to 64/. 



Manzanillas, Montillas, 

Vino de Pastoa, 

Amont,ilIa<los. 



92/- to 72/- 



Old in qoftle of all the choiiseet 
varieties. 



^JJ>^"JJL._.ia*_"X'. LU 



84/- to 140/- 
ysfprdlng t» age a mi charactCT. 



22 The Empire of India. 



States. Tho local School of Art, under tlio patronage of the cnHglitcne<l Rajt 
has ondoavonred to improve tho indigenous art of tho town by attending to 
details so as to correct tho habit of merely repeating tho designs which hav( 
licen handed down from their forefathers, which in each successive rcpetitioi 
have lost a great deal of tho heavily and finish of tho original work. Ii 
addition to architectural carving, Jeypore and Khansa, a neighbouring town 
largely supply images of gods curved in marble, of which examples are shown 
From the black marble of Ketri tlie statuaries produce elephants and other toyt 
and jain images. Bikanir contributes stono models of houses, carved trcllii 
work and windows, besides objects of Hindu worship, and figures of aniuiab 
carved in red sandstone. From Jodhpur come ^'owls, boxes, &o., made of the 
famed Makrana marble, and the Jaisalmir cups and saucers aro made of 30II0W 
limestone, blended with red ochre-like substance, and otlier stones well polished. 
Bhartpur and Karauli also produce pnthrotan, wliich aio largo bowls used for 
storing coins, with or without covers, plates, carved animals, either from tho red 
or white sandstone, or from a softer kind of stone somewhat resembling soapstone 
Tho gold and silver pLxte and jewellery of tho various States aro each 
represented by characteristic collections. The excellence of the native work- 
manship is shown in tho chased silver and parcel gilt plate ; but tho art in which 
Jeypore stands unrivalled, enamelling on gold, is more worthj' of careful 
attention than tho gold and siU'or smiths' work, of which there will be so manr 
other examples throughout tho different courts. Tho collection of enamels on 
gold as well as on silver, includes jharms, bracelets, sleeve-links, rings, perfumo 
holders, &c., of which among the smaller, yet perhaps jnost characteristic ai 
well as inexpensive exfimples, aro tho uiango-shaped charms or lockets which 
are used by Hindus to contain scent, and by Mahommedans to hold a small 
compass to indicate tho direction of Mecca. The collection cannot of course 
illustrate all tho possible applications of this beautiful art, but tho examples 
show tho truth of what is assorted, that the best work on gold is produced at 
Jeypore. Silver enamel of good quality is also made at Jeypore, but th( 
conditions of fixing the colouj-s and tho risks are much greater than when gold 
is used. Very little enamelling on copper is practised. Some beautiful green 
enamels — so called — are exhibited, which aro made at Partabgarh, but they an 
not true enamels. Some have supposed the figures are cut out of a piece oi 
gold leaf, which is afterwards applied to a layer of hot enamel. Native 
authorities state that tho patterns aro etched into tho glass by strong acid, and 
the incisions filled with very fine and pure powdered gold, which is made tfl 
adhere by exposure to great heat in tho furnace, and prolonged gentle heat in 
an oven. Tho medallions are composed of ground glass, upon which quaint 
patterns of figures, landscapes, and flowers aro traced in gold. A piece 

SIE JOH)l BE>iNETr, 65 & 64, Cheapside, London. 
' Watch, Clock, and Jewellery Manufacturer, by Appointment to Her Majesty. 

SILVER KEYLESS J-PLATE HALF-CHRONOMETER, in strong crvsal glass cnsc 
Jewelled throughout. This watch is gpeclally made for rough wear and all variations of temperature. J^, iU' 

SILVER HUNTING or HALF-HUNTING f-PLATE KEYLESS LEVER, in ston 
illTer OMe, ohronometer balance, Jewelled throughout. A thoronghly reliable Watob. £C, <7, £«. «io. 



The Empire of India. 23 



white foil of silvor backing termed dmk w placed behind the glass, and sorves 
to give that peculiar lustre and depth of colour which is so much admired. 
Returning to gold and- silvor plate and jewellery, the chnsed silver of Bikanir 
will be found to show fairly good work. Those shown are excollont examples. 
The silversmiths in the sorvico of H.H. the Maharaja of Ulwar, have manu- 
factured a group of Npecimcns of the filigrainod and chased work. They 
include a silver chuskidan, that is a Rajput wine l)ottlo and glaHS stand, a khasdan 
or b"tel holder, a surahi or water bottle, a milk jug and two piirs of bracelets. 
Jodhpur oontrilmtcs ton objects in gold and silver work and jewellery. One 
of these (3023), the timnii/a, or neck ornament, is made of gold and silver of 
different shapes, and worn by almost every Hindu woman in Marwar. Next 
to it is the tara or anklet, a silver foot ornament, chiefly used by Brahraans as 
a marriage present to a bride. Amongst the gold and silver plate can bo 
noticed a wine-holder used by Kajputs when drinking. " ' . ' ' '.' 

A special exhibit which comes under the head of jewellery is the collection 
of garnets, and different ornaments, such as necklaces and bracelets, formed of 
thorn, from Jeypore. The pieces of garnet are dng in quarries in various 
places. Some also are collected from river beds. They vary from j\ to 1 in. in 
diameter. The colours range from the deepest re<l to violet, purple, and yellow. 
The diggers sell the stones to the dealers or lapidaries. Tlio best aro cut as 
carbuncles or stones hollowed out like half plums. 

Lacquered-ware cups and water jars are nhown from Indragurh in the Kotah 
state. The cups are revolved in a lathe, and the pieces of lacquer applied, 
which, when heated by friction, adhere to the wood. The omamentai work on 
the cups is then done by means of a small fine chisel. The melted lac is put 
upon stirahis with a small piece of iron. These are merely mentioned, there 
being nothing characteristic in the Rajputana lacquered ware. The art being 
practised all over India will be spoken of more fully when larger and better 
collections occur. 

■ The inlaid work of Etawah shovrs a method of decoration peculiar to that 
town. The articles are made of shisham wood or of buffalo horn inlaid with ivory 
or mother of-pearl, and are principally used for omamentai purposes. The 
industry is confined to two or three families of the khaii caste, who turn out 
their work very slowly, though it is as a rule carefully and strongly executed. 
The Kotah screen is made of similar work. 

From Marwar there are samples of the ivorj' carving made at Pali which aro 
said to be chiefly purchased by gentlemen visiting that place. More curious 
and characteristic are the hindoras or cradles made of wood, carved, coloured, and 
gold silk, which are exported from Jodhpur. They vary in value according to 
the material used, size, and finish. Their purpose is for the religions rite of 

VENTILATI NG, COOLING AN D DRYING, 

BLACKMAN AIR PROPELLER. 

"BLAOKMA N ROTARY PUNKAH." 

Sole Makers— 

TEE BIiACKMAN AIR PBOFII[iL£B VSNTHiATINa CO., I.IMITED, 
ST, Fore Street, »nd fi2, Austin Friars, liOndon, K.C 



24 The Empire of India. 



swiugiug Iliudu gods at festivals. Together with these uro examples of the 
singhaaan or thrones used for seating Hindu gods. The Ulwar ivory-carving 
includes a partially enamelled elephant. The rider is supposed to be the god 
Sitaran and the driver Hanuman the monkey. An ivory antimony case with 
pearls round the top of the cover, and a perforated scre»>a work are worthy of 
notice. ,- 

The Bikanir artists excel in wood-carving, door frames costing as much as 
Es. 100. The ivory-carving and lacquered ware are also good. The wood- 
carving contains wooden models of idols, elephants, camels, horses, and of an oil 
press, a countiy cart, a camel plough, a churn, spinning wheel, bullock cart and 
a well. The model of an elephant carriage from Ulwar and the rotu, or bullock 
carriage, from Jeypore are exact reproductions, with their curious and cumbrous 
arrangements of guards for the wheels and the rich ornamentation with 
embroidered cushions and covers of those in ordinary use by the princely and 
wealthy families. 

The arms rud armour of the collection lent from Ulwar for exhibition, 
comprise both ancient f>nd modem weapons, offensive and defensive. Among 
them the most j-cmarkable are— a very long sword with a species of double 
handle, which is v. ' by native chiefs as a support when sitting, the steel 
poniard with gold work representing in alto-relievo the pictvires of Hindu 
gods and goddesses, the shields, ancient and modern, made of rhinoceros skin 
with gold and steel bosses, and the gtnol shields with koft or damascened work. 
From Jodhpur also comes a supply of shields and daggers, and numerous 
examples of the Sirohi swords which are famous in Eajputana, the prices 
varying according to the quality of the steel and the workmanship of the sword 
hilts, which are generally wrought with silver and gold, and range from Rs. 2 
to Rs. 100. 

In brass, copper, and mixed metals, the Jeypore School of Art displays 
excellence of work, but the absence of any detailed list prevents any special 
comparison of the different articles exhibited. A curious lamp, made of brass 
or iron, so constructed that it will roll on the ground without upsetting the 
oil-box or the light being put out, is sent from Jodhpur. 

The glazed pottery of Rajputana is not given a foremost rank amongst the 
exemplars of that art, such as belong to the historical glazed earthenware of 
Madura, Sindh, and the Punjab. The painted pottery of Kotah and. the gilt 
pottery of Amroha are mentioned in the •' Industrial Arts of India," as among 
the principal varieties of Indian fancy pottery made ptirposely for exportation. 

In Eajputana, cotton is woven everywhere, and the printed muslins and 
chintzes of Jeypore and Jodhpur are prized all over Ilindostan for the purity 
and brilliance of their dyes. Large cotton duria of Rajputana striped in red, 

^PARKINSON & FRODSHAM, 

Matcb, Clocft, anb Cbronometer flDahera, 

4, CHANOE A-LLEY, COHIVHILL, LONDON, 

To the Englith and principal Foreign Oovernmenti, 

SPECIALITIES— £3 2i, Silver Keyleai Watoh, and £2i lOi, OolA Huotiof Keyless Half Oliro&ometer 



The Empire of India. 25 



preen, yellow, blue and black, are marvellous examples of the skill of Indian 
weavers in harmonising the most prismatic coloxirs. A detailed account of the 
varieties of cloth manufactured in Ajmere-Mhairwara gives a description of the 
aeven varieties of cloth manufactured, which, with variations, may bo used as a 
classification of the different cotton stuffs manufactured throughout Eajputana. 
First, pagria, or turbans, which are generally softer or lighter in texture than 
other native cloths, the ordinary dimensions being thirteen yards long by ten 
inches wide. Those made from native thread are used by the mi-al population. 
From English thread are made fine specimens of native mualins, into which 
gold thread is often tastefully introduced. Second, iakri or reza, a coarse cloth 
jaade from native thread, and used by the rural population for garments on 
i'.ccount ot its durability and cheapness, also extensively for calico printing, bed 
covers and floor cloths. Third, septa, a kind of coarso muslin, which is, however, 
seldom made or sold in the district, because the machine-made muslins of 
Manchester and Bombay have entirely superseded it, and the general demand 
for Manchester cloths is driving out cloths worked with English thread. 
The fourth, khea, is a kind of checkered fabric, chiefly remarkable as 
exhibiting a different kind of weaving from that of the ordinary hand-woven 
clcths of Ajmere. The pattern is generally plain. The thread of the weft is 
entwined alternately with that of the warp, so that the make of the fabric 
appears diagonal or crosswise across the fabric, instead of the thread crossing at 
right angles. Of the three other sorts, one is only a variety of the takri cloth. 
Another called aim, is a narrower cotton fabric used only by Mussulman women. 
It is distinguished by having stripes lengthwise down the piece of a different 
colour from the groundwork. The commoner patterns are dark blue with 
white stripes, or blue with red stripes. The last ailed charkana, is the same all 
over— a kind of check variation of the preceding, with varieties in black and 
white check or rod and blue. 

All native Indian fabrics are either plain cloths woven with the single 
thread, cloths with a longitudinal stripe, or cloths with diagonal patterns. The 
Ajmere cotton prints are far inferior to those of Jeypore, both in purity and 
brilliancy of dyes. The favourite colour is dark red, and varieties of colours 
are obtained by the use of indigo and turmeric. The cloth is damped and 
stretched, and wooden blocks, on which the floral patterns project in strong 
relief, are charged with colour, and then pressed down on the cloth. Tinsel 
printing, of which the specimens exhibited are by no means attractive, is also 
common in the district. The patterns used in colour printing are almost always 
variations of the same design, the ground being coloured black, red, yellow, or 
azure blue, with striped or spotted border, and the field covered with imitations 
of plantain fruit, surrounded by small squares of various colours. 

STEEL, SPRINGS, STEEL CASTINGS, FILES, tc. 

SAMUEL 03B0RN & CO., SHEFFIELD. 

LOISOH: Viotoria Mansions, Westminster, ABHOLD FTE-SMITH, ite$ident Partner. 

See detailed Adverti$ement in Official Catalogue pag$ " \' 



26 The Empire of India. 



SotaH muslin woven bj Mahommedan or Hindu weavers, is made in hand 
looms of European cotton thread. It is principally disposed of wholesale for 
export to Nimach and other places in India. Kotah also exhibits dyed cloths. 
The process cx>nsist8 of first dyeing the cloth, and secondly producing a pattern 
by tying up with cotton threads small portions of the cloth in pieces about the 
size of a threepenny piece, and often much smaller. The tying is so tightly 
and thoroughly dono that when dipi)ed in the second dye these spots retain 
their original colour. Very intricate patterns of pagodas, trees, animals and 
fruits are produced with three different colours. Each portion of the pattern 
that is required of one colour has to be knotted at one time. It is then dyed, 
and the second set of knots tied, and so on. The effect is almost that of crape 
when the pattern is a close one. Washing takes away, however, this effect and 
renders the cioth quite flat. 

The Ulwar embroidery in gold and silk thread is much admired for the 
designs and the fineness of the workmanship, a good examfjle being shown in 
the angharkhat or coat, exhibited in the Silk Ware Court. The Bikanir 
embroidery in gold and silver is shown on a number of exhibits, which aro 
described as botlices, jacket ~ ''ndshawls of dancing girlw, two being specimens 
of hair embroidery worked upon silk. The Shergarh embroidered cloths com- 
prise rugs, saddle cloths and elephant trap|tings made of English broadcloth, 
embroidered with floss silk of various colours. Saddle-cloths are the principal 
article, and are generally made for local sale '^ >.-, . 

Of woollen fabrics, the Bikanir serges aro considered the best in Bajpntana. 
From Jilarwar come shawls and petticoats woven by Jat women in the Nagore 
district. These are said to have found numerous European buyers of late. 

. ;j:c^ CEXTKAL INDIA COURT. >: . - 

. f jr.. .i . , 

This Agency is also an official designation applied to a numerous group of 
States placed ^under the charge of the Governor-General. The area is 75,000 
square miles, with a population a little exceeding nine millions. Of these the 
l^iding states Gwalior, ludore Chhatarpur Bhopal, and Butlam, Datia, Chhatarpur, 
Dhar, Dewas, and Orchha contribute exhibits. ."■.." ' 

On the right-hand side facing the Bombay Court, tho Central India screen 
consists of three bays each about 10 ft. in length. Tho central bay is higher 
than those flanking it, and is intended to illustrate Bu<ldhist and Hindu sculp- 
tures as found in Centrul India. The pillars aro modelled on, thoiigh not 
exactly copied from, sculptures existing at Rhajurahu in Bundelkhand. At the 
base of each is a large female figure, with smaller figures on either side, and 
above these, groups of small figures arranged in tiers, each of a different design, 



TENTS FOR INDIA AND HOT CLIMATES. 

ImproTttd Double Roof Ridge Tents, as supplied to the prinolpal Missionary 
Societies, Travellers, tec, tor use on THE COWCwO. 

PATENT COTS, HAMMOCKS. BEDSTEADS AND CAMP EQUIPMENT, AND FURNITURE OF ALL KINDS. 

ROT-PBOOF CANVAS CLOTHei AVD TABPAULINS FOB TEA PLANTEBS. 

"""ics- BENJN- ED6IN8T0N. lmm.ii,'-'"^Ss^;'SS."°^ 



The Empire of India, 27 

the whole being in high relief. The cross-beam uniting the pillars illustrates 
Hindu style both in figures and in ornamentation. The centre is occupied by 
an image of Ganoshji. This mixture of styles was adopted in order to take an 
opportunity of owing Buddhist and Hindu figures together. The bays 
flanking this ce i.ral gateway are somewhat lower, and consist of one pillar at 
each extremity, supporting, with the help of the central pillars, horizontal 
screens of Gwnlior stone-carving in relief. These pillars are of simpler style 
than the central pair, but are also modelled on the carvings of Khajurahu. The 
stone screens consist of panels and plaques, in various designs, some copied 
from the Sanchi Tope, near Bhopal, others from the Fort at Gwalior, and others 
again planned by the workmen themselves. „, .. .^.f 

On the left-hand side facing the Bombay Court, the style of screen is alto- 
gether lighter. Here, again, there are three bays, but the central one consists 
of an arch in the middle about 5 ft. broad, flanked by two narrow passages 
about 2 ft. broad. There is no horizontal screen in the central portion of this 
bay, which is simply an archway, but the side portions are fitted with glazed 
tiles. One flanking bay is fitted with perforated stone-work from Gwalior, and 
the other with perforated wood-carving from IJjjain. The three pairs of pillars 
supporting ttiese three bays are all of similar style, differing only in elaborate- 
ness of carving, and are copied from the kind of pillars often seen in temples 
and dwelling-houses in Indore and its neighbourhood. The perforated stone 
panels and wood-carvings ai'o, as before, partly copied from actual buildings, 
partly designed by the workmen. 

The outer pillars of the portion of the screen first described, and all six 
pillars of the second portion, are surmounted by brass pinnacles made at 
Ratlam, and copied from temples. 

The collections sent from the several States of the Central India Agency 
cannot bo said to be extensive, nor to contain particularly striking objects. 
The stone-carving of Gwalior, of which the great gate of the Indian Palace is 
the most remarkable example, is liere rejiresented by panels and plaques, both 
perforated and carved in relief. Those numbered 217, 218 are especially 
noticeable for their fineness of workmanship. The designs are taken from the 
intricate and elaborate patterns of the stone lattices of tombs and palaces 
included in the great Fort of Gwalior, which has recently been restored to H.H. 
the Maharaja Sindhia. A variety of cups, bottles, and other objects carved out 
<jf soapstone are examples of an industry common "^to Chhatarpur, Orchha and 
Bijawar. A betel leaf carved in tliis material, from Alipura, is noticeable 
for its fine execution. The small stone figures of gods from Dhar are only 
interesting as being the results of an industry newly started in that state, but 
of a collection from Mandawar some of the images of deities are old and curious 

"""Z JEFFREY & CO., 

*^^' MANUFACTURERS AND EXPORTEES OP ALL CLASSICS OF 

ARTISTIC WALL PAPERS (free from Arsenic), 

Fmhn — e d Leatben and liCather Papers, Hand-print«d Decorations, FlockR. Lacquered Gold Paptn, OeQiBf 
and Vvrtery Papers, and all classes of Chkap Machinr I>rinti:i> Wall Papiu. 

Hiskeit 4warda. ioolnding THE GOLD MEDAL, fuii, lS7t. 

TWO OOLD XESALS Health Exhibitioii. IBffl 

Factory :-«4, 1SS8BX BO AX), LONDOV, W. 



28 The Empire of India. 



examples. The carved pillar supporting rotating frames has been designed by 
a native of Indore. Four female figures appear to hold up the frames and the 
pil!ar is surrounded by another figure. 

Jewellery. — The enamels of Rutlam are produced by the same process as those 
of Partabgarh, elsewhere mentioned, differing only that the ground colour is blue 
instead of green. The work of the gold and silver smiths of Jhansi is seen in 
the gold and silver rings, which are of exceedingly light and fine workmanpLip. 
But the best assortment is from Indore, and contains very good saviples of 
native ornaments. Some of the bracelets are of superior make. Of the gold 
and silver plate the best are the salvers in silver repousai work ornamented with 
gold from Rampura in the Indore State. 

The bracelets, armlets, and necklets made of base metal, chiefly of zinc, from 
Bewah, deserve careful examination, many of them showing very beautiful 
designs. An old and curious set of chessmen in brass from Charkhari, a 
spherical lamp of perforated brass work, which can be rolled along the ground 
when lighted, and a lock containing a double-barrelled pistol from Chhatarpur, 
the brass pinnacles from Butlam which decorate a portion of the screen, and 
different vessels of hookahs, &c., in white metal from Ujjain, are illustrative of 
the special manufactures of those places. ' - ■» 

Amongst the arms is an antique sword from Charkhari. It is said that a 
Baja of Charkhari used to tie the head and four legs of a camel together and 
cut them through with one blow of this weapon. Of modern arms, a beautifully 
wrought inlaid shield, with three daggers fastened to it to serve as offensive 
weapons, is from Datia. A gold damascened sword and axe is from Fauna, 
adjacent to which town lie the celebrated diamond mine^. 

A variety of small wares in the ordinary lacquer-work is contributed from 
Bewah. This universal Indian manufacture will be noticed moro at length in 
other Courts where there is an opportunity of drawing attention to more 
examples. T\iany of the designs, of which there is a considerable variety, are 
pleasing, and the same may be said of the Indore bangles. 

Textiles. — Foremost amongst the cotton fabrics stand the muslins, turbans, 
loin-cloths, &c., manufactured at the once important but now insignificant town 
of Chanderi. These are the finest cloths manufactured in Central India. The 
jnuslin is especially fine and is usually loft white ; and the borders of silk and 
gold lace are handsome and effective. In mme of the articles the silk is coloured 
differently on either side. Almost equal to these are the Maheswar muslins 
from Indore. The fine yellow cloths from Sarangpur in Dewas are highly 
esteemed in Central India for their excellence. The yellow colour is the natural 
tint of the cotton. Ujjain and Mandawav in the Gwalior State have furnished 
a large assortment of stamped cloths of good quality with a great yariety 

CHAS. DAY 8l CO., 17, Water Lane, London, E.G. 

SOLK EXPOST BOTTUNO AGENTS FOB TUE FAMOUS 

"JOHN JAMESON WHISKEY," 

Tbi Leadtnv DUBLIN KAXX. 



VAUGHAK - JONSS* 

" O. I. €^.»» 

HiaELAND HALT '^SlflKT. 
AIM, VAUaHAN-JOKBS' "STAV^iUm" SiOrite, «<), 
Sou bj «U DMlen Uironghont JpOIk, Mie OoloniM, ft*. 



The Empire of India. 29 



of patterns. From Gbanderi also come the best silk fabrics, one specimen which 
IB deep crimson on one side and green on the other, with a broad gold lace 
border, being the handsomest. 

The embroideries exhibited inclode horse trappings embroidered with wool 
and silk, and a chessboard of old embroidery from Gharkhari, as well as Butlam 
imitation gold and silver embroidery of an ordinary character. 

r.i r .. BOMBAY COURT. , r. 

The Art Ware Court of Bombay has been most carefully filled with the 
best specimens of the manufactures of that great Presidency. The area directly 
under the Bombay Government contains 124,134 square miles, and a population 
of lei millions. The numerous Native States add to these totals 73,000 square 
miles, with 7 millions of inhabitants. The groat city of Bombay, which in 
numbers and commercial enterprise claims the title of Prima in India, exceeds 
Calcutta and Madras in actual population, and in point of numbers ranks as the 
second city in the British Empire. Besides these, the state of Baroda, which 
contains 8,570 square miles, with a population of 2,185,000, is represented. 

The Screen. — The screen, the general design for which was made by 
Mr. Griffiths, the Superintendent of the Bomliay School of Art and Secretary to 
the Bombay Committee for the London Exhibition, consists of two lengths, each 
80 ft long, made up of eight open bays, 10 ft. wide. In addition to these are the 
four ends, each 12 ft. wide, the total length of the screen being 208 ft., with 
a uniform height of 10 ft. The design of the screen has been made with 
a view to illustrate as fully as possJMe the characteristic wood-carving of the 
Presidency. 

The sections belonging to the Boyal Commission, to His Highness the 
Gaikwar of Baroda, and to His Highness the Bao of Cutch, were executed by 
native artizans under the superintendence of Mr. Wimbridge, of the East India 
Art Manufacturing Company, Bombay. The carved details for the Boyal 
Commission and Cutch sections have been selected by Mr. Wimbridge from 
Mahafiz Khan, Shapur, Dastar Khan, and Rani Sipri mosques at Ahmedabad, 
and the detail for the Baroda section from various houses in Surat. 

The Bhavnagar section, which comprises four of the richest bays, was 
constructed in Bhavnagar itself, under the immediate supervision of Mr. Proctor 
Sims, the state engineer, assisted by a very intelligent native mistry. The 
details of the work are taken from the old palace, and from some of the old 
houses in the town. The Junagar section was likewise carried out locally by 
Dalpat Kathtt. The work is executed in teak. 

The Bhavnagar portion of the screen will be generally admitted to be the 

Sm JOHK BENNETT, 65 & 64, Ghe^pside, London. 
Watch, Clock, and Jewellery Mannfkctorer, by Appointment to Her Majesty. 

GOLD KEYLESS MINUTE CHRONOGRAPH of the highest quality, finiBhed through- 
oat in the beat poMlIHe style. KtcKant la qtpeanaoe and perfectly accurate u • Umekeeper. Thb Watcb 
wgfateri tiw wmtiilu, Mcooda and mha of a wcond. X30to£M. 

GOLD KEYLESS CHRONOMETER of the highest qntdUy. Adjiuted and rated. 
%daHratriflito gar pnmn i t U mx. In iBM*iT« IS-caaa Bnitin|. Bair-auntinc, « crjital glaM owes, CM to £89. 



30 The Empire of India. 

richest and most beautiful, not only iu its own Court, but throughout the range 
of the Art Courts. The details, selected from the ancient mosques of the city 
of Ahmedabad, once the greatest in Western India, and stated by the Govern- 
ment Gazetteer to have been, from 1573 to 1600, the handsomest town in 
Hindostan, perhaps in the world, and which Sir Thomas Eowe declared to bo 
" a goodly city as large as London," illustrate the action of Mahommedan influence 
uiion the Hindu style. The mosques from which the details are taken, and 
which also furnish the patterns for the two windows in perforated brass which 
are exhibited, were buUt towards the end of the fifteenth and the beginning of 
the sixteenth centuries. The Koyal Commissioners have taken plaster casts of 
the panels and pillars in this screen for the decoration of nearly the whole of 
the private Exhibitors' Court, which is a signal testimohy to the beautiful and 
remarkably effective design and workmanship exliibited in it. 

The Baroda Pigeon House. — The Baroda Pigeon House, a lofty structure 
most elaborately carved, attracts attention, and well deserves its position. It 
must not be supposed that this Pigeon House, which is presented by H.H. the 
Gaikwar of Baroda, is an example of poultry farming, or represents any such 
use in domestic economy, as the dove-cotes in our homesteads. In Baroda and 
throughout Gujarat the inhabitants erect pigeon houses for feeding not only 
pigeons but parrots, sparrows, and all birds living in or near their towns. The 
Gujaratis consider it a sin to kill any animal, and to feed them is held to be a 
groat act of charity. Pigeon houses therefore are erected by the wealthy 
natives from motives of piety. Several other specimens of wood-carving have 
been sent from Gujarat. Carved blackwood furniture, the old clumsy carving, 
the style of which was obviously derived from the Dutch, and was utterly 
inapplicable to chairs, couches and tables, is seen to better advantage in the 
'cabinets and picture frames both from Ahmedabad and from the Katnagiri 
School of Indiist'y. The establishment started at Ahmedabad by Mr. Lock- 
wood de Forest, an American gentleman, for the construction of carved furni- 
ture which is exported to New York, has given a considerable stimulus to 
this art industry, and, as will be seen by the specimens exhibited, turns out 
articles of good design and careful Pnish. The wood-carving for domestic 
architecture is still carried on at Surat, and there are several workshops 
where doors, shutters and cupboards may bo bought ready made. A carved 
doorway furnishes a specitnon of this class. From Bhavnagar also comes a 
large marble screen o^ elaborate design, and a fair example of modern carving 
in stone. It forms part of the cenotaph or sculptured marble chhatri designed 
by Mr. GriflSths, and which is now being erected in memory of the deceased' 
wife of H.H. the Thakur Saheb. 

The wood-carving as used in ordinary houses is well illustrated by a carved 

HOLLAND'S New "PARADOX " Double Gun, Patent 

12 BOBE. Shooting Conical Bnlleti up to 100 yards like an ExpreM Bifle, and Shot 
liko a flrst-rata ordinary Shot Gun. Weight abont Tlbi. 

FOR FULL DSaCRtPTIOS tee ixtge 485, and " FIELD " NOnCE, April %it\, 1886. 

"INVALUABLE FOR SPORTSMEN IN INDIA AND THE COLONIES." 

PBIOXB FBOM 35 TO 60 OUINBAS. 

HOLLAND & HOLLAND, 98, New Bond Street, London, W. 



The Empire of India. 31 



doorway from Baroda, whence also comes the back wall representing some of 
the stylos found on the front of native houses. The door is particularly well 
carved, but the brackets and other portions of the decoration are Europeanised 
in stylo, and do not show any particular exce]lonce of work. The handles of 
the door deserve careful examination. 

Inlaid Work. — The well-known Bombay and Surat inlaid workboxes made of 
sandal- wood, and decorated with ivory, blackwood or metal, are imported in 
large quantities, and too well kno^vn to need any description. The migration of 
the Paisi artisans of Surat to Bombay established there this handiwork, which 
originally came from Shiraz to Sind, and thence to Gujarat. The Bombay Com- 
mittee has acted very wisely in sending only a few of the best specimens, 
both on account of their liability to be spoiled by exposure to damp, and 
)ecau8e the ordinary class are common objects in the shops of London. The 
Ratnagiri School of Industry sends a largo cabinet inlaid with ivory and 
staghorn. 

The Poona clay figure? are distinguished by their modelling and lifelike 
representation of the variety of races inhabiting the Bombay Presidency, each 
race being distinguished by its dress and its turban. They differ from Lucknow 
models in that the dresses are composed of actual pieces of cloth, ■'y'-*" ro ' 

The glazed tiles, which have been manufactured at Hala in Sind, and repro- 
duce the work which adorns the interior and exterior of the ancient mosques and 
tombs at Hyderabad in Sind, are sent to the Exhibition by Colonel Trevor, the 
collector of that district. 

Pottery is still produced, although not to the extent that it was in the days 
of the Amirs, when glazed tiles of exquisite colour and design were extensively 
produced for lining the mosquss and tombs which are now in ruins. The 
pottery now produced is very beautiful: the tradition is that a Chinese 
traveller was induced to settle in Sind in order to start the ceramic manu- 
facture, and that the present potters, who arc all Mussuiuians, are either his 
direct or collateral descendants. They now fonn a distinct community, 
called " Kashigars." The difficulty of transjwrting their fragile wares from the 
far interior of Sind has caused Mr. Terry to start a manufactory in Bombay 
under the supervision of two Kashigars. Except the glazed pottery from 
Ahmedabad, all such ware exhibited in the Bombay Court was made in this 
establishment. It represents the original Sind art as modified both by the 
application of it to a variety of new ishapes, and the introduction of decorations 
copied from the Ajanta caves, as well as from scenes from the two great Indian 
epic poems. Pattan, in the Baroda territory, has a name for pottery, of which 
specimens have been sent. The ware is mostly unglazed, and the designs are 
painted green, this being the only colour that the Pattan potters can glaze with. 



Xraae Marii — 

Obelisk Of Luxor. 



ALL 

CICAKBTTES 

MARKED 

"LUXOR." 



"I II VAD" CIGARETTES. 



LUXOR 



PTTRS TX7BKISH TOBACCO. 
WARRAKTED HAND-MADB. 

THREE DISTINCT QUALITIES r-8PECIAL— FIRST-SECOND. 

ALEZANDBIA CIOABETTE CO.,Iatd.,63ft64,NewBroadSt.,LoDdoa|E.0L 
AGENTS WANtSD FOR AI4« TH9 COLONIES* 



33 The Empire of India, 



The siaapes are, however, very ancient, and, though rough in character, are very 
oflfective for decorative purposes. 

Metal Work. — The principal centres of the manufacture of copper and brass 
ware in the Bombay Presidency are Nasik and Poona ; although a large trade in 
the universally required copper and brass utensils is carried on in other large 
towns, Nasik drinking cups and sacrificial pots are preferred to those of Poona 
on account of their superior finish. The ornamental objects, as well as idols, 
lamps, and other articles, have all come from Poona or Kasik. At the Bombay 
School of Art, Mr. Griffiths has specially prepared for this Exhibition a large 
copper vase, and a panel in repousse work, the design having been taken from 
carvings in the caves of Ajanta. 

Trophy of Arms. — The large and handsome Trophy of Arms, contributed by 
H.H. the Rao of Cutch, which forms a conspicuous object, illustrates the manu- 
facture at Bhuj in Cutch of copies, so far as appearance goes, of the genuine 
old Indian arms, which comprise almost every possible shape and form of sword 
and dagger, from the historic toagnak or tiger claw with which Sivaji, the 
founder of the Maratta power, stabbed the Bijaporo general, to the most costly 
tulwar. These arms are only intended for the purpose of d3coration. They are 
made of inferior steel, but are rendered attractive by being inlaid with gold 
and silver, while the copper sheaths are ornamented with repousse work of gold. 
The Earoda Darbar has lent a representative collection of old Indian arms, in 
which may be noticed some fine examples of inlaid gold, silver and ivory work. 
Other collections have been sent from Bhavnagar and from Palanpur, of which 
the majority are modern. 

Lacquered Wares. — Sawantwari, a small Maratta state, near the territory 
of Goa, has for a long time had a name for its bamboo baskets, lined with 
cloth and painted with Jndian pigments in various designs, and finally lac- 
quered. Fans made of the fragrant root of the khaskas grass, ornamented 
with beetles' wings, and edged with peacock feathers, are also made in that 
principality. Hindu playing-cards made of paper and lacquered, pats or low 
stools on which the natives sit to dine, the devharaa or shrines for the family 
gods, dolls, toys and cradles, are all shown in the lacquered ware of 
Sawantwari. The dome-shaj^ed shri)\e of Ganpati, the deity presiding 
over knowledge and success, has been exhibited as a typical specimen of the 
workmanship. There are also tables, desks, chairs, wall-brackets, cabinets, 
stcols and book-shelves, which have been specially made for this exhibition 
to exemplify the applicabilitj' of this stylo of decorative art to lesser ai-ticles 
of domestic funiiture. From Hyderabad, in Sind, lacquered toys are exhibited, 
and have also been sent from Nasik and from Mahuwa in the Bhavnagar state. 
The teapoy boxes, flower stands, and card trays, are admirable examples of the 



="£"" HYDROLElNE''S' 



The material is rapidly replacing Soap In England for cleansing 
wool. Wool may be washed with Hydroleine at the rate of 
Is. per pack. Sole Manufacturers — 

F. J. HARRISON & Co., Umited, WatUng Street Works, Leicester. 



The Empire of India. *J 



woll-known Sind lacquer ware. The SincI boxes are made by laying various 
coloured lac in succession, while turning on the lathe, and then cutting tho 
ilesign through tho difl'erent colours. Other l)oxc8 uro siinplv etched and 
painted with hunting scenes or liowors, and then coated with a thin transparent 
layer of lac varnish. Lacquer ware turned on tho lothe is also exhibited from 
Nasik, Baroda, Bhavnagar, and Goudal. Another application of lac is found in 
the collection of bangles made of wood, and lac lined with tinsel, decorated with 
spangles or dyed red, from Ahmcdabad and Surat, where they are largely iwed 
by Gujarati women. 

Horn Work. — Viziadurg and Mahran, in the Ratnagiri district and Sawant- 
wari, are tho places where bisons' horns uro moulded into ornamental flower- 
stands, trees, cups, stands for idols, bucks, cubs, antelopes, elephants, and the 
god Ganpati. Of late tho artisans, who are Hindu carpenters to whom tho 
secret process has been handed down througli five or six generations from tho 
first discoverer, have also taken to making inkstands, &e., suitable for European 
use. It is said that cocoanut oil and wax are applied to tho horn, which is 
then heated and pressed in moulds, but tho process is not definitely known. 
After being roughly shaped the liorn is scraped and polished, and finally some 
designs are chased and filled in with chalk. Tii l"; ouibay Cummitteo has 
sent a flower stand, a kamal or lotus-shaped tray mounted on a nandi or sacred 
bull. Tho SawantAvari Darbar contributes an inkstand, and Buroda scuds a 
carved and polished horn in the shape of a peacock. -..^ ..i 

Ivory Work. — Ivory inlaid work has already been mentioned. Ivory carvlug 
is practised to a small extent at Poona, Junagad, Satara, Ahmcdabad, Surat 
and Cutch. Ivory figures are made in Bombay and Surat by some of tho Parsi 
work-box makers, but of late they have been using stag-horn instead. At 
Poona ivory combs aro made in tho Kashapitti. At Junagar and Ahmedabad 
there are good ivory car\'ers, but they mostly work with ebony or black wood 
unless an article in ivory is specially ordered. An excellent specimen of the 
figure of Kartikswami, tho son of Shiva, and the general of the celestial army, 
riding on a peacock, has been contributed by H.H. the Rao of Cutch. 

Gold and Silver Work. — Cutch, Poona, Baroda, Bhavnagar, Ahmednagar and 
Bombay contribute o. large collection of vases, cups, tea and coffee services, 
plates and flower stands, and H.H. the Rao of Cutch not only sends the best but 
tho largest collection in the whole of tho Indian section. Bepousse work in 
silver is a speciality of Cutch. It is attributed to a Dutch origin, but in course 
of time has been perfectly assimilated to the native style of the province. H.H. 
the Thakur Saheb of Bhavnagar contributes a very valuable collection of palace 
jewellery, made of gold or silver, and studded with precious stones. The 
Bombay Comn»ittee send a lota to illustrate the chased work done at Poona, and 

THE NEW HOUSEHOLD LIFT. 



Every PRIVATE HOUSE, 
H( 



CHKAP. (Patented.) USggirii. 

COALS, LINEN, BOOKS, 

PARCELS. LUGGAGE, &c., 

up and down Stairs with 

eeise and safety. 



lOTEL, SCHOOL, 
should contain it for 
carrying 

For Price and Slostrated Oircolar, address 0. W. 0B0SSLE7 & Co., 14, St. Maiy Axa, E.O. 



SAVES 

THE CARPETS, 

WALLS, MONEY, 

TIME, TROUBLE. 



34 The Empire of India. 

it is the best work of its kiud. A largo and complete collection of the gold and 
silver ornaments used by the high-caste Hindus of Rxma has been specially made 
to order for this Exhibition, with the difference that baser metals are used 
instead, and gilt. This collection has thus been secured for a very small bura, 
and fully represents the original shapes, and even the lustre, as a part of it is 
gilt and another electro-plated. From IJaroda comes a collection of gold and 
silver articles, mostly ornaments in common use. But a notable addition is tho 
caparisoned and dressed silver model of the state elephant. 

Aden, which, though situated on tho Arabian coast of the Red Sea, is under 
the administration of the Bombay Government, contribiites a fine collection of 
fciilver jewellery as worn by tho Arab and Somali women. The shapes are not 
only massive but very quaint, and it is a collection which deserves a special 
and close inspection, as it is particularly interesting both to the fanciers of 
fiilver work, and to the student of comparative ethnology, who can read remote 
kinship in tho long-descendvd forms of ornament common to widely separated 
laces. 

Textile Fabrics. — Notwithstanding the changes in the prosperity of the cottou 
cloth industry, caused first by tho extinction of the trading monopoly of the East 
India Company, Avhich affected Surat, and more recently by the unrestrained 
Manchester imports, which have almost destroyed tho cotton manufac ires of 
Bardach, there is still a very extensive industry carried on throughout the 
Bombay Presidency, both in -weaving cotton cloth, printing calicoes, and manu- 
facturing articles of dress worn by both sexes. ]n the Ahmed abad collectorate 
the weaving of cotton cloth is still an important industry. In Ahmedabad 
itself there are several steam factories employing over two thousand hands. 
Yeola, Ahmedabad, Bijapore, Baroda, Kaira, Cutch, Gondal and Sind all con- 
tribute a large collection of nadis and khans for Avomen, dhotis or waist-cloths, 
turbans, floor-cloths, and printed cloths. Ahmedabad sends two fine examples 
of cloth printed with gold and silver leaf. This industry is nearly extinct, 
and there is only one man at Ahmedabad who carries on the work. A 
great distinction between the Gujerat and tho Maratta races is in the decoration 
of their cotton goods, the purely Maratta people seldom wearing printed cotton 
goods, while the inhabitants of Gujerat prefer them to all others. The beautiful 
printed floor-cloths from Cutch and Sind are conspicuous in the decoration of 
the Bombay Court, Tho collection of turbans sent by the Bombay Committee 
is doubly interesting from the representation of the various head-dresses as 
distinguishing the different divisions of the inhabitants of Bombay. The 
variety of shapes which one single piece of cloth assumes in the hands of the 
turban folders, without being cut or stitched together, will prove as interesting 
to a careful observer as the numerous social divisions that are denoted by thom> 

M. B. FOSTER and SONS, 

ALE, BEER. AND CYDER MERCHANTS. AND PURE 
M/NERAL WATER MANUFACTURERS. 

27, BROOK STREET, BOND STREET, W. 

For Ocueral AdTexUsement soe pago . 



The Empire of India. gj^ 



bout 40 to 75 yards of cloth aro required for the construction of a single 
arban, but the purpose of illustrating the different shapes has been served by 
nitation patterns which show the mode of application and tlio roHult. 

The 8ilk fabrics exhibited aro mostly fine exaniplcH of the historical silk 
lanufactnrors of Ahmcdabad, Surat, Tanna, l^oona and Yoola. These are the 
ii(>f but not the only cities of the silk Jimnufacturo in the Presidency. 

At Ahmedubad kinkhah or kincob, witli tho woof either of gold or silver only, 
woven, about five or six hundred looms being engaged in tho manufacture! 
'ho maferial is used for covering state carriages, saddle cloths, thrones, 
ushious, chairs, and couches, and marriage dresses of bridegrooms, bodices 
urn by women of Gujcrat, and Mu.ssulmans' jackets and caps are also made of 
. There aro two varieties of the Ahmcdabad brocades, one being thick and 
Dstly, while tho other is known as tho bunarsi, after Benares, from which town 
10 pattern was originally obtained. This is the thinner and comparatively 
icapor material. The kinUiab generally now produced and sold at Ahmeda- 
ad is not as superior as it formerly was, for inferior foreign gold and silver 
iread is substituted in tho placo of tho purer Indian material. It was 
lerefore necessary to have specimens carefully manufactured for tho Exhi- 
ition, and Mr. Griffiths thus secured two magnificent specimens, one of tho 
nest kinkhab and another of the banarsi. Such pieces are called rumah, and 
sed for covering presents sent to high state officials. Of tho latter variety a 
reat number of samples illustrate the different patterns. A pair of light 
lue curtains with tho keri or mango design worked in gold is specially 
a bo admired. Besides the gold and silver kinkhab, the Surat weavers employ 
ifferently coloured silk itself in producing tho effect in lieu of the gold 
ad silver thread. There is a largo exportation to Siam of gold and silver 
rocade in the form of loin cloths, which aro used by the princes and nobles of 
lat country. A variety of Surat brocade, in which tho design is partly 
orked in coloured silk and partly in bullion thread, is known as jamdans. 
ne silk and cotton brocade is called nababi himro from the fact of this particu- 
ir pattern being exclusively appropriated for the last four or five generations 
the use of the families of the Nabob of Surat. Although a mixed material, the 
otton warp is so covered by the silk weft as not to be visible, and thtis enables 
evout Mussulmans to comply with the law which prohibits them from 
rearing garments of pure silk. There are numerous specimenB of that 
eculiar pattern, the handhna or knot-dyeing, which gave its name to tho old 
andauna handkerchief. The surface of the undyed cloth is divided into ono- 
ich squares by the draughtsman or chitarna. Tho knotter or bandanari, 
enerally a girl, picks up a little cloth at each corner of tho squares, and tiee 
t into a knot according to tho pattern. When knotted all over, tho cloth is 

EAST CHAIHS & SOFAS, 

By HOWARD & SONS, 25 Berners St., 

FOR HOME OR THE COLONIES, 



86 3^ Empire of India, 

dyod the colour roriuirod for tho ground, uftor whicli tho knots are untied, ai 
thoro are usually littlo Bcpmroa of whito, tho controH of which are general! 
hand-painted in yellow. This is tho simplest of hundana patterns, but the 
vary up to tho more complicated or flower-garden design, in which man 
colours are applied in successive processes of dyeing. Among tho silk an 
golden fabrics from Yeola will be found a specimen of work woven red on on 
side and yellow on tho other. Tho gold and silver and silk embroidery of 8in< 
Surat and Bombay is largely illustrated. It would bo worth while t< 
compare the collection of old embroideries lent to the Bombay Commiltw 
which show the superiority of the ancient dyes. 

BENGAL COURT. 

The Bengal Court represents the territory governed by tho Lioutenan 
Governor of Bengal, tho limits of wliose jurisdiction are almost identical witj 
those of tho Dowaung of lieugal, Behar and Orissa, conferred by Shah Alar 
upon the East India Company iu 17G5. It actually includes Bengal proper, Behs 
Orissa (much more extensive than tho originally granted district) and Chut: 
Nagpur. These contain an area of 150,588 square miles (exclusive of tl 
doKolate Sundarbuns (more usually Sonderbands) and a i)opulatJon of 66,691,5i 
souls, one-third of the population of British India. In addition, the Katii 
States in connection with Bengal have an area of 96,004 square miles, and 
population of 34,911,270 souls, making a total of 204,765 square miles and 6S 
millions. Tho principal native states included in Bengal, for Exhibitii 
purposes aro Kuch Behar and Hill Tipperah, neither of which are large ( 
important, and a number of small states known as tho Tributary Mahals. 

Hindu Screen.— Tho screens of tho Bengal Art- ware Court are an attempt 
illustrate, chiefly by means of jjapier-mdche castings, tho btyles of architectur 
ornament characteristic of the best Hindu and Muhamniadan buildings in Beuj: 
Proper. The Northern screen is adapted from the temple of Krishna at Kauti* 
agar, near Dinajpur, built between 1704 and 1722 a.d. This templo forms t 
excellent example of the brick architecture of Lower Bengal, and one of its chi 
constnictive peculiarities, tho bent cornice, supposed by the late Mr. Fergus* 
to have been copied from the common bamboo hut of the country, has been repi 
duced in the screen. The entire surface of the building is covered with ten 
cotta reliefs, representing for the most part figure-subjects taken from t 
daily life of tho people. From some of tho best of these ca^ts have be 
made in a mixture of papier mdche and plaster of Paris, coloured to match 1 
originals, and attached to the screen so as to represent the general effect of ' 
temple. . . 

SIR JOHN BENNETT, 65 & 64, Cheapside, London. 
Watch, Clock, and Jewel lery Mannfacturer, by App ointment to Her M^jei^ 

SILVER KEYLESS HALF-CHRONOMETER, |-plato movcmetit, fully jeweUed, adjust 

for nil cllni»te«, »ud U BpecUUy manufcctured for burning and rouRh wear. £\o, il2. £'6. 
SILVER KEYLESS CHRONOGRAPH, willi fly-back aeconds hand, j-plutc, half-Chro 
meter, lew»Ued In 13 icUons. A flr.t-cl»8)9 WMoh, perjecUy •ccuwl^ Mtd reliable, reguterii.g tbe •««* 
fUUu of a second, £7, £8, «10. £15, £90, £31. 
♦ 



The Empire of InAia. 87 

Muhammadan St'reen. — The Southern or Aliihaminadnn wrocnwas doHigrjcd hy 
r. Jules Schaumburg,* artist to the Gcf>logical Survey of India, on the line's of tho 
•fhitooture of tho ancient city of Gaur an<l its suburb Panduah. Ganr bccamo 
)o capital of Bengal under MuhammtMl Piaklityar Khilji in A.n. 1198, incrcaHcd 
reatly in size and wealth up to its sack by Shcr Shah, tho Afghan Governor of 
char in 1537, and was finally almndonod in 157o, under Aklmr, in conscquenco 

a pestilence which devastated tho citj'. The general idea of tho hereon was 

rivod from tho Qadam Kasul Mosque, built by Nusrah Shah in 1530, tho flat 
lasters bulging outwards at the Iwttom are adapte<l from tho tomb of Sultan 
hyasuddin (1211-1227), known us tho Eklahi Mosque, at Pnndua, while tho 
tailocl ornamentation consists of casts taken from tho remains of thcso and 
her buildings preserved in the Indian Museum, Calcutta. Tho painted design 
; the weat end of tho screen is a composition from canned stones and tiles in tho 
nscum, and in intended to represent tho enamelled tiles with which tho Gaur 
id Pandua buildings were overlaid. 

Carting. — Of the stucco mouldings which are characteristic of many houses 

Bengal, those in Dacca are most remarkable for their beauty. Tho specimens 
hibitod were obtaine<l with difficulty, as the work is but little in demand, and 
le industry is dying out. Sculpture generally has almost died out in Bengal, 
he great temples of Orissa and the ruins in Chutia Nagpur and Lcssar 
»ow that in ancient times sculpture was a flourishing industry. Formerly 
inhat, a town in Burdwan, annually turned out largo numbers of images of 
rishna and the Sivaito symbols, but this trade also has declined. Tho clay 
odels of Krishnagur on tho other hand belong to an industry which, origina- 
ng in the manufacture of sacred images, gradually extended its scope to tho 
presentation of every form of social life. The life-sized figures which in tho 
conomic Court illustrate tho ethnology of India, and the models which faith- 
illy represent tho rural village and the different operations of agricultural life, 
« all constructed at Krishnagur. Calcutta also supplies clay models, two of 
hich represent the goddess Durga, otherwise known as the " terrible Kali," 
ife of the god Siva tho Destroyer. Tho annual festival calletl Durga Puja, 
U in Bengal in her honour, is the greatest holiday of tho Hindu population 
he north, couth, oast and west gates of tho celebrated temple of Jaggernath at 
nri may bo examined in carefully-executed models. 

Jewellery. — The chief centres in Bengal of the manufacture of jewellery are 
icca, Cuttack, and Calcutta. Tho silver filigrain work in which tho people 

Cuttack have attained such sui-passing skill and delicacy, is. Sir George 
irdwood remarks, " identical in character with that of Arabia, Malta, Genoa, 



' : i .. I? ♦ Since deceased. 



ARTON & CO., WINE MERCHANTS, LONDON. 

"W— t»B«d Oillces; 3M», ST. JAHSS* STRSBT, "W. 



JRET. 



Light DiBncr. 



18/- to 80/- 



Hfgber CUw— Pint. Seoand. Mid Tbird Gn wths. 



18T8 



36/. 



1876 Ife79 



42,'- 



48/- 



18TT 



64/- 



1873 



60/- 



- -cjt fri», 



For Choice VinUgs CUreti lee pi^ 



1872 



66/- 



1875 



72/- 



38 The Empire of India. 

K or way, Swodon, and Denmark, and with tho fili grain work of Ancien 
Greece, Byzantium, and Etruria, and was probably carried into the west by th 
Phoenicians and Arabs, and into Scandinavia by the Normans. In Cuttac 
tho work is generally done by boys, whose sensitive fingers and keener sigl: 
enable them to put the fine silver threads together with the necessary rapidit 
and accuracy. It is quite distinct in character from the indigenous silvc 
jewellery of the country." ,\, ; .; 

Jewellery to suit European taste, such as necklets and necklaces, bracoleti 

lockets, pendants, and brooches, hairpins, shoebuckles, and other article! 

are extensively manufactured for export, but the personal ornaments &ru 

attardans and panhattas, or I'ccoptacles for perfume and betel, are in grea 

demand amongst tho Bengalis. Gold and silver filigrain is also largelj 

manufactured at Dacca. The Nawab Ahsanulla has lent a gootl collection 

pei'sonal ornaments and boxes, among which one is specially remarkable, an 

silver models of elephants, &c. It is said that tho demand for Dacca silverwar 

has increased of late, while that for Cuttack has diminished. Tho Maharaja 

of Diiiajpur also exhibits a collection of the characteristic silver jewellery o 

that place, which shows highly interesting primitive forms, strongly recallic 

the ancient torques of the Celtic races. The State of Hill Tipperah exhibits 

collection of work resembling the Cutiack ware. An envelope case is special! 

worthy of notice. Gold jewellery worn by tho higher classes in Bengal i 

chiefly made in Calcutta. The different shapes are illustrated in tho exhibitioi 

of cheap jewellery made in gilt metal. These ornaments are chiefly used I 

women who are too poor to afford real gold or silver ornaments, and by nati^ 

dancers or singers, and are brought from Bonpash Kdmdrpara, in Burdwai 

where the kdmdrs or blacksmiths carry on their hereditary manufactun 

Mahommedaus, who are tho professional electroplaters of Bengal, wash an 

gild the ornaments, giving them a complete finish. In the " Industrial Arts ( 

India," it is stated that at Dacca a considerable quantity of gold and silv* 

plate of good original design and excellent workmanship is made. Tho Bangs 

Committee, however, report that but little gold or silver plate work is execute 

by the natives of Bengal. From Murshidabad an drdkdan is exhibited, whi 

three specimens of tho primitive Tliibetan work have been sent from Darjilin 

The Calcutta Government School of Art shows a collection of copper repou. 

work made by the students. Vessels of boll-metal, brass or copper, are used 

every native household. Hindus use brass and bell-metal ware for domesi 

and copper for religious purposes, while tho Mahommedans prefer tinni 

copper vessels. Khankra, near Murshidabad, and Janjharpur near Darbhango 

have the best reputation for plain polished work. Hugli, Gaya, Moharbhanj» ai 

Calcutta, are the only places where there is any carving worth notice, and 



NORTON'S PATENT ABYSSINIAN AND ARTESIAN 

. For providing laxge or small supplies of Pure Water. Invaluable to Oolooista 

for Irrigtition purposes. 

LE GRAND & SUTCLIFF, Contractors to H.M. War Depart"* 
Hydraulic Engineer*, zoo, Bunhill Row, London, E.G. 



The Empire of India. 39 



cftnnot boar comparison with that executed in other provinces. The cut iigurea 
of deities from Gaya and Moharbhanj arc quaint in design, but without finish. 
The collection of spittoons, watcrcups, drinking vessels, chillimchis, plates and 
1k(w1s, tl'c, was purchased in the Calcutta Bazaar. It consists of articles manu- 
factured in Calcutta or brought from the districts of P.aukura, Burdwan, 
ilowrah, Ahmtdalc^d, and ]\Iurshidabad. The largo and smaller brass spittoons 
are specialities of the village of Bolur in the Ilowrah district. Good specimens 
of the best boll-metal wares manufactured in Mursliidabad will bo found 
amongst them. Birbhum furnishes a large collection, and liangpur sends two 
examples of Chilmari cups, so called from the place of their manufactmo ; one 
(894) is a uest of nine bell-metal cups, locally called a ijdnju hati. The next is 
a tumbler with a cup below and another at the top, with a small j^lato covered 
over with a conical cover. This is called yauja yclns, and is generally used 
for carrying tiffin, &o. 

The inlaid or bidri ware made at Purniah and Mur.shidabad is well 
represented, though, in the process of manufacture, both as regards the 
combined metal of copper and zinc, of which tlie ware is made, and the mod© 
of inlaying the gold and silver, whether it be leaf for the inferior or wire 
for the best articles, there is an essential difiference between the original 
manufacture of Bidar and that of Bengal. In the first the ground colour 
is as a rule white, while the ornamental patterns are in black. In the second 
the ground is black, the tracing and figures being of silver and white. A 
hukd lent by the Nawab of Murshidabad is gold, inlaid on a black ground. 
The ornaments of the Purniah ware are sometimes of a Chinese character, 
probably introduced by way of Sikkim or Bhotan. 

The inland work of Monghyr, consisting of highly-polished ebony inlaid 
with ivory, is the only manufacture of its kind in Beuijal, but the superior 
attractions of the more lucrative employment on the East India Railway 
are said to have reduced the number of Hindu carpenters engaged in this 
industry to six or eight. The ivory carving of Murshidabad ^*s under the 
active i)atronage of the Maharani Swarnnnuiyi, M.C.I., of Kasimbazar, and the 
Nawab of Murshidabad, and is said to be the best in Bengal, but trade is 
said to bo on the decline. It is also carried on in Patna, Dacca, Orissa, 
Rangpur, Hill Tippenih and Sarun. The Murshidabad work is exemplified 
by a collection of models of tho goddess Durga, a bullock cart and native 
woman going to bathe, lent by the Maharaja of Dinajpur, and a collection of 
palkis boats, personal ornaments, ploughmen and jdouglis, &c. The Maharani 
Swarnamayi lias offered the carved elephant with state howdah and figures 
(798), and the carved stick (707), as presents to Her Majesty the Queen, 
Empress of India, and H.K.H. tho Prince of Wales respectively, at tho close 

SIR JOHN BENNETT, 65 & 64, Oheapside, London. 
Watoh, Clock, and Jewellery Manufacturer, by Appointment to Her Mt^jesty. 

GENTLEMEN'S GOLD KEYLESS CLOCK WATCHES, of tho liighoBt qualiiy, 

ttiiklng en paMtant tho huurs and c|nart«r«, also repeating the hours, qimrtors, and minutoo, with p<-rp<>tual 
calendar, ilidwlnft the day of the week, the day of the montb, the month and phniK^s of the moon ; and alio witi) 
fly-back seconds chrono^aph movtmout for racing, engineering, and other piir|)usea, from Alii. 



40 The Empire of India. 



of the Exhibition. Among the other carvings are figures of prominent 
personages of the Hindn mythology. An ivory hat and an ivory fan ( 1 480-1 ), are 
presentations from H.II. the Maharaja of Hill Tipperah to H.R.IT. the Prince of 
Wa'os. 

Laeqiwred Waren. — The lacqneroJ wares of Ilambazar in Birbhum, and of 
Mnrshidabad, are the bost in Bengal. The models of ftnits and vegetables are 
not good, nor is much artistic taste shown in the colouring, but the polish 
of the surfaces show;} great care in the manipulation. The Patna caps 
and boxes have better pretensions to design, but their workmanship is rude 
and unfinished. The Shahabad playing cards, made of pieces of talc lacquered 
and painted, are a noteworthy sj^ecimen of Indian carving, and amongst the 
Mnrshidabad gold 3i>angled articles some are worthy of notice. 

At late Exhibitions there have been seen no specimens of Bengal woo<l 
carving. The present collection shows that the art, thou<;h not much practised, 
still exists. The rooilels of the temples constructed at Barakhar, Cuttack, and 
Dinajpnr, are good samples of the Bengali skill in carpentry. The 0»ya 
carving, lioth old and modem, can be studied in the specimens of old doorways 
and balconies, and the now doorway made at Gaya. \ /r^ 

'■■ Calcutta Government School of Art furnishes a gambhar-wood (Gmelina 
arborea, Kox.) jewel-box carve<l after Hindu ornamental designs, by Babu 
Harish Chandra, the teacher of wood carving in the School of Art, Calcutta. 
The five repousse copper electro-plated panels fixed on the top and sides are 
made by Babu Saratchandra Das, a student of the same school. The designs 
in these are taken from Bhubaneswar Temple, in Orissa. 

Four sets of ornaments, each consisting of necklace, n pair of bracelets, a 
fair of rings, and a brooch, are exhibited from Monghyr. One is of buflalo horn, 
two of ebony, and the fourth is a curious set made out of betel nuts, and a 
remarkable stick made of betel nuts joined together, with an ivory handle, 
made at Sanin, is notc<l as presented by the Maharaja Krishna Pratab Sahai 
of Hatwa, to the Government of Bengal. The carved stone-wares manufactured 
at Gaya, locally called sonirash, are the best of the kind in Bengal. They are 
purchased to a large extent by the pilgrims who visit Gaya, and the Public 
Library of that place has lent a very good collection, pottery, «fec., including 
black marble jars, plate^i, &c , figures of idols, mendicants, and animals. Two 
large plates from Monghyr have been presented by Messrs. Ambler & Co., whose 
manufactures ere illustrated by a lai^^e collection in the Imperial Court. The 
potteiy of Bengal is more remarkable for its shape than for external finish 
or decoration. Dinajpur cor-i-.'butes the liest forms. Messrs. Bum & Co.V 
Ramganj Pottery Works turn out excellent pottery, though not of an oriental 
deaoription. The black and red pottery wares of Sarun, consisting of cops, 

JOHNSTON'S BEEF FLOUR 

And BEEF LOZENGES. 

The Great Muscle Formers for Athletes, Cyclists, Pedestrians, 

Cricketers, etc. 

Sihibit Is CaDi^aD Section. Oices— 10, Trinity Sqnare, Tower Hill, londoi. 



TTie Empire of India. 41 



saucers, goblots, teapots, A-c, are snid to bo a manufacture introduced from 
Azingash. In unglazocl pottery the Calcutta Government School of Art sends 
a variety of pattcms, Ruch as the lizard pattern, the monkey pattern, the 
trimurti pattern, louring figures of Brahma, Vishnu, and Mahadeva, the swan, 
and lotns patterns. In the Patna glass ware there is a strong inclination 
manif3«ted to imitate European work. 

Textile Fahric8.—W\i\v the exception of the celehratwl Dacca muslins, the 
MuTshidabad and Rankura silks and the Tasar silks, the fabrics of Bengal aro 
not of a high order of excellence. Notwithstanding the supercession of native- 
made cotton fabrics by the cheaper piece goods of Manchester, which has taken 
rlace generally throughout the country, the former are still woven in small quan- 
tities in every district. A collection of cotton fabrics bought in Howrah Bazaar, 
and those made in Dinajpur and in the Chittngong and Hill Districts, show 
generally the style of nativo-mado cloths worn in Bengal. In the first collec- 
tion it is believed that no Indian dyes, with the exwption of indigo, are used. 
The twist and the dyes are imported, and the dhotis and naria aro woven in 
the villages. The ccuntiy-wovon cloths aie more durable than imported piece- 
goods, but their comparatively high prices prevent their being commonly worn. 
The colours in the cloths from the Hill Tribes are firm and durable, while the 
rlesigns are generally good. The hokti cloth, which resembles the well-known 
Mi used for hot-weather uniforms, and is superior to it in that it dc.es not 
change colour or fade, is manufactured in Pumia, Muzfifferpur and Dharbanga. 
A large collection of well-made cotton fabrics of European fashion is sent by 
Messrs. Thakur Prosad Shaw and Co. of Dinapur. In Patna the weaving of 
fine cotton stuffs still continues. 

The celebrated muslins of Dacca aro still represented, but the exquisite 
fineness of the historical manufacture is a thing of the past. Sir George Biid- 
wood tells us that in the time of Jehangir, muslin could be manufactured 
15 yds. long and 1 yd. broad, weighing only 900 grains and worth £40. Now 
the finest piece of that size weighs 1(500 grains, and is worth only £10. Rare 
mnslins, which were named the "dew of the evening," and " running water," 
because they became invisible on the wet grass or in a stream, no longer exist. 
Several fine specimens of the present mamifacture are exhibited by the Nawah 
A&inulla. Others aro sent for sale. The muslins are now generally made of 
English twist, but the finer sorts of Indian twist. The weaving of the latter 
if carried on during the rains, and in the early morning and evening, as there 
is not enough moisture in the air at other times, and the warp would break. 
In dry hot weather it is necessary when weaving the finest fabrics to keep 
•hallow vessels of water beneath the net, the evaporation from which keeps tho 
warp moist. Pubna produces the finest plain dotis and narit manufactnre<l in 



lflrO"\Ar HEA-JDY. 



"THE BRITISH TRADE JOURNAL" Guide to the Industries and 
Manufacturers of Great Britain and Ireland. 

HMctally pr«pare4 for the «•• of Colonial •■« Xadlita Vialton •• BaflaMl 

'jpis.xa:m i/- sir i^ost. 

"TEB BBITZ8K TBADB JOUBNAIi." 118 0ANH09 8TBBBT, XiONOOIT* 



42 The Empire of India. 



Bengal. They are only made to order for the rich and well-to-do members of 
society. 

Charkhana or coloured checks, known as Mijnamali cloths from the place of 
their manufacture, are made in Tijjporah, an<l said to bo prepared from cotton 
grown in the state. Some of tlio checked and striped patterns display great 
taste. Cotton printing with country block prints was formerly a considerable 
manufactm-e in Bengal, but the introduction of Manchester goods has almor-t 
destroyed ti.o trade. Calcutta and the Districts of iJarbhangah, Saron and 
Patna aro the only places in Bengal where tliis art is still carrieil on. Speci- 
mens from Patna show that the fabrics aro only stamjiod in colours, but in 
the Calcutta goods the patterns are first struck off with carved tamarind wood 
blocks smeared with a })eculiar sort of dye stuff, and then boiled in a dye 
solution which leaves a reddish colour in the cloth that does not fade. 

Carpets aro the only woollen fabrics made in Bengal. The Darjiling fabrics 
and rugs exhibited are manufactured in Thibet and used by Thibetans. The 
carpets made in the Hazaribugh and Bhagalpur jails aro perhaps the best. The 
Patna cairpets are marred by their texture and aniline dyes. 

The chief silk-producing districts in Bengal are Murshidabad and Ban- 
kura. Large collections are sent from these two places, and also from Midna- 
pur. Pieces of silk, probably of Chinese design, are shown from Darjiling, 
which albo sends coats, hats and dancing jrcsses. Maldah dyed silks arc 
represented by mvis of "peacock neck " colour, " sky " colour, and " snnshine 
and shade," which is a shot silk. Some white silks from Murshidabad are 
excellent examples. They are manufactured chiefly from Morchband silk, which 
is the best of the kind for whiteness and glossy and soft textures. Worthy of 
notice are ^vo })iece8 of unbleached silk cloth, representing the well-known 
corahs. 

In mixed fabrics Bhagalpur sends si)ecimen8 of a cloth called hafta^ which 
is made of iasar silk in the warp, ani cotton in the weft. This is described m 
very durable, and is in great demand both by Europeans and natives. The 
hafta cloth is of xniiform colour, being dyed after being woven. The renowned 
embroideries of Murshidabad, the embroidered muslin of Dacca and Patna make 
a varied and attractive exhibition. The collections of Dacca and Calcutta 
embroideries are Ijelieved to bo the most comprehensive tlmt have yet been 
made. The embroidery known as 1ca»lda, which is executed with tho wild muga 
or ta*.ar silk, is a manufacture considerably on tho incroiise, tho pieces being 
largely oxi)ortod by Arab merchants to Adeii, Persia and Turkey for turlams. 
Two magnificont 8i>ecimons of gold emlnoidery, ono being a canopy with 
fringes, and the other the cover of a palanquiny havo been lent hy Maharani 
Swamamayi, and a beautiful embroidered saddle-cloth (No. 97) has been piv 



"FAIRY.' 
Blamfrd an mrf iMmf. 



CLAi4K£'8 (New Patent) I h^^^ {^.uM.rkj^u^ 



'Fairy' Lamps and 'Fairy' Llglits. i f ^va: :;^^ 



TIhvw I«mni ara iim.|« rntlr»1f of fllan, onmrintr nbaotats tWnty fmm Ftn MiA dioprinc of Owi. They mjoln no Clwlng. 
MB^KU WKAlt OUT; wtiiii burnlna tliity (iiliv n<(illt« tiiair tlU« o^ " Vairj Ugbta." 

•n» Patent "Fairy" Itlgllt* Rlnialantuiiriil •on, alcadj- lli;bt, anil nH)nlra oa •tt«all.>n nftar lighiiac. Thaj am >■••■ 



- - iry _ . .... 

to exti£^Uh«d bjr nan Ji thu " Kairy " ExtlMi;ui«b«*r supp'liyl with '^very Iaid|i, aiiti raklUy ivU/iilo<l. 
gjt.i^n*"tairit" '•'impmrti" Fiwy" iAgkliarr I'aU^Htilitt Orfil BrilaiH, fViv.M'rway, llttjiimt, dmilrim, am4 H^ Cntti 

The Tra^U M.trtt r.rt a'io li'^ittertd ima&i\e nUtvt f.'f>tt«lrM«. 

84MUSI< OI«ABKE, Patent Pjrramid and Fairy Lamp and Liyht Works, 

OHIlO'k HILL, LONDON; AKO NEWARK, NEW JERtEY, U.S.A. 



The Empire of India. 43 



8cntcd by tho Rajah of Ilntw-a to the Bengal Govcmiuent. The large 
collection of chikan work from Calcutta will bo found described in detail in tho 
special catalogue. Tho coloured grass mats exhibited are used by tho Hindiis 
during sacred ceremonials, and they aro shown in tho coUectiou purchafic<l in 
the Calcutta Bazaar. Tho l>eautiful ivory mat, margiuatetl with gold embroidery 
firom Dacca, made of narrow and thin ivory strij^es woven like tho adjacent 
tital patli mats, has been lent by the Nawab of Dacca. ,. , . , „.. 

■ - ,... , - . . ■•■-■ : ■ ■-.^i . 

..... : .-. „ ,: :r • ... 

NEPAL COURT. 

Adjoining tlie Bengal Court is tho small but highly interesting court 
devoted to the Art-ware of tho little-known tcnitory of Nepal, which stretches 
from the southern ranges of the Himalayas twenty miles into tho " plain " and 
700 miles along tho Northern India frontier. Tho area is estimated at 54,000 
square miles, and tho populat? i is guessed rather than reckoned at al)out 
two millions. Although adverse to tho admission of Euroixjtui tourists into 
the valleys of Nepal, the Government has co-operated with tho Resident in 
furnishing a swall court with examples of tho Ki>eeial arts and industries which 
belong almost exclusively to tho Nowars, whom tho Ghurkhas conquered about 
1768, becoming thus tho dominant race. 

The Screen. — The front face of tho screen, which is double, consists of a 
large central placjue, and two smaller side plaques of carved birch wood, divided 
and bordered by panels of carved satisal wood. 

The central plaque is a copy, half the actual scale of a window above tho 
entrance of an ancient No war Vihar, or monaster}' in tho iovni Patau. The 
original window ntust bo from two to three hundre<l years old. All the details 
have been faithfully copied in tho replica. The side plaques aro copies on a 
reduced scale of windows fre<juently seen in old Newar buildings — either 
monasteries, temples, darlMirs, or private dwellings. Tho inner face of the 
screen is of carved birch- wochI, tho patterns shown being reproductions of 
types of ancient Newar decorative carving. Tho double row of pillars and 
arches supporting the screen aro copie<l from tho enclosure of the temple at 
Tripureswar, on the banks of the river Baghmati near Katmandu. The carving 
of the front face of the central arch is supix)scd to represent cloudy sky, tho 
winged figures being angels, or tho substitute for them in Newar mythology, 
and the dragons symbols of lightning. 

Two models give good types of tho peculiar temple architecture of Nopal, 
and the architectural wood carving, which is by far tho most important 
decorative art to be found in the country, is exemplified not only in the screen, 

SIR JOHN BENNETT, 65 & 64, Cheapside, London. 
Watch, Clock, aad Jewellery Manufacturer, by Appointment to Her Majesty. 

THE "SIR JOHN." A £25 8tantlur<l fold keyleM f-plato hair-obroiiometor. Accurately 
timed for ail clinuOv*, Jewelled in 13 ficUuns. lu mMsive lit-cant caac, with niuDogiam or crest riciily tm- 
UizoDcd, X25. 

GOLD KEYLESS HALF-CHRONOMETER SPLIT-SECONDS CHRONOGRAPH 

aCttehlstMftqiuaitjr. Adjutcd «Q<i flnlst«d In tho bhm perfect itjio. tio, tM, MO, t'Q. 



44 The Empire of India. 



but in a great numl)cr of Rpecimens of })illar8, doorways, arches, balconies, <to. 
1'ho carving is artistic in tho highest dogreo. Figures of gods, demons, snakes, 
and animals of all sorts, wreaths and flowers and intricate patterns, are worked 
on balconies and windows, the proportions of -wliich are as graceful and truo as 
the details are elaborate. This work is done by a class of Newars called 
lokarmi. Unfortunately the industry is fast falling into abeyance from a com- 
bination of causes, of which perhaps the greatest is the expensivoness of the 
work. An interesting object is tho front of a Nepalese pati or verandah, 
resting-place erected by tho pious for tho accommodation of travellers. It is a 
ct py in sal wood of a pali of some antiquity in tho town of Pattan. 

A curious set of musical instruments includes both wind instruments and 
drums and tambourines, which are believed to Ih) peculiar to tho countrj'. 

The jewellery exhibited shows that Nepalese gold and silversmiths are not 
particularly skilful, but occasionally some good filigree work is seen in the 
sheaths of tulwars and other weapons. Several of tho designs for rings, head 
ornaments, &c., are j^eculiar and not eeen elsewhere. The military head- 
dresses are i>eculiar to tho country, worn by tho highest class, are of great 
value, and composed almost entirely of diamonds, pearls, and emeralds set in 
silver. 

Tho brass and copper wares are examples of tho work done by Newars at 
Pattan. They include lotas, balls, bells, lamps, and religious objects. A great 
deal of brass-work is done by Newars at Pattan, and tho designs of some of the 
lamps are quaint and artistic. Tho pagoda-like temples are hung with Httlo 
bells, to the clappers of which are attached broad leaf-shaped piecoH of brass. 
These aro set in motion by tho wind, and a continual tinkle is kept up. 
Besides others, two classes of bells aro largely manufactured. Ono made of 
brass is used in Hindu temples. Tho other of mixed metal is used by Buddh- 
ists. The bows and an-ows, targets of rhinoceros hide, and other arms 
exhibited, may be classed as obsolete arms, though bows and arrows aro still 
used in some parts of tho Terai. The kora is a carved tulwar, tho extremity of 
the blade widening so as to Fomowhat resemble tho blado of an axe. It was 
formerly used in warfare, but at present only in beheading bullocks for 
sacrificoc The animal's head is taken off at ono blow. 

In tho cotton and silk fabrics, there aro bpecimens of Nepaleso homespun 
cloth, but the materials of tho other cotton and silk clothing are imported. A 
very curious object amongst tho saddlery is a saddle in use in the households of 
wealthy Nepalese. It is strapped on the backs of male or female servants, 
whose duty it is to carry their masters and mistresses up and down stairs, or 
from one part of the house to another. A Nepalese lady of rank will scarcely 
walk from ono room to tho next. '. 

HOWARD PARQUET, 

etjOOE* oo-7-a]E,i3sra-s ■whioh 

WILL NOT WEAR OUT. 



The Empire of India. 45 



NORTH-WEST PROVINCES AND OUDH COURT. 

The North- Western ProvinoiS and OuJh, forming together the upper 
portion of the great valley of the Ganges, have an area of 106,1 1 1 square miles, 
and a total population of 44,000,000. Allahabad is the present seat of Govern- 
ment, transferred from the ancient Moghal city of Agra, while Lucknow is the 
former capital of the Kingdom of Oudh. These are all seats and centres of art 
manufactures, and Agra, in particular, boasts the possession of the glorious 
monuments of Moghal magnificence, aft'ection and piety contained in the Taj- 
Mahal, the most beautiful building in India — perhaps in the world — and the 
great Fort with its mosques and palaces. 

In political connection with the Government of the North -Western 
Provinces are the two Native States Rampur and Gurwhal. 

Screens. — The screens fall into three divisions, of which the first row of 
marble pillars, inlaid with precious stones, has been taken from a largo number 
of pillars of similar design now lying in the Fort at Agra, and constitute a gift 
from the Government of the United Provinces to the National collection at 
South Kensington. The inlaid work on the pillars is similar to much of that on 
the world-famed 1 aj, and it is supposed that they were constructed in view of 
extending the buildings known as the Diwan-i-khas. Before, however, the 
pillars could bo erected, Agra was taken and held for a time by Sooraj Mull, 
the neighbouring Raja of Bharatpur, by whom the pillars were apparently buried 
previous to the town being recovered from him. 

The next consists entirely of stone- carving executed at Muttra and Agra 
for the Royal Commission. The trellised screens are faithful copies of similar 
screens in the Taj and at Fatehpur Sikri, respectively, while the open arches are 
in like manner copies of work to be seen in the Agra Fort and Fatehpur Sikri. 

The third consists entirely of wood-work. The ends of the Court are 
furnished by workmen from the districts of Bulandshahr and Mainpuri, while 
the frontage to the extent of 50 foot is occupied by caived wood-work, the 
greater portion of which has been dug out of ancient houses in Lucknow City 
under demolition as ruinous from age. Necessarily, to adapt the screen to the 
dimensions insisted on, some fresh wood has hud to be added, but in the main this 
portion represents the stylo of doors, arches, «fec., to be seen in the Lucknow 
bazaars. Owing to the decay of the older part of the city, house demolition is 
an every-day occurrence, and not a lew doors, as delicately carved as this 
example, are to bo found a prey to white ants and weather in the tinxber yards. 
The remaining portion of the frontage was executed at Farukhabad froc. 
tlic designs, and under the superintendence, of Soth Janki Das, a wealthy 

The STRANGERS' HOME, for ASIATICS, AFRICANS, and 80UTH- 

SEA ISLANDERS, 

WEST INDIA DOCK ROAD, LIMEHOUSE. LONDON, E. 

President: CAPTAr.V TlIS noSuURAin.K FliASrii MAVDE, R..V. 

Tha oU«cl of tUl IsgUtatioa b to oflte u> UllIKKTALS, AFHI0AN8. uid POLVNKSIAS's, nho oome to KnRUn.l, • r<inir<ir«aU« aM 

ttin|iao«aU« VoAglng, with WhoIaunM Foud, mi miMt modanU term* ; tu Prvtnt U<m /nmi Imp,itUion ; to procun' lln'iu. il i>i«llil«, Rm|J»y 

mi^iil In veaeb' and maamlljr to bafHaiul throi, ami to praMiit to all who can mui, n«.( tUiir, il, portiinu of tbo IMy K. ripluna lii Ihiir 

own kacnaCB. ' CuntribulOB* an qpauUUy loUcltad to ptorida for daitiluta oawv, nliick are numaruiu, ami luch uuDtrlbutloiu maj U« 

. I.H. t'lUiUCBSON, 1^., ttoBaaor«rTS«9tff7i^UMUoaM.«rleUMBwik«»-MMri. autCLAT, BITAM, * Co., Lomlaid SIrMt. 



46 The Empire of India. 



lueroKant of that city, and is tho copy of the frontage of a verandah erected a 
few years ago in tho Seth's house. 

Carving. — The Btonc-carving of Agra, which one portion of tho screen illus- 
tratcs, is applied to stone trcllis-work and exquisitely fine work in marble and 
alabaster. This is a Icgacj'' from tho golden age of Agra, when the skilled 
workmen of Rajputana were imported to carve tho white marbles of Jcypore and 
tho rod sandstone of Bhurtpur, with which respectively tho great forts and 
mosques of Delhi and Agia and tho palaces of Fatehpur Sikri were built and 
decorated. The marble toapoys, plates, boxes, and paper weights, inlaid with 
precious stones and mother-o'-pearl, in like manner represent the revival of the 
art which is applied by Austin of Bordeaux to the decorations of tho Taj-Mahal, 
and of which tho early form is shown by tho pillars described above. 

Carved sandstone waro is also executed by tho workers in the inlaid 
marbles; and hero may bo mentioned tho model from Mirzapnr, illustrating 
a Hindu temple such as are found in various parts of Upper India. Tho 
district of Mirzapur is described as abounding in good stones and good 
workmen. 

Jewellery. — The manufacture of Lucknovv jewellery, though like the trade of 
the Jauharis, or dealers in precious stones, it has declined since the abolition of 
tho luxurious and splendid court, still maintains its excellence, though not its 
extent. A speciality of Lucknow is what is known as diamond-cut silver 
ornaments. Facets are cut and burnished which, when in the form of stars, 
bear at a distance a strong resemblance to the flashing of a diamond. Tho 
best, and it might almost be said tho only, collection under this heading 
comes from Lucknow itself; but Rao Bareli and Jhausi send single examples. 

The gold and silver Avare, as distinguished from jewellery, show consider- 
able variety in dfjsigns and in - 'ork, some of which is engraved, some repousse, 
some in plain silver, others in silver-gilt, and others enamelled. 

One of tho more notable s ats of the manufacture of bidri ware, already 
described, is the same city of Lucknow, where it has been an increasing trado 
for some years. The number of manufacturers engaged in 1881 was 13, and 
the next year 31. A modified form of hidri work called zarhuland is made at 
Lucknow, in which the patterns arc slightly raised and not set even with the 
surface, as in the ordinary hidri ware. This is an imitation of many kinds of 
copper and brass ware — especially those of tho Punjab — in which the whit« 
silver designs stand out in relief on a red or yellow ground of the copper 
or brass vessels. The process followetl in the manufacture of zarhuland is 
nearlj'^ the same as that of the ordinary hidri, except that, instead of excavating 
the patterns for tho gold or silver plates, the ornamental designs are raised 
above the surface and chased. 

RUDGE & CO. Limited. WORKS : COVENTRY. 

Oldest and Lftrfffost BICYCLE AJSI> TMCYCLE 
IMLaiiuiatctuirerN in t.lio World. 

The BUDOB *' ROTABY " Tiioyole has oovered 232^ miles within 24 hours on the high 
road, being the grsates^ distaaoa on reoord.— See The Times, Sept 26th, 1889. 

London Depots: 12, OUEP/N VICTOBU STREET, E.C.i 443, OZFOBD ST., W. 

USTS rRKS Oy APPUCATWJf, 



The Empire of tndia. 47 



TliO Moratlabad ware, in which tin is soldered on the brass and incised 
through to the interior metal in floriated patterns, which sometimes are 
pimply marked by the yellow outlines of tho brass, and at others by 
graving out tho whole ground between tho scrolls and filling it in with 
a composition of lacquer, either black or of various colours, has advanced 
rapidly in jxjpularity during the last few years. A considerable collection 
of 134 articles is brought together, and will servo to make this artistic 
and ornamental work still better known. 

The engraved Benares brass -ware already mentioned, is in like manner 
lluHtrated, not only by examples of salvers, shields, &c., but by models 
of temples and mosques. The Lucknow manufactures of brass, copper, and 
mixed-metal ware, differ from the Benares ware in that tho shapes are 
more suitable for tho Mussulman purchasers than for Hindus. A largo 
copper tray (Xo. 1206) deserves a special notice. The principal variation 
in the other exhibits of these wares, is in sumo cases the copper studding 
of tho Lahitpur ware, and tho fluted surface in others, the shajjcs being 
•generally the same. Note, however, tho curious inkstands of the village 
iiccountants (1213-14). The bell-metal ware from Mullipatti, Azamgarh, is 
known from tho proportions of tho alloy as san aatais, or one hundred 
and twenty-seven, and can only be obtained in a few places. The city of 
Mathura, or Muttra, once a centre of the Buddhist faith, and "converted" 
by Shah Jehan, who appointed a governor " expressly to stamp out idolatry," 
is now a great centre of Hindu devotion, and visited annually by krge 
numbers of pilgrims. The sunoundiug country teems with legends of the 
iivino brothers, Krishna and Balaram, who dwelt in tho neighbouring plain. 
The brass images of deities, and the brass and silver toys in the shape 
of horses and peacocks which are shown, are largely manufactured for the 
)cnefit of the pilgrims. 

Amongst the enamelled vessels, the best work is that on specimens 
)re8erved from the time of the old native Court. ' ' ' ' " "* 

TLe inlaid work from Mainpuri is of shtsham wood, into which patterns 
ue beaten in brass wire and polished. Tho designs are either of foliage 
)r geometrical. The same work can bo applied with good effect to 
)anelling doors, picture-framing, and other decorative purposes. 

The different lacquered wares show tho style peculiar to each district; 
)ut the modes of manufacture already described are the same in alL 

The papier-macho woj-k from Rampur and Mandawar is in both cases 
m introduction from Kashmir, and the description of it will be more 
ippropriately given under the heading of tho Kashmir Court. 

Tho wood carving of Nagina, in Bijnor district, has greatly developed of 

OLD LONDON STREET. 

IRHE C6jVDUI¥ 8ta;iding in tlio Centre of " (©iBc Itontiou ^tiftU " is a faithful 
reproduction of the famous Comluit called the •' Standabu," wliioh stood at the Top of 
^oniblll before the Fire of London, and was the point from which distancea were calculated. 

The Konnuin to fitted with one of JUDSOM'S "PBRrSCT PVBZTT'* nZiXXSS, which u« tte 
>nly really reliable Filien ever invented, and wiU undonbtedljr supersede all those now in OM whoa their valne to 
ludcrctood. JfamfUttt pott fru. 

)ANIEL JUDSON & SON, Limited, 77, Southwark St., London, &E. 



48 The Empire of India. 

late, and is now applied tu innumcrablo articlea of housoliuld and general 
use, of Avhich 44 oxamploH arc shown. Ebony id tho principal nmtoriul 
roliovod hy silver and niother-o'-pwirl laountH in tlio nioro olal>orato and 
accordingly more expensive doHign-s. There is nothing characteristic except 
tho material which is in tho Itanda exhibits of lapidaries' work. The 
agates ore procured from tho bed of the river Ken, and are chiefly used 
in making articles of European design. 

Cotton Weaving. — Tho cotton fabrics in this Court are almost all of the 

finost sorts manufactured in tho North- Western provinces. Notwithstanding 

the comj)etition of Manchester fabrics, tho great cotton-weaving industry o 

Oudh still holds its ground, although tho Jolahisa, or hand-loom weavers 

of Lucknow, are reported by Mr. Hoey as finding their trade so diminishing 

that they are emigrating from tho city, or seeking other occupations. 

The exhibits compri.so fine specimens of tho muslins of Sikanderabad 

turban cloths fringed with gold, handkerchiefs, &c. These are distinguishwl 

not only by their fineness, but by the use of gold thread as a bordci 

The woven pattern muslins from Jais, Kao Baroli, are tho most famous o 

the textile manufactures of that place. The weavers Imve a curious art o 

interweaving at tho time of manufactjiro any design that may Ik) suggests 

to thcin. Verses and sentences are most common, and are suggested h] 

every taste and creed. Some are passjiges from tho Koran, others from th 

Vedas, and others from Dr. Watts's moral songs and hymns. At Lucknov 

m\isliu is still largely manufactured, being preferred for embroider 

purposes to English muslin. Tho woven pattern muslin of Benares rival 

in its delicacy tho famous product of the Dacca looms, and tho Kampu 

cotton damask, either plain or with borders and coloured thread, o 

interwoven with gold thread, received a gold medal at the Calcutt 

Exhibition. 

Cotton Printing. — Cotton-printing is still a successful calling in Lucknow 
notwithstanding they have to compete with Manchester chintzes sold for on 
shilling a yard, while the native handiwork costs one shilliiig and eightpence 
but tho Lucknow chintzes are far superior in the colour, the Kukrail and Bait 
rivers being famous for the purity of tints that their waters give to the deep- tone 
dyes of India. The hand-stamped chintzes of Fatehpur, of which there ar 
four pieces, may bo noted as more elaborate in design, and on a large 
scale. Tho patterns and work of the cotton carpets of Bulandshahr, Agn 
and Aligarh, are various, and they are of all sizes, tho best being used « 
small prayer carpets for Mussulman devotions. 

Embroidery. — The chikan or hand-worked flower muslin of Lucknow is i 
great demand in all parts of India. The material embroidered is tho tanzeb o 

JOSEPH TERRT & SONS. CLEHENTHOBPE. TORE 

manufactttrers op 

LOZENGES. CANDI ED PEELS, AND GENERAL CONFECTION ERY FOR EXPORT. 

ESTABLISHED 1767. 



Prise Xedala: firom Kelboume, Adelaide, and Ohristohoroh Zntematioiul 

Bxhil)itiona« and otbers. 



1 



\ 



J>« Mmfin of India. ^ 

ocally manafootured mndin, of whioh .amplaTnro «o,».r«tely cxhibMTTii 
-.ttora .. stamped in a th.ok »„l„tio„ of red oohru, or a rod dyo oxtr.cto.1 from 
«■, Ly . tJV or cotton printer, who doo. no other work. Mr. lloey «.v7 
peaking of the embroidery, that little girl», Ave or six years of age. may LoTin 
ittmg at the doors of houses husily moving their tiny Angers o^er a pkee of 

'" H "InoT " ;r7' '"', "'"'^'' ""y "-•" "»"• ">" poor prieo of a j»,L (M ) 
,rthe 100 flowers. It is by this early beginning that .J,ta» workersattain'l 
mit skill they do „, embroidery. One pieee of »J yards long, workinl in^l 
,;^o w„h diagonal »tr,iK,s ami flowers, will eontain r,«0 yards of the .tri»''rd 
.0 flower, 1 he embroiderer for all this work is paid only f,.„r rnpeos Tho 
, pieees of the Benares kMk,h,, or cloth-of.gold broeades. eall forTspee W 
marks, but eommand attention a, the most eflective of all ^e fabr e"Xn 

GM and S.l.crLaee.~Th. celebrated gold and silver embroideries andZ;. 

Lueknow are divided into i„„.l„„i or muslins hand-embioiderod in go d 
Head, and used for ea,«s. dress pieces. &c. and zardozi. which iiieludo voC 
Id cloth embroidered with gold and silver thread, shawl . caT'l " 1c th^ 
worked „i the same manner as tho Delhi karcU,. The gold aid suter ia«^ i 
owever. a separate staple manufacture. In both the embroidery an 1 tie lacTt « 
.Id or silver wire is drawn to that cvtiaordinaiy fineness wWch is obtarable 

oZrtoe .tfr°iu •' "f """" --'"■»-"• "'•o "iH .uodneTZri; 
HI jaras ot Bilvcr-gilt wiro from a rupees worth of silver 'I'l... .1,.... i 

aployed for gold or silver lace is bcalen with a ha urn r nto 1 latS 

Tat tlf M °°'^ ""n""""" '°'"™" ^™*""« »«™ -1 -av^g gold t: 
that the cadla, or gold or silver thread which makes the woof is not put in a 

:"of'the" rlir"'f'"'ir°" """ "'"•"' "f *''° --"• ona'^r. orCbr 
»t of the article, are for the native market , but European demand for slipperl 

br^M"" 1^ ' ■"" i^"'*^" •■' '■"P""" t" *'■<' ""nufacture. i'roin S 
.broidered scarves and gold lace in rolls are also shown. ^«»" Afcia 

THE PUNJAB COUOT. ' ,. ■ 

The Punjab Province, including the terrii y suriounJing Delhi, contain, 
tt\Z"'- " "• ""'' " '"P"''*'™ °f '^•'^''■«' souls.^ The e ar^ "I 

ZtZ^Z TrVr""*, ''•T'^" "' '"'■"''itonts. Both these estimt^^ 

r.r;vriet:'tt:^„S' '™^'--' ""^^'- «- "-" •-'°- «- 

P/ifr%x^» w .i^LARKE'S Now Patent 

FAIRY" LAMPS AND "FAIRY" T ir-urpQ 



50 The Empire of India, 

of tho longer arcades is wrought in shishara {Dalhergia Wmu), the cabinet woo^ 
of tho Punjab, and was made at Udoki, a village in tho Amritsar district, by i 
largo family of Sikh carpenters, headed by Gopal Singh and Ganga Singb 
Carpentry has long been a favourite occupation of the Sikhs, and this portion ii 
a fair sample of their skill. The pillars are slightly varied in detail, and tb 
proportion of the parts is according tc the received canons of to-day as derite^ 
from Moghul architecture. The spandrils or mihrabs, owing to tho condition 
involved"in the sizes specified on the sketch-plan furnished as a guide, an 
somewhat insignificant in their proportions, but there are numerous examples c 
procisoij this form l)oth in old and modem work. The horizontal panels are i- 
framed geometric lattices (not perforated), locally known as Pinjra, literaUi 
" cage-work," strongly resembling the lattice work seen in Arabic architecture 
This is, perhaps, the most characteristic feature of Punjab wood-work, and it i 
valuable as producing a peculiar eifect of repose. One set of the horizonta 
panelH is in shisham wood inlaid with ivory, and Was made at Bassi Ghulai 
Huasain, near Hushiarpur. Tho cresting and tho tinials aro forms m actua 
use. The whole of the work, indeed, is such as is wrought for tho best clas 
of constructions every day in the Punjab. 

The similar length opposite is in deodar or Himalayan cedar {Cedn 
deodara), and is tho work of various hands in Tjahove, notably Chanda Sing 
and Lena Singh, also Sikhs. Deodar wood is full of resin, and consequently i 
not attacked by insects, and it is extremely durable. It is practicaUy tl 
building timber of the province. ^ _ 

Tho end arcades— two in shisham and two in deodar— are designed m 
different style, known among Punjab workmen as Akbari. It is doubtfi 
wherher this older type of wood-work is correctly referred to the time of Akbai 
hnt the name serves well enough to indicate a finer and nioro delicate fashio 
thfin is now usually followed. The square Hindu shaft and other minor detai 
are characteristic of this style, and in older work a peculiar crispness an 
brightness of execution, combined sometimes with excessive minuteness, ai 

noticeable. ^^e^■ 

Carving.— The arclutectuml wood-work of the provinces is also exemplified i 
the series of carved doors and windows from Berar, Chiniot and Ilissar, tl 
carved screen of three arch»-s from Sialkot, and an arcado of three arches fro 
Batala. The carvod door from Karnal, in the southern part of the Punjab, 
altogether exceptional, and is copied from an old Hindu stone door. There 
scarcely any Hindu sculpture in wood extant, and on the Punjab plains vea 
little Hindu stone carving. Tho current architectural notions are entire 
Mussulman. The six panels in geometrical tracery, or pinjra, literally cas: 
work, are specimens of tho Arabic geometrical wood-work, which is an importai 

BARTON & CO.. WINE MERCHANTS, LDNDOI 

CUOICB VINTAOB CLARETS. _ 



CHOICE 
VIHTAGE 
CLARETS. 



1864 
Ch. Ii»tonr, Ch. L»Bte, 
Ch. Ifrow, Ch. Monton BothicWld, 
Cb.Cwd'^tuaroe). 



1869 
Ch. lAtoor, 
Ch. L*flt%^ 
Cb. liCovaU Buion. 



I8TI 
Ch. L> tonr, 

d)! CM S'EatooiiMl. 




The Empire 0/ Jadia. 51 



fisature in Punjab arohitectural design. The carvod paneU from Siulkot ore 
ntended for ubo in furniture. . ,.^,.^,,, ,,j, j^^,,^ J ., ^. ,^ 
Jeiff^er//.— The special witalogue etates ihat the fleleotion of gold and ailvor- 
mitha' work for personal adomn.ont has been limited by circumstancc-H to purely 
opuhir forms. Most of the ornaments in ordinary use in tho Punjab will bo 
found, but there are very fo^v of a cosUy kind. The great variety of tbo urticlos 
wUI, however, furnish a good iUustration of the universal use of silver orna- 
ments by all ages and all classes in India. It has been well said that tho 
quantity and quality of jeweUery worn by women is a sure and safe criterion 
of the prosiKjrity of tlie people. It is an investment for savings easily con- 
%'ertible in cnse of need. 

^itaiiK-ii.— Enamelled jewellery from Kiingra, Alultan, and Baliawalpur are 
good examples of tho Punjab branches of silver enamelling. Bahawulpur 
patterns are chiefly of the conventional flowers in panels, scrolls and geometric 
diapers and probably are of tho same origin as tho Multan enuuiol which Mr. 
Baden Powell states to have been first made by a jeweller named .N'aulu, 400 
years ago. The colours generaUy employed are blue, blaok, yellow, and several 
shade* of orange, briokdust red or pink. The euamels from Kangra and Kulu 
also are remarkable for the excellency of their blues. None of these, however, 
equal the Jeyixire enamels described in the Raj pu tana Court. 

The damascened work or ko/t, which was formerly extensively practised on 
the arms and armour made in the chief towns of tho l»unjab, is now only found 
in Sialkot and at Gujerat. The articles made are chiefly ornamental small 
wares for decorative purposes. The art consists in ineiuiting or inlaying a 
wire of ore metal, usually gold or silver, on another in omameutiil patterns. 
Gold and steel are tho favourite malcriak. In tho best examples (tar-i-niahan) 
tho pattern is first incised, and tho wire is laid in. In tho ordinary work of 
the Punjab, the iron or steel is first roughened all over, and tlio gilded silver 
wire is laid on in foliated patterns, and bumiahed into its place. Tho ground 
i« afterwards blued by heat. Tho surface of the iron or steel is sometimes 
chiselled in patterns in relief. Specimens of this variety are shown from. 
Uhore. Two caskets (642 & 043), from Sialkot and Gujerat, were made to the 
order of tho Royal Commissioners. 

Brass, Cypper, and Mixed Metal.— 0{ tho brass, copper, and mixed-metal 
wares, 40 articles are specimens of tho manufacture of brass-ware at Rewari in 
the Gurguon District, the greater part of which, in accordance with modern 
custom, is tinned. The articles shown include hookahs, pandans or betel-nut 
boxes, water vessels, lamp.s, belh* for carts, cattle, and temples, «fcc. 

The graven patterns are minute and comparatively inettective, and appear to 
be unitated from the well-known Monulabad wares. The IXra Gha/i Klmn 

^GIDIUS. >EGIDIUS. 

THE OHLY FLANNEL SHIRTS TKAT SEVxJl SBRINK IN WASHm&, 

Sttif wwhcd 100 time.^. S. it u^ silk auU . !*stic. Cm be worn with or witbont u uirf. r-vert. Made iu mlxeiJ 
a^^i "^•W"'!'. greys, drtbu. bn>«n«. vc . *l-o in wh!t« for T-nni» or t rickrt. I3i. 6d. : Uiree lor 39» ed 
■^^I" Undor-yeBis, summer and wiiiier wejgbt. 8^ inchM to 48incliea cheat; Oenaemen's Pants 
to vaMx, aa InohM waUt to 6i inches watot; Veata, 4a. 9iL to 7s. dd; Pants, 60. 8d. to 811. W, 
S£LF-XElSfmJi JXD FATTBKJSS /MOM TBM tUKXR^ 

». VOIiI» « CO., *1, F017I.TRY, 1.0S90S. 

K 2 



52 "^ TJr Empire of India. 

chnstfl and ornamental biasH wai C8 are conBidored to bo l>oautiful in both form 
and woikinunHliip. It h n«.ti<l that coppm- ongravinR on tin in employed by 
Maliommedann, while braHH, tinned or plain, is preferred by the llinduB. This 
ut leuBt id the opinion of Mr. Kiplinp.-. The Jindiana locks in the fonn of 
animals, and with a European lever action, are eurioiiB. Two HetH of waren lor 
Hindu worwhip are nhown from (Jurpaon and Hialkot. A set compriwH a taahUi, 
or diHh in which id(dH receive ablutiouH; the nrhn, a vewwd of Hymbolio Hhapo; a 
singitnan, or stand for idolH ; the arii, or nacTiUoial hiinp; the bell ; tho charmanlt, 
or spoon ; and the kniiU, or vchhcI for mixing wwidal-wood paste. The provalonco 
of Miihomnu'ihinism liaH prevented any d(>veh)pment of ligure eawtinf? in tlio 
conntrieH known eolloctively as the JMinjub. The idols of Amriiwir arc 
l)rimitive and iM«)r in denipn, and it in Htate«l, on the authority of Mr. Kiplin}?, 
that tho npiMr ehiHHes of HindiiH earo very litth) for idola of any kind, and tho 
preferences of tho lower claHHos aro for tho more monKtrous perHonugos of their 
mytholojjjy. 

Thf Gohlrn /Vm/)/*'.— This brief allusion to religiouK differeuceh as iufluenciiiK 
art may nerve to cull uttenticm to the AniritHiir door in beaten cop|Hn--work, which 
is in tiie H<ylo of nonie of the beafen Hilvor tloors at tho goldcu temple of tho 
J)arbar Sahib of the Sikhs. The upper part of tho temple itholf is sheathed in 
beaten work of opper rit;hly gihled, whence it derives its name. Tho model of 
thia holiest shrine of tho Sik' religion, whit.h, like Mahommedanism, oxolndeK 
all iconic forms, or what are co.nmonly termed idols, from its worship, has Ikh'U 
made by Sikh carjienters. The only obji-et, if it may ho so (tailed, of worshin 
in this p»lden temple, is tho Adi (iranth or holy scriptures of tho Sikhs, in 
this teujphs as in all others, a eoi)y ((f the holy book is exposed to the venera- 
tion of tho ])ilgrinjs on an ottoman, and it is ceremonially covered with 
magniJioent kinkhabii and sMk wrajjpors, while an attendant sits by waving u 

chauri. 

y(r„„,_Among the arms and armour, tho more notable aro tho matchloi^kH 
madeatKohal, and the sw»>rd-l)elt with its numerous ajiiwndages from J Km 
Uhazi Khan, which is an exceptionally good example »>f the t4ihte and «k:ll which, 
amongst the warlike jMipulation of tho frontier, are often lava>hed on war 
trappings. At Sialkot chain-mail suits and Char Ainn, or four plate suits of 
armour, aro still made fo-- the retinuoB of some native chiefs, and for sale to 
Tjuopcans. Gujeronwala has a reputation for oUensivo arms as well as for 
moro innocent cutlery, for which Nizamabad is especially known. The fimsb 
and iH)lish of tho articles, though not perfect, is better than tho quality of tho 
steel, whi<'h, although tough, is deiicient iii hiirdnoss, and often hardly to be 
distinguished from good iron. Old iiles of Knglish mauiifHcturo are, however. 
som«tim«K forged into dngg'irs and knives of good quality, but the country iron 



NOTICE T O VISI TORS. 

LL intorrste.1 in NEW OOMMBROIAL PLANTS and DRUGS, 

. TANNLN8, BSBJbiNUES, PJiKFUMBS, i»ii.i Uieir pi«ii«r»uoa for die MwkeW 

dciiring IsroKHATiow, ut K«p')rti on Biiiuplw ahuuld okU upon 

THOMAS CHRISTY A Co., 185, ftinclii|icli Sirwt, Cokmtal Produce MeBtamts. 

Cni<fri ',/ - >>«» Commetfinl rianti and i/r^to»," JV«. 1 to 9, «in he tikdMid ai th« 0^. 



A 



The Empire of ^'ndia. 0.1 



is generally uh(h1. By uii ingoniuuH procesH of ciohin};, tlio wavy linos called 
jnuhar, tho Porsiiin HmitirH work ho mnch pri/cd on old Mudon, nro imitated. A 
ground of fine limo mixtul with mncilage is laid over tho blade, and when 
nuarly Hot the nrtiAcer doxtrouNly removoH the lino with Iuh Uupi>)> in lino linoH 
which have a certain roMtniblanco to the lineH of wohUnl unO Hied stucl. 
Sulphate of iron is then applied, to bitu in those linos. No oxpor;, ...iwover, can 
)m) taken in by theso marks, as cIoho examination shows the grain of the thumb. 
A rude form of penknife, with Immovabh> blade, a tnrned-up point and wooden 
handle, is said to Ik) tho only article of Ni»tniabad cutlery which has a largo 
lo( al sale. 

Carved Chair. — Under tho heading •' Carved Furniture and Carpentry," in a 
curiotiB chair contributed by the Municipality of Lahore, which is a relic; of tho 
IHiriod of tho 8ikh rule, and Ix^Iongod to Uen. Ilahi Daksh, who commanded tho 
Khalsa artillery. Tho ivory inlay of llushiarpur in well represented by cabinet!, 
chnirH, tables, 6co. i^o., made of nhlnham wo<m1 inlaid with ivory. This industry 
is of recent growth, owing much of its present character to tho ex(!rtiimM of 
Mr. W. Coldstream, C.8. Wood inlay is understoo<l to a limited extent by moHt 
of tho more skilful inittreH, or carpenters, of the Punjab, who emphty Istx and 
other white woods upon »hitihant, or the latter upon tho yellow danlar. Hoxwood 
inlaid in nhiflmm is tho main feature of three tables from Lahore and Amritsar. 
KniNs inlay is piactised in llushiarpur, but the best work comes from Chiniot. 

Lac Turnery. — Tho examples of lao turnery come from many placen in tlio 
I'tinjab; it is applied not only to ornamental wares, but to nccesHury domostio 
iirticleH, such as logs of bedsteads, stools, and tables, &c. 

Native house furnitiiro is exceedingly simple, being limited usually to a 
iKidstead, one or two low stools, a K])inning-wheel, and a few boxes. A part 
of each marriage outfit in tho Punjab is a charpoy, and a quaint, high-backed 
nt(rt)l of turned wood, ornamented with lac. Very littlo painting on wood ia 
now done, and tho lac surface, obtitined by ])ressing what is virtually a stick of 
coloured sealing-wax on an object revolving iti tho lathe, is a harder and more 
Holid covering than any paint. Tho heat dovel'»i)ed by friction melts tho lac ; 
furtlior friction with tho diy stem of a ])alm leaf, held endwiHo, and a final 
u))])licatiou of an oiled rag of muslin, ])olish a coat of colour which resistM dust, 
the great heat of the hot wi^vthor, and the damp of the rains. lUit there aro 
many retineme.ita in this most simple art. In Sindh and in the Punjab, layer 
ui)on layer of coloured lac are laid. Then, with a stylus, these c(4ttH are 
KcratohuJ through in a manner analogous to Italian mjraffitu decoration. 8u]»- 
[xming red to havo been lirst laid, then green, and lastly black: the black ia 
iorutchod through for green leaves, the grecu and black for u red flower, and for 
It white lino all aro cut through to tho wihhI. A red-and-gruon pattern with 



EWART & SON, 346, Euston Road, London, N.W. 

"LIGHTNING" GEYSER. 

Heats Lar^e Bath in 4 Minutes. Boils Water Instantiy. 

HIGHEST ^WARD FOR GEYSERS GIVEN BY THE SOCIETY OF ARCHITECTS. 



54 The Empire of India. 



whito outlinuM un a blac>k field \h thus |inMliic!C<l : tho Finv/opiir pattorn 
Hcrutoiiinfi; ih iieibaiM tho iiiuHt Mkilful, while that of Ikim IhiiuuI Kbaci is th 
luokit luiuiito. Tho wood iimmI ih ^'(•nerally HhiHhiiia (^Dalberffia mimm), but th 
taiuariKk, ueuuia, und othor ison-reHiuoUM wijuiIh uro altto employed. Th 
wurkiiioii havo recently diMcovered that uiiiline coIoiu-h can Im uneil, aud ii 
ooniMMiui'UHro the Dura iNUiail Klian work liaH loHt thu Mobriuty of dark red, bUeii 
yellow, and Hilver which UMed to ditftiu^uihh it. 

Pottery. — Of tho Punjab );rluzud jMittery, Delhi contiibuteH H)(> HixjcimeuN t 
tho niiMiuni nmnufm^ture. which Hhow that it w (|iiito poNNibU) to make a kind c 
|Nircehiin with ihe materiala Ut In; |inN-iir<'d in thu nei^iil)ourh<NMl. Tho fiaitt 
or iMNly iM iirtilirially oom|Mit<e<l of |Ntwdeiud Htonu, hold to^<:thc>r for uiouldinji 
with nuumla or ^unl. It cannot, therefore, )>e ruRily worked on tho whotd, hn 
i« preMMxl in niouldH. The <dd moH<|UeH atul tomhti in tli«i I'unjub, aH well aa h 
8indh, exhibit lieautiful deitjration of monaiu and glaxi^d pottery, and tilea o 
faieucr. TIiih art, known aa kaiti, iM ittill in exiMtenc^o. The M|KH;imen8 o 
•lalandhar, liahore, and Multan ware uoiitain many re| trod net ioim of the dfloi>ra 
tivo tih^, but the ori)j;inal moMiiie, in which (iu:h loaf an«l Ntem waH a Neparate piec 
IN only repreaented pictorially. Kxix'pt for luMtkuliH and nurtihi* there im w 
pla<<o in native life for vrH».elH of ^laxed ]Hittery. (hie exception to thiM ii 
ahown from ri-Nliawar, whrru diHlniH, the chief of which Ih tho tab»k, a larg^ 
circular dixh of I'crHian ori^rin, uro UNcd for eating fr<»m. 

TextHtt. — Anton}; tho tuxtilo t»ntribu(orH fiom the Punjab, tho oxqniiiit 
ootton priuta nmde by Allayar of Kot Kanuilia, und <h«)hen under the direction 
of Mr. Punlon Clarke for tho Uoyal CommiNNionerH, form part of the decoration 
of tho voatibule. < 'olonr-printiuf; on cr>tton dotli ih practiHoil in moat town 
and villitgea of tho province, and is fully reproHented amon^; the oxhihiU 
Tho patteni), with one or two inMi);niticant oxceptioiiM, are lar^^o and (MjarM 
proliably iM-cauxo tho nmteiial UHually preferred for a tpiilt, the decoration o 
which Ih tho htapin of the cotton -printer'H trade, ih tho Htout and rou^h home 
apun known an Khmlnr. TIil- dyen UHcd hitherto are himple, lieiu); nuNttlj 
imligo, maddi r, (Mimej^nmato rind, turmeric;, Haitlower, catechu, tiio Mulpbate 
of iron and c«>p|N>r, and a(»cia |nmIh, uhciI with tamarink pilln, alum, aD< 
vof<itable acidH, The bhMtka are of w«mm1, and are cut by onlinary carjwntoraai 
a rule. Some of thcHe printa are Huitablo for wall hanf^ingH (^Npecially, becanai 
of tho UddnoHN of the ijuttorna which repeat the motivcH of Mahommodan wal 
dw^jrati<jnM. 

Cation. —Cotton printera form a oaate known aa ohhimba or ohipi, diitioc 
from the dyern (ranpoK). At the lant eeiuiUB 10,101) nmi aud 1,106 womei 
wera returned aa »>tt«in printem in tho Punjab, but probv.bly nemo of thoao ar 
only waMhcr-men. Aniline colourN are liked by natives, and are only kept oo 

~^ JOHN GLENp ■'• '^''*'''i 

^ ADVERTISEMENT AGENT. ' 

Solr AgtHt to the Coutra€l9ri{lViLt.lAM Ci.owKS 6* SoNS, Limited) for Ih* Advtrtiumt» 
im tAii Quid* and Ikt other Official J^iuatwHt of the Colonial and JndiuH MxhtkltoH, 



LONDON: 3 79 a, STRAND, tV.C. 
iEmtrmm* im Sout^MmptOH Strrtt.) 



TJte Empire of India, fi5 



of oottoii priutM by thoir cotit. Thu uvurugo prico of cotUm print on native 
doth in throo or four uoIoium Ih alKtut ten uuuiih per wpuiro yard. Another form 
of printing in tinjiol printing in foiln of gold or Milvur, wliioli is uxcluHivuly 
pniotiMOil ou ciothti worn ut weddings. SouuitinifH colour iH UHcd together with 
a foil on whitu tdotliH. Uuiil gold uiid Hilvtu- leaf \h in Hoino puttcniH fioniDolhi, 
and from Kolittik. 'i'ho Itoliiuk foil printn anj exireptionjiUy dnrublo — nomo- 
timoHitifi true gold wliieh laHtH for iiiany yojirH. Of the proocMH of knot-<lyeing, a 
doMuription ban Imsuii provioiiHly givcui under the liombay (V»urt. Tho chirai, 
from Delhi, are exanipleH <>f one of the nioNt elulxtrate forniH, NtripoH in various 
oohMira ln'ing produ(;ed on nurrow widtliH of imiKlin for turWii piecoM. Tho 
paintod Afridf lau ehitliH from PoHhawiir are only niiHuaiiied (Litton cloth 
deeoRitcil with linwiod-oil painting, whieh iH nut ptrculiar to the I'unjab frontier, 
l)iit :h pniotiHed al Ahniediibad, and Morvi in lioiubay. At Natiik the putturn 
iH pro<liH!ed by a perforate*! Htanip iit tho end <tf a tulnj full of «,'<dour. Tho 
I'cHhawiir iH all traced with a Htick, no HtampH or tulaiH Infing uh»h1. The work 
iH more duruldo than might Im) expe(;ted, uiul Home H|K)cimenH fiom Bannu aru 
fine in colour, but much of the I'eHJiawar work Ih very poor. 

Among the other cotton clothM are examples af klwn, a ntout fubri*; woven in 
(•ohiunxl checkered patteriiH, the peculiar (piality uf Htri[M*«l cloth known aH ««»«, 
the fino hmg jloth (iilhid y«/i, und tiie Kuhtiik miiHlin. The Provincial JailH 
Niid HitecintcuH of their maniifuuture in the form of cotton durrlca, uned for floor 
OiveringH. 

Woollen /'Vi^riV*.— The variety of wo<dlen fubricnin a province rvhich jMmHCHseH 
a northern frontierof hill territory, with nevore and long wintent, and VHmlering 
Ujion Cabul and KaHlimir, iH ne»;eHHuriIy couHideruble. The fHbri«.*H made of Hh«ep'H 
wo<»l aro few in number, except in the Hill DiHtricts, where the drcKS of tho 
iN-tjplo (^MmihtH lilmoHt wholly of wool. In tho plainn, every ono who can afford 
it defendn hiniHelf from the (;old by thickncHHt^H of c«»tton cloth, and ooatH or 
i|uiltn |Mtdd«xl with c(»tt()n wo(»l, and the kambhnU, or bhinket«, aro uw.'d only by 
tlio |M>orer cluHHes, From the plaiiiH como tho coame und hard blanketing, a 
finer kind of woollen wrapper called loig, and a cmirMo ch»th, «»r j>o/n, of which 
R|M-cimenM are hIuiwu. The HericM of fine woollen gt»o«lH, contributed by three <»f 
tho moNt extennive nhawl merchantH of the province, fully dinplayn tho proMent 
Mule «>f the nmnufacture of tho liner wooIh ; both tho real jmHlimlna, or w*Kil of 
the Thilxiitiin Hhawl-g(»at, and tho wmil from which tho well-known ramjHtre 
rhiuliler in mtt4lo, and the kirmani wool, whieh latter in called nakti jHi»hmina, or 
iiuitatitm {NiKhm. The Maharajah of KaHhmir hohU untrict mono|>oly of all tho 
fiucHt clanH of w<Kd that goes from tho fiontier dJHtrictM of Turfan and Kuuhar ; 
but many of tho HhawlH went from Amritnar, Ludiana, and other plooon, aro of 
• xuoptionul linenoHH, and tho plain dhawln from Amrittiur uro umougat tho finuut 
tiitw iiiado. 

SiUc9.—Tho silk wt^aving of tho Punjab \h Htill caiTicd on, but tho wider width* 
wmI finer qualitien formerly .••r<xluced have paHmnl away with tho Hikh iirdarn. 
The ijulbardan, or Htriped green and crimnon, lilac and Hcarlet, yoUowund criniHou 
Uiug tho finest eombinationn, und the darya plain dilk, of which yellowinh-groou 
mill uochineul criniHon are tho favourite tintN, are Htill in demand. LuHtro is 
U'A ouuNiduivd indiMpuu^^ablu in thu bilk fabricM, many of which are intended to 



56 The Empire of India. 



wash. Tho bridal drcsgos, both Hindu and Mahommcdan, from Batata, show 
ono of tho rustic uses of the local manufacture. Tho Bahawalpur silks are 
generally stripod, and frequently interwoven with gold thread. The present 
examples, although not lustrous, havo good substance, and seem well adapted 
for curtains and the finer class of hangings. IT. IT. the Nawab of Bahawalpur 
has sent this exhibit. 

From MulUiu come specimens of tho mixed silk and cotton fabrics which 
havo been before mentioned as only permissible to strict Mussulmans. The 
small silk wares, made by the handicraftsmen called patoli, include important 
parts of native dress, such as izarhand^ a netted silk girdle used by both sexes ; 
the paranda, a long silk tasseled tail, which is plaited into a maiden's hair ; th( 
sezbandg, or cords and taseels used to secure tho coverlet to the charpoy, or bed 
frame, and many other kinds of silk ornaments. 

Emhrotdcrif. — In embroidery, P/itt/Arari, literally flower-work, is tho name applied 
to the embroidery wrought by peasant women on tho ohrni or sheet which furuM 
the most important part of their dress. Originally only three colours of cotton 
cloth were used. Ited, from madder, i)urplo from a combination of madder with 
indigo and black or bluo-l)luck, whieli is produced by aitcchu and indigo. The 
colours of the silk are green, two shades of yellow crimson, white, black, and dark 
green, and tho clotli used for tho purpose was almost invariably tho homespun 
Khadar, a coarse fabric, the rough texture of which, however, is admirably 
Buited to give deptli and solidity of colour when dyed. Tho Phuikari stitch it 
really a darning stitch, and the best patterns were usually those elementan- 
combinations of tho square and triangle which seem to come naturally when 
darning a fabric, the threads of which can 1h) easily counted. In some districts 
pieces of thin glass, quicksilvered, are inserted, being held in place by a sort of 
button-hole stitch. 

Of tho well-known Delhi embroideryj thirty-seven examples are exhibited 
by Messrs. Manna Shan, and display the most notable varieties of modern 
work. Besides these, there is tho dress of a Delhi dancing-girl and a 
bridegroom's dress. The most costly embroidery is worked with silver-gilt, 
or silver wire, drawn out into the fineness of thread ; but tho bulk of gold 
embroidery is done with Icaldbdtun, or common gold thread — a body of silk 
over wound with a thin flattened wire of gold or silver. There are two 
principal kinds of gold embroidery — ono solid and rich, called hdr-chob, applied 
usually to velvet or cloth for occasions of State, elephant trappings, saddle 
cloths, mamads and carpets spread out before royal seats. It is so named 
because tho material, whether velvet or cloth, is in tho first instance 
stretched smooth and tied on u wooden frame ; but tho art of embroidery 
in this stylo meets now with little demand. The second kind of embroidery 
called h'tr-chikan, is done in ono operation with a needle charged with gold 
thread, the pattern being usually drawn or. paper, pricked out with a pin, 
and tho paper being stretched over tho cioth to bo embroidered, yellow 
colour is put on over the lines of pin-holes, and mark yellow the cloti 
Iwneath. In other cases tho pattern is lightly stamped by means of » 
wooden block. 

Slioea. — Tho trade in tho gold embroidered shoes of Delhi has, there is every 



The Empire of India. 67 



reamn to believe, considerably increased during the last twenty years, at 
the beginning of which time the exports were valued at 4 lakhs of rupees. 
A series of examples from nine district* of the Punjab displays the shoes 
in general use, and is followed by a Kimilpr collection of the sandal or chapli, 
worn in Northern India, varjing in form ; none of the varieties resemble tlio 
classic shape, with a separate stall for the big toe, worn in Bombay. In 
parts of the Himalaya and Kashmir, an elaborately-laced sandal encloses a 
sock in soft deerskin, and forms one of the most comfortable foot-coverings 
known. The Peshawar sandal is generaUy embroidered witli silk, and 
specimens of this kind of unusual excellence are shown from Dera Ghazi 
Khan. From Bannu, another frontier district, pretty gold-embroidcre<l 
buskins in soft red leather are sho^vn. TJie resemblance of many of these 
to the sandals on the feet of antique statues need scarcely be pointed out. 

KASHMIR COURT. i-itv* 

The State of Kashmir extends from the Plain of tho Punjab across the 
central range of the Himalaya towards Chinese Tartary and Tibet. Tho 
valley of Kashmir forms but a small jiortion of tho whole area, which is 
cstimiited at 801,000 square miles, with alwut a million and a half inhabitants. 
Tlic Maharaja presents annually, by way of tribute to his Suzerain, 1 horse, 
12 goats, and 3 pairs of tho celobmted Kasliniii- shawls. 

Screen.—" The screen for tlic Kashmir and Frontier States' Court," writes 
Sir Oliver St. John, Resident in Kashmir, " is copied from the verandah of an 
old wooden mosque near Chakoti, on the Kashmir Murreo Road, to which tho 
attention of travellers is invited in Ince's handlxjok. The date of its erection 
was not, as far as I cc.uld find, anywhere marked on the buihling, but tradition 
and the character of tho carving seem to iwint to the eariier i)art of the last 
century. The pillars, brackets, and architruvo Iwam of tho screen are almost 
an exact copy of tho original both in design and proportion. Tho sido bays, 
6 ft. 3 in. each, are identical, and tho front bays differ oniy in that the original 
arches, each 5 ft. 2^ in. span, have become pillars 10 feet apart surmounted by 
>nickeb». The raiHi.g at the top is piHJra work, such -3 is commonly made and 
Med throughout Kuehtiiir at tho present day. The material is deodar wood." 

Carriii^.—Bcsides the screen, examples are shown of the carved wood-work of 
Kashmir as applicablo to ceilings. These are executed in chil wood (Pitn 
awwtw). The Kanhmir 2>apier mdchi, or painted wood-work is, owing to the number 
'f English officers on furlough, and tourists who visit tho country, well known 
n English houses. The work goes by the name of kiir-i-kalam-ddni or pen-case 
rork, and is also called hir-i-munakanh or painted ware. It is done on articles 
f either smooth wood or papier-macho by pulping oaarse native paper, and 
Qonlding the softened material to the required shape. Tho article is covered 
nth a coating of white paint, on tho surfaoo of which a delicate pattern iu 
oloars, chiefly crimson, green, and blue, is drawn with a fine brush. Flowers 
» nd the coai-ser designs seen upon shawls are most commonly produced. A very 
»«tty iiattem is also done by painting with gold paint a spreading series of 
f unote branches and leaves upon a white ground,— a border of brighter colouring 



gg The Empire of India. 



is added, and sometimes figures of men and animals are introduced. The surtaco 
is varnished over with a varnish made by boiling the dearest copal in pure 
turpentine. Ten carved and painted plaques illustrate the method of decoratmg 
ceilings with this work. • i-.i -^i ■ n. ^ 

The well-kno>m Kashmir silver-gilt plato is illustrated by ft good collection 
including spocimcns of the latest style. Of this, Sir George Birdwoul 
remarks that it wtxs almost confined to the production of the water vessels 
copied from the clay models in use in the northern parts of the Punjab. Ho 
also notices that the ruddy gold is peculiar to Kashmir, not being found any 
where else in India until Burma in reached. The set exhibited, however 
mainly consists of articles designed for European use, and shows specimens of 
the modem style. The price of good work is stated to bo 374 P^r cent, added io 
the price of the silver. Of the silver plato, the cost of the work is 2o per cent, 
additional. This art is said to have been imported by the Mongols, but the 
natural superiority of the people of the Kashmir Valley in elaborating designs, 
whether in meUl-work or enamelling or weaving, has brought tho Kashmir 
goldsmith's ort to its perfection. 

In the brass, copper, and mixed metal, the embossed and pierced brass-work 
is described as new, and the Kashmiri workman dislikes doing it from the 
hardness of the brass as compared with copper. The engraved and lacquered 
brass-work is entirely diffbrent in stylo and colouring from any Indian work, 
The copper work shown is made in immense quantities for sale t» '^^''**^"_ 
The people themselves never use it untinned, as has been already noticed of the 
Mussulman population in the Punjab. The ordinary household metal-work u 
not equal to the best Persian, but surpasses that of Afghanistan or Turkesten. 
Within the last fifteen years gilding and enamelUng copper has been 
introduced. An example of the copper enamelled before gilding is shown in 
No. 227. The large vase (No. 201) is, writes Sir Oliver St. John, the Residenl 
in Kashmir, *' one of tho largest and best pieces of work and design that I have 
seen in Kashmir." Originally, dark and light blue only were used, and the 
designs were comparatively simple ; but latterly pink, green, yellow, and white 
have been added, and the patterns elaborated and multiplied on each piece. A 
number of articles in silver-enamel are also eho^vn. A chair carved in walnut 
wood exemplifies the orders occasionally given to native workmen for chain 
made after European models in carved walnut, as excellent wabaut-wood aboundi- 

in Kashmir. . ^.i. a u 

Textiles.^Of the cotton fabrics tho hundred beautiful specimens of the »amM 
chintzes have been referred to as decorating the vestibule. These were speciall; 
executed according to the designs and directions of Mr. Purdon Clarke. Ihes 
chintzes are made at Sambar, a small town at the foot of the hiUs some 30 mUe 
south of Jummoo. The demand for them has recently been so great that th 
Kashmir Government has practically made a monopoly of th^m, and the pnc 
has been raised from 9 or 10 to 14 rupees. 

If the Kashmir chintzes, with exquisite patterns and colours, have advanw 
in demand and price, the opposite may bo said of the once precious Kashraii 
shawls. This manufacture, it is stated, which formerly brought half a millioJ 
a year iiito Kashmir, is now well-nigh moribund. Unless means are taken by th 



The Empire of India. 59 



Government to preserve it, the art of weaving the finest shawls will probably be 
extinct 15 or 20 years hence. The warehouses of London and Paris are full 
of shawls which find no purchasers, and the value in Kashmir has consequently 
fallen to a third of what it was ten years ago. The shawl (No. 31) now marked 
Rs. 300 world, in former days, have cost Rs. 800 to Rs. 1000. The specimens Nob. 
1 to 4 are from tho Maharaju'n toafui-khana or storehouse, and are of the finest 
quality, unattainable nowadays. Specimens of shawl stuflf are exhibited, woven 
from tho unbleached and undyod pashminay or under- wool of the shawl-goat. 
The mode of procuring it is thus described : " At the commencement of 
summer the animal is shorn with a knife in the direction of the growth of the 
hair, that is, from head to tail. When this is done the wool is combed down in 
the reverse direction. This separates almost entirely the upper hair from the 
wool underneath. The hair is soft, and is wrought up into coarse fabrics." 
One specimen of pashmina exhibited is woven of tho true pashm of tho ibex, 
which is very rare and most highly valued as making tho lightest, warmest, and 
strongest cloth. ■ "*,, • j 

CENTRAL PROVINCES COURT. -/mi./ 

The Central Provinces, of which Nagpnr is tho headquarters, cover an area 
of a little under 85,000 H([uaro miles of hill-, valleys, and plateaux. There are 
15 Native States, with nearly 29,000 txjuaro miles, and a total population of 
over 1,700,000. 

Screens. — The screens, which form three sides of each of the Central Provinces' 
Courts, are the handiwork of native carpenters at Nagpur, and are very fair 
specimens of the wood-carving which is very characteribtic of tho Central 
Provinces. The art of carving in wood, and to a kss degree in stone, ie 
perhaps the only one in which these Provinces can hold their own against other 
Provinces in India. It is no uncommon thing to find, oven in small villages, 
houses with carved teak fronts of considerable beauty, and in several towns 
there are streets with carved wooden frontages displaying very considerable 
taste and skill. Carved wood plays an important part in Nagpur architecture, 
and the Maratha palaces in the vicinity of the city are distinguished by their 
high verandahs of black teak often very elaborately carved. 

Jewellery. — Two gold necklets from Sambalpur are described as of rough 
execution, but interesting as the handiwork of one of the districts in India most 
Iremoto from road or railway communication. The Sambalpur District is 220 miles 
Idistant from the nearest railway station. The necklets are, so far as is known, 
Ithe only jewellery made in these Provinces that has any distinctive oharao- 
Iterifltic. They are largely worn by Brahmin youths, and considered to possess 
[the virtue of an amulet, recall:^<g once again the stories of the chandan hars 

ifhich were necessary to the lifo of the wearers. 
Textile Fabrics. — Tho present condition of the trade is thus illustrated in 

be report sent together with tho cotton fabrics exhibited. Tho weaving 
of fine cotton cloth is the most characteristic manufacture of the Nagpur, 

)handara and Chanda districts ; the cloths of Umrer (in Nagpur) and 

wni (in Bhandara) being conmdcTed especially good. The art of spinning 
read of great fineness is one lor which these diatriots have long been well 



^0 The Empire of India. 



known. The importation of English yarn, and the competition of the 
machine-made yarn of the Nagpur Cotton MillH, are repoited to have reHulted in a 
great decline in the art of liand-spinuing. The weaving industry has not suflfered 
HO greatly from this competition, partly because of the intrinsic excellence of 
the goods manufactured, aud partly because of the prejudice in favour of wearing 
them which exists amongst ihe better class of Marathas. The greater part of 
the woven goods turned out consists of turbans and dhotis, which pro distin- 
guished by bearing a border of (generally) dark red silk, on the breadth of which 
the value of the fabric in groat measure depends. These borders are ofJen woven 
in intricate patterns of different whades of colour ; but the manufacture has 
fallen off under the competition of English-made goods; and it is now not 
uncommon to attach a locally made eilk border to cotton cloths imported from 
Bombay. The Deputy-Commissioner of Bhandara writes that the cotton-weaving 
industry has declined very considerably during the past ten years. Not only is 
the number of articles now turned out much less than formerly, but the value of 
the goods is very much lower. I'auni used to be especially fumous for tho 
finely-woven, broad-bordered and richly-ornamented turbans and dhotis wluch 
it produced. Bhundura, too, used to produce a plentiful supply of turbans and 
waist-cloths of considerable value. Quantity and quality have now fallen off at 
both places. The opening of railway communicaliou with Bombay has there- 
fore had the same ill effect on local weaving as on brass-working, and has 
greatly harmed the two principal indigcnoiis handicrafts of tho Provinces. It 
is fair, however, to add that it is only the production of fine cotton cloth which 
appeal's to have suffered, aud that tho weaving of tho coarse cotton stuffs worn 
by the agricultural classes seems to have greatly increased in some places. 

Silk, — Taa$ar silk-weaviug is carried on at a number of places in Sambalpur 
district, of which Barpali is the chief. Cloth of good quality is also made in tho 
town of Bilaspur, at which a colony of Tasaar weavers was settled some years ago by 
Mr. Chisholm, when Deputy-Commissioner of this district. The material is verj- 
largely used in Chliattisgurh for dhotis and coats, taking the place which i» 
occupied by Umror aud Tauni fabrics in Nagpur. 

At Burhanpur the most important silk-weaving of the provinces is still 
carried on. It is specially noted for its aaria, which are commonly woven of 
silk and cotton mixed. They are made up in a large variety of patterns and 
colours, tho best of which are represented by specimens in the present collection. 
The gold and silver embroidery manufactured at Burhanpur is said to show 
no signs of declining, notwithstanding that the city itself is by no means in 
its formerly prosperous condition, but the gold-wrought cotton tissues an( 
brocaded silks are still, as will bo seen from the examples shown, keeping 
up tho ancient reputation that they earned when it was the seat of th( 
Maliommedan Government. 

I..' . vJ^';^f ASSAM COURT. ' 

Assam as a Province includes the Upper Brahmaputra Valley, or Assam Proper 
which, are the districts of Sylhet and Goalpara, part of the original Davaunw 
and Caohar and Hill Districts, which are being gradually settled. The area ii 



IVte Empire of India. 01 



computed at about 46,000 wjiiare niiloa, and tho total population at nearly five 
millions. It is best ropresontod in tho Tea Conrt. 

2^0 Screen. — Tho Assam ornamental screen is composed almost entirely of 
hnmboo and cane, but a kind of mat locally known as aital palti and some nativo 
tnlk cloths have been also used in its manufacture. There are really two screens, 
one for enoh side of the Court. These differ from each other only in pattern, 
tlio main idea being exactly tlio same in ouch. This consists of a sentry box at 
one end octsupying two fet?t of tho length. Tho remaining sweep of 18 feet is 
divided into two by a bamboo pillar resting in a socket «>f lacquereil wood, which 
Iso forms a seat. The whole length of the screen (20 feet) is covered by a board 
20 feet long, 2^ feet wide, and iOi^ feet from the ground. The under-surface of 
this board is covered with the best sitnl-pnlii matting. The workmanship is so 
ine that twenty three strips of the patti go to one inch. Below tho Ijoard, and . 
it right angles to it along the central line, is a series of six panels, Heparate<l 
rom each other by Ixamboo bars and enclosed in bamboo frames. Each half of 
he space of eighteen feet contains two small and one large panel. The panels 
U ditter in design, and consist of intricate figures worked out by native artists 
ind formed in very fine cane. Along the two edges of the long bcu-i-ds runs 
fringe of hanging canc-work, six incheo deep, worked out like the fianels, but 
Q different designs. The board is partially supported by brackets alsc> of cane- 
irork. As will be seen from the screen, dooorativo art in Assiim, as applied to 
onstruction, cannot be said to exist. 

Jewellery. — Several interesting collections of jewellery will claim admiration 
f those who examine them. First is tho Barpeta jewellery, a peculiarly fino 
pecies of gold filigree which is made at Barpefa in the Kamrup district. 
'ho articles are chiefly bracelets and necklaces — tlie latter being especially 
eautiful. The gold is sometimes imported direct from Calcutta, but is often 
btained from Mahommedan coins brought (to save weight) instead of rupees,].*;/ 
10 elephant traders of Rangpur and Furnea. Secondly, the best-known articles 
f the Khasi Hills jewellery, are tho coral and gold necklaces, largely worn by 
10 more wealthy of the Khasi women. These necklaces consist of alternate 
eads (about the size of small marbles) of coral and gold, held together by a 
iread passing through a hole in the centre of each. The coral is reol and comes 

from Calcutta. The gold beads are shells of f;old filled up with lac. Tho 
alue of a necklace varies from Hs. oO to 200, and a good specimen would, 
lerefore, have been too expensive to be included amongst the exhibits. The 
allop-shell ear-ring and gold collaret are peculiar to these hills. 

Thirdly, the Manipur jewellery is made in the Hill State of that name, gold 
id silver articles being largely uianufacture4 for the native trade at Manipur. 
He gold used is always pure, but a large number of the articles consist half of 
>ld and half of silver. Last, come the Jorhat ear-rings enamelled on gold. 
Ha colours are blue, green, and white, and tho etlect is strikingly beautiful. 
ho ornaments produced are lockots, ear-rings, bracelets, and necklaces. The 
le is not extensive, and is only confined to natives. The ornaments are often 
t with precious stones. 

Br&n, Copper, <ftc.— 'Amongst the brass, copper, and mixed metal wares, ther» 
•KrfgaHilli brake bracelets, and Vcssole generally made all o;ver the prcivinoe. 



eSI The Empire of India. 



The material used is either brass, or boll-metal ooraposod of brass and copper, 
which is melted and cast in moulds. Brass vessels are made from sheet brass, 
which is out and beaten into the required shape. This manufacture is almost 
confined to Morios, a Mahominodan caste found all over Assam. The peculiar 
weapons of the several tribes from the Bhutias, Nagas and Kukis do not seem 
to include any blades such as are forged by the Khamptis, and are of exceptional 
toughness and keenness. • . . . r , 

The former native Court e.m\ prosperity of Assam, which was destroyed by 
the Burmese invaders, is represented by a few carvers in ivory wlio still remain 
at Jorhat, being descendants of those who worked for the Assam kings ; but 
the handicraft appears to bo dying out, as there is next to no demand for the 
articles produced. These are mainly spoons and forks, combs, and sometimes 
chessmen. 1 he favourite patterns represent a crane in the act of preening, and 
a crocodile with a fish in its mouth. - ; .j , ., jt i 

Included in wood -carving are several models, such as a tiger-trap froiu 
Nowgong ; a dug-out, which represents the ordinary vehicle of communication 
in the province during the rains from May to Octo)>er; and a palanquin. 
Lakhimpur sends a model of an Assamese homestead, tlie exact representation of 
the appearance of tilings on the premises of an ordinary Assamese cultivator. 
A single family usually occupies one of those ho.nestoads, which is soparatal 
from the next by a few fields. Two families never occui>y the same premises, 
unless closely related by blood. The ingenuity of the Manipuris, who are tho 
Japanese of this part of India, is shown in nineteen models of Manipur wood 

work. 

Textile Fabrics, -Tlio textile fabrics are represented by groups. (1.) Goal 
para cloths. Fabi-ics made of cotton are common all over tho province, am 
their manufacture is as widely distributed as their use. English yarn is sail 
to Ik) rapidly taking the place of homespun thread, except when coarse m 
particularly durable cloths are required; but tho fonncr is largely used k 
domestic purposes, aad the spinning-wheel and the loom are to be found i 
almost every Assamese household. (2.) >iaga cloths. Dhotis or waist-oloths.- 
These are generally unomameuted, but occasionally coloured patterns aro woven 
into the ond. Chaddars or sheets.— These are almost invariably quite plain 
except when made of tho finer kinds of cotton yarn. In this case they an 
sometimes as fine as muslins, and are only prepared by women of resiK>ctabilitv 
for private use. These carefully-woven fabrics are generally decorated Avitl 
elaborately-worked paticjms of flowers, fniits and birds in coloured thread 
sometimes of silk, and sometimes of cotton. (3.) Kuki and Cachari cloths, th 
different articles of which aro curious ; and (4.) Manipur cloths. 

5t7fe.— Silk fabrics are excessively numerous, and vary greatly in materia 
workmanship, quality, and colour. From Goalpara and Sibsagar several specimen 
are sent of the silk manufacture, which is that of eri and muga silk, obtaiue 
from two species of worms, the first of which feeds upon the castor-oil plan 
while the muga feeds on a forest tree called the sum. No means have jet bee 
discovered of reeling tho eri silk, and tho thread is always made froin it t 
spinning. As a natural consequenco th» thread is uneven and coarse, and th 
cloth v«3ry rough but durablo. The commonest cloth of this material is calle 



TKe Empire of India. 68 

borkapar, a large heavy sheet about 21 feet by 5, universally worn by men of 
the {leosant cIons during the cold weather. The eri cloth is commonly worn by 
the peasantry, and the muga cloth by the upper clatisuH, and it is a noticeable 
fact tliat women of rcHjiectubility rarely engage in the manufacture of eri cloth. 
Bcuket Work. — The AsHam Valley basket-work is very varied, and a know- 
ledge of the art is universal. The Sylhot sital-pntti mats are the finest specimens 
of this manufacture. The work is exceedingly tedious and expensive. The 
material is a kind of reed, called in Bengali muria. The coarser kinds of mats 
are universally used for sitting and sleeping on, especially during the hot 
weather. The word aital means cool. 

BURMA COURT. 

British Burma, before the recent annexation, contained a population of 
3,730,771, occupying H7,220 square miles, and compiiHing the sea coast pro* 
vinces of Arakan, TenuHsorim, and Tavvy, and I'ogu, the lower valley of the 
Irawtidi. The distinction of British Burma exists no longer, but the Burma 
Court cannot show exhibits from the former kingdom. 

The screen of the Burma Court is made of carved teak with Jcalaga Cor cloth 
hanging) panels. The upper part resembles the carving placed round the eaves 
nud gables of Burmese niounsterics, palaces, and shrines. The small flume-liko 
pinna(;les pi-rhaps point back to a former fire-wor«hip oru. The frame-work 
just below is an example of the ordinary wood-curving of the country, and the 
kalagas (or applique work) which are placed us imnels, are part of the hangings 
used as screens, roofings, or backgrounds at open-air festivals or in-door feasts. 
The pillars are ornamented in red and gold in n manner common in shrines and 
monasteries. The workmanship is purposely that iwot witli on olyects com- 
mouly made in Burma. 

The screens of the Burmese Court strike the spctitator, not necessarily by 
the excellonoe of the carving, for that is elBcwhero I'ivulled, l)ut by the distinc- 
tive character of the complicated design, with the feeling that he has passed 
from India pi'oper into a country where the religion, the manners and customs, 
and consequently the arts of the people, diifer from any already examined, and 
this feeling will bo confirmed ns the exhibits which fill the Court of the pro- 
sperous province of British Burma are examined. The words British Burma 
are for the ju-esent used advisedly, for although the distinction between 
it and Upper Burma exists no longer, and although the prevalent character of 
Rwriaese art-work is the same from Mandalay to Bhanio as from Rangoon to 
Muudalay, yet still all the exhibits belong to the Lower Burma or to the sca- 
Bido provinces mentioned alx)ve. 

The only aicbitectural carving exemplified is in wood, and tlie ordinary 
carver is a proficient at either foliage or figure work. In addition to this the 
Rangoon models of men, women, and carts, are examples of the work of the 
best carvers, but the iBosi" characteristic work, both of foliage and figures, is to 
wi found at Buddhist monasteries, where thesaorod seven-roofed spire, supported 
on Vermilion and gold-plated pillars, rises rbovo a placid figure of Gautama: 
WkJh line of eaves and gable is adorned with a many -pinnacled piece of carving 
rising tip at the corflers over the head of a giiardian angel. 



6i The Empire of India. 



A curious and intricate efifect is ohtained by Burmese workmen for da handles 
and table ornaments. The outside of the specimen is carved with foliage and 
flowers through the interstices of which the inside is hollowed out nearly to the 
o'entre, where a figure is carved in situ. The figure looks as if it had been 
carved separately and inserted into a flowery bower ; but closer examination 
ehows that this is not the case, and the men may at any time be seen carving 
the figure through the opening of the tracery. 

A fine collection of gold and silver ware from Kangoon, and also from the 
Shan States, exemplifies the well-known and highly -esteemed silver-work of 
Burma. Whether it is hammered, embossed, chased, carved, or cut into upon 
tracery, it is all made in exactly the same way. It can be applied to any shape, 
and European patterns are often covered with the Burmese work ; but the native 
demand is entirely for articles of simple shape, such as large round bowls 
without cover or legs, betel-boxes, small oval lime-boxes, and such like. 

The examples of jewellery are chiefly of filigree, with which are associated 
small pieces of solid gold, either beaten out into the petals of a leaf, or cut like a 
diamond to form the flashing centre of a rosette or a sparkling pendant. In this 
case the burnished gold retains its proper colour, but in all others it is dyed red 
with tamarind juice, a barbaric custom to which the Burmese tenaciously cling. 
The reason given is that no other metal but gold will assume this particular 
ruddy colour when treated with tamarind juice ; it may in fact be regarded as 
the Hall mark of Burmese jewellery. The goldsmiths show great skill and, 
what is rarer amongst the Burmese, great patience and industry in making their 
filigree work. For they have first to draw the wire from solid gold, and they 
then laboriously construct the delicate pieces of which the work is finally formed. 
The dalizan is perhaps the prettiest of all, and in silver it is sought after by 
Europeans. It is composed of a collar .about half-an-inch high, from which 
hang rows of peacocks, rosettes, crescents, &c,, linked together and gradually 
narrowing towards the lower edge. Ornaments for > o hair'5>ro of two kinds : 
those made of sprays of leaves and those ?nade by a» 3hing conventional orna- 
ments to a curved bar by spiral springs. In both kinds a peacock or pheasant 
is introduced in the centre. Coloured pieces of glass and sometimes precious 
stones are set in the leaves, and the whole piece vibrates with every movement 
of the head. Chains and round necklaces are formed by plaiting flat pieces of 
gold in various ways, and soldering on to the faces small knobs and grains. 
This kind of work is perhaps the best in design and finish of any mada by 
Burmese goldsmiths. Specimens of silver niello are also shown. Matiiy of the 
silversmiths are proficient in this art. The articles made are ci .ps, lime-boxes, 
plates, knife-handles, and are all quite smooth with a '"olish. The t)lack enamel 
used is made of two parts of lead, one part silver, ai ' . "^ P^ copper, and 
sulphur is added while the materials are melting. oib^9 

The only important manufactures in brass are th'* ^Jastings of images of 
Gautama, bells and gongs, which are in perpetual requet for religious purposes, 
and to jtrovide which for a Buddhist Monastery or pagr '* is a work of merim, 
which goes to the spiritual credit of the offerer. M 

The lacquered war© used in British Burma is of t/o kinds— (i.) T^t u^ 
which the article is made of b'askieit-work la'(jiiu«'r'(/d oVfer: '(ii.) That in which 



The Empire of India. eS 



the article is made of wood. With regard to shape alone, a distinction might 
be drawn between things used in ordinary life and those which are dedicated 
to the service of the monastery. All the lacquerware made on a basket-work 
form comes from Upper Burma, where it is a very important trade. In 
British Burma the trade is confined to the production of wooden articles lac- 
quered over, such as the large round platter with a raised edge, iu which the 
family dinner is served round, and square boxes and bowls. Another sot of 
artists produce richly gilt boxes used in the monasteries for holding palm- 
leaf manuscripts, the bowls with a pagoda-shaped cover used for carrying food 
to monasteries and pagodas and shrines on which to place images of Gaudama. 
Tne coffers referred to appear as if covered with pictures drawn in black on 
a gold ground, and the effect is so good that a small demand for tables, panels, 
and bowls of the same work has sprung up. 

Textiles.— Thvoughont Burma weaving is cariied on, though not so much in 

the large towns as in the country. The cloths woven are chiefly cotton for homo 

use, and putsos, cloths worn by men, which are from fifteen to eight yards long, 

md varying in width from three-quarters of a yard to 3^ feet; or tameins, worn 

)y women, a sheet of two portions sewn together, about 4^ feet long and about 

)i feet broad. Besides these, tUndaings or coverlets and saungs or thick sheets 

ire woven. The following description of the Burmese dress of both sexes U 

aken from the valuable work of the late Mr. Forbes : " The patterns are either 

)lain variegated stripes, checks, and plaids, or in the most fashionable and expen- 

live a series of zig-zag lines of varying breadth and colours, with sometimes a 

eaf-like pattern between. These last, from the intricacy of the pattern and the 

lumber of the shuttles employed for the different coloured threads, require great 

ikill and a large amount of labour. In some of the best cloths one hundred 

ihuttles are used, and cloths are distinguished on this account as fifty-shuttle, 

iighty-shuttle, hundred-shuttle putsoes. The prices of cloths of the best mami- 

acture, as aljjove described, run up to 200 rupees (£20), or even more. The piece 

s fashioned for wear by cutting the length of the web in half, and then stitching 

he lengths together, so as to form a double width. One end is closed so an to 

aake a kind of wallet. The puUo now nine yards long and one and a half wide, 

s girt round the waist in an ingenious manner without any belt, by a twist and' 

I hitch of the cloth. It thus forms a kilt with a long spare end in front ; this 

s sometimes tucked in at the waist, and allowed to hang low in front in heavy 

aids, but the most graceful way of wearing it is to throw it loosely over 

le shoulder, A white cotton jacket (of English longcloth) reaching the waist, 

iid a handkerchief (of Manchester manufacture) wound round the head, com* 

lete the costume. 

" The tamein, or female •^|:ess, is difficult to describe. It consists of three pieces 
)ined ; the upper, of E^ ej ^h red or black cotton stuff; the body of the dress, 
bree-quartersofayarden iP and a yard-and-a-half wide, and a lower border 
bout half-a-yard deep. ^ These parts sewn together, form an oblong cloth a 
-tfd-and-a-half wide, a/d about two yards long. This is simply wrapped 
^nd the body, and secu ely fastened by a hitch in the edge of the cloth in 
'.e mysterious manne- , over the bosom below the armpits, and again at the 
^t; the fold remainiiig loose downwards, displays in walking, rather more 



QQ The Empire of India. 



of the lady's leg on one side than woidd be considered quite proper with m 
It would perhaps simplify the explanation if the reader took a bath-towel six 
feet long and four-and-a-half feet in width, and endeavoured to put it on as a 
garment, covering the body from the armpits to the feet." 

The same dresses are also manufactured in silks, which are all of very 
brilliant, not to say gaudy patterns and colours ; but in British Burma the silk 
articles of clothing are chiefly of European manufacture, being cheaper, though 
far less durable than the home manufacture. The gold and silver embroidene^ 
shown, are only used in Lower Burma to supply costumes for the theatre. 
Gold and silver lace are freely used, as ure precious stones, and the result is an 
exceedingly costly garment. A very effective decorative work in Bilk is showi: 
in the kalaga, or hanging, from Rangoon. The Tcalaga^ most ordinarily m use 
are made in cloth, and are red hangings or purdahs. They are about ten oi 
twelve feet long, and four or five feet deep, on which are pourtrayed scenes fron> 
one of the mythological plays. The work is technically known as apphque 
work and is formed by cutting the figures and foliage of the picture out ol 
vari-coloured cloths and sewing them on to the background. The resul^ in 
Burma is a gorgeously-coloured screen, which is used to decorate the house on 
festive occasions or to partition off a part of it for a guest. The kalaga also 
forms a gay roof-covering for the bullock-cart when the family travek to one oi 
the large pagoda feasts. .;,...:--'- 

MADEAS COUET,. 



j..i itt ^ ••«'»•' 



Next to Burma comes the Madras Court, representing the territories of tha 
Presidency, which occupies the entire south of the leninsnla, together with » 
lone strip running northwards on the Coromandel Co;.Bt. It has an area o 
139 900 square miles, with a population of 30,688,504. The important pnnci 
Dalities of Travancore and Cochin, with three smaller states, are in connectioi 
lith Madras, and our ancient and faithful allies of Travancore and Cochin a. 
well represented. The city of Madras, the third greatest m India, is entirely o 
EngUsh origin, and dates from the building of the factory in 1639 

The carved screens for the Madras Court are in a style of the Dravidia. 

architecture of Southern India of the Vijaynagar period, i.e. about the 15th a 

16th century. Avoiding as far as possible the grotesque eccentricities of th 

Btvle it is attempted to show that South Indian carvers are capable of muc 

,r«>od work. The columns are fluted and ribb<^d and crossed at intervals wrt 

bands of elaborate ornament. The upi^er portion is cut in representation o 

chatty, or earthen vessel, from which the capital springs m the shape ot 

lotus Above this two richly-carved brackets assist m supporting the on 

beam on which the upper portior or entablature of the screen rests. The Hind 

architects use an elaborate system oi brackets in place of the arch construe k 

of Saracenic and European builders. The long beam is divided into paneis fill- 

with various designs of foliage, birds, gryphons, and other monsters of Him 

mythology. What might be caUed the frieze of the entablature is divided in 

panels by carved upright struts. The panels themselves are each divided in 

three niches, the design being adapted from the metal shnnes in which 

Hindus place the images of their gods. The centye of each of these is hU 



_^ The Umpire of India. gj 

with pierced foliage, generally in representation of the tree of lifo, and „ the 
.pandrel between the niches, a cobra with distended hood is coiled up. The 
variety of the patterns on the screen and the treatment of animal for^s wTu 
jpve a good Idea of the facUity for ornamental design possessed by most orieZ 
lunmcraftsmen. The screen is constructed of Burma teak by a Madras^^ 
penter EamaUngam A^ri. The general design was prepared by the Sunerin- 
tondent of the Madras School of Arts and executed under his direction by aCt 
twenty Madras carvers, the .^,ller details being designed by Minakshi AsTrY . 
carver ftom Ramnad, m the Madura District. The difficulty of golting a 
sufficent number of carvers in Madras city, and the short time aUowef for th! 
work prevented the design being carried out in its entirety 

The most interesting of the exhibits sent frcm the Madras Presidency are 
described by Colonel Hawkes, the President of the Madras Committee.^" old 
native jewellery, brass and copper utensils, wood carvings, cotton ^d sUk 
f r ?.? r "/"^r ""f embroideries." We miss fxamplcs, Cover 

\t, y^ ^ ""), ^°1* ""* '"™'' P'"'" ''■»■" «"> Presidency, ^ly S 
cxhibitsbeingclassed under this head, two of which are a c»n,u;stick anH 
te m .olid sUver. made m the Madras School of Art. Besides these, Tspln of 
rfid silver and two chased silver muffineers (!) are specified, but re^Erons 
of old jewellery-whioh. as we are told, it is being daily melted up aTdTord 
mto new and infenor patterns ; so that on no future occiion is the Lteion f w 
seat likely to be equalled-must be viewed with a melancholy cuntty K 
cons^te of several portions, which may be considered as separate illec<ion„ Th! 
ujythological or «ra»y jewellery, and that more especially wrouirht ^^1,. 
of Mussulman families, and the weU known exquisUe gold TeClt y rf Trichf 
nopoly. are all represented. The old native iewelW frnm Al j . 

»ve.l examples „f the curious gold ear 01.31:: Tne^TthetTjetr™ 
which IS wern in a greatly distended hole in the lower lobe of the ear Th. 
^neral coUectlon of old native jewellery from Southern India shows the"„flrfte 
«i6iy of forms characterising the several races of Southern luJiY Th. i 
.necessarily referred ^ the special catalogue for the ^I:' tin of at o" 
iOO articles, including gold ornaments to bo worn in the ear tl,„ ? 

»ck of the hair, with imitations of jasmine buds and !!L , , ' '"' *■" 
ie gold marrhige emblem (a represtntatio^'ort.relororKlrrirrd 
..ds. the gold rings as worn by Mussulman females on thelhumb and on^^ 
mlcx finger, the gold marriage necklet of forty-eight beads 0^1 »L fi« 
«•» rubies and fifty-seven beads, the silver armlets wrUtlete wk W f ^ 
«aaUions strung on threM as worn by Mahomedw 1^^! sUvt fl^ "■'""' 

lo the ethnologist, iho special collection of jewellery worn bv th. »L ■ • , 
rod«,. Badagas and KoUhs of the NUgiri Hills, whTch i^clX*^!^!^"^™ 
''m. copper, and iron, will be more attractive than the silver 7^' ' 

i»played in such abundance. H.H. the Maharaja of Cochin con,!r. ""'""<"'*» 
ollection also of the jewellery peculiar to his -^Ir jLZ^tlT T^^l 
•enticned the gold filigrain necklace, with three dasps oTT^ro:TJ:Lt 
"the upper portion, and seven on the lower, worn by il castas I^ tl ^ 
.amage necklace of three medallions strung on red silk. Tn^ther consisW 



68 The Empire of India. 



fifty-one medallions of green stone mounted on gold, with 153 rubies strung on 
red silk, while the medallions composing the ornament represent the avatai-s of 
Vishnu. The Maharaja also oends the show of silver jewellery of native make 
intended for European wear. This contains beautifully wrought examples of 
the well known filigrain silver, and the brooches of various patterns, such as 
the vine, the Indian lute, the flower and leaf, the butterfly and palanquin, and 
the bracelets of flowers or butterflies. 

The special collection from South Canara contains the gold and silver orna 
ments worn by Mapala women, and the waist belts for little children. Under 
the heading ornaments, in the baser metals, are included several collections of 
peasant jewellery worn in the different districts of Vizagapatam, Chingleput, 
Malabar, Tanjore, Kistna, &c. 

The Maharaja of Vizagapatam sends a gilded state hovcdah, with set of 
elephant trappings for state and ceremonious occasions, as well as a silver howdah 
used for ordinary purposes. 

The jewellers of Travancore are noted as producing silver filigrained work 
of the best description, and H.H. the Maharaja of Travancore supplies a special 
collection of over one hundred articles, both in gold and silver work. 

The brass and copper work of Tanjore, which is described as the finest in 
India, is represented by an admirable collection. Most of the articles are 
sacrificial utensils, besides which there is a numerous group of copper models, 
not only of sacred objects, but of daggers, battle-axes, ploughs, &o. In mixed 
metals, water vessels of brass ornamented with silver and copper flowers, or of 
copper inlaid with silver, are exhibited by the Madras School of Art. 

H.H. the Maharaja of Vizianagram exhibits a numerous assortment of arms, 
including a number of sacrificial knives used in human sacrifice. Two circlet 
of iron, for throwing in warfare, represent a very ancient form of weapon, the 
use of which is mentioned in the great Indian epic poems. 

Besides the screen there is a window in carved teak, the work of a pupil in 
the School of Art, and a native doorway of carved neem vs^ood. The garden 
set ornamented with carved wooden figures of Hindu gods 1;aken from a very 
old idol car, is destined to remain in the South Kensington Museum. Two 
carved blocks in sandal wood, representing mythological sultjects, are specially 
commended to attention by the President of the Committee. Inlaid sandjdl' 
wood work and lacquered ware of Karnul, Nossam, and Cuddapah are of thel® 
usual character. I 

The well-known ivory carving of Travancore is also illustrated by a Ion J 8 
series of small articles, such as paper cutters, paper weights, &o. Models o1 ^^ 
H.H. the Maharaja's state barge and canoe with cabin, and a variety of carvel 
cocoanut shells are also shown. I^* 

The glazed and unglazed pottery is altogether the work of the School of Arl|^ 
The forms and green colour of the old Madura pottery are carefully followed, f"' 

Among the specimens of cotton fabrics, which are not designated as a ru 
by their place of manufacture, are very fine pieces of beautiful ami muslii 
which rank with the manufactures of Dacca, Nagpur, and Nellore. The Eaja ( 
Pithapur, in the Godaveri district, sends a special collection of hand-printe 
palampurSt canopy-cloths and curtains. A series of these, representing seem 



m 
ot 
of 

ail 



The Empire of India. 69 

from the BaiuayaT}ani, and from the Mahabharata, though not attractive to 
European eyes, are remarkable as examples of hand-printing. The native 
hand-printed wares are set oflF by '*live so-called palampura from Manchestor, 
imported for sale in Madras and Bengal. The great deterioration of the 
pattern will bo manifest." 

Of the silks the Committee remark that the silk cloths would seem to bo 
peculiarly suitable for the present stylo of ladies' dresses, and as the material 
used is pure and unadulterated, the colours well blended, and the borders 
handsome, it is to be hoped the Exhibition will give a very desirable impetus to 
the Indian silk manufacture. Accordingly, pieces of silk, checkered, striped, 
and plain, all good examples of quality and colouring, are collected for the 
delectation, and, it is to bo hoped, the admiration of the softer sex. Except 
the Berhampur silks, however, these exhibits, like the cottons, have no refer- 
ence as to their special place of manufacture. 

H.E. Mrs. Grant-Duflf gives a striking proof of the interest taken by her 
in the manufactures of the Presidency by the beautiful exhibition of embroi- 
deries and laces which she contributes. Other embroideries and laces are 
exhibited by the Hobart School of Mohammedan girls. 

HYDERABAD COURT. ' 

The last Court is divided between Hyderabad, or the dominions of the 
Nizam, and Mysore and Coorg, two adjacent states, situated in the heart of the 
Dekhan. The Nizam is the chief Mohammedan native ruler, and a descendant 
of the Mighal Nizam-ul-Mulkh (Regulator of the Empire). This prince pofl- 
Besses a territory comprising 81,807 scLuare miles, and a population of nearly 
ten millions, j.^'f^^i, />.!» K.ry li«^^./.>f >>,?,;!<? .Jit w 

The screen consists of a series of arches, the posts being 10 ft. apart from 
centre to centre. Except in the centre piece or gateway, the height of the 
screen [is lOi^ ft., and that of the arches, 8 ft. from the ground ; these, to 
facilitate description, may be numbered 1 to 7. Nos. 1 and 7 are intended to 
show the brass-work of the province. • -f'* ;. >w.H 

The second and sixth arches are of Bidri ware, i.e. blackened pewter inlaid 
with gold, silver, or copper. The third and fifth arches — those on either side 
of the central piece — are entirely of lacquer work. 

The central portion of the screen, or, as it may well be termed, the central 
gateway, is a Tazzia, such as is commonly constructed during the Mohorran 
festival, to represent the Mausoleum of Hassain and Hussain. 

In the combined Court preference may naturally be given to the portion 
dt/oted to the manufactures from the dominions of the Nizam, and the great 
Mohammudan city of Hyderabad with its population of 200,000 souls. Accord- 
ing to the Gazetteer of India, the principal manufactures are the ornamental 
metal ware of Bidar, the gold-embroidered cloths of Aurangabad, Gulbarga, and 
other towns, and the excellent paper of diflferent kinds made by the inhabitants 
of the hamlet of Eagarpur, near the famous fortress of Doulatabad. 

The jewellery and silver ware are all of Aurangabad manufacture, with 
silver filigree boxes which resemble the Dehli silver work. The only one of the 



70 The Empire of India. 



art manufactures in metal is the hidri ware, which is here shown from its 
original birthplace of Bidar. Close on a hundred articles are exhibited 
exemplifying the important industry which commands an extensive demand. 
No dowry is considered complete among the better class of Moham- 
medans unless a complete set of hidri ware, from bed-legs to a spittoon, is 
included. The high prices often render it necessary for the father of a family 
to begin his collection years before his daughter is marriageable. The mode of 
manufacture has been elsewhere described. The mixture used at Bidar is 
variously stated by authorities at one part of copper to sixteen of zinc, or one 
part of copper to fourteen of zinc. The patterns of Bidar are generally of a 
natural floral description. Both gold and silver are inlaid, and copper also is 
sometimes used in this work at Bidar. fl* JrJ'io'i (h.t O't ij Ji ^Hiu 

Admirers of armour will find ample scope to indulge their taste in the col- 
lection of ancient armour purchased in the city of Hyderabad, which is noted 
for old arms, and the modem blades made from the steel in the Hyderabad 
territory rival the finest Damascus. 

The lacquer ware shown in the ornamental screen is also illustrated by a 
large assortment of boxes, fans, sandals, &o.i io .^('iior. n^ikiii uM v-i : 

The beautiful lacquer work of Baingaupali, Skjagir in the Eaichur district, is 
used in ornamenting every article of domestic use. Like the inlaid metal work 
of Bidar, articles forming part of the wedding dowry are lacquered. The work 
is of two kinds or classes, one embossed and the other plain, and called 
respectively viunahathi and lajavoardi. The embossing is produced by a tedious 
process. Shells or slag from the foj'ge are finely ground with some glutinous 
substance, which is kept a secret, and layer upon layer of this ingredient put on 
with a brush till the requisite height is attained. The whole is then covered 
with gold-leaf, the designs are picked out in paint, and the article varnished. 

Textiles. — The cotton fabrics include Kaki coloured muslins, plain and striped, 
from Eaichur. These are a luxury in the hot weather, and are used by both sexes 
among the natives, the men using the cloth for their angrakaa or loose jackets, 
and the women for wraps. The muslins of Eaichur closely resemble those of 
Nandair, and are about one-fourth the price ; but good judges profess to see a 
great difference. 

Thirty-nine pieces are also shown of the finest muslins manufactured in the 
Hyderabad state. These are salmon-coloured. They are, like the others, all 
woven in hand-looms. Beside these are examples of the Eaichur counterpanes, 
and the stamped cloth from Indore, commonly used as coverlets and curtains. 
The Gulbarga Jail exhibits examples of prayer carpets, and a selection of cotton 
carpets of the noted Warangal make. The aniline dyes can be remarked as 
having superseded the true cid Indian dyes in this manufacture. 

The gold and silver cloth and lace of Aurangabad and the gorgeous 
embroideries applied to the canopies of costly state umbrellas of dignity, the 
elephants' cloths and state horses* caparisons generally, are somewhat sparsely 
represented. The Gulbarga embroidery is inferior in work to that of Auran- 
gabad. The work in the exhibits is, however, well done, but the metal used is 
copper gilt. The pure silk »aris of Eaichur, and the mashru or mixed satin 
for Mohammedan use, and the flowered silks of Aurangabad, are the chief sil'* 



T^e Empire of India. 71 



fabrics shown, and of these it is needless to say more than that they are the 
products of long-established seats of the production of the finest silk wares, and 
are well worthy of their reputation. Seven pieces of embroideries in gold and 
beetle wings complete the r^oUection. 

Raichur is famous for its leather industry, principally applied to the 
manufacture of the slippers and shoes. The leather employed is sometimes 
dved, but not unfrequently, as in examples shown, gilt or silvered. The 
slippers embroidered with gilt and copper are very commonly used, especially 
by dancing girls. 

^/^^' MYSORE AND COORG COURT. "■['''■''''' 

Mysore and Coorg are conterminous Hill Stfites, the latter under the direct 
administration of the Governor-General, and the former a Native State ruled 
over by a descendant of the Hindu chieftain from whom Hyder Ali usurped it. 
Mysore has an area of over 25,000 square miles, and a population of over 4,000,000. 
Coorg is a small mountainous district of about 1600 square miles, south of 
Mysore, inhabited by a fine race of highlanders numbering about 180,000. 

The screen for the Mysore and Coorg Court encloses a space of about 70 ft. 
in length by 12 ft. in width. The front elevation is divided into seven bays of 
10 ft. each, the Mysore Court of five bays being separated from the Coorg Court 
of two bays by a partition. The designs for the pillars and arches are copied 
from the T^aria Daulat Bagh (the Garden Palace, built by Tippoo Sultan at 
Seringapatam, and long occupied by the Duke of Wellington, then Colonel 
Wellesley), reduced to half the original dimensions. The pillars, panels, &c„ 
are made of different kinds of Mysore timber, the carving being executed by 
local carpent€)rs. The plain panels above the arches of the front elevation and 
at the sides and top of the three partition screens are filled in with photographs 
of Mysore sconery, &c., and nati ve mythological paintings. 

Taken ?vl the order of the Special Catalogue, first noticeable, is a group of 
Hindu deities carved in soap-stone. Sacred sculpture in this material and 
dating some hundreds of yeara back, is found in a perfect state of preservation all 
over the St>ate. The figures are from two feet high down to miniature repre- 
sentations. This collection indicates the motif of almost all the well known 
Mysore work. The Canara carving already described, dnd the Sorab and other 
Mysore work are identical, in every respect, executed in high relief, and illus- 
trating the Puranas or legendary histories of the Hindu deities. The conven- 
tional and deformed figures of Brahma, Siva and Vishnu Krishna, and their 
cons'orts and attendant guardians to the earth are contrasted with the foliated 
borders. 

The lacquer veare of Ohenaputten consists of wooden toys turned and prettily 
laoquered. Chessmen and chess boards are also made of the same ware. 

The Mysore inlaid ebony furniture, of which sixteen samples are exhibited, 
Has risen in importance since the Calcutta Exhibition, and at present the demand 
exceeds the supply. 

The work of the Mysore goldsmiths in either of the precious metals is well 
known for the delipacy and ingenuity displayed in chasing, engraving and 



73 The Empire of India, 



ornamenting the pattemg. The exquisite gold diBhes presented to H.R.H. the 
Prince Wales will be romomberod by all who have availed themselves of the 
opportunities so freely aflforded of inspecting Ilis Royal Highness's Indian 
collections. The maker (Venkatrammana) of these exquisite works, exhibits 
silver castings and silver chased work in awami figures and salvers. Engraved 
and reponssS plate is also shown from Bangalore. 

The brass and copper utensils, and the brass and copper idols of the Tumkur 
districts are widely noted, and the other known seats of this industry, such an 
Kagamangala and Magadi are represented by articles intended for religious or for 
ordinary use. The best workmen of the staple work in metals are Jains. The 
ordinary work is described as rough, without finish or accuracy, the circles and 
the lines inaccurate, and the marks of the file and the burnisher everywhere 
visible. The brass and copper wares for sacrificial purposes are necessarily 
confined to the ancient patteme, no innovation being permisaible. There is a 
good collection representing the ordinary gold and silver ornaments set with 
gems, which are imitated in base metal and glass. trmiM 

Textiles. — Among these the Ganjam chintzes have been specially reproduced 
from old printing blocks of the time of Hyder Ali, reproducing tlie pattemn 
which were worn by the peons of Hyder Ali and Tippoo Sahib. The woollen 
Kambli, marked 732, is sent as a specimen of the choice Davangiri manufacture, 
of which the excellence is proved by a piece measuring two yards by six yards, 
being rolled up and placed in the hollow of a small bamboo, one foot and a half 
long, and two and a half inches in diameter. 

Throughout Mysore silk manufacture has always flourished. The rich 
texture and costly patterns of the silks of Bangalore are well known, and 
Tumkur also produces fine material. The disease amongst the silkworms has 
however caused a considerable decline in the manufacture. One example is 
shown of the Bangalore woollen carpeting woven with the same pattern on 
both sides, and noted for durability. Bangalore woollen pile rugs are also 
exhibited, with the note that the trade in these for export has fallen o.T since 
the weavers adopted aniline dyes. 

I.— THE IMPERIAL COURT. ^'■'^^ 

It has already been explained in the prefatory remarks, J). 11, that the 
useful products of India which are collected in the Imperial or Economic 
Court, which we will now examine, are arranged on a diflferent plan from 
that of the Art Courts. The raw products and rough manufactures which 
have been collected together to illustrate the resources of India, have been 
grouped together in successive divisions, which are described with scienafij 
exactitude in the special catalogue. For those who wish to enquire more par- 
ticularly into any special group of products, it is only needful io explain 
that each exhibit is numbered, and a reference to the Index Collection arranged 
on the walls of the Court, so as to appear exactly opposite to the correspond- 
ing commercial collections, will facilitate the study of the larger samples dis- 
played on the tables and trophies or in the glass cases. The whole of this 
Court may be described as a survey of the economic reso arces, the productive 



^__________ The Empire of India. 73 

powers, and the commerce of India. The magnitude of the foreign trade of 
India enables it to rank as the fifth great cx)mmeroial power in the world 
The total value of the external sea-borne trade of India may be said roughly 
to be 166 millions of pounds sterling, of which 70 millions represent exports 
and 85 millions imports. Of this the commerce between India and the United 
Kingdom claims 86 millions sterling, of which 36 millions represent exports 
and 50 millions imports. To form a complete estimate of tho foreign commerce 
of India, we must add to this the land trade across the frontiers, which 
amounts to about 12 millions sterling. The staples of this commerce are 
illustrated in this Court. The visitors will do well to try and realise the fact 
that the coUection of the fruits of the earth, the implements and the results 
of human labour, and the illustrations of the rural life which present them- 
selves one after the other, represents a population of 252 millions, and an area 
of cultivated land of ovei- 189 millions of acres. 

The Forest Trophy.— The massive archway 9vbich fonns the entrance to the 
Court is constructed entirely of Indian timbers, and designed by Mr. F. B. 
Manson, Deputy Conservator of Forests, Chutia Nagpur, Bengal. The middle 
portion xs 22 ft. broad, and rises to a height of 15 ft. ; the side parts are 
12J ft. high. The total breadth of the trophy is 46 ft., and it is 5 ft. in thick- 
Dess. It contains 3000 specimens of useful timbers. 

The timber specimens used in its construction belong mostly to the Bengal 
Economic Museum, and have been lent by the Government of Bengal. Tho 
trophy includes also the greater part of Mr. J. S. Gamble's collection described 
in his "Manual of Indian Timbers." The specimens so described are marked 
with a letter followed by a number; the letter denotes the region from which 
3ach specimen was obtained. In addition to these collections a large number 
)f new blocks of wood, furnished by the Inspector General of Forests, have 
ilso been built into the trophy. The very extensive series of timbers thus 
)rought together has been arranged on the trophy in geometrical patterns, 
tnd on either side of the arches are placed fretwork panels of teak wood in 
Jabesque design. A border of alternating dark and light woods surround 
he entire framework. The pilasters are supported by large slabs of timber, 
)evelled to show the grain of the wood. For the construction of the orna- 
lental arches some of the principal Indian timbers procurable in Calcutta, 
iz., teak, sdl, sissu, and pine have been used. The geometrical tracery of the 
anels forming the plinth on either side of the middle arch is of teak 
nd sissu; whilst that of the pilasters on each side of the smaller arches is of 
eak. 

Immediately close to the arch are articles of furniture carved from the 
ifood of tho Padouk or Andaman redwood tree. The table constructed of one 
mplete section shows the enormous size which this dark red, close-grained 
hd hard wood attains. 

The Bamboo !ZVop%.— Occupying the c(mtre of the Court, and conspicuous 
y Its height, the great object of attraction will undoubtedly be the Bamboo 
rophy, which consists of an arch over the central transverse path leading from 
le Art Ware Courts, a-ZS contains one of the most perfect collections of bamboos 
?er exhibited. This-^fkmiliar name of the gigantic grasses has, Hke so many 



74 The Empire of India. 

other terms, come to us through the Portuguese piouecrs of European trade and 
settlement in India. The trophy consists of a platform raised 12 ft. above the 
floor on four columns. The steps on either side are covered with split bamboo 
arranged in geometric patterns which are continued on the tioor of the plat- 
form. The forty steps of the two staircases exhibit forty diflferent designs ami 
ten species of bamboo. In all, thirty species of bamboo are exhibited in the 
trophy, for full explanation of which the curious are referred to the index sot 
on the adjacent walls. The number of objects made of bamboo which are 
hung over the trophy far from exhausts the uses and applications of this, as it 
may be called, most versatile gift of nature to the Indian and Indo-Chineso 

peoples. 

FruitB and Vegetables.— A ooUection, partly of models made at the Botanic 
Gardens of Saharanpore, under the supervision of Mr. J. F. Duthio, and by the 
Krishnagur modellers employed by the Government of India, and partly of 
actual fruits, such as will bear the transport and keep good in the glass cases, is 
supplemented by a largo collection of preserved fruits, jams, and pickles. With 
regard to the fruits, it will be a surprise to many to hoar that the fruits of the 
East are, it is believed, much overrated in Europe. Many of the best of Indian 
fruits have been introduced from Europe, China, the West Indies, and America. 
The most characteristic modem fruits of India are the mango, guava, litchi, 
pine-apple, and plantain. Of these the mango is far the most popular fruit in 
India. Colonel Yule in his Glossary says that the royal fruit, the mangifera 
indica, when of good quality is one of the richest and best fruits of the world. 
The origin of the word is Tamil mdn-kay, i.e. man fruit. The Portuguese formed 
from this manga which we have adopted as mango. Numerous varieties of jams, 
pickles, and chutnoys, prepared from this celebrated fruit are to be found 
amongst the exhibits. 

^ttte.—Together with the fruite are samples of nuts, a tei-m which in India 
includes ground nuts and seeds the edible pine. The true almonds, which are a 
sacred offering common to the Hindoo and the Jain, as well as a regular 
ingredient in cookery, especially in a savoury pillao, are imported by the 
traders of Afghanistan and Persia. The Afghnr. traders also supply the hazel 
nut, the walnut, and the pistachio nut, from Afghanistan and Kashmir. ^ 

The Singara nut (647), which is grown on an aquatic weed, forms in some 
parts of the country an important article of food. It is stated that in Kashmir 
30,000 persons are dependent upon this wild plant for food during certain 

months. 

Cocoa JVMf.— Near the bamboo trophy is a most interesting collection ol 
objects made from the common cocoanut palm (properly called coco and vulgarlj 
coker), exhibited by Mr. Pereira, of Bombay. Eighty-three articles are enumer 
ated. The origin of the name of this well-known and useful palm, which to tb 
early travellers and medisBval writers was known as the Indian nut, is suggest© 
to be the old Spanish coca, a shell, although the Portuguese and Spaniards saj 
that it was called coca because it looks like the face of a monkey or some othe 

anim£vl. 

Vegetables.— The vegetables met with in India are readily divided into tw 
sections of indigenous and introduced. Of the latter it may be said tha 



The Empire of India. ' 75 

European fruits and vegetables, though often growing luxuriantly, rarely attain 

tho same flavour as their European congeners. Of these, however, the cabbage, 

tlio cauliflower, and radish, alone are eaten by the natives of India, but not until 

thoy are over-grown and coarse. From America the potato and the egg-apple, 

or hrinjal, have been introduced. As to the indigenous vegetables, India may be 

lowed as the region of the cucumber and the melon, with a large series of allied 

lints, all of which yield valuable fruits and vegetables, and furnish a great 

)roportion of the food of the people. It is almost impossible to arrive at any 

Hofinito idea as to the extent of the internal trade in vegetables. Nothing is 

more characteristic of tho Indian village than its bazaar or market-place, and it 

would be difficult to find a bazaar where the egg-apple, the melon, the cucumber, 

' pumpkin, and the radish, were not offered for sale alongside of rice plantains 

id chillies. The foreign trade in vegetables has increased in the last five years 

Vera about £20,460 to £21,963 ; the bulk of these exports go from Bombay, 

Nearly the whole of the pot-herbs are wild plants which require no cultivation, 

md they illustrate one of the most striking features of India, for in few 

■countries in the world are so many edible products to be procured for the 

rouble of collecting, edible products too which enter largely into the dietary of 

ho mass of tho people. 

Puhes.— By themselves under the head of " Pulses " will be found tho varioHfl 
eguminous seeds which under the name of ddl and gram, the lentils (which 
urnish the vaunted and really beneficial food for invalids known as revalenta), 
md others occupy an area of cultivation of forty-eight millions of acres. The 
!;rain merchant's shop, in which the varieties of this collection are shown, 
eproduces one of the most curious and interesting features of an Indian bazaar.' 
Grains.— One of the most important collections is that of the grains, which 
nay be popularly described as rice, wheat, barley, oats, Indian com, and the 
rarious forms of millet. Of these, rice is the most valuable of all the cereals to 
he inhabitants of India. It is the principal food in Bengal, Burma, Orissa and 
ho eastern portion of Central India, the southern parts of Madras, and the 
vestern districts of Bombay. In the Punjab, the North West Provinces, 
md Oudh, Behar, and the northern parts of the Central Provinces, and Gujerat, 
lie poorer classes live chiefly on millets, supplemented by barley and gram,' 
vhile the rich only use wheat and rice. In tho southern part of the Central 
'rovinces, Berar to Bombay, Decoan and the northern part of Madras, the juar 
lud hajra are the staple foods, and in Mysore the small millet known as raggy 
•!• ragi, furnishes the principal provision. In Assam rice is the staple with the 
ddition of Indian Corn and Job's Tears. The estimate of the total area of 
and annually under cereals is 119,400,000 acres, of which nearly sixty millions 
re devoted to rice. As there are many forms, so there are several crops of 
his essential grain which is, in truth, the staff of life to at least one-third of 
he Indian population. For the foreign trade, which, however, may be said to 
lave been almost ruined within the past few years, the chief supply comes from 
he abundant harvests of that most prosperous province British Burma, while 
bengal supplies a small proportion. "Where rice cannot be cultivated the 
nillets invariably take its place as the staple food crop of the mass of the 
•eople. Even in wheat-producing districts this is true. Dr. Hunter is of 



76 The Empire of India. 



opinion that, taking India as a whole, it may be affirmed that the staple food 
grain is neither rice, nor wheat, but millet. Excluding the special rice tracts, 
varieties of millet are grown more extensively from Madras in the south, at 
least &3 far as Eajputana iu the north. 

Wheat. — The development of the export trade in wheat within the last 
fifteen years is one of the most remarkable facts recorded in the Eeports of the 
material progress of India. Of the two divisions the soft wheats are in most 
demand for the United Kingdom, while the hard forms which are preferred by 
the natives of India are in great request in the Italian market for the manu- 
facture of macaroni. The total area under wheat cultivation in the year 1B84- 
85 has been calculated at 20,306,404 acres, the Punjab taking the lead with itt 
eight millions of acres, while Bengal had only one million. > ,; .^r .f^i; 

Grain Trophy. — AH these grains are combined in the structure of th( 
Grain Trophy, the idea of which is taken from the famous tomb of Itmdd-ud 
Dowlah at Agra, the beautiful marble geometric mosaics having been imitated 
by glasp panels of coloured grains. On the outside elevations there are large 
panels, iwo of which are devoted to rice, two to wheat, two to Indian corn, 
one to barley and oats, and one to millets and Job's tears, a curious grain wbicli 
is cultivated in Assam and among the Eastern frontier hill-tribes. Sixteen 
smaller panels are filled with the pulses, and the remainder with other edible 
grains and oil aeeds. The interior is filled with grains in ear, and Indian corn 
ooba. In the four corners of the room are shown commercial samples of th« 
grains, and in the centre a group of three women modelled in clay " grinding at 
the mill." Near it are cases containing special displays of wheat exhibite« 
by the Bombay Commercial Committee, and collections of rice from Benga 
and Burma. 

Sugars, — The raw and refined sugars exhibited by Messrs Turner, Morris, k 
Co., of Calcutta, and Messrs, Carew & Co., are examples of a cultivation anda trad( 
which are more important at present for Indian internal commerce than for th( 
prospects of increased exportation. The 1,922,000 acres of sugar-cane cultiva 
tion may be said to yield two million tons of coarse sugar. Besides sugar-cane 
sugar is obtained from the date palm, or toddy palm, of Bengal, and the palmyr 
or toddy palm, of South India, Bombay, and Burma ; but the exports, in whid 
the sugar-cane produce cannot be discriminated from other produce, oul 
amounted to one million cwts., as against the two million tons just mentione( 
Improvements in the present defective method of expressing the juice, am 
gradual removal of the prejudice against refined sugars amongst the natives o 
India, who chiefly consume gur or raw sugar, will doubtless give a large stimuli! 
to the internal trade. A model prepared at Poena in order to show the method o 
crushing the sugar-cane in the Bombay Presidency, is exhibited in the Agri 
cultural annexe. The primitive pestle mill is still the machine most general! 
used over the greater part of India for the extraction of cane juice. Th 
method of working it is shown in the model village. 

Narcotics and Stimulants. — Of the Indian narcotics and stimulants, the firs 
place is naturally taken by the product of the poppy, commonly called Opium 
from its Greek term omov (opion), from which as a Government monopoly, th 
Government of India draws an average revenue of nine millions arising froi 



The Empire of India. 77 



" provigion " opium, t.c. opium sont to China, while tho immouBo internal consump- 
tion of "oiciso" opium, i.e. opium consumed in India, gives a return of about 
£800,000 more. The cultivation of opium is highly remunerative to the culti- 
vator, who obtains an advance in two instalments, and has a certain market, but 
for all this, opium production is not popular, and eflforts to extend poppy cultiva- 
tion have boon resisted keenly. The mod j of preparation, and tho various stages 
of the opium aro completely illustrated in the collection, as well as by the 
models. Another Narcotic, almost peculiar to India, is Indian hemp, which in 
one or other of its forms, is either smoked as ganja and charas, or consumed as 
hasheesh liquor, or eaten in the form of majun, a special sweetmeat, the last two 
forms being preparations of 6Aa»^, the young leaves and twigs of the semi-wild 
plant gathered in tho North West Provinces, where ganja is not allowed to bo 
cultivated. 

Tho distillation of spirits is under the Exciso department, the revenue 
derived by Government from excise being on an average four millions 
and tho departmental collection of spirits and drugs, together with the 
appliances and instruments used in smuggling, well repays examination. 
The universal Indian still is illustrated by a model, one-quarter the 
actual size. Attention is called to the exhibits of beer produced by 
the hill breweries, tho more important of which are in Madras and the 
Punjab, and whose ale and beer are of an excellent quality, as may bo seen by 
tho fact that the import of foreign beers in 1884-85 was 194,531 gallons less 
than in the previous year. Another novelty is the exhibit by his Highness tho 
Maharaja of Kashmir of the wines and spirits prepared in his kingdom. The 
white wine obtained at Calcutta International Exl-bition, a gold medal for its 
purity and superior quality. 

Indian tea and Indian tobacco aro considered in a court allotted to them 
although they naturally take a most important place among the products of 
this class. , ^;-v) ■.,...:..". i,y tm.-. 

Drugs.— There are over thirteen hundred plants reputed by the natives of 
India to possess remedial properties; and as in all popular herbals which exist 
unwritten as having been handed down from unknown antiquity by tradition, 
a great number even of the most highly-esteemed are valueless. The Sub- 
Court devoted to drugs and medicines contains examples of over one hundred 
indigenous drugs, which have almost all attained a European reputation, and 
which most thoroughly deserve to be more extensively used. From Nepaul a 
large series of aconites, accompanied with botanical specimens of the plants 
from which the roots were obtained, has been sent by Dr. Gimlette. The 
raonkshood or wolvesbane, which grows on the Himalayan heights, from an 
altitude of 10,000 feet to the highest limits of vegetation, is equalled if not 
surpassed m its poisonous and its curative powers by its congener the Indian 
or Nepaul aconite. The specimens of cinchona or Penivian bark numbered 
780, bear their silent witness to tho success of an entei-prise undertaken by the 
Government of India to acclimatise if possible this invaluable tree and so to 
bnng within reach of the population of India what up to that time had been 
too costly a remedy. This was primarily due to the travels and labours of Mr 
Clements Markham, C.B., devoted to the examination of the cinchnnas of Peru 



78 The Empire of India. 



in thoii- native forests, and their impoi-tation to and ultimate establishment in 
India in 1860. The product of the Government plantations at Darjiling and 
on the Nilgiris amounted together in 1884-85 to 457,218 lbs., most of which 
was manufactured into febrifuges. Extensive private plantations also exist in 
Southern India, and the exports in 1884-85 were valued at nearly £100,000. 

Fibres. — We now come to the vegetable libres of India. The more important 
of these, such as cotton, juto, rhoa, and ether commercial fibres and paper 
materials, are exhibited in separate sub-cour ;s, and require separate notice. But 
besides these there is an extensive series of fibres which are regularly used 
by the natives of India, though the large majority are unknown to the textile 
manufacturers of Europe. The Indian flora contains over 300 fibre-yioldinji; 
plants, one-third of which afford strong and useful fibres. Some of those will 
bo found illustrated in the ' Ropo Trophy,' near which are excellent samples ol 
stair-carpets and door-mats made of the well-known coir or cocoa-nut fibre. 

Cotton. — The samples of cotton prepared by the Commercial Exhibition Com- 
mittee of Bengal represent the most valuable article of Indian export trade. In 
India there are 14 million acres annually under cotton, without Including Bengal 
and Assam, of which no returns are published, and the exports for the year 
1884r-85 amounted to 5,060,057 cwt., representing a value of £13,286,367. It is 
noteworthy that to the English manufacturer Indian cotton is, comparatively 
speaking, of secondary importance. Of the exports above quoted not quite one- 
half was consigned to England, and nearly half the amount of this was re 
exported to the Continent. The largest market for Indian cotton is found in 
Italy. Cotton manufactures will be found in a special collection prepared by 
the Chamber of Commerce of the Cottonopolis of India, the great city of 
Bombay, the mills of which, both in magnitude and completeness, rival any of 
our most famous English cotton factories. In 1882-83 out of 62 cottons mills in 
all India, as many as 46 were in the Bombay Presidency. Of these 29 were iii 
the island of Bombay, the rest almost without exception being in Gujerat. 
The total capital thus employed in the Bombay Presidency was estimated at 
£900,000, and the total amount of raw cotton worked up in the year was 
estimated at 1,232,000 cwts. as compared with 4,742,624 cwt. exported from 
Bombay in the same time. The latest returas showed an advance in the valu 
of exports of manufactured cottons of nearly one million pounds, those of the 
raw material having declined in equal proportion. The total Indian foreign 
trade in cotton was valued at over 41 millions. In addition to the cotton 
exhibits from Bombay, special collections will bo found from Bengal, the North 
West Provinces, and Assam. 

Jute. — If Bombay be tho Cottonopolis of India, as the Presidency of Bombay 
contains the best cotton lands, the cultivation and manufacture of jute is a 
Bengal industry, and Calcutta is the emporium of the great foreign jute trade, 
The first commercial mention of the word "jute" is in the customs returns of 
the exports for 1828. In that year 8G4 cwt., valued at £62, of raw jute were 
exported to Europe. The manufacture of gunny-bags and cloth was then 
entirely in the hands of Indian peasants, but the trade must have been limited 
since there does not appear to have been any foreign exports in those jute 
manufactures. Jute mills were, however, early established in Dundee, and a 



The Empire of India. 79 



large export trade in raw jtito sprang into existence. Down to the year 1864 
little or no effort was made to improve the Indian jute manufactures, but in 
that year the *' Ishera Yarn Mills Co." was established at Seramporo. Throe 
years later the company, now known as the *' Baranagore Jute Mills," was 
established, and in 1863-64 the *' Gowripore Jute Factory " was founded. 
Factories sprang up rapidly in every direction round Calcutta. Tlioro are now 
twenty-three large juto i^'lls at work in India, and in 1884-85 the exports of 
raw jute amounted to £4,601,368, and the exports of manufactured jute to 
£1,543,869, showing the startling fact that the value of the foreign trade in 
jute in 1828 was only ^62 sterling, and 1885-6 it was £6,241,568. 

Bhea. — One of the first and most important of the commercial fibres, not so 
much in its present as in its probable future utility, is rhoa. The prize offered by 
the Government of India for the most perfectly successful machine for separating 
this fibre was, it is true, not awarded, no single machine being deemed able to 
comply at the time Avith all the requirements ; but strenuous endeavours have 
within recent years been made to overcome the difficulties of dealing with rhoa 
grass, and the difficulty of the separation of the fibre has been overcome. The 
high price of the fibre itself, together with its exceptional strength and 
durability, unfit it for many purposes. The Glenrock Company, Limited, of the 
Wynaad, Madras, exhibit an interesting collection of their fibres, showing not 
only rhea but also tv/o or three of the allied rhea fibres, including the so-called 
wild rhea of South India. The wild rhea of Assam, and various Nilgiri nsttles, 
and, in addition, pine-apple fibre and Manilla hemp, together with a large 
assortment of aloe fibre, are also on view. 

Paper. — The art of paper-making in India dates from the time of the great 
emperor Akbar, and wus first practised in Kashmir. Rapidly it spread all over 
India, displacing the birch bark used by the hill-tribes, and the palm leaves 
which served the people of the plains as the vehicle on which they incised with 
a stylus their accounts and written records, and of which examples are shown 
in the Education exhibits. It is probable that the inhabitants of the Eastern 
Himalaya, long previously to that era, derived the art of paper-making as 
[practised in Nepal from China. The Nepal papers, of which extensive 
DoUections are exhibited, are prepared from the bark of two sorts of daphne, 
and from the fibre of a plant which grows along the Himalaya, and has 
recently been found plentifully on the mountains of Manipur, extending to the 
northern frontier of Burma. The paper manufacture of India, like the paper 
trade of England, is still seeking for a now material. The paper trophy, as well 
lis the special show case contributed by the Bengal Exhibition Committee, shows 
the paper materials ; the half stuff's, the manufactured papers from all parts of 
India. The Bally Paper Mills of Calcutta, and the Upper Indian Paper Mills 
of Lucknow, are the chief contributors ; but besides, a largo collection of jail 
Hnd native-made papers fi'om all parts of India is exhibited. 

Oil Seeds. — In his Review of the Seaborne Foreign Trade for 1884-85, Mr. O'Conor 
says of oil seeds : " This trade has developed in recent years into one of the first 
importance, exceeding greatly the trade in wheat, rice, jute, both raw and manu- 
factured combined, and indigo or tea, and being exceeded only by cotton or 
opium." In 1879-80 the quantity and value were respectively 709,469 cwt. 



80 The Empire of India. 

and £4,685,892. In 1884-85 the corresponding returns were 1,825,688 cwt. and 
£10,745,203, the increase in five years being about 78!^ per cent, in quantity 
and 69^ per cent, in value. Linseed, rape seed, til, or gingelly seed, extracted 
from the seed of the sesame plant, poppy seed, earth nuts, and castor seed are 
the principal articles of exportation. They have here been mentioned in order 
of their respective aggregate values thus: — Linseed, £4,192,934; Kapeseod, 
£2,683,590; Sesame or Gingelly, £1,923,002; Poppy, £409,159; Earth Nuts, 
£361,406; Castor, £2,103,379. 

The export trade of linseed, which the above figures show to represent more 
than half the commerce in seeds, is divided between the ports of Calcutta and 
Bombay, which now ships nearly five million out of the total of 8,746,596 cwt., 
while Calcutta, which, in the year 1880 posKessed four-fifths of the total trade, 
now returns the lesser moietj'. The bulk of the exports, viz., 4,731,138 cwt, 
go to the United Kingdom, i'rance receiving only 1,650,659, and the United 
States 1,231,437 cwt. The tei-m " rapeseed " includes also the Indian mustard, 
for the true mustard is scarcely met with in India. Of these there wew 
collectively exported 459,281 cwt., valued at nearly three millions. The trade 
name of the sesame seed, which comes next in importance, is another instanw 
of commercial nomenclature derived from the first Portuguese traders. In 
Colonel Yule's " Glossary " it is traced step by step from the Arabic al-jaljuldn, 
corrupted by the Spaniards into aljonjoli, and so gradually transformed into 
jinjali or gingeli. It is used in India for culinary purposes, for anointing, and 
also in soup furniture, and as a lamp oil. It sh.-^ es with the ground 
nuts the reputation of being employed by European importers to furnish 
a sham olive oil. Of the latter the cultivation may be described as a 
modem industry, the trade in oil as a substitute for olive oil having 
within the past thirty or forty years developed in an almost unprecedented 
manner. The value of the exports of ground nuts from India rose between 
1879 and 1885 from nearly £17,000 to something over £360,000 ; and 
jthe exports from the French ports in India were but little short of the 
same amount, the total value being thus just over half a million sterling, 
The bulk of this seed is shipped for the continent, principally to France and 
Italy. France is said to import from all countries 33 million francs' worth ol 
the ground nuts, of which India only supplies 2^ millions, but it is believed 
that the oil expressed from these nuts, as well as that from gingeli seed, finds iti 
way into the markets of Europe as olive oil. 

Oils. — Of the exports of prepared oils nearly three-fourths are castor oil, the 
annual export of which is about 3 million gallons, valued at about £300,000, the 
coooa-nut oil being the only other of any importance. Of this over a million 
and a-half gallons, valued at £162,000, were shipped to Great Britain and to 
France in 1884-85.;s"!^i ,'. tsmi' im^iiimfm-^^^^m-f oitv mu- ii>!i^ 

With the oils are associated the perfumes, headed by the delicate an( 
fragrant otto of roses, the utr or perfume par excellence, the chief seat of manu 
facture of which is at Ghazipur on the Ganges, bu+. which is also largely raadt 
in the North West Provinces and the Punjab. Among other essential oils usei 
in perfumery are found the oil of the carraway seed, a colourless or yellowisl 
oil obtained from the flower buds or flower stalks of the clove plant, the jasmin 



Thf Umpire of India, 81 

lie mace the aniseed, and the patchouli; while the cananga odorata yielda tho 
perfume ylang-ylang, and tho sunflower seed oil is said to be an ingredient in 
the " incomparable macassar " oil. 

^nffrf XYYf7^"!^'f ^"I'^-Among; the extracts and inspissated' sap4 
Sub-court XXXIV.) first comes tho catechu or cutch of commerce This 
•esinous extract which is prepared by boiling down a decoction from chips 
)f the wood of the acacva catechu, figures variously as a condiment, or spit^ 
,r as a med.cxoe. It is used as an astringent in medicine, and al^ in 
lyeing and tanmng. The value of the catechu exported from India h^ 
natenaUy deci^ased in the last five years from £426,641 in 1880-81 to £'>8 > 078 

he^No th m fT''^''*' "^"""^'''^ '^ ^'''"^^ °^ ^^S" ^"*°^- The cutch o"r kath of 
tl 1 in " r Vr"" •' Pnncipally prepared in Kumaon, instead of being 
rBurma an^E "k T"^*«»^^' ?^ ^^^^ ^^' -to large masses, as is th. case 
a Burma and Bombay tw.gs are placed in the concentrated decoction, and the 

f about one half-.nch in .ue. ^his is a much purer article, and, though not 
.ported, IS argely consumed in India as an accompaniment o plT tZ 
rdmary cutch of commerce is a deep reddish-brown with a glassy fracture In 
n la a solution of catechu by the addition of lime or alum, isVs^ra dull 
^l dye, largely employed by the calico-printers to produce metallic shades. In 

LnhnT T^"^"" ";'' '' ''""^ ' ^^"S ^''' «^ t^«^« ^^^ Bl^rubs yielding 
ftmphor, caoutchouc and gutta-percha, foremost among which is the true india^ 
ubber tree,^c«« elastica which grows freely in the Lth-Eastern SaW s 
^stward ot Assam and Aracan. Although the Government has established a 

S tr^r^^^ ""' t' '"l^ """^ ^'^"PP^>' ^^*^-*o '^ t^« trade -ith 
ie hJl-tribes who prepare the substance and carry it into the valley of Assam 

jr sale. An important Indian extract is the medicinal ossaMida. VLTZ 

ZhT r ^^^^r*'^^' -^-^ - --t used by the natives of India.?nd 
J which Bombay does a large trade. The thick fleshy roots of the assafoLtida 
.Idmg plants are cut or sci-aped, when a milky juice exudes. Thfs Ta": 

ms the assafcetula scented gum resin, which is known to us as an intoleiabfe 
useful medicine, but in Eastern countries has been from time immemor^^ 
iiployed as a flavouring spice. ' uoii;>,,Jit.v -Avju i"""emor.ai 

Indigo not only received its name from Europeans, but, as Mr. O'Conor sav8 • 
Ihe manufacture of indigo is, of all forms of enterprise now knownTn iSa" 
at which .^s first taken up by Europeans, who still retain the mono^foW 

the manufacture of this article, at anv rate so far «« ...2 °TZ 



any rate so far as concerns the 



\Hay L-,«-i X J . „ 7 ' J^ ^**''*^ "" ^^^ as concerns the 

*,,/'"",'"* *° *"''^ '^^'^'^•>- European marks of indiso ar^ 
»™ntees of quahty, and the exports from India ha™ hitherto cZZ 

cultivation lu tho North-West Provinces under native supervision Z 

r^^nH- '.^''' "''^°"" '"'*""'=' of ""''^ ""■"■feoturo being retained 

consumption m he conntr,." There aro 197 factories working in Wl 

« m the North-West Provinoes and Oudh, and 1.254 in the Madil 

«denoy, of which the hrger number a,o under Eu^tan mta^rn^ 



a 



82 The Empire of ItieUa. 

The mode of manufacture is shown in the model of an indigo factoiy which ii 

exhibited in the Commercial annexe. The material dealt with is exemplified 

by the ooUection of green leaf indigo shown under the auspices of the Benga 

Exhibition and Commercial Committee, while Madras furnishes dry leaf indigo, 

Lac— The curious and valuable Indian product kaown as lac, of which i 

large collection of sampler, both from Calcutta, and gathered from all parts c 

India by the various departments, is on view, is the resinous incnistation formw 

on the twigs of certain trees through the aotion of the lae insect- In India lac i 

dissolved in native spirits and coloured. In this forri it is used as a varnisl 

for carpentry and furniture. Mixed with sulphur and some colouring agent i 

is formed into a sealing-wax like sticks, called hatli, which is used to produo 

lacquered articles of India, as distinguished from the Japanese lacquer, whic 

is the natural resinous sap of trees. In Europe, lac is largely made int 

sealing-wax. Dissolved into spirits it forms spirit vaniish. It is made int 

ce.nent, into luiiographers' ink, and is used to stiffen hats and other articlt 

constructed of felt. The exports of manufactured lac during the last recorda 

year amounted to £599,145. The exports of lae-dye, which in 1880 wet 

i£l3,020, have almost disappeared, the cause of this being the discovery an 

rapid extension of the use of the aniline dyes, which has been destructive n; 

only to the tinctorial but also to the textile industries of India. These che* 

colours have not only depraved the taste of the people, but have demoraliflj 

their indigenous ii:dustries. The soft delicacy and harmony of colour whid 

formerly characterised Indian fabrics have given place to the brilliant tintao 

the aniline cdours, while the reputation for durability formerly enjoyed u; 

Indian dye-i-tuvi's has been destroyed. Throughout the Courts where th 

nianufactures are exhibited, at every step the eye wiU meet with proofs of thii 

Not only have the textile industries been thus irreparably injured, but mostc 

the indigenous tincioiialindustriefi have been completely ruined*, ^jn^ , 

,:l.it-t;ij^f(Hii '>ii! ■).. Hi..>.-( viiv^i! i--'u:.t ^)'il .->""' -J-j^-.r,! 4iK>.',> <.«vutiuU li 

H^ai«i>JwmUiMr .'^M: MINERALS AND ORES. ' ''^'^^y' ';/''' -'i- 

' The Geological Survey of India, under the direction of Mr. Henry B. Med 
cott, has contributed an invaluable collection of the minerals and ores of Ind 
Many of these are already well known, but the maps furnished along with t 
collection will doubtless he much appreciated. A distinct feature of the collecti( 
and one new and full of interest, will be found to be the sectional geographii^ 
map of India, 40 feet long. A special series of maps is devoted to the coal fiel 
gf India, which will surprise many by their immense extent and wide distril 
tion. At present there are 80 coal mines woiked ia India, of which 78 are 
Bengal, one in the Central Provinces, and one in As-'Mim. The total output 
1883 was 1,315,776 tons, and the number of people employed 23,172. 



1 



AGRICtTLTTTRAli IMPLEMENTS AND MODELS. 



The collection of agricultural implements displayed in the annexe adjoining t 
Economic Court, illustrated as it is by various models, will interest those vi 
have oven in a superficial way, as time and inclination may have led tli< 



J 



The Emp ire of India. g3 

'"r*?'^^^'' ^T^':''' specimens of the pitxlucte of India. Dr. Hurter points 
out thav tho cultivation of the soil forms the occupation of the Indian people iu 
a sense which it is difficult to realise in England. Census returas show 
that the total of persons directly supported by cultivation is more than two- 
thirds of the whole agricultural males. The Famine Coirmissionors further 
estimated that 90 per cent, of the rural population livo more or les. by the 
tillage of the soil. It would con-itute in itself an industrial exhibition to 
lUustrate the infinite variety of agriculture in the different provinces. But 
everywhere the same patient industry prevails. The Indian agriculturists, so 
far as their stnct adhesion to the traditional practice and system handed down 
to them from generations will permit them, ure intelligent, ingenious and caie- 
lu farmers. Superficial observers will toU us that the natives of India are not 
auigent, but so far as the vast majority, who may be described as field-workers 
are a)neorned, no English farm nor even allotment could surpass their lands in 
caretul cleanliness, freedom from weeds, and utilisation of everything that their 
hereditary science or their own patient industry could suggest to get the best 
return that the ground and the season will admit of. Of tho models illustrative 
ot the a^cultural life of India, one represents an Indian village in Northern 
India, and was executed by natives of Lucknow. „,),j^.j^ ^^ ^ 

There are two admirable models of Bengal homesteads, 'the first being that 
)t a weU-to-do Hindu cultivator, and the other of a Mohammedan farmer, each 
loldmg about eight or ten acres. Other models successively illustrate various 
larm operations m Bengal, ploughing and sowing, rolling and levelling, hoeing 
md weeding, and the various methods of irrigating, reaping, threshing and 
s^mnowmg are aU faithfully represented, but for full descriptions of them we 
nust refer to the special catalogue. Of the agricultural implements and 
nachines which are represented one-third of the actual size, but in other 
respects are faithful copies of those in actual use, the chief characteristics to be 
)b8erved are the very small extent to which they are adapted to save hand- 
abour, the preponderance of wood in their construction, and the variations in 
onn of the same implement. Of ploughs, it may be generally said that the 
ndian implement has no resemblance whatever to any English plough, though 
t IS not unlike the plough used in countries south of Europe. The horse-hoe is 
he only English implement to which it can be compared. In no indigenous 
lough IS the share formed to invert the soil, wkich is really scraped or torn 
B the plough passes through it. For deep ploughing, it is necessary that the 
round be ploughed over half-a-dozen times, where twice, with a suitable 
nplement, would produce tho same result. With the exception of some heavy 
aneties, specially used in Southern and Central India, tho furrov/ made by an 
rdmary plough is seldom more than three inches in depth. Efforts have been 
>«we to introduce abetter design and more effective implements, especially 
y the introduction of an improved plougb, called Kaisar, at the Government 
tpenmental farm at Cawnpora This ploughs deeper than the native plough 
Bd completely inverts the soil; but it has been found necessary to devise a 
nplex plough to serve the doable purpose of inverting the soil and sowing 
ke the native implement, but the native cultivators have hitherto patronised 
i0?a only to a limited extent. Among the various agricultural implements, 



o 2 



^4 The Empire of tndid. 

a most curious one is the rice sledge (No. 27). The platform in so M.ade that 
all the parts give easily. On it the seedlings are laid in neat bundles, and it 
is drawn hy hullocka over the embankments and through the ruts and water- 
waste of the rice fields, where no carts could go, and yet without .Iropping one 
bundle of seedlings. . 

hf, ;, r«ii ETHNOLOGICAL SUB-COURTS. f;,,v ih • 

The Etlmological exhibits successively disposed throughout the Economic 
Court represent in life-like models, appropriately costumed and armed, men 
and women of , the wilder tribes which are found throughout the variouB 
countries of India in the hills and forests, and who are the descendants of the 
races who inhabited the country before the A an immigration, and for want of 
a better term may be called the indigenous races. It is impossible to do more 
than to give a list of the Courts in order. Thus commencing from the timber 
arch, first come the natives of the Andaman and Nicobar islands. Next are found 
the Karens of Burma. The Singphos, Mishmis, Nagas, and other hill tribes of 
Assam follow in due order, and are succeeded by Kols and Santals, and othei 
races from different territories in the Bengal Presidency. Bombay and Madras 
occupy the two next Sub-Courts, while the Central Provinces, Central India, 
and Rajputana are grouped together containing representatives, amongst othen 
of the Gonds amongst whom the practice of human sacrifice prevailed until put 
down by the Government of India, and the Bhils. Mysore, Coorg, and Hyder- 
abad succeed, and the last in order, come the North-Westem Provinces and Oudh 
and the Punjab. Full accounts of each of the races of tribes represented have 
been furnished by Dr. Watt in the Special Catalogue. Besides the figures the 
ordinary domestic and other utensils and arms of each are shown on the adjacent 
sides of the Courts. , ,; , . , ., . 

t-> ■(■.(;! , -'ir .-i.ri \r.'^'- • "• • " '■ ■'■■ '■■>■''■ f *■ vtr, >,; 

■ -,'1 '>7(ia "j i.itiif'.n «.-ir'. •/:ii'l ,i-;!.iv. ■ii\ .!>■■' 

> . ..otJ.>i.r.v THE TEA. COFFEE, AND TOBACCO COURT. ^ ,„r, ■ 

' '' The Court devoted to the tea, coffee, and tobacco of India, is filled with th 
largest assortment of samples that has ever been collected together. The exhibit 
are displayed in glass vessels, arranged according to the districts : and the visitc 
can practically sample the beverages, and purchase packets for home testing. 

Up to the year 1823, China was believed to be the exclusive home of the tei 
plant, and to possess an indisputable monopoly of the tea trade. In that.yo 
the tea-plant was discovered to be indigenous in Assam, and the first attempt t 
introduce tea cultivation into India commenced about 1830. The Government o 
India employed Mr. Fortune to collect varieties of the Chinese plants and 1 
unpod seeds, and labourers skilled in the cultivation, Assam being selected i 
the first locality for the new enterprise. The first twelve chests of tea froi 
Apsam were received in England in 1838. From Assam the cultivation of H 
extended into Cachar and Sylhet, and by degrees into the Hill districts, t 
North-Westem Provinces and the Punjab. Tea plantations were subsequent 
established, and are now flourishing in the Nilgiri Hills. The imporiance 
the tea trade is seen from the following statement :— The tea gardens m Ind 
are estimated to occupy an area of 260,286 acres, of which Assam and CaoM 



1 



The Empre of India. g5 



pojwefls over 188,000, while nearly 60,000 are in Bengal. The North- WoBt 
I'rovinoea and the Punjab are equal with about 8000 each, and Madras has 5551 
jicres. The quantity of Indian tea exported has increased from 26J million 
pounds in 1875 to 60 millions in 1884, representing a value of over 4 millions 
of pounds sterling. ,nr, ruStliU .,1 .fnu, j l,;.<,n rurr/ .,i„! f...(,;,-,f^f.,. 

The oofFee plantations of Southern Indir. have not boon prosperous of late 
years. The destructive leaf disease hac diminished the yield, while the prioea 
obtainable have fallen. The value of the total exports in 1884-85 was about 
£1,250,000. 

The cultivation of ooooa or cacao has only within recent yoais been intro- 
duced like cinchona from South America, but there are now thriving plantations 
in the Madras Presidency, and the trade is an increasing one. .•I.vunjj t 

Great attention has been paid, both by private growers and on experimental 
farms under the Government of Bengal, to the growth and cultivation of the 
tobaooo plant in India, and its subsequent manufacture. The exports of leaf 
and manufactured tobacco during the year 1884-85 were valued at £150,000. 

' ^'' ' "" ' '■ ' THE KUCH BEHAB TROPHY. "" ' ;" ' ' "" ^ -•'»"•"'. 

At the head of the North Grand Avenue there is a striking scenic illustration 
of jungle life and tiger hunting, arranged by Mr. Eowland Ward, F.Z.S. In 
" The Jungle " are specimens and groups of great game ; in this division may bo 
noted, wounded boar finding refuge; cheetahs and axis; gaur, buffalo, bears 
and young, ovis ammon, ibex, goral, nilgai, markhor, Bara aingha, hog deer, 
blackbuck, an Albino blackbuck, sambur, leopards, &c., and many birds. 
Among the reptiles are alligators, pythons, and other snakes, lizards, &o. 

The Hunting Trophy immediately adjacent, is mainly due to the generous 
assistance of H.H. the Maharaja Kuch Behar. The scene represents a hunting 
elephant preceding the beaters, which has come upon a group of tigers, one of 
which he has stricken, while another has sprung upon him with deadly grip. 
Others are near, or retreating in the tall grass and bamboo copse. Among other 
animals of Kuch Behar are leopard, buffalo, various deer, bear, wild oat, boar, 
porcupine, monkey, &c. Vultures, pea fowl, jungle fowl, green pigeon, and 

,, ^ .. ADMINISTRATIVE COURTy"-"^'':''"*!^^'"^''" 

The Administrative Court, devoted to exhibits prepared by the various 
departments of the Government of India, occupies the galleries leading from the 
right or north side ot the building above the steps leading to the Central 
Courts. The Imperial Secretarial Departments are:— I. The Department of 
Revenue and Agriculture, which is represented in minor departments, viz., 
Sunrey of India, Meteorology. Geological Survey, Agriculture, Land Revenue, 
Internal Trade and Emigration. II. The Department of Finance and Com- 
merce includes General Finance, Salt, Customs and Port Dues, Excise, Opium, 
the Mint, Stamps, the Post Office, External Trade and Government I»rinting. 
III. Under the Home Department aro the sections Education, Law and Justice, 
Yoim SmHmj W<1 Medical, Arph»ological Survey Forests Statistics, J»ils, 



I iiMndMiii iiiiiirr ....^. 



80 The Empire of India. 



IV. The Pnblio Works Depari-ooerit represontH KailwayH, Roods, Irrigation, Public 
Buildings and Telegraphs. V. The Legislative Dopartmont has only to do witli 
Acts and Regulations. VT. The Foreign Department regulatt^s Native Statin 
and Imperial Orders and Decorations. VII. The Militaiy and Marino Depart- 
ment is subdivided into Array Head-Quarters, Military and Marine. • "Jhuj- 
"1 Of these, Meteorblogy and Geological Survey are represented in the Bcononiic 
Court annexe, where also will l>e found exhibitu illustrative of Salt, Excise, 
Opium, Forests and Irrigation. 

The Survey of India Department contributes illustrations of the various 
processes by which the results of the surveying operations are transfoiTed to 
maps, and the maps themselves, in which are made accessible to every one the 
exact knowledge collected by the labours of science, and the observations of 
dauntless and patient explorers. The Revenue Settlement Maps and charts 
showing the internal trade and the emigration are both worthy of study. 
Everyone will be interested to learn of the large and constant emigration of 
Indian labourers to the tea-gardens of Assam, the Island of Mauritius, and to 
•the distant labour fields of the West Indies and Demerara, and even to our 
young but vigorous colony of Fiji. Some return after their contract of servioo 
expires, with their savings. Others remain as settlers. 

In the divisions of the Department of Finance and Commerce, besides tlio 
printed reports, there are exhibited specimens of the coinage of India, and the 
processes of the Mints. Patterns of all stamps used which make up a reventie 
of over three million pounds, are shown by Messrs. De la Rue. The Post Office 
shows from the different Presidencies models illustrating the peculiar means of 
carriage which are needed in distributing the 184 millions of letters, cards, &c., 
delivered throughout India in one year, models of mail runners and riders, &c. 
Specimens of buffahi horns sounded to scare away wild beasts in Assam, or bows 
and arrows carried for defence in Rajptitana, carts, coaches, boats and rafts are 
ranged according to the particular provinces. Our printers and bookbinders can 
compare the tools and work of their Indian fellow-craftsmen. 

The Home Department sends a most curious and complete illustration of the 
means and appliances employed in the 111,237 schools with their 2,790,061 
pupils inspected in 1882-3. The indigenous schools of the Punjab, and 
all schools not inspected aie of course omitted. The model of an indigenous 
school in Bombay is well worthy of examination. 

The model shown by the Public Works Department, illustrating the Indian 
railway carriages, the public buildings, and the great works constructed foi 
irrigation, on which the lives of millions constantly depend, can only be pointed 
out as claiming much more than a passing glance. QitJ io oiua xliiou 

The Military and Marine Department, in additioti to the portrait models 
"V^rhich stand round the vestibule, contributes not only descriptions but various 
models illustrating the internal economy of the army, and the soldier life and 
work in barracks. The medical ambulances, the war material, elephant khed- 
dahs for catching the wild elephants, which become the most useful and docile 
servants, and other instructive exhibits, will be found illustrated in the some- 
what confined space available, ; i . , 

The Forest Department has charge of the ihimenfe tracts of forest, the dn6 



The Empire of India. fl7 



conservation of which is noedftil not merely for the supply of timber, but for 
the guarding against the nooes«ary rainfall being, as has happened in so man^ 
districts, lessened even to drought, by the denudation arising from indiscriminate 
destruction of timber. The practical exhibita are to be seen throughout the 
Economic Court. : r i-j-v^Mrii ■'itytu .tojf » • . i ' 

The Meteorological Section of the Home Department, also, has as its princiintl 
(bject, not merely the collection of reports on which to found weather warnings 
though these in the countrj- of cyclones an, of the highost importance), but alsd 
to watch, and, if possible, forecast the failure, whole or partial of the rains, and 
» to warn the Government officers to prepare to cope with the danger of drought 
rad distress and death among the agricultural millions of India. 

A special collection illustrating not only the silk manufactures, but also the 
ixact state of sericulture in India, is arranged in cases lining the half of thd 
iurved passage around the Durbar Hall. Under the joint auspices of the 
lovemraent of India and the Eoyal Commission, Mr. Wardle, who is well known 
s having done more than anyone else to promote improvements in the growth 
f raw silk as well as the manufacture of silks in India, has been charged with 
naking the collection. Not only is the finer product of the mulberry silkworm 
xhibited, but also that of what is known as the tussar as well a« the muga and 
ria worms, noticed in the view of the Assam Court. Important improvements 
a the method of reeling the raw silk from the cocoons have recently been n-ade, 
nd appear to promise a more hopeful future for the Indian silks. . - . . ' 

^.t ilfAihf . THE INDIAN PALACE; ii-'-i« sn^^a^ili il,; i , .ir-> 
Previous Exhibitions have served to illustrate some of the multitudinous Arts 
ad products of our Indian Empire, but it has been left for this occasion to 
ring before us the technical processes of their manufactures, the application 
nd use of objects which otherwise would have remained but beautiful curios, 
uitable only for the glass cases of a Museum. 

For this purpose the Secretary of the Royal Commission made arrangements 
wt year for the utilisation of Indian Art work (as far as possible) in the con- 
truction and decoration of the Courts, and submitted for the approval of 
[.R.H. the President, a plan for the draping of the vestibule with Indian 
rmted cottons, the separation of the Courts by carved wooden and stone 
Mens, the construction of a Palace Durbar Hall in carved wood, and in con- 
ection with it the peculiar feature of most oriental Palaces, a " Karkhaneh," or 
wkshop, where jewellers, weavers, carvers, and others would cairy on their 
•ades, and produce before the visitors the marvellous and beautiful objects of 
leir handiwork. 

At the request of H.R.H. the Prince of Wales, the Lords of the Committee 
Council on Education gave permission to Mr. C. P. Clarke, C.I.E., the Keeper 
the India Museum, to visit India, and this gentleman returned m May last, 

mng completed the necessary arrangements, and brought .bftck a party oi 

ood-carvers, who immediately commenced the Durbar Hall. 



88 The Empire of India. 



Tho great Btoue gateway proHented to the South KensiiiKton Museum by 
His IlighnesB the Maharaja Sindhia having also l)oon lent by the Anthoritiea 
of tho Science and Art Department, a design made by Mr. Pardon Clarke whilst 
in India was approved, and the gateway incorporated with tliu Durbar Hall and 
artizans' shops. The whole now roprcHonts a typical Koyal Palace and Court- 
yard, with shops overlooked by an Audience Hall, and the public jiortions of an 
Indian Pulaco in tho Hindu-PerBian style known as Moghal. Protected V»y 
two bastion towers and loopholed walls, tho courtyard is entered through tli( 
Gwalior gateway, a remarkable example of modern Indian Art which would 
alone merit a visit to tho Exhibition from the richness of its decoratiou, 
and peculiarity of construction, so completely at variance with our system of 
masonr}'. It was designed, and the work of execution superintended, by Major 
James Keith, the Curator of Antiquities at tho Gwalior Fort. 

The shops surrounding three sides of the courtyard number thirteen, and 
seven more lino a passage on the right which leads to tho Piivate Exhibitoib 
Gallery. These aro raised about two feet above the level of tho pavement, and 
eaoh front is divided into Lhree openings by columns and foliated arches witii 
lattice panels over. • .1' 

On the fourth side is a wide porch extending back and on cither side ; thi 
low ceiling being supported by cross beams, and many columns with bracka 
capitals. Here are the carpet looms, and office whero all arrangements are madt 
and orders received for work to be executed by the artiziins in the courtyard. 

Passing through tho porch, or Hall of Columns, the garden vestibule 
reached, a building of somewhat mixed character, partaking more of the form 
and construction of a largo marquee tent than the glirapsea of solid masonry 
showing through the tent-like hangings will admit. The mosaic floor and 
curious tank fountain again add to this look of solidity, which is confirmed ly 
the red sandstone staircase leading up to tho Durbar Hall overlooking tLe 
Palace courtyard. 

This room is certainly the most remarkable object in the Exhibition, beiuj 
of foreign origin, yet made in the Exhibition by two natives of Bhera in th 
Punjab. Entered on the east side through a triple arched opening, the Hall i 
seen at a coup-d'oeil, and visitors are bewildered with the mass of intricat 
ornament which covers the walls and ceiling. The foliated arches of the head 
of the thirteen recessed windows are again repeated in the casements, and th 
peculiar bracketed cornice carries another line of these graceful arches rouD 
the room. 

The pictures relating to India are exhibited in the Upper Gallery of tB 



Royal 


Albert Hall. 


■.■,5^1 


M 


^-A 


;•»!•!.. \/^ 


or,- 


'!■ 


.'■' 1 


< :r. i) ■\i 


ii.i--. 


■"i 


•'lii 1; 


ii)itf 


iun 


• If 


rrn vith:* liU\<f 


li v.v 


:)!. 


. ( 


If*! ,'-l'j 


'U 


' 


■-•■I'/ 


•i,:nf .-. 


i-(i 


v- 


■ f .'ti-'n 




U 




'.do Uslhi\'.;ti 


blfl: 


hV>. 


ir. 


VfJtlft • 


•M 


!•: 


itij^' 


V 'Ml; • 


>Ti»l ' 


•f • 


1 :iil.i--?< 

.;fi.. 


I luff. 
n'lftiv. 


,r>A\ 


;n! 


l(»to'» Ofll t') v 


[vukT 


•>r<» 


!'■■ 


»i«7/ -f 


' '-'' 


i(( 


•r^r 


hU .11. 


fUi 


'I 


1 5-!-»tu 


yt 'h' 





nV- Kt lK}ixwin Ai^itoiJai.!-^ t^idi tmn ,t\bul .1i-*jy oi ,mrr<:»iiwl/^ j»Ji>ftl 



Advertiafiments. 



ftO 



tf 



ADAMS & CO. 

GUN, RIFLE, AND REVOLVER MANUFAdURERS, 
82, Finsbury Pavement, London, E.O. 



{i/OOROATK STUKKT STATW.V, CITF.) 



The "RELIANCE" HAMMERLESS GUN. 




' With 

AUTOMATIC INTEBOEPTINa 
BLOOK SAFETY LOOKS. 

This Oun ix absolutely SAFE »fiti\nnt ACXJIOKNTAL DISCHAIUiF: tlio mPcliAnlHm iR ximple and ilurahlt, 
am) the hrwch action cmi ho niad« to orm with t llbor top, Mdo, "f nniier liver. I'r ci> fri)m £28 10». Od, 

A I.ARUE ASSOUTMKNTofGUNS. IIAMMEEand HAMMEI<LF:Si'. wlih latest ln>|iTOTniieiit.., prepared 
fur this S>'n»on. PrloB to f iilt all purclmsprfl. 

ADAMS k CO. '8 "BPBCIAL QUN." CENTRAL-FIUE DOUnLK-IlARRFL GHN, 12. 18 or 30 
here, Kobouiid liccka, with Ix)w Hammerx, I'atrnt Snap Fore-emI, Chukr or Cylinder-bored Hard Uamticua Uurrelt, 
Doublr-Orip Action, £7 ; Snap Action, £7 10b.; Tcp Lever Snap, JES. 

lABOE BOBE BI7LE8 and EXPBESS SINGLE AID DOUBLE BABBBL BIFLE& 

Bored un our Non-fuuIiDg Rifling gyftem, giving (he flattest irajrctnry coniliincd with perfect accuracy. 

lAXllEB and BAHXEXLEM EJEOTOB BOOK and BABBIT BIELE8 't very modcrato prices. 

ADAMS & CO.'S MABTINI-ZELLEB PATENT BIFLE8. 

For ROOK, RABBIT, and SMALL DEER SHOOI'tNli, -380 Boro, price £8: -360 Bore Express; -300 More 
and -330 Bore, Extra qnal ty, price £4. Those Rifles are the CHEAPEST and BEST RIFLES yet made, 
and fi>r aooaiaoy of shooting are unaurpaved. 

Il.hVS TRATKD VRIE LIST O.V APPUCATIOIT, POST-FRSK. 

NG MACHINERY. 




1885. 



ft 



PATENT 
SPECIALITIES. 

Bock Drills. 

Compressors. 

Crushing 

Bolls. 

Stamps. 



INVENTIONS EXHIBITION. 

ONLY GOLD MEDAL. 




1885. 

SPECIAL 
PLANTS FOR 

Gold. 

Silver. 

Copper. 

Tin. 

Lead. 



PATENT FRUE VANNER. 

DRESSING PLANT, WINDING AND PUMPING ENGINES. 

ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUES on application to 

T. B. JORDAN, SON & COMMANS, 

ADELAIDE CHAMBEB8, I ADELAIDE W0BK8, 

62, OBACECHUBCH ST., E.O. I 8TBATF0BD an4 WIOAN. 



ALWAYS BBMAIN TRUE IN ANY OIiIMATE. 

PHTENT lYORY HANDPACTURING CO., {<D. AQENGT, 115, LOUDON WUL, E.C. 



'««ia<S!i!psp^pjW^'5'!r»v- 



90 



Advertigemenis. 



DUBLiN EXHIBITION, 1865, 



THE PRIZE MEDAL, rtrn 



kU 



fv?J 



KINAHAN'S 





flnB 








1 




HI^^B 








) .: 


^^^^e2 


dj'-vV 


c. 


B^^^V 








^^^1 


;V!,x aiTA 


h 


W^^Ba 










^^H 


■TH'iAa ) 


H'l 1.1"' 


^^Hi^ 


. M', 


' * r > 


'"' ^^1 


:wj-.'' 


l^^l 


' '|:'lo'dB »l (( 


bO .nC 


HIH^&^ 


'■•' . 


1 i ' 


1 ^^1^1 


' "iM • /! 


B^^^l 


f (! • f;<.|i iJi ( 


■-Tj.-l;' 


^^^1 


.". /. . 


•'-.i.i:( 


IxAU,^^^ 


Cd.'H 


1^1 




^(' .n 


KsiftjCSali^l 


M.n' 


(0 { • 


^d'w^^M 


"• %ir« .T 


H^^l 


'» W'.'.Ki j\ 1 ' 


•■% trllJ;' 


^jH 


•.I..;: 








H| 




-r-i- ■ .-r 

J0. 


H 


^ 


^ 


r t ^^^^^m 


■ 


1 


/7 ."■ V -■ <- 


m 


^1 


1 


k 


T.;;i 11 -"j; 


TRADE MARK^-rv"';'/;; 



/T 



WHISKY. 

"The Cream oHi Irish Whiskies." 



11 -^''«iiiiiis:'!'!i;::iri:iiiiiii!!ii!"ui;ii'"':::r 

11 tori ?'?''M j.;x.r»m.».'^"«; y| 

■ N; ^ "a quMUtf of thU Whitky." ,.,|||!| 

Bl!iiiiiiiM;!:;;;;ii;ii:;i;i;iiimuiuiai|it>im«i|;»:;!;i4«l|i«ii!n 



TiJMO: 



KINAHAN'S 







1 r *" ■ .'^ 



" CELEBRATED ,4W> 
SCOTCH 



larrA 



.tl'T^riTWA" 



WHISKY.*' 



EXPORT STORES:— 



OFFICES:— 



fw^^ 



3:1 & 35, Commercial Street, LoDdon,E. 1 20, Great Titcbfleld Street, London, W. 
GOLD MEDAL, PARIS EXHIBITION, 1878. 



(01 -) 



THE DOMINION OF CANADA " >• 

* 'i 1 . . . . . ' I . . . . - ~ 



1. ) . 



rw Domiuion of Canada occupies the northern half of the North American continent It covera 
iaareaof3.o00 000 8<iuaro miles, and is territorially about equal in oytent to the continent of 
kurope. Reaching from the Athuitic to the Pacific Ocean, the western half has a southom 
frontier which, if extended across the Atlantic Ocean, would strike the latitude of Paria, while the 
outbernmost point of the eastern section of the country is in the latitude of Koroe. Canada is 
huj^the physical equivaknt on the continent of North America of the great empires and 

^'"^ u"t?L '■"*°^' f '*"""' ^^^y* ^"*^'' '"^ ^"'•'P*' S*'<^d«" °wl Norway. Belgium, and the 
kitish Islands; it is, above all. an integral porUon of the Briti^ Empire. containing natural 
csourcep as varied and as great as of those countries. . ^ ^^ , 

Nineteen short years ago Her Majesty's possessions in North America entered npilll"i 
orporate exutence, and the change that has since taken place in the general development and 
he prosperity of Canada cannot but be accepted as a remarkable proof of the sagacity of the 
mperml and colonial statesmen who directed the movement. The confedemtion grew out of the 
.atural desire of the people of the disconnected pmvinces to unite for their mutual benefit. To 
he petition tor the privilege of confederating, the British Parliament responded, in 1867, by 
.assing the 'British North American Act," pn>vi<ling for the voluntary union of the varion. 
»rovince8 in North America under the name of the " Dominion of Canada," and for the cession to 
he Dominion of all the vast unsettled area of British America formerly dominated by the 
ludsou 8 Bay Company, with power to create new provinces and admit them into the uniou 
rhen suflBciently populated. The Act came into oiieration on the 1st of July, 1867-the 
jovmoes of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick uniting with Upper and Lower Canada, or, aa 
hereafter known. Ontario and Quebec. This union of the inland and maritime province, gave 
« tanada an importance she had never before possessed. In 1870. the Province of Manitoba 
ffls created, having been carved out of that portion of tlio territory lying on both sides of the 
ed River of the North, embracing the city of Winnipeg and the old Red River setUements of 
lie Hudson s Bay Company. In 1871, the large and prosperous Province of British Columbia 
m added comprising all tl^at region lying between the Rooky Mountains and the Pacific, 
loluding the numerous large islands fringing the coast, and extending from the Uuitetl 

TeLfXrattr"'^*^*'''"*^^'""""**'^ ^'"'^*' ^^'^ '° ^^^^ ^'^"''^ ^^'"'^ Island joined 
This political bond has been strengthened by the construction of the Canadian Pacific 
ailway, the great national undertaking which has now been brought to a successful termina- 
ion,nnd by means of which the extreme eastern and western portion of the Dominion are 
rouglit into close relationsliip with each other and with tlie hitherto scarcely known prairie 
^Sions of the North-West Territory. The completion of the new line must largely stimulate 
ravel, immigration, settlement, and commerce, and draw the attention of the people of every 
iition to the enormous area of the Dominion, its large population, and the great variety and 
iftgmtude of Its natural resources. 

The population of the Dominion approximates 5,000.000. which is augmenting »t a-rapid 
'te, and which, notwithstanding the diversity of origin, has, under the force of ciroumstance^ 
een welded into a ..jmogeneous whole. About one-half ore of English, Scotch, and Irish 
"raotion; one-fourth are of direct French descent; (Germany is well represented; and every 
»uon in Europe has contributed its quota to swell the population. Of Indians there is ait 
itunated pupuktion of 100.000. About one-third of these live in the older provinces, and have 
^nioug since gathered into settlements under the care of oflloers of the Indian Department, 

some cases having industrial schools and other organisations to aid them in their progress 
T^ . ? civilisation ; and it is only necessary to glance at the products of Indian industry 

"le *-xliibition in order to learn how marked that progiess has been. >.^^ ,,4i -..^^^ „ 



02 Canada. 

The Government of Canada, as at present constituted, is a representative one, the executive 
authority being vested in the Sovereign of Great Britain, and carried on in the name of the 
Crown by a Governor-General, assisted by a Privy Council. The legislative branch consists of a 
Dominion Parliament, composed of two houses. The Upper House, or Senate, consists ol 
laembers who are appointed for life by the Governor- General in Council. The House of Commoiu 
is a purely representative body, elected by the people, the representation being apportioned to the 
various provinces in the ratio of their population. Bach province enjoys local self-government, 
having a provincial legislature elected by the people, and a Lieutenant-Governor appointed 
by the Federal Government. There is also a very perfect system of municipal governraett 
throughout the Dominion. Both the counties and townships have local governments or councils 
which regulate their local taxation for roads, taxes for schools and other purposes, so that eveij 
man directly votes for the taxes which he pays. This system of responsibility, from the 
munioipalitios up to the General Government, causes everywhere a feeling of contentment and 
satisfaction, the people, with truth, believing that no other form of government which can lie 
devised on earth can give them grcRter freedom. 

The utmost religious liberty everywhere prevails in Canada. Persons coming to the Dominica 
from Europe, of every religious persuasion, will find their own churches and abundaat faciliti« 
for the practice of their faith among neighbours who will sympathise with their views. 

Before school boartls were eetablished in England the Dominion had a well-organised systes 
of public or common schools in operation, iu which instruction is not merely confined to th) 
rudiments of education. In many cases the higher branches are taught, and the children receivi 
a sound practical education, fitting them for any ordinary position in life. Both in the oounti; 
districts and in the towns boards of trustees, elected by the people, manage the affairs of th 
public schools. Provision is also made for the establishment of separate schools in district 
whero the inhabitants are divided in their religious opinions, and mixed schools are not possibU 
The public schools are absolutely free, and are supported partly by a local tax and portly byi 
grant from the Provincial Treasury. In addition, there are grammar schools in all parts of th 
country, managed like the public schools, at which, as well as at the many excellent prlvati 
schools, pupils receive a good classical and modem education. Above these again are tli 
high schools, collegiate institutes, and universities, the latter liberally endowed with scholarahiin 
where the cost of attendance is comparatively so small as to place the facilities for educatlw 
they offer within the reach of all. There are also schools of surgery and medicine in th 
larger cities, and the religious denominations also have colleges at which young men m 
prepared for the ministry. The higher education of girls is also met in the fullest manne 
by numerous high schools, generally denominational in character. In fact, means of eduoatioi 
from the highest to the lowest, everywhere abound in the Dominion, i, ?^'' t^'fii"f "pr y 

The variations of the Canadian climate are less than in many oonntr^eB of mwh smalU 
extent. But throughout nearly its whole area Canada is characterised by a greater heat < 
Bomraer, and a lower temperature in winter than in corresponding European latitudes. Th 
climate of the eastern and especially of the western provinces is moderated by the Atlantic an 
Pacific Oceans respectively, while the great water system of rivers and lakes, which extend 
throughout the Dominion, helps to prraerve an equable climate in the Interior provinces. Tl 
degrees of latitude, therefore, are a very imperfect guide to the character of the Canadian clima 
as compared with that of the British Isles, and any statement of the mean temperature of the U 
is deceptive. The severity of the winter, as tested by the thermometer, leads to a very exaggerati 
impression of Canadian experiences. Owing to the dry, clear, bracing atmosphere which general! 
prevails, the sense of discomfort produced by the raw easterly winds and damp fogs of Engine 
suggests an idea of cold such as is rarely experienced in a Canadian winter. There are, indee< 
©very winter a few days of Intense cold, as in the summer there are brief periods of equally inteni 
heat, when the thermometer ascends, or descends, through a scale unknowm in the Englii 
climate. But throughout the greater part of the winter season iu Canada the sky is bright m 
dear, and the weather thoroughly enjoyable. Skating, snow-shoeing, tobogganing, and ofhe 
outdoor exercises, are in universal favour, and the sound ol the sleigh-bcils in the open thorougl 
fare adds to the exhilarating sense produced by the pure bracing atmosphere. Everywhere H 
appearance of the snow is hailed as seasonable and beneficial. It protects the wheat sown i 
Butump from the frost, affords f»ciUties to Iho farmer for bringing bis produce to roftrket, ai<l»tl 



imbeman in collecting the fruita of his labour in tlie forest at suitable points for transport, and 
. contributes alike to business and pleasure. In short, the Canadian climate is marked by the 
riking contrast of two seasons— summer and winter— bringing with them alternations of fruitful 
hour and of repose, intermingled with profltablo industry and pleasure. This characteristic 
"revttils, with slight variations, throughout the greater part of the Dominion. 

While it is impossible, within the limits of this introduction, to speak in detail of the 
fricultural capabilities of Canada, it may bo stated generally that its soU and climate are ^uch 
lat the country produces a greater rariety of grainj, grasses, vegetables, and fruits than is 
jually grown m Great Britain and Ireland. It possesses tho largest extent of cultivable land 
Bt opened for settlement, adapted to the growth of productions of the temperate climates, not 
ily on the American Continent, but in the world. Cauada is pre-eminently a country of yeoman 
rmers. The land is held in possession and tilled by the settler on his own account ; and with 
rery addition to the numbers of its industrious population, fresh acrosare recovered from the 
ildernesB and added to the productive resources and the wealth of the Dominion. By nation 
idustry and frugality it is in tho power of every Canadian to become owner of a house and pro- 
rietor of whatever amount of land be cati turn to profitable acooant Tho majority of the farms 
re small, tilled by the proprietor with his own hands, with the help of his sons and occasional 
tred labour m the busy season of harvesting. But capital is also successfully applied to farming, 
id large stock farms in the eastern provinces, and latterly in the ranching country at tho foot of 
le Eocky Mountaius, are now carried on with great success. 

The forests of Canada abound in fine timber, adapted to almost every variety of u*ful or 
mamental work, and furnishing one main element of wealth. Their value is becoming more 
pparent every year. At present the produce of the forests exceeds in value any other yield of the 
rowth, produce, or manufacture of the Dominion. The total value of tiie annual exi^orts of 
mbcr products approximates £0.000,000, for which Great Britain and the United bUat^ ai&tho 
rindpal markets. j~^* 'iu i-f.*XlX/ .dxcrc 7jL7r 

The mineral resources are rcpresentetl by coal fields of immense extent, both on its Atlantic 
ad Pacific coasis ; and the^e are large deposits beneath the surface of its prairie lauds east of tho 
ocky Mountains. It has iron, gold, silver, copper, lead, and other mines of great richness 
»gether with almost every description of the most valuable building materials; also petroleum' 
lit, nud phosphates. ' ' 

Looking to the native fauna of Cauada from an economic point of view, it is abundantly 
rident that the nnxmal life of ite seas and rivers is one of its great and inoshanstible sources of 
ealth. Alike oh tiie sea coasts, in the estuaries, and throughout its great inland lakes and 
Ters, the most valuable fish abound. Canada has been esteemed from its earliest discovery n.r 
3 valuable fur-bcnring animals, and has been tho trapping and hunting ground for two centuries 
)r the Hudson's Day Company and other organisations. For sportsmen the country offerd 
inusual attractions, both in the abundance and variety of its game— wliich is well distributed 
ver the backwoods of the eastern provinces, the districts immediately west of Lake Superior tlw 
mine region, and in British Columbia. Tl»e northern sections of Canada are the breeding 
rounds of an infinite variety of the feathered tribe* 

Thus, with an advantageous geographical position, with a climate and resources not widely 
issiinilar to those of tho mother country, with institutions calculated to secure law and order 
ivll and religious liberty, and tho best traditions of the mother country, no greet keenness of 
iBion 18 required to forsee that Canada must, in the no distant future, become the home of one 
f the most populous and powerful people?} of the earth, r- -' -^ < i W -*^'i^i. UK> iji\n 



' « ■•!# 



,MOGHOJ ,HauoR08 ,rdi 01 lai 

3m 33TAMiT33 Ql^h 8^01330 



94 Advertiten^ents. 







k CO., 





PRIZE MEDAL AWARDED '^''^ i''^ " "'* ;- '''I "'•♦ "' ; prize MEDAL AWARDED 

CABINET 
MAKERS, 

INTERNATIONAL > iutifjw .tjiU jut^ MPitiiOiiivt -r/wv. INTERNATIONAL 

HEALtH EXHIBITION, 1834., ., , - INVENTIONS EXHIBITIQN, 1886. 

! 'Al i'lYUttHJn.tTTTJTT/Vy Q fP 1? T> T|l "D Cf"^""<f 'T''»5*»'''' 5 

I : m«>iH^ lu«»><K>«>'; U jrXLl/ JLl O X llliilLlV O, ;m MffJ ,i 

itiiii '4 Jtiilq'ia V . , ■: -' • --11. '. u .1 . V '^ ■^'*'' *'i '''"'' 

"t ■'.'? !,: i^iluio:^ ^;'ri.ilv(iiit ;>ii.» ai '(if AND" "^''''^Ti"'*'''*'' '^'* "' '"*i"'l it^ofi : 

, ... . > , . >y^ itiif/ ii« h:«,tn«'j v/oii yiii .>.ifUji:i«t;M v. 

House Furnishers. 

■ ;■•,...■ . .i;f;ii . . „a;-j^.; ...;;.:;. i. .v'ijiI-O'i ; 

Messrs. GAINSFORD k CO., wer^ dpp6ihted 
by the Executive Council of the above Exhibitions 
to supply the Furniture, Carpets, &.C., for the 
Council Chamber, Chairman's Room, the Press 
and J u rors' OflTices ■ ^'^ ''-•"^**- **>■«« ^"'■■*' *'<«*8 *j» *^' ^^^^ vrsAVM tm juti. 

Also by the Royal Commission for the Colonial 
and Indian Exhibition, London, 1886, for the 
Furnishing of the Executive President's Qhamber, 

H.R.H. THE PRINCE OP WALES, K.G., 

the Chairman's Reception Room, and the Indian 
and General Ofrices, &c., &c, .,iv»iw«wt*.«««iuu.<i'i.ii«. 



161 TO 167, BOBflUGH, LONDON, 8.E. 

DESIGNS AND ESTIMATES FREE, 
sPEciiL suippma tebms. 



Canada. 



95 



-if; 



VEGETABLE KINGDOM. 

GROUP I.— AGRICULTURE. 

Class 1. ] ,{7/- 7 1',"* ~ ji / 

•J J, Machinery and IiH2}lement8,\fT>y: 1. 

ABELL, JOHN, Toronto, Ontario. 

— <1) "Toronto Advance" Steam Tliresher. 
(2) (Jompound Portable Engine for all fuels. (8) 
'I'en-H.-P. "Triumph" Portable Engine. (4) 
Twelve-horse Level Tread-power Thresher. 

AIKMAN, DAVID, Box 416, P.O., 

Montreal, Quebec— (1) Model of Floating 
Miuhintry for the mauufuctnro of peat fuel. 
(2) Samples of Fn^suiCkMlIOT.,a.IAn 

A. S. WHITING MAUrrPAC- 
TUBING CO., Oahawa, Ontario.— 

f^pjihes, Forks, Hoes, Eakes. 

BEDABD, li. a., St. Hyaointhe, 

Quebec. — Agricultural Implements. .,jr.l:;ot 

BEBTBAND, P. X., St. Hyaointhe, 

Quebec— Cross-furrow Plough, 

BBSSETTB, J. & S., Iberville, 
Quebec — (I) Uprij^ht Kuj- Prets. (2) 
Two-H.-P. Threshing Mill. . -, rr t,- ,r 

BOYD & CO., Huntingdon, Quebec. 
—(1) Two-H.-P. Sweep Thresher. (2) Hny 
Tedder. (3) Rake. (4) Coi u or Pohito Hoe. 

BRANDON MANUPACTURINQ 
CO. OP TOBONTO, Toronto, Ontario. 

(1) Garden Wheelbarrow. (2) Cliurns. 

CAMPBELL, MANSON, Chatham, 
Ontario. — Fanning Mill. 

CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY 
CO., Montreal, Quebec — Ploughs, Horse, 
liukes, &c. 

CHALIPOUX, O., " & SONS, St. 
Hyaointhe, Quebec— <1) Tiireaher. (2) 

COCKSHUTl?^LOti-aB[ CO., Brant- 
ford, Brant, Ontario, — (1) Hoot nud Corn 
Cultivator. (2) Jointer Ploughs. (3) One- 
borse Plough. (4) Sulky "Gang" Plough. 
(5) Riding Single Plough. (6) Turf and 
Stubble Plough. (7) Breaker Plough. 

■LUiL 

OOULTHARD, SCOTT, & CO., 
Oshawa, Ontario. — Combined Grain Drill 
Bnd Broadcast Sower. 

DOMINION BABB WIBE CO.. 42 

Foundling Street, Montreal, Quebec— 

Borb Wire Fencing. 



DUBOIS, LOUIS E., Toronto, On- 
tario. — Model of a Plough for ditching. 

DUNDAS HOUSE - SHOE AND 
POBOINO CO., Dunctafl, Ontario.— 

Threshing Machine Teeth. 

DUNN, P., C6te St. Paul, Montreal, 
Quebec-- Fence and Hcop Staples. 

ELLIOTT, JOHN, & SON, London, 
Middlesex, Ontario.— (1) Milwaukee. (2) 
Hinders. (3) Sulky Plough with power- lift 
(4) Field Plough. 

PORSYTH, W., Peterborough, On- 
tario. — (1) Improved Fanning Mill and Seed 
Separator. (2) Hand Pump for well. ; j^ ^^ i 

aiLLIE8, QEOROE, Ganatid<iiie, 
Leiads, Ontario. — (1) Steel Harrow. (2) 
Steel Field 'Jultivator. i - ;-* ■ 

GOOLD, EDWARD .L., Ss CO., 

Brantford, Ontario. — Fanning MilL -, 

GOWDY, THOMAS, & CO., Queli)h, 
Ontario. — Lawn Mowers. 

HARRIS, A., SON, & CO., Brant- 

foi'd. Brant, Ontario. — Harvesting Ma- 
chinery. 

LARMONTH, JOHN, & CO., Mon- 
treal. Quebec— (1) One-H.-P. Thresher. (2) 
Two-H.-P. ThiCsher. ^-^yiaoihiji 10.^1 

McPARLANB, THOMPSON. & 
ANDERSON, Fredericton, New Bruns- 
wick. — (1) Mowing Machine. (2) Horse 
Rake. (3) Steel Plough. ,1,. 

McKINNON, D. W., North Sydney, 
Cape Breton. — Section of Waggon Body, 
showing Exiiibitor's Patent End Gate Faaten- 
iug. ..^ ,;/ :. .:<..... — ..^. 

. ......ill . U,,^.U . .. , > V ■ 

MASSEY MANUPACTURING CO., 

Toronto, Ontario. — (1) One "Toronto" 
Light Binder. (2) " Toronto" Mower. (8) 
"Massey" Harvester. (4) "Massey" Mower. 
(5) Sharp's Hav Rake. (6) "Massey " Harvester. 
(7) " Toronto " Mower, two-horse. (8) " To- 
ronto " Mower, one horse. (9) " Massey " 
Mower. (10) Sharp's Hay and Stubblo 
Rake, 

MAXWELL, DAVID, Paris, Braat, 
Ontario.— (1) Harvester Binder. (2) Reaper. 

(3) Rakfe. (4) Mower. 

MOODY, WILLIAM, Sc SONS, Tw- 

rebonne, Quebec. — (1) Seeding Machine 
for broadcast sowing. (2) Two-horse Tbreali- 
ing Machine. (3) Two-horse Mowing Maohiue. 

(4) One-horEC Hay Rake, 



08 



Camiddi 



MOBBid if WAOVF^ Brantford, 
Ontario. — "Morria" Top Double-dresadr 
Threshiug Machines. 

wobth-ambhican manupao- 

TURING CO., London. Ontario. — (1) 

Twine Bindin<; Hftrvcsting Mo.hine. (2) 
Gru8a Mowing Machiue. 

ONTARIO IiSAD AND BARB 
WIRE CO. 

;, ONTARIO PITMP CO., Toronto, 

Ontario.— (1) 10 ft. "HftUiday" SUndard 
Pumping Windmill, with Pumps attached in 
working order. (2) Three sizes of Feed 
Grinders. 



OTTERVUiLB 

INO CO.— Tools. 



MANUPACTUR- 



PAXTON, TATE & CO., Port Perry, 
Ontario.— (1> 18 in. "Perfection" Turbine 
Water Wlieel. (2) 20 in. "Vulcnn" Turbfne 
Water Wheel. (3) 23 in. " Leflfel " Turbine 
Water Wheel. jlA^Wtiif .GMOOfj 

ROSS, DAVID, Huntingdon, Quebec. 

— Iteversible Steel Tooth Harrow, 

RYAN, WILLIAM, Chatham, On- 
tario. — Scotch Plough — silver-plated handle, 
jS^old nnta, polished b(>»n and share. 

SAWYER, L. D., & CO., Hamilton, 
Ontario. — (1) Mowing Machine. (2) Heaping 
Machine. 

STEVENS, TURNER, & BURNS, 
London, Middlo8ex,Ontario.— ( 1) Twelve- 
H.P. Portable Threshing Engine and Boiler on 
vrhbcls. (2) Combined Threshing Machine, 
Separator, and Cleaner. 

WATSON MANUPACTURINQ CO.. 
Ayr, Waterloo, Ontario. — (1) "New" 
Single Mowing Machine. (2) " Daisy " Horse 
Itake. (3) " Lion " Single Reaping Machine. 

WELLAND VALE MANUPAC- 
TURINQ CO., St. Catherine's, Lincoln, 
Ontario. — Axe^, Scythes, Forks, Horse Rakes. 

WILKINSON, a, & CO., Aurora, 
York, Ontario. — Ploughs, Steel Scrapers 
(Wheeler and Drag), Seed Drills, Cultivators, 
ScutHers, Wheelbarrows. 

WILSON, J. C, & CO., Pioton, On- 
tario.— Iron Water Wheels, " Little Giont " 

WILSON, MATTHEW, & CO., 
Hamilton, Ontario. — Agricultural Imple- 
ments. 

WISNER, J. O., SON, & CO., B^-ant- 
ford, Brant, Ontario. — (1) Comb Drill. 
(2) Htty Tedder. (3) Hay liake. (4) Spring 
Tooth Cultivator. 

YOUNG, E. 0.5 Bridgetown, Nova 
Scotia.— (1) Apple iJarroI Pies-s. (2) Chop- 
ping Axe. 



Class 2. 

CereiU. 

ANDERSON. W. A., Saskatchewan 
Land and Homestead Company, Assini- 
boia.— (1) White Oats. (2) Wheat. 

ANTICOSTI, an Island in the Qulf 
of St. Lawrence, Province of Quebec, 
the property of P. W. and T. G-. STOCK- 
WELL.— Collection of Cereals. 

"ANTSYERE," Pasqua's Reserve, 
Assiniboia. — Red Fyfe Wheat 

ASH AM. GEORQE, Pasqua's Be* 

serve, Assiniboia. — Red Fyfe Wheat. 

BALL. JOHN. Charlottetown, Princ« 
Edward Island.— Sbeaf of White Oats. 

BELL, GEORQE, Shubenacadie, 
Nova Scotia.— Wliite Oats. 

BLACK, REV. A. B., Amherst, Nova 
Scotia.— Wheat. 

BLAKE. WILLIAM. Shubenacadie, 
Nova Scotia. — Gnivel Buckwheat. 

BOKER, R., Si SON, Victoria, British 
Columbia. — Wheat, Oats, liyc, Barley, Teas. 

BOLE, J., Regina District, Assini- 
boia.— Barley. ;jjijixwH ..CO i>> av 

BOYD, HUGH, North Arm, New 
Westminster, British Columbia. — (1) 
Wheat. (2) Oats. 

BRYANT, J. D., South Saanich, 
British Columbia. — Varieties of Indian 
Corn— lield and garden. 

BUCHANAN, R., Port Qu'Appelle 
District, Assiniboia. — Red Fyfe Whe.it, 
Black Oats. 

BULMAN, ROBERT, South Rustico, 
Queen's County, Prince Edward Island. 
—Two-rowed Barley, White Oats. 

BULMAN, THOMAS, South Rustico, 
Queen's County, Prince Edward Island 
— White Oats, Black Oats, White WI.eat 
Fodder Corn. 

LURKE, JA&tES, Southport, Queen'i 
County, Prince Edward Island-- Indian 

Corn (three earr,). 

BURNS, a.. Bums District, Assini- 
boia. — Barley. 

BUTHOUR, JULIUS, North Saanich, 
British Columbia.— Fall Wheat and Pens. 

CAMPBELL, JOHN W., Post Office, 
Box 46. Truro, Nova Scotia.— Egrptian 
Cream Outa in straw and in bulk. 



Canada. 



97 



CANADIAN GOVERNMENT 

DEPABIMENT OP AGIUCUL- 

rUBE), Otta, Ontario. — Collection of 

rcreals, S'cgetables, Roots, &c., from the variouH 

rovinces. 

CANADIAN PACIFIC RAIIiWAY 
CO., Montreal, Quebec. - - CollectioTi of 
'erenls, Roots, &c., from tho Nortli-West 
Territories. 

CAHSON, ROBERT, Pavillion, Lil- 
ovet, British Columbia, — (1) Wheat. 
2) Oats. (3) liarley. 

OHESLEY, B., Bridgetown, Anna- 
polis, Nova Scotia. — AVinter Wheat. 

CHISHOLME, J. A., Clydesdale, An- 
[igonishe, Nova Scotia.— White Russian 
■Spring Wheat and Oats. j 

CLARK, JOHN, Tatamagouohe, 
Nova Scotia.-Hl) Wcovil-proof Wheat in 
Ditlk and stalk. (9i) Oats in the straw. 

CLARKE, JAMES, Tatamagouohe 
Bay, Colchester, Nova Scotia fl) 

Wheat. (2) I3uney. (3) liuck Wheat. ' 

CLAPPEBTON, JOHN, Victoria, 
British Columbia.— AVheat and OaU. 

CLINTON & MURRAY, Okanagon, 
British Coltimbia.— Oats. 

CROSB"£, ISAAC, Marahfleld, 
iueen's County, Prince Edwaxd 
Bland.— rearl Barley. 

DARBY, EDWIN, Egmont Bay, 
Prince County, Prince Edward Island. 
-Fodder Corn. 

DAVISON, FRED., Builington, 
Prince Coimty, Prince Edward Island. 
-Black Oats, 

DBWAR, JOHN, Lot 48, Queen's 
3ounty, Prince Edward Island.— White 

}ats. 

DICKIE, J. H., Moose Mountain 
)i8trict, Assiniboia. — Black Oats, Bed 

i'yfe Wheat. 

DICKSON, JOHN A., Onslow, Nova 
jcotia.— Barley. 

DRINKWATER, JOSEPH, ^omenoa, 

^owichan, British Columbia Wheat 

indOatB. 

^DUNCAN, W. Cm Maple Bay, 
-owichan, British Columbia. — Fall 
W heat. 

EAGLE, C. B., 150 Mile House, 
banboo, British Columbia.— Peas. 



BATON, WILLIAM, Kentville.Nova 
Scotia.— (1) Winter Wheat. (2) Beans. (3) 
Indian Corn. 

EDYSON, MILTON, Maple Bay, 
British Columbia.— Barley. 

ELLIOTT, ALANSON, Oxley, 

Essex, Ontario,— White and Yellow Dont 

FERGUSON, J., North Arm, Fraser 
River, British Columbia.— Barley. 

FISHER, H., Hegina District, Assi- 
niboia.— Barley, White Oats, Wheat. 

FORD, J., Moose Mountain District, 
Assiniboia.— Wheat. 

POSTER, J. W., Clinton, Lillooet, 
British Columbia.— Bailey. 

FRASER, DONALD, Pictou, Nova 

Scotia. — Grains, Timothy. 

FRASER, DONALD, Acadia Farm, 
Pictou, Nova Scotia.- Grains, Timothy. 

FULTON, CLIFFORD C, Lower 
Stewiacke, Colchester, Nova Scotia.— 
Bhick Barley. 

FURSTMAN, E. M., British Colum- 
bia.— Wheat. 

GILCHRIST, CHARLES, Port 
Hope, Ontario.— W^ild Rice prepared for 
culinary purposes. 

GIRONARD, L., Okanagon, British 
Columbia.— Wheat. 

GRAHAM, D., Okanagon, British 
Columbia. — Wheat. 

GRINDER, P., Big Bar, Fraser 
River, British Columbia.— Wheat. 

HARTNEY, H., Menteith, Turtle 
Mountain, Manitoba. — Red Fyfe and 
Spring Wheat. ,, ^, 

.nil ^i> 

HAWKS, J. F., Soda Creek, British 

Columbia.— Spring and Fall Wheat. 

HENCH, H., Big Bar, Fraser River, 
British Columbia. — Wheat. 

HETHERINGTON, J., Lac la Haehe, 
Lillooet, British Columbia. — Barley. 

HILLHOUSE. R., Broadview Dis- 
trict, Assiniboia.— Rye-Grass Seed, Wheat. 

HISLOP, T., Moose Mountain Dis- 
trict, Assiniboia. — Wheat, Field Peas, 
White Oats. 

HOAR, ISAAC, Post Ofllce Box 3, 
Truro, Nova Scotia. — Bkck Norway Oats, 
Squirrel toil Barley. 

B 



98 



Canada. 



HOEaa, D. W., & CO., Frederlcton, 
New Brvmswick. — Corn. 

HOEY, R., Lillooet, British Colum- 
bia.— Wheat. 

IRVING, THOMAS, Poet Office Box 
886, Montreal, Quebec. — Collection of 
Cereals. 

ISIDORE, a., Dog Creek, Lillooet, 
British Columbia.— Wheat. 

JOHNSON, D. McQ., Upper 
Stewiacke, Colchester, Nova Scotia. — 

Field Seeds, various kinds. ; .j u.'i. 

JOSTER, J. R., Moncton Steam 
Flour Mills, Moncton, New Bruns- 
wick.— (1) Corn. (2) Buck wlitut. (3) 
Cracked Wheat. 

KEATLEY, C, Big Bar, Eraser 
River, British Columbia. — Wheat. 

KENNEDY, ALEXANDER, Lot 48, 
Queen's Coonty, Prince Edward Island. 
— Two-rowed Barley, Red Wheat. 

KESTERING, C, Big Bar, Eraser 
Valley, British Columbia. — Wheat. 

KING, G. H., Charlottetown, Prince 
Edward Island. — Fodder Com. ._ ^ ,^ 

KIPP, HENRY, Chilliwack, British 
Columbia. — Pens (Grey and White), Spring 
Wheat, Rye, and Indian Com. 

KNOX, A. B., Okanagon, British 

Columbia.— Wheat. ,. 

LARTZ, O. H., St. Catherine's, 
Ontario. — Yellow Corn on cob. 

LEPURGEY, "WILLIAM, Summer- 
side, Prince Edward Island. — Indian Com. 

LONG, ROBERT M., Cowichan, 
British Columbia. — Early Spring Wheat 
and White Russian Oats. 

McCAW, WILLIAM, Whitewood, 
Pipestone Country, Assiniboia.— Wheat. 

McCALLUM, STEPHEN, Brackley 
Point Road, Queen's County, Prince 
Edward Island.— U lack Oats. 

MACDONALD, DONALD, South 
Saanieh, British Columbia.— Wheat. 

McEWEN, ADOLPHUS, St Peter's 
Bay, King's County, Prince Edward 
Island.— White Wheat. 

McKAY FARMING CO., Indian 

Head District, Assiniboia Wliite Gate, 

Wheat. 



McKINNON, ALEXANDER, Char- 
lottetown Royalty, Prince Edward 
Island.— <1) Sheaf of Black Oats. (2) Fodder 
Corn. 

McLELLAN, J. A., Regina District, 
Assiniboia. — Red Fyfu Wheat, White Oata. 

McMYN BROS., North Arm, Frase? 
River, British Columbia.— Oats. 

Mcpherson, DONALD.Cowichan 
British Columbia.— Oats. 

MALLETT, "WILLIAM. Union 
Road, Queen's Coiinty, Prince Edward 
Island. — Buckwheat. 

MAPCOTTE, X., South Saanicl., 
British Columbia.— Wheat. 

MARSHALL, RITSON, "Wilmot, 
Nova Scotia. — (1) Shepody Buckwheac. (2: 
Field Beans. 

MARSHALL, ROBERT, "Wilmot 
Nova Scotia.— Wliite Oats. 

MARTIN, R., Regina District, Assi 
niboia. — Wheat. 

MONTREAL COLONISATION CO. 

Kijnbrae, Assiniboia.— Wheat. 

MOORE, E. T., KentviUe, King'! 
County, Nova Scotia.— Winter Wheat. 

MURCHISON, MALCOLM, Norti 
River, Queen's County, Prince Edward 
Island. — Fodder Corn. .m;,,,'i 

MUTCH, E. "W., Fort Qu'Appelli 
District, Assiniboia. — Gold Drop Wheat. 

NEW BRUNSWICK GO"\nBElJ 
MENT (DEPARTMENT OP AGEI 
CULTURE), St. John, New Brunswick 
— Collection of Cereals of tlie Province. 

"OSOUP," Little Child's Reserve 
Assiniboia. — Barley, -j^,;;^ stotfb 

PARKIN, W., Regina District, Assi 
niboia.— Black Oats. 

PENITENTIARY OP BRITISI 
COLUMBIA, New Westminster, Bril 
ish Columbia. — Wlieot. 

PETERS, GEORGE E., Lower Mor 
tagvie. King's County, Prince Edwan 
Island. — Buckwheat. 

PINCHBECK ^ L"YNE, Williami 
Lot, Cariboo, British Columbia.— Wheal 

PLAXTON, WILLIAM, Prince Al 
bert. North- West Territories.— Wheat. 

POLLARD, JOHN, Clinton, Britisl 
Columbia.— Russian Barley. 



Canada. 



99 



PORT ARTHUR DISTRICT (per T. 
A. KEEFER, Esq.), Port Arthur, On- 
tario. — Cereals and Grain from the Free Grant 
Township of Oliver, exhibited by the Citizens 
of Port Arthur, Ontario. 

POSTILL BROS.— Wheat." 

PURDY, Ij., Regina District, Asaini- 
boia. — Wheat. 

QUEBEC GOVERNMENT. Quebec. 

— Collection of Cereals of the Provinces. 

RAMSAY, CElARLES, Paradise, An- 
napulis. Nova Scotia. — Spring Wheat. 

REHILL, WILLIAM, Seaforth, On- 
tario. — Peas, Various Wheats, Spring Wheat, 
crossed with Gold Drop and Club. ^ i^ '-■■ 

RISKE, L. W., Soda Creek, Cariboo, 
British Columbia^ — Wheat and Spring 

Wheat. 

ROBERTSON, DANIEL, BrudeneU, 
King's County, Prince Edward Island. 

—lied Wheat. 

ROSS, JOHN, ProDpect Farm, New 
Glasgow, Nova Scotia. — Australian Wheat 
and New Zealand Oats, grown in Canada. 

RYERSON, S. M., Yarmouth, Nova 
Scotia.— Silver-hull Uuckwhcat. 

'ST. HYACINTHS AGRICUL- 
TURAL SOCIETY, St. Hyacinthe, 
Quebec. — Collection of Cereals. 

SANDOVER, S., North Saanich, 
British Columbia.— Barley. 

SCHUBERT, G. A., British Colum- 
bia. — Wheat and Oats. . . .,..,., ,.. 

SCOTCH CROFTERS, Pipestone 
District, Assiniboia. — Sheaves of Grain. 

SEMLIN, CHARLES A., M.P.P., 
Cache Creek, Yale, British Columbia. 
—Wheat and Barley. .3^- ^.-r ,Te.J*tU;; 

SEXSMITH, W. A., Wolseley Dis- 
trict, Assiniboia. — Wheat. 

SHARMAN BROS., Surrey, British 
Columbia. — Wheat. 

SHAW ALEXANDER, West River, 
Prince Edward Island. — Sheaf of Norway 
Oats. 

SIMPSON, H., South Saanioh, Brit- 
ish Columbia. — Peaa and Oats. 

SKINNER, J., Katepwe, Fort Qu'Ap- 
pelle District^ Assiniboia. — Flax Seed. 



SLUGQETT, JOHN, North Saanioh, 
British Columbia.— Whoat and Oata. 

SMITH, R. R., Fort Qu'Appelle, Dis- 
trict, Assiniboia.— Hull -less Barley. 

SPAIN, MRS. M. B., Wilmot, Anna- 
polis, Nova Scotia.— Cereals in bulk and 
straw. 

STEPHENSON, R., Chilliwaok, 
British Columbia.— Barley. 

SWITZER, S. W., Saskatchewan 
Land and Homestead Co., Assiniboia. — 
Wheat, Black Oats. 

SYMBURNER, R. H., Fort Qu'Ap- 
pelle District, Assiniboia. — UuU-lesM 
Barley. 

SYMONDS, J., Regina District, 
Assiniboia.— Flax Seed. 

"THE MAN WHO TOOK THE 
COAT," Assiniboia Reserve, Assini- 
boia. — Wheat. 

THOMPSON, WILLIAM, South 
Saanich, Vancouver Island, British 
Columbia. — (1) Fall Wheat grown in South 
Saanich. (2) Outa. 

THORNE, EDWARD, Okanagon, 
British Columbia. — Wheat. 

"THREE BULLS," Blackfoot Re- 
serve, Assiniboia.— Barley. 

TROYER, C, Moose Mountain Dis- 
trict, Assiniboia. — Wheat. 

VENOT, A. J., Mahone Bay, Lirnen- 
berg, N.S. — White Russian Spring Wheat. 

■VICTORIA RICE MILLS, Victoria, 
British Columbia. — Rice, and I'roducts of 
Rice. 

VIEUX, C. B., Okanagon, British 
Columbia.— Wheat. 

WARWICK, G. C, New West- 
minster, British Columbia. — Millet 
heads. 

•WEASEL CALF," Blackfoot In- 
dian Reserve, Assiniboia.— Oats. 

WARD, JOSEPH' W., Montreal, 

Quebec. — Hops, Hay, Beans, &c. 

WESTINGTON, WILLIAM JOHN, 
Flainville, Northumberland, Ontario. — 

Barley. 

WHlTEj ROBERT W., Newport, 
Hants, Nova Scotia. — Natural Grain and 
Seeds. 

WHITE, WILLIAM, North Saanich, 
British Columbia Fall Wheat. 

u 2 



100 



Canada. 



WIIiLIAMS, T., Abarnethy, Qu' 
Appelle Distriot, ABsiniboia.— White 
Whcftt. 

WIIjSON, B., Whltewood, Pipestone 
Country, Aaainiboia.— Wheut. 

WILTSHIRE, FRANK, Kentville, 
Nova Bootia. — White Oats (-'Biirpeo 
Welcome "). 

YORK COLONISATION CO., York 
Colony, Aasiniboia.— Wheat. 

Class 3. 

Vegetables and Fniit, 

ANTICOSTI, an Island in the Gulf of 
St. Lawrence, Province of Quebec, the 
property of P. W. & T. O. StookwelL— 

Collections of Vegetables aud Fruit. (Shown 
in the Collective Exhibit.) 

A wf ri x\ n' ' 

BAYFIELD, EDWARD, Charlotte- 
town. Prince Edward Island. — One 

Mangold. ->-^ ,.,.-;,:...,... 

BAYLEY, W. E., Regina District, 
Aasiniboia. — Five Pink-top Tnrnipa. 

"BIG PLUME," Blackfoot Reserve, 
Assiniboia. — White Potatoes. 

BISHOP, W. C, Long Lake District, 
Assiniboia. — Potutooe. 

BRITISH COLUMBIA GOVERN- 
MENT (Department of Agriculture), 
Victoria, British Columbia. — Cranberiee. 

BULMAN, ROBERT, South Rustico, 
Queen's County, Prince Edward Island. 
— Five Potatoes, " Early Hose." 

BURKE, JAMES, Southport, Queen's 
County, Prince Edwax'd Island. — (1) 

One Cabbage. (2) Twelve Roots of Celery. 

BUTHOUR, JULIUS, North Saa- 
nich, Vancouver Island, British 
Columbia.— Field Peas. 

CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY 
CO., Montreal, Quebec.— Preserved Roots. 

CHOWAN, HENRY, Princetown 
Road, Queen's County, Prince Edward 
Island. — Turnip, 27 lbs. 



OLAPPBRTON, JOHN, Victoria, 
British Columbia.— Peas. 

OOMPTON, GEORGE, St. Eleanor's, 
Prince County, Prince Edward Island. 

—Twelve I'otJitoea, " Mclutyiii's." 

CULLUM, W. C, Rogina District, 
Assiniboia.— Field Swede Turnips. 

DEWAR, A. E., Southport, Queen's 
County, Prince Edward Island.— Man- 
gold. 

DICKIE, J. H., Moose Mountain 
District, Assiniboia.— Thrie White Tur- 
)ii[)8. 

DRAKE, ROBERT, Cornwall, 
Queen's County, Prince Edward Island. 

—Potatoes " McIntyiT.'' 

ELLIOTT, LEONARD W., Clarence, 
Nova Scotia.— Small Field Peas. 

" ESS," Paaqua's Reserve, Assiniboia. 

— Potatoca. .-^jvj liJii-j 1 ,v»i 

FARQUHARSON, JAMES, Lot 48, 
Queen's County, Prince Edward Island. 

— Potatoes (new kind). 

GILBERT J., Rogina District, Assi- 
niboia.— Pink-top Turnips. White Turnips. 

GILL, ABRAM, Little York, Queen's 
County, Prince Edward Island.— (1) 
Potatoes, "Beauty of Hebron." (2) "White 
Star." (3) " Burbank Seedling." 

GRANT, JOHN, M.P.P., Victoria, 
British Columbia. — Potatoes grown on COth 
parallel North Jjatitude, Northern Boundary of 
British Columbia, on Liard River. 

HAZARD, CHARLES J., Bellevue, 
Queen's County, Prince Edward Island. 

— Potatoes, " Late Rose." 

HENDERSON, M., Regina District, 
Assiniboia. — White Potatoes. 

HISLOP, T., Moose Mountain Dis- 
trict, Assiniboia. — (1) Potatoes "Early 
Rose." (2) "Beauty of Hebron." (8) White 

HOEGG, D. W., & CO., Fredeticton, 
New Brunswick. — Tomatoe*. 



Xraae Mark — 

Obelisk of Laxor. 



ALL 

CIGARETTES 

MARKED 

"LUXOR. 



ft 



u 



LUXOR 



" CIGARETTES. 

PUUm TURKISH TOBACCO. 
WABBAKTXD HAND-MADS. 

THREE DISTINCT QUALITIES —SPECIAL— FIRST— SECOND. 

AIiEXAICDBUl CIOABETTE CO.,Ltd.,63ft64,NevBroadSt.,London,E.a 
AGENTS WANTED FOR ALL THE COLONIES. 



Canada, 



101 



JONES. LOCK. Pownal, Queen's 
County, Prince Edward Island.— Pota- 

tooH, " VVhito Star." 

KNIOHT, ISAAC, Charlottetown, 
Prince Edward Island.^!) lied Oniona. 
(2) Whito Ouiona. (8) Indlun (Jorn (Yoliow). 

HoDONALI), D., Loon Creek, Port 

Qu'Appelle District, Assiniboia Field 

Teas. 

MoDONALD, DONALD, North 
Bedeque, Prince County, Prinoe Ed- 
ward Island. — Turnip. .-■^•.^.1 .. 

McDonald, WILLIAM, Panmure 
Island, Queen's County, Prince Edward 
Island.— Potatoes, '• Beauty of Hebron." 

McINNES, BRUCE, Regina District, 
Assiniboia — White Turnips. 

McLEOD, NORMAN, Orwell Point, 
Queen's County, Prince Edward Island. 
— Potatoes, "Mclntyre." 

McMillan, JOHN, West River, 
Queen's County, Prince Edward Island. 
—Field Peas. 'n. ,XJi>-iiO'.* ..s-.!- ,(n .'f, 

MALLETT, WILLIAM, Union Road, 
Queen's County, Prince Edward Island. 
—Field Peus. 

MONKLBY, GEORGE, Port Hill, 
Prince County, Prince Edward Island. 
—Field Peas. 

MONTGOMERY, DAVID, Summer- 
side, Prince Edward Island.— (1) Potatoes 

— " Early Rose." (2) " Silver Dollar." 

MOODY, J., Regina District, Assini- 
boia.-White Turnips, ^j,., ;,.T,.vr*- 

MOBRIS, THOMAS, Charlottetown, 
Prince Edward Island.— Turnip, It)^ lbs. 

MUTCH, J., Regina District, Assini- 
boia.— Field Peas. 

"NAKOTOOS," Pile HiUs, Assini- 
boia.— White Potatoes. 

NEW BRUNSWICK GOVERN- 
MENT (DEPARTMENT OP AGRI- 
CULTURE), St. John, New Brunswick. 

—Collection of Vegetable Products of the 
Province. 

"OSOUP," Little ChUd's Reserve, 
Assiniboia. — Potatoes. 

PENITENTIARY OP BRITISH 
COLUMBIA, New Westminster, Brit- 
ish Columbia.— Peas, Potatoea. 

PINCHBECK & LYNE, Williams 
lK)t, Oarjboo, British Columbia. — 

Potatoes. ^ruttaO ,Jaol 



PROUGHT, NEIL, Oallas Point, 
Queen's Counny, Prince Edward Island. 

—Potatoes, "Early Uoso," 

PURDY, T., Regina District, Assini- 
boia.— (1) Boet8. (2) FieMo Swwl© Turnip*. 
(3) Mangolds. (4) Beets. (6) CutroU. (6) 
Potntoes, 

"RABBIT SKIN," Assiniboine Re- 
serve, Assiniboia.— Mangolds. 

ROBERTSON, JOHN, Now Perth, 
Queen's Covinty, Prince Edward Island. 

—(1) Speckled Beans. Whito Field Beans. (2) 
Three Beets. (3) Five Carrots. (4) Four 
Parsnips. (5) " Hollow Crown' Turnip Seed. 
(6; Long Suiuli Blood Buct Sued. 

ROGERS, WILLIAM, Freetown, 
Prince County, Prince Edward Island. 

—Potatoes, " Prolific." 

ROSS, DONALD, North Bedeque, 
Prince County, Prince Edward Island. 
— (1) Twelve Potatoes, "Early KoiC." (2) 
Twelve Potatoes, "Mclntyro." (3) SwodmU 
Turnip. 

ROSS, R., Regina District, Assiniboia. 
— Marrowfat Peas. "• • ' 

ROWE, JOHN J., Charlottetown, 
Prince Edward Island. — (1) Roots of 
Celery, (2) Italian and Plain Tomatoes. 

ST. HYACINTHE AGRICUL- 
TURAL SOCIETY, St. Hyaointhe, 
Quebec— (1) Vegetables. (2) Peas. 

SCHURMAN, WILLIAM, Bedeque, 
Prince Covinty, Prince Edward Island. 

— Potatoes. 



«*.' 



irvrv.rMTi 



SHARMAN BROTHERS, Surrey, 
British Columbia. — Peas. 

SMITH, D., North Arm, Eraser River, 
British Columbia. — Peas. 

SMITH, J. F., Regina District, As- 
siniboia.— Marrowfat Peas. 

SPAIN, MRS. M. B., Wilmot, Anna- 
polin. Nova Scotia.— Carrots, Onions, and 
Potatoes. 

STEWART, D., Southport, Queen's 
Coimty, Prince Edward Island. — Pota- 
toes, " New York." 

« THE LOUISE," Blackfoot Re8ei*ve, 
Assiniboia. — Potatoes. 

TORRANCE T. FRASEU, B.Sc, 
Montreal, Quebec. — Frssh Vegetables. 



102 



Canada. 



TWEBDY, GEOBOE, North River, 
Queen'e County, Prince Edward Island. 
~il) Potato«8 "Prolific." (2) "Dakota 

Bod.^' (8) " White Star." (4) Turnip, 18^ llw. 

WELLS, AIiLEN, J.P., Chilliwaokl 

British Columbia — Cauliflowers. 

WILSON & SIBBALD, Regina Dis- 
trict, AsBiniboia.— Wliito Turnip.-!. 

YOUNQ, J., Penso District, Assini- 
boia.— (8) Wljito Turnii)H. (2) Field Swede 
Turnips. 

J 1 ;■' •• ' .,ri' 

Fruit. 

BEOBIE, BIR M. B., Victoria, British 
Columbia.— Peaches. 

CANADIAN GOVERNMENT, Ot- 
tawa, Ontario. — (1) Fruits of all kinds grown 
in Canada (preserved in uleohol). (2) An nssoit- 
ment of late-keeping apples in fresh condition. 

CHESLEY, B., Bridgetown, Anna- 
polis, Nova Scotia. — Apples, " Non- 
pareils." 

EVANS, MRS. J., Chilliwack, Bri- 
tish Col'imMa.— Pears. 

HOEG, G. D. W., & CO., PrederiotOn, 
New Brunswick.— Apples, Blueberries. 

NOVA SCOTIA GOVERNMENT, 

Halifax.— Collection of Fruits. 

PENWELL, CHARLES T., Victoria, 
British Columbia.— Pears. 

ROWLING, W .H., New West- 
minster, British Colvmbia.— Grapes. 

SELWYN, MISS, Ottawa Ontario. 
—Fruit from the " Shepherdia Argcntea." 

SPAIN, MRS. M. B., Wilmot, Anna- 
polis, Nova Scotia (1) Long-keoping 

Apples. (2) Native Grapes. 

TORRANCE, J. ERASER, B.Sc, 

Montreal, Quebec— Fresh Fruit. 

TRONA, THOMAS, Victoria, Bri- 
Columbia. — Apples, " Baldwin." 

TRUTCH, THE HON. JOSEPH W., 
Victoria, British Columbia.— Pears. 

WEIjLS. ALLEN, J.P., ChiUiwack, 
British Columbia.— Apples. 



OlaSvS 4. 

Fnrinacieou* IrodtwU. 

BEER & SONS, Charlottetown, 
Prince Edward Island.— Potato Farina. 

EDWARDSBURGH STARCH CO., 

Cardinal, Grenville, Ontario.- Laundry 
and Culinary Slarohes. 

PARQUHARSON. D., Charlotte- 
town. Prince Edward Island.— Potato 

Farina. 

PISH & IRELAND, Lachuto Mills, 
Argenteuil, Quebec. — (1) Dessicated Wheat, 
Barley, Poas. (2) KoUed Oats and Wheat. 
(3) 8nowflake Barley. (4) Prepared Poa 
Flour. V.5) Prepared Groats and Whole Whnnt 
Jloal. (6) Pearl Barley and Pearl Wheat. 

McKINNON & McLean, Charlotte- 
town. Prince Edward Island. — Fnrina. 

PROWSE & SONS, Murray Har- 
bour, King's County, Prince Edward 
Island.— Potato Farina. „ , , 

' .:.-r.J. ,UM-?'. 

RANKING, T., & SONS, St. John, 
New Bnmswick.— Farinaceous Producta. 

Class 5. 

Dwellings. Utenxilt^ Fertilizerg, 

ARMSTRONG, J. S. A., St. John, 
New Brunswick. — Complete Models of 
Prairie Settler's House, Tow'> House, Church. 

CANADA CHEMICAL MANURE 
AND FERTILISER CO. ^jrjvn 

CAMPBELL, CHARLES, Rich- 
mond, Quebec— Butter Tubs. 

CLIPPORD, HON. W. AUSTIN, 
Manitoba. — Model of Dairy Farm. 

DAVIS, WILLI A.M, Richmond, 
Quebec — Patent Splash and Drop Chum. 

DOMINION DAIRY HOUSE, Dan- 
ville, Richmond, Quebec. — Dairy Imple- 
ments. 

ECCLES, D. E., & SONS, Mouth of 
the Nerepis, King's County, New 
Brunswick. — Patent Beehives. 

PISH PBRTILIZING CO., Digby, 

Nova Scotia. — Fish Fertilizer. 

GO OLD, EDWARD L., gs CO., 

Brantford, Ontario.— Bee Hives. 



Canada, 



103 



HOLTBRMANM", 31. P., Plsherville, 
laldlmand, Ontario.— Hivo. llonoy Ex- 
motor. ' *-• 

PUTT, P. R., Chatham, Ontario.— 

)iiiry UtonsilH. 

SMITH & CO., St. Jerome, Terre- 
)onne, Quebec. -HiitUr Tuba. 

STANDARD FERTILIZER & CIIE- 

IkllCAL CO. (THE), Limited, Tost 

ice. Box 170, Montreal, Quebec— 

' 'liitsphule AIunurcH. 

TANNER, PROFESSOR, South Ken- 
jington, London, England.— Drawing of 
Model (V)lonifll Hottlomrnt, proposed to bo 
tiiblishoil in tho North-Wost of Canada. 



Ai 



GROUP II.— FORESTS. 

"^ "'• Class 1. "-"•'''' •' 

Trtet, Plants, and Vlmoerg. Forent Producta. 
Timber, Worked and Unu-orJied, • 

ANTIOOSTI, an Island in the Gulf 
of St. Lawrence, Province of Quebec, 
the property of F. W. & T. G. STOCK- 
WELL. — Various Woods, polislicd and un- 
iiilishod. (See the Collective Exhibit from tho 
sliind.) 

BLACK, "W. "W., Trxiro, Nova Scotia. 

— l.'ollcctioii of Woodd from Nova Scotia. 



BURSTALL, J. 

'ine Deals. ... v. 



& CO., Quebec. — 



CAMPBELL, GEORGE GORDON, 

Truro, Nova Scotia. — Collection of tho 
mligeiious and Naturalised Plants of Truro, 
S'ova Scotia. 



CANADIAN GOVERNMENT, 
Ottawa, Ontario. — Botanical Exhibit, pre- 
pared by tho Geological and Natural History 

urvey of Canada. (1) A Collection of the 
{■"lowering Pliints and Ferns of tho Dominion. 
(2) A Collection of the Fruits of tho Forest 
rrees. (3) The Medicinal Plants of the Do- 
minion. (4) 50 to (iO Photographs of Canadian 
limber Trees, each framed in wood of the 

ift'^s represented. (5) Horticultural and 
ItotaDical Garden. (6) Commercial Woods. 
7) B.illBh Columbia Woods. (8) Carved 
>liow Cases of various woods. 

CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY 
CO., Montreal, Quebec. — Woods of the 
N'orth-West Territory of Canada. 

CHAMBERLIN, MRS., Ottawa, 

Ontario.— (1) 250 Plates of single specimens 
•f Wild Flowers and Fungi. (2) 25 Groups of 
Flowers, by Mrs. C. P. Traill, folio, 1869. (3) 
Plates of " Plant Life in Canuda." (4) Two 
largo framed Pictures of an enormous Fungus. 



CONSTANT, JANE A., Ottawa, 
Ontario. — Wrcatli of Naturnl Flowers grown 
in Canada. 

OIQNAC, O., 8c SON, 129 Prince 

Edward Street, Quebec— Canadian Wood» 
uscfl in Mouldings. 

HAMILTON, JOHN, New Perth, 
King's County, Prince Edward Island. 

— Hj)ocimen8 of Prince Edward iHland Foliage. 

HASTINGS SAW MILL CO., Bur- 

rard Inlet, British Columbia (Agents in 
London- HEATLEY,WOTTON «t CO., 
11 George Yard, Lombard Street, E.C.). 

— (1) Sections <»f Douj^las Fir Trees. (2) Sec- 
tion of Hpruoe Tico. (3) Planks. Sponi, Rail- 
way Ties, Whinglcb. 

HAZLEHURST, WILLIAM, St. 
John, New Brunswick.— W(x)d Fibre. 

HILL, ALBERT J.. Port Moody, 

British Columbia. — -Mbnm containing spo- 
eimens of IJritish Columbia Ferns. 

HILL, MRS., Amherst, Nova Scotia. 
— Album containing 50 Plates of British 
Columbia Wild Flowers. 

HOWE, J., & G. D., St. John, New. 

Brunswick.— Wood. ;••:, 

JACK, MISS E. M., care of J. J. 
AUSTIN, Jun., Chateauguay Basin* 
Quebec. — Forest-treo Seeds, with tho Flower 
of each Seed Painted and Classified. 

KEITH, A., & SON, Halifax, Nova 
Scotia.— A Half-Hogshead (Oak). 

McLaren, J. H., & Co., Ottawa, 

Ontario.— Wood. 

MOHUN, EDWARD, C.E., Port 
Hammond, British Columbia.— Speci- 
mens of AVoods of British Columbia. 

MORRIS, D. W., Sainte Th^rfese, 
Terrebonne, Quebec— Peat. 

NEW BRUNSWICK RAILWAY 
CO., St. John, New Brunswick. — (1) 

Collection of tho Woods of Now Brunswick. 
(2) Portable Office. 

PORT ARTHUR DISTRICT (per 
T. A. KEEPER, Esq.), Port Arthur, 
Ontario. — Collection of Woods as samples of 
Mining Timbers from tho Gold and Silver 
Regions in the district of Thunder Bay, Lake 
Superior, f^f^ ^7' ^^^. 

PROVANCHER, THE ABB]fi L., 

Cap Rouge, Quebec. — Bound Table in 
Marquetry. 

ROYAL CITY PLANING MILLS 
CO., Limited, New Westminster, British 
Coltxmbia.— (1) Fir Spruce. (2) Fir Bark. 



104 



Canada. 



SAYWARD, W. P., Post Office Box 
190, Victoria, British Columbia.— vV(xm1. 

STEVENSON, S. C, Montreal, Que- 
bec. — Collection of Woods. 

WHITE, J. ,;, ,, ! ,. 

WHITEHEAD, W. T. : ; < 

Class 2. 

Trades In connection with Forests. 

ANGUS & CO., East Angus, Comp- 
ton, Quebec. — Prepared Wood Tulp. 

BLANCHARD, W. H., Windsor, 
Hants, Nova Scotia. — Wooil Pulp or 
Manufactures ft-om the Elltrshouse Pulp and 
Paper Mills. 

EBANDON MANUFACTURING 
CO. OF TORONTO, Toronto, Ontario. 
—(1) Samples of Wooden Good«. (2) Toys 
and Domestic Utensils. 

BUCKINGHAM PULP CO., Mon- 
treal, Quebec (JOHN FARMAN, Sec- 
retary and Treasurer, 467 St. Paul 
Street). — (1) Wooil Pulp and I/igneous Meal. 
(2) Samples of «ne Wood. 

BUIiMER, H., JUN., & BROTHER, 
Montreal, Quebec. — Assortment of Manu- 
factured Ijumber. 

CAMI-^BELIj, EWEN, Brae, Prince 
Edwei'd Island. — Sawn Cedar Shingles. 

C*l!rADA THREAD CO. 

CANADIAN GOVERNMENT, Ot- 
taTK'a, Ontario.^ — Boxes, Rope, Baskets, (fcc., 
uiiide from wood and bark by Indians. 

CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILW^ 
CO., Montreal, Quebec. — (1) A Manitoba.! 
Sfittler's Outfit of Furniture. (2) ^^^lcelbarrow, 
in use in tfie North- West. 

CIMON, SIMON X., M.P., Murray 
Bay, Charlevoix, Quebec. — Wood Pulp 
and Wood Pulp Board. 

CONVERSE, JOHN A., Montreal, 
Quebec. — (1) Manilla, Russian, and other 
Cordage. (2) Binder Twine. 



CRIIiLY, JOHN, & CO., Montreal 
Quebec. — (1) Manilla Blotting. (2) Hop 
Manilla. (3) Pajicr Bags. 

CROFT & ANGUS, Chemaines 
Vancouver Island, British Columbia.- 
Manufactured Lumber. 

DALBY, WTEiIiIAM, Victoria, Bri 
tish Columbia. — (1) Tan Bark (Vaucouvp 
Island Hemlock). (2) Sample of Ground Bark 
with Skin tanned by it. 

DARTMOUTH ROPEWORKS CO. 
Halifax, Nova Scotia.— Cordage. 

DE BECK BROS. & CO, Brunett* 
Saw Mills, New Westminster, Britisl 
Columbia. — (1) I^ar^'o Planks oi" Fir, Spriiw, 
Cedar, and Hemlock. (2) Other kinds of bmail 
Ijumber. (S) Salmon Boxes, as made fci 
canneries. 

ELLIOTT & CO., Toronto, Ontario 
— Linseed and its Products. 

GIBSON, ALEXANDER. 

HARDY, LANSON, Lockeport, Nova 
Scotia. — (1) Harness Cask. (2) Oil Casl s 

HASTINGS SAW MILL CO., 
Granville, Burrard Inlet, British Co. 
Imnbia (Agents in London, MESSRS 
HEATLEY, WOTTON & CO., 11 
CJeorge Yard, Lombard Street. E.C.).- 
(1) Wood and Manufactured Lumber. (2 
Table. 

LA soci:6t:6 industrielle du 

COMTil DE MASKIN0NG:6, Port 
Maskinong6, Quebec. — Wood Pulp. 

LOGAN, ALEXANDER, NorthI 
Sydney, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia.- 
Iron Stump-Extractor. 

LYMAN, SONS, & CO., 384 St. 
Paul Street, Montreal, Quebec. — Lin- 
seed and Products. . - ,,-,;-(•,'■ 

McNAUGHTEN, JOHN, & CO., 
Quebec, Quebec. — (1) Wood Pulp. (2j 
WtMxl Board. 

MOODYVILLE SAW MILL CO., 
Moodyville, British Columbia. (1 
Rough and Dressed Lumber. (2) Beams. (S. 
Scautlings. (4) Laths. (5) Wickets. 



TO COLONIAL VISITORS 1 1 



We Manufaciure 250 Varieties of Lathes. Engineers' Tools ofeverij Dcseriptm. 

London SJiOW Booms: 99, Fenchurch Street. All Correspondence to Britannia 
Company, Colchcstei'. Makers to the British Government, 



Canada. 



105 



BATTENBEBO, WILLIAM, Char- 
lottetown. Prince Edward Island.— 
Pressod Hay. 

BOYAL CITY PLANING CO., LI- 
mited, New Westminster, British 
Columbia. — (1) Sawn and Split Shingles. 
(2) Laths. 

BUSSELL, W., & SON, Newcastle, 
New Brunswick. — Spools. 

THOMPSON & CO., Sherbrooke, 
Quebec. — Bobbins and Spools mado of Wood. 

WOODBUBN SARVEN WHEEL 
CO., St. Catherine's, Ontario.— Material 
lor AVhcels. 



ANIMAL KINGDOM. 

ANIMALS AND THEIR PRODUCTS. 
BIRDS AND TERRESTRIAL MAM- 
MALS. INSECTS AND THEIR PRO- 
DUCTS. 

THE PBINCESS LOUISE, 
HER BOYAL HIGHNESS, MAE- 
CHIONESS OP LOBNE.— Colltctiou 
of Canadian Birds. 

ANTICOSTI, an Island in the Gulf 
of St. Lawrence, Province of Quebec, 
the property of P. W. & T. G. STOCK- 
WELL. — Collection of Animals and Bin's 
(stuffed). 

BIRMINGHAM, M., St. John, New 
Brunswick. — A Stufl'od Moose {Alces 
imlchis). 

BISHOP, WATSON, Kentville, King's 
County, Nova Scotia. — Collection of 
Stuffed Birds. 

BOLE, W. NORMAN, New West- 
minster, British Columbia A Big-horn 

Mountain Sheep. 

CAMERON, JOHN, Victoria, British 
Columbia.— Elk Horns. 

CANADIAN GOVEENMENT, Ot- 
tawa, Ontario. — Collection of Canadian 
Birds, prt'pnred by the Geological and Natural 
Hialory Survey. 

CONLON, JOHN, Wilmot, Anna- 

)olis. Nova fcsootia.— Native Furs— Fox, 
iftceoon, Mink, Musk-rat, Weasel, Beaver, &c. 

CREASE. HENBY P. PELEW, Vic- 
una, British Columbia Two pairs of 

argo Elk llorus from Salmou River, British 

JoUmibia. 

CROSS, WM.. Toronto, Ontario.— 

-11808 of Caua^iian Birds an<l Mammals. 



DUBOIS, LOUIS E., Toronto, Ot- 
tawa.— Ostrich Feathers, dyed and prepared. 

ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY OP 
ONTARIO (Incorporated 1870), Lon- 
don, Ontario. — Collection of Canadian 

Insects. 

GUTMANN & PRANK, Victoria, 
British Columbia.— Furs. 

HOLTERMANN. R. P., Fisher- 
ville, Haldimand, Ontario. — Natural 
Honey. 

HUBBARD, J. H., Winnipeg, Mani- 
toba.— Collection of Stuffed Birds and Animals. 

HUDSON BAY CO.- Collection of Fur 

Skins. 

HUDSON BAY CO.— Collection of Hud- 
son Bay Furs, prepared by James Inee, 156 Ox- 
ford Street, London, W. • • 

HYDE, H. A., New Westminster, 
British Colvimbia.— (1) Insects pi^uljar in 
the Province of British Columbia. (2) Caril)oo 
Head and Horns. 

LALIBEBT:6, J.B., St. Roch Quebec. 

Quebec. — Furs. 

McDOUGALL, ALEXANDEB, New 

Westminster, British Columbia,— 

Honey. 



,'/.f 



U' 



MAY, E. PASSMOBE, M.D., To- 
ronto, Ontario.— Red Deer. 

NICOL, DAVID, Cataraqui, Ontario. 

(1) Cases of Stuffed Birds of Canada. (2) 
Case of Stuffed Mammals. 

PELOQUIN, CHABLES, St. 
Hyacinthe, Quebec (Contributed per 
THE ST. HYACINTHE AGBICUL- 
TUBAL SOCIETY).— Improveil Beehive. 

POBT ARTHUB DISTBICT, On- 
tario (Per T. A. KEEPEB, Esq., Port 
Arthur). — (1) White Be.iver Skin from the 
Lake of the \Voo<l8. (2) Black Fox Skin. 
(3) Spruce Partridge or Grouse. (4) Stuffc«l 
Beaver. (5) Stuffed Cariboo. (6) Heads the 
property of 3Ir. Allan McDougall. 

POWELL, J. W., Victoria, British 
Colvimbia. — Ccriboo Heads, male, female, and 
calf. Mountain Goat Head. 

PBOVANCHEB, THE ABB:6 L., 

Cap Bouge, Quebec— An Insect sculptured 
to size of 27 feet in length. 

BENPBEW, G. R., & CO., Quebec, 

Quebec— Furs. 



106 



Canada. 



SMAXiIi, G. B., Nt,w "WeBtminater, 
BritiBh Columbia.— Doer's Head. 

STBATPOKD, H., Kingston, On- 
tario.— (1) Head of Moose. (2) Heads of 
Virginia Deer. ^.iiuv t- 

VENNOE, MBS. H. Q., 142 Mans- 
field Street, Montreal, Quebec— Collec- 
tion of Canadian Birds of Prey and Small 
Birds. 

WILSON, ROBERT, Booth, Pontiac, 
Quebec.— Moose Heads {Alcea Ameriounus), 
inounlcd. . ^^ • , . - 

GROUP III.— FISHERIES. 

Class 1. '^'^^■"^^i!";,- 

Fiahes. 

ANTICOSTI, an Island in the Gvdf 
of St. Lawrence, Province of Quebec, 
the property of P. W. & T. G. Stock- 
well.— (1) Otters. (2) Seal Skins. (See the 
Collective Exhibit from the Island.) 

CANADIAN GOVERNMENT (De- 
partment of Marine and Fisheries), 
Ottawa, Ontario. — Stuffed and preserved 
Sijeoimcns of Canadian Fishes and Marino 
In vertebra ta. For Details, see Canadian Do- 
minion Official Catalogue. 

CLARK & ROBBLEE, Summerside, 
Prince County, Prince Edward Island. 

— Fresh Mackerel. 5 •-,; ^5; _^- jyj^'- 

- Class 2. 

Marine Mamnuds, ., . , ■. . ' 

CANADIAN GOVERNMENT (De- 
partment of Marine and Fisheries), 
Ottawa, Ontario.— Collection of Marine 
Mammals. 

Class 3. i..; -- 

Apparatus and Products. 

ALLCOCK, LAIGHT, & WEST- 
WOOD, Toronto, Ontario. — Fishing 
Tackle. 

ANTICOSTI, an Island in the Gulf 
of St. Lawrence, Province of Quebec, 
the property of P. W. & T. O. Stock- 
well.— <1) iKibster Claws. (2) Seal Oil. (3) 
Cod Oil. (Tn the Collective Exhibit from the 
Island.) 

BAIN, FRANCIS, North River, 
Queen's County, Prince Edward 
Island.— <1) Mussel Mud. (2) Black Mud- 
(3) Marl. 

BEST, H. W., St. John, New Bruns- 

wiok.— Oyster Shells. - - -^ . 



BONNYN, WM. WINGPIELD. 

CORBITT, G. E., Annapolis, Nova 
Scotia.— Mussel Mud. 

DALZELL, JOSEPH, St, John, New 
Brunswick.— Gculleniau'rt Sporting Caso : 
Combination Hods, Six-.strip Lancewood Salmon 
Rod, Greenheart-wood Salmon Rod, Lancewood 
Trout Rod. 

GOODWIN, DANIEL, Canso, Guys- 
borough, Nova Scotia.— Squid Jigs used iu 
catching S(xuid. 

GUTMANN & FRANK, Victoria, 
British Columbia.— Implements for thu 
Capture of Seals and Dog Fish. 

KING, J. W., Windsor, Nova Scotia. 
— Fish-way Ladder, in operation. 

MATHIAS, OWEN, Victoria, British 
Columbia.— Dried Herring Spawn, for Arti- 
ficiarHfttchingaud Breeding. 

NAAS, ENOS, Lunenberg, Nova 
Scotia. — Squid Hooks. 

PICKERING, WM., Summerside, 
Prince Coxinty, Prince Edward Island. 
—Pair of Oyster Rakes or Tongs. 

SCRIBNER, D., & SON, St. John, 
New Brunswick. — Salmon and Trout Fish- 
ing Rods, made from greenheart-wood. 

SEIFERT, G., 34 Fabrique Street 
Quebec. — Canadian Pearls. 

SPRATT, JOSEPH, Victoria, 
British Columbia.— Fish Guano. 

TATE, HENRY L., Cause, Guys- 
borough. Nova Scotia.— Eel Spear. 



I. 



■.I J 



■..ilk -, uiVjCic 

Class 4. 



Fish as Food. 

ANTICOSTI, an Island in the Gulf 
of St. Lawrence, Province of Quebec, 
the property of P. W. & T. G. Stock- 
well.— Dried Cod-fish. (With tho Colieotivu 
Exhibit from tho Island.) 

BENT, GILBERT, & SONS, St. John 
New Brunswick.— <1) Mess Shad. (2, 
Eastern Herring. (3) Mackerel. (4) Drj 
Cod-fiah. 

BRITISH COLUMBIA GOVERN 

MENT (Department of Agriculture) 
Victoria, British Columbia.— Fish. 

EARLE, THOMAS, Victoria, British 
Columbia.— (1) Canned Salmon. (2) Cannei 

Clams. 



Canada. 



107 



i'OItREST & CO., Halifax, Nova 

otia. — Canned Salmon and Lobster. 

aOLDBN CROWN" PACKING 
)., Halifax, Nova Scotia.— Preserved 

3-RANT, JAMSS B., Charlottetown, 
ince Edward Island. — (1) Preserved 
okcrel. (2) Lobsters. (3) Claw Lobster. 

mEGORY & CO., New Westminster, 
itish. Colvunbla. — Salt Salmon. 

ATVTBLEN, J. B., & CO., Pictou, 
)va Scotia. — Pressed Lobsters. 

EIATHEWAY, HARDINAY, St. 
hn. New Brunswick. — Boneless Cod- 



HOEGG, D. W., & CO., Fredericton, 

>w Brunswick. — Tinned Lobsters. 

LEONARD BROS., Post Office 266, 
. John, New Brunswick. — Boneless 

sh. 

LONGWORTH & CO., Charlotte- 
wn, Prince Edward Island.— (1) Pre- 
ed Mackerel. (2) Preserved Lobster. 

McDonald, mcdonald, & co., 

>uri8 East, King's County, Prince 
iward Island.— (1) Boneless Ifnkc. (2) 
iieless Cod-fish. 

McDowEiiii, McNeill, & 

cDOWIlLL, Rivers InJet, Victoria, 
itish Columbia.— Canned Clams. 

McLEOD, A. C, Park Corner, Queen'3 
)unty. Prince Edward Island. — Lob- 
rs — " Keystone brand." 

McNEIL, ARCHIBALD, Charlotte- 
vm, Prince Edward Island.— Mackerel. 

McNUTT, D. & P., Malpeque, 
ince County, Prince Edward Island. 

Lobsters in Tins. 

NOBLE, R. B., Richibucto, County 
ent. New Brunswick.— Canned Lobsters. 

O'LEARY, HENRY, Richibucto, 
Dunty Kent, New Brunswick.— Canned 

bsters. 

TAYLOR, ALPRED, Mabou, In- 
imess. Nova Scotia. — Salmon,-. ■ '■• 

TODD, L H., & SON, Victoria, 
ritiah Columbia. — Canned Salmon from 
chmond Cannery, North Arm, Fraser River. 

TORRASE, A., New Westminster, 
ritish Columbia.— Salt Salmon. 

TURNER, BEETON, & CO., British 

Jlumbia. — Canned Salmon and Canned 

ams. 



WELCH, RITHET, &; CO.i Victoria, 
British Columbia. — Canned Salmon, various 
brands. 

YOUNG, G. L., St. John, New 

Brunswick. — Fresh, Smoked, and Salted 
Fish. 



MINERAL KINGDOM. 

GROUP IV.— MINES AND 
MINF4RALS. 



Class 1. 



w .v.: 



Mining and MetaUurgy, and Industries 
connected thereivith. 

ACADIA COAL CO., SteUarton, 

Nova Scotia.— Block of Coal, -c^^jmstj? 

ALBERT MANUFACTURING CO., 
Hillsborough, Albert, New Brimswiok. 
— (1) Crude Gypsum. (2) Specimens of Plas- 
ter of Paris and Ground Plaster. 

ALLAN, W. A., care of the Director 
of the Geological Survey of Canada, 
Ottawa. — (1) Specimen of Apatite (74 and 
89). (2) IMicas (87). (3) Apatite Crystal 
(93). (4) Orthoclase. 

ANGLO-CANADIAN ASBESTOS 
CO., Montreal (London Office, 110 
Cannon Street, E.C.), Quebec. — Crude 

Asbestos. _^:^., . ,^, ,., _ 

ANLY, A. Y., Port Medway, Nova 

Scotia. — Mineral Umber. 

ANTICOSTI, an Island in the Gulf 
of St. Lawrence, Province of Quebec, 
the pror iy of P. W. & T. G. STOCK- 
WELL, .soil from Cormorant Point, includ- 
ing stones, marble, fossils, polishing sand, (See 
the Collective Exhibit from the Island.) 

ARCHIBALD, CHARLES, Cow 
Bay, Cape Breton. — (1) Coal and Patent 
Fuel. (2) Bituminous Coal and Coal Tar. 

ASBESTOS MINING & MANU- 
PACTURING CO., Quebec. — Asbefitos 
Goods. 

AUSTIN, R., British Columbia.— 

Anthracite Coal. 

BAKER, WILLIAM, McNab, B. 
13, E. i, L. 27, Ontario.— (I) Clay. (2) 
Limestone. (3) Lime. 

BATTLE, JOHN, Thorold, Welland, 
Ontario. — Barrels of Thorold Hydraulic 
Cement. 



108 



Canada. 



BJBCK, O., & CO., Fenetanguishene, 
Simcoe, Ontario.— (1) Clay. (2) Bricks. 

BEER, ISAIAH, Hamilton, Ontario. 

—Machine-pressed Brick. 

BELL, JAMES, Storrlngton, Quebec. 

— Apatite. •,, . . . 

BENJAMIN-, HENRY, Phlllpsburg, 
Missiaquoi, QueV o. — Marble and Building 
Stuno. 

BENTLEY, M., & SON, Dudawell 
Flag Quarry, Quobec— Flagstone. 

BOSTON AGBESTOS PACKING 
CO., Thetford, Quebec Chrysolite. 

BREAULT, D., & SONS, St. John's, 
Quebec. — (1) Limestone. (2) Lime. 

BROSSEAU, FRAN9OIS, L'Acadie, 
St. John's, Quebec— (1) Limestone. (2) 
'Lime. 

BROWN, — , Carleton Place, On- 
tario.— Red Brick. » -,T '};:r;ti i J / 

BROWN, R. H., Sydney Mines, Cape 
Breton.— Fossil riants. 

BULLEN, W. P., British Columbia. 

—Fig Iron Ores (103). 

BULMER & SHEPPARD, Montreal, 
Quebec. — Specimens of Bricks and Drain 
Tiles. 

CAT. A BOGIE MINING CO., Limi- 
ted, Bagot, Ontario. — Magnetite. : " ^ 

CANADA CONSOLIDATED (JOLD 
MINING CO., Deloro, Hastings, On- 
tario. — (1) Gold-bearing Ores carrying 
Arsenic. (2) Crude and Retined Arsenic (Nos. 
132, 133, 133a, 133b, 133o, 133d). 

CANADIAN GOVERNMENT 
(PROVINCIAL DEPARTMENT OP 
PUBLIC WORKS), Quebec— Sandstpues 
and Limestone. , , 

CANADA GOVERNMENT, Otta- 
wa, Ontario. — (1) Collection of Soils, in 
glass tubes. (2) Obelisk, representing the gold 
obtained in British Columbia during the past 
25 years. 

CANADIAN GOVERNMENT 
(GEOLOGICAL AND NATURAL 
HISTORY SURVEY OP CANADA— 
Director-General, DR. ALFRED R C. 
SBLWYN, F.R.S.), Ottawa, Ontario.— 
Collection of Minerals, &c. (For details, see 
Canadian Government Official Catalogue.) 

CANADIAN GRANITE CO., 
Limited, Ottawa, Ontario.— Granite (100), 
Serpentine, Marble, &c. 



CANADIAN PACIFIC RAtLW. 
CO., Montreal, Quebec. — Collection 
Soils and Minerals of Manitoba and the No: 
West Territory. 

CARTER, CALVIN, Wolfbtown, B 
L. 19, Quebec. — (1) Steatite; Btea 
Powder ; Steatite Pencils — from "White Ri 
Soapstone Mine. (2) Chronic Iron Ore. 

CASHMORB, THOMAS, Pembro 
Ontario.— (1) Brick Clay. (2) Brick. 

CENTRAIi ONTARIO RAILWA 

— Magnetite. 

CHAMBERS & MACLEOD, WolU 
ton, R. 1, L. 14, Ontario.— Mngnctite. 

CHAMBERS, R.E., Leander Nelsoi 
Farm, Brookfield, Colchester, Nci 
Scotia. — Limouitc. 

CHAMBE:RS, R. E., Granton Quan 
Pictou, Nov \ Scotia — Freestone (tii 
grained grey). 

CHAPMAN, R. H. G., Alfleld, E. 
L. 10, Pontiac, Quebec. — Dolomite (wlii 
coarse, crystalline), ^ ,,; 

CHICAGO AND VERT ISLAK 
STONE CO., Isle Vert, Lake Superic 
Ontario.- Red Sandstone. 

CHRISTIAN, C, Hull, Quebec 
Hornblendic Gneias, for maeailamiscd roi 
me king. 

CLARK, NORMAN, Palmerstc 



Ontario. — Magnetite. 



■J A ,G.C' 



CLARKE, THOMAS, Salt Spring 
Nova Scotia.— Block of Coal. 

COBOURG, PETERBOROUGI 
AND MARMORA MINING CO., Be 
mont, Ontario. — Iron Ores— Hematites si 
Magnetite (Nos. 78 to 86). 

COLLIE, DR., River John, Not 
Scotia. — Sandstone. •■- -'■' 

COLONIAL COPPER MINE CC 
Dorchester, New Brunswick. — ( 
Copper. (2) Mispickel. (3) Molybdenite. 

CONNORS, G., & SONS, Cannin 
King's County, Nova Scotia. — (1) Cls 
(2) Drain Tiles and Collars. 

CONVERSE, JOHN A., Montrei 
Quebec. — Land and Calcined Piaster. 

CORNELL, Bosanquet, R. E. L. S 
Ontario.— (1) Clay. (2) Tiles. 

CUMMINS, W., LouisviUe, Mon 
ton. New Brunswick.- (1) Clay. ( 
Stock Brick, 



Canada. 



lURTIS, Iff., & SON, Ontonabee. 

tario.— (1) Clftv. (2) White Brick. (3) 
itli Brick. (4) Tiles. (5) Ked Brick. 



109 



iYRETTE, A., 

tario. — Silver Ore. 



Port William, 



ETERLmG, ABRAHAM, Bertie, 
J, L. 29, Ontario.— (1) (Jlav. (2) White 
k. (3) Clay. (4) Red Bricks, ^.j ^ 

ICKSON-, WILLIAM, PakenJiam. 
»rio.— (1) Limestone. (2) Renssellcarile. 

OBIB, WILLIAM M., Ekfrid, R. 8. 

.-(l)Clay. (2) Bricks. (3) Drain Tiles. 

RY, JOHNSON, Kingston, Ontario, 
'd Brick. 

CTDSWELL MARBLE AND LIME 
, Dudswell, Quebec— (1) Limestone. 
Lime. 

QPFERIN GOLD MINING CO., 
nou River East, Halifax, Nova 

;ia.— Auriferous Quartz. .; j- 

[JNSMUIR & SONS, R., Union 
e Comox, British Columbia.— Coul. 

DTUI8, — , Joliette, Quebec— Fire 

, Marble, &o. 

JSSAULT, CHARLES, St. Alban 
rry, La Chevrotifere, Quebec— Lime- 

.ARTON SALT WORKS CO, 

wick. County Larobton, Ontario. 

Pmo Salt. (2) Coarse Salt. (3) Brine. 

jNWICK & SCLATER, 229, Com- 
loners Street, Montreal, Quebec— 

! Asbestos, and Manufactures thereof. 



RGUSON, P., Ross, R. 4, L, 

nc— (1) Limestone. (2) Lime. 



21, 



PRtD, a., Greenfield, Glengarry. 
Ontario.— Fancy Red Brick. 

GAIRDNER, R. H., Montreal, 
Quebec— Asbestos, rhosplmte, Mica, Serpen- 
tine, Slate, Infusorial Earth. --,M,»f 

GALBRAITH, R. L. T., M.PP 

British Columbia.- Galena (102)— Arsentil 
ferous and Auriferous. 

GIBBONS, R., Southampton, On- 

tario.-(l) Clay. (2) Bricka. 

w?Pt?°?' '^•' YorkviUe, Ontario- 
White Brick. 

aS^°^/. T?^^^^' ^^'^ MiUei. Lime 
Works, Colborne. R. 1. L. 1, Ontario.- 

(1) Jiimestone. (2) Lime. 

COT^nS^^r^T P^ BRITISH 
S2 S??%^' S*«*«^«. British Colum. 
bia (per the Hon. G. Robinson, Pro- 
vincial Seeretary).-Native Gold in Quartz. 

GRAND RIVER PLASTER CO., 
Gypsum Mines, Haldimand, Ontario 

— Gypsum Rock. 

n?5^?? ^^^NK RAILWAY OP 
CANADA, Kingston, Ontario. - f I) 

Limestone. (2) Bituminous Coal. ' 

GRANT, J., Halifax, Nova Scotia.- 

Collection of t)ie Minerals of Nova Scotia. 

gPf ^-NSIDE, -, Carleton, Ontario. 

— \\ iiite Buck. 

GRIFFIN, ELIZABETH, Laxto. 
Victoria, Ontario.— Kaolin. 

GRUNDY, H., Harvey. R. 15, L. 14 

Ontario.— Lithographic Stone. 

GUNN A., & CO., Pitzroy Lead 
Mine, Chats Island. -U) Galena r2) 
Galena (Prills). (3) Pi,? Lead. — ^" ^^ 

HA MB LEY, R.. Bowmanville, 
Ontario.-<l) clays. (2) Bricks. (3) Tihs. 

HANES, R., Matilda, Ontario.-Clay. 

ta5:f^?^.?'^,°^' -' YorkviUe, On- 
tano. — Red Brick. 

HAYCOCK, EDWARD, Haycock 

Location, Templeton, Quebec-Uematito 
and Magnetite, 



ETT, GEORGE A., Miramiehi. 
Brunswick. (1) day. (2) Stock 

RSYTH, ROBERT, Montreal. 
«e.— Polished Granife Pedestals. 

WLER, G. C, Kilmarnock, On- 

-iVrtificjn.l &tone: Keystones, Chimney. 

??^' JS C., St. Thomas.-(l) Clav. 
"ckg. (3) Drain Tiles. ' 

*«i t'n 1868 .] «5 O i-i r^ rt I 7^ I 

L ?Ll!'^L"/^".'"^ *"° SUBMARINE TELEGRAPHY, 

12, Princes Street, Hanover Square, London, W 
»gar.- W m. LANT CARPE NTER. B.A., B.Sc, F.ch A.S.T.E. 

4-; s^lXtIa/ra^.'"c^p,•ironris^^^ ^p-'*of ,.300 



110 



Canada. 



HEFFBB, THOMAS, Bathurst, New 
Brunswick. — (1) Clay 'brown nnd dark- 
grey). (2) Stock Brick. (3) TrosBod Brick. 

HENDERSON & POTTS, Halifax, 

Nova Scotia -Sulphate Barytcs Rock— crude 

and ground. 

HOGAN, PETER, Westmoreland 
Union Preestono.Ciuarry.— Sandstone. 

HOaa, J., Lanark, R. 10, Ij. 21, 

Ontario.— (1) Limestone. (2) lame. 

HOOKER, T. W., Welland, Ontario. 
—(1) Clay. (2) Bricks. 

HURD & ROBERTS, Hamilton, 

Ontario.— (1) Marble Monument, with lime- 
stone base. (2) Marbleized Slab. 

IRWIN, HOPPER, & CO., Montreal, 
Quebec (London Office, 110 Cannon 
Street, E.C.).— Manufactured Aabestoa. 

JAMIESON, C, Beaver Brook, 
Hants, Nova Scotia.— Gypaum (polished 
column and base). 

JAMIESON, J. A.., Horton, R. 3, 
E. J, L. 13, Ontaric— (1) Limestone. (2) 
Lime. 

JARVIS ISLAND SILVER CO.. 
Jarris, Ontario.— Ore with Silver. 

JEPPRBY, W. H., Danville, Rich- 
mond, Quebec— Crude Asbestos (No. 131). 

JENKINS & CHAMBERS, Wollas- 
ton, Ontario.— Magnetites. 

JENKINS, CHAMBERS, BROWN, 
& CLUTE, WoUaston, Ontario.— Mag- 
netites. 

JESSOP, J., Victoria, British Colum- 
bia.— (1) Galena— Argentiferous and Auri- 
ferous— (104). (2) Boonite (97). 

JOHNSON & CO., Thetford, Quebec. 
— Cruue Asbestos (88). 

JOHNSON, JAMES, Westminster 
R L 5J miles west of London, Middle- 
sex. Ontario.— (1) Clay. (2) Brick. 

JOHNSON, JAMES, StaflFord, K. 1, 
L. 30, Ontario.— Brick Clay. 

JONES, JOHN, Marmora, Ontario. 

—Auriferous Vein Matter (Mispickel). 



KOOTBNBY SYNDICAT 

Limited, Kooteney, British Colum 
(Agent, ARTHUR FELL, 46 Qu« 
Victoria Stroet, London, E.C.). — 
Samples of Gold-bearing Quartz. (2) H\l 
Ixjaring Lead Ores (Galena). (3) Sanipk 
Quartz, containing gold, silver, and cop 
(4) Sample of Fire Clay. (5) Samplis 
Silver-bearing Lead Ores (Galena). 

T. ATTF. SUPERIOR NATT 
COPPER MINING CO., Point J 
mainse. Lake Superior.— Copper Ore. 

LA ROCHE & CO., BeUeviUe, 
tario.—Scd Brick. i; ,t.-) . 

LEE, JOHN, & CO., at. John, I 
Brunswick. — (1) Red Clay. (2) S 
Brick. (3) Pi esse 1 Brick. (4) Ornara* 
Brick. (5) Flooring Tile. 

URGAULT, PAUL, St. Valenti 
Stottsville, Quebec— Limestone 

LEMANG, RICHARD, Pift 
Point, Prince Coimty, Prince Edw 
Island.— Bricks. 

LEWIS, CAPTAIN, Victoria, Brit 
Columbia. — Magnetite. 

LIEVRES RIVER LAND A 
PHOSPHATE CO., Montreal, Que 
—Apatite (92^— Phosphate of Lime. 



LINGHAM, N., Belleville, Ont) 
-Red Brick. 

LIONAIS, CHARLES, Box 
Post Office, Montreal, Quebe 
Asbestos. 

LOMER, ROHR, & CO., 8 Cui 
House Square, Montreal, Queb 
A putitc (Rock Phosphate of Lime), fromva 
mines 

LONGMAN, R, Rawdon, Onti 
—(1) Clay. (2) Bricks 

McCREADY, R. L., Sussex, \ 
Brunswick.— Infusorial Earth. 

Mcculloch, w. p., ^.v^tf 

British Columbia.— Gold and Silver 



r( 



Mcdonald, C. p. M., Greea 
Glengarry, Ontario.— Limestone. 



JONER, — , 
—Red Brick. 



Leslieville, Ontario. 
Mines, 



KING BROS., Thetford 

Quebec— Crude Asbestos (88). 



Mcelroy, henry, & son.: 

mond, Carleton, Ontario.— (1) Cla, 
Brick. 

McBWBN, G., HenaaU, Huron 
tario.-Salt. ' 

McGILLIVBAY. D., Athole 
yard, Kenyon, Ontano.-(l) ti*J 
Bricks. ) \ A"«VJ .'.\'\ v 

McKBEN, ADAM, & SOI^^S' P „ 
Nova Scotia Sandstone (flne-gnuBe« ( 



Canada. 



Ill 



McKFTiTiAR BBOS., Port William, 
)ntario. — Gold-bearing Quartz. 



& EAMES, B. M., 
Iiake Superior. — Silver 



McKTJT.T.AR 
'hunder Bay, 

)rc 

MACKENZIE, ALEXANDER, Am- 
lerst, Cumberland, Nova Scotia.— 
nfusoiial Earth (Trii>olite) from various 
nutcea. 

MACPHERSON, JOHN, West 
?iver, Pictou, Nova Scotia.— (1) Ilrown 
landstone. (2) Grey Sandstone. 

MAIiIiETTE, L. K., Pointe Claire, 
iuebec. — Limestone. 

MARKHAM, ALFRED, Markham- 
ille, New Brunswick. — Samples of Man- 
iiui'se Ore. 

MATHISON, JOSEPH, Lower 
j'Ardoise, Richmond, Nova Scotia. — 
ron Ore. 

MILLER, ERASTUS, Park Hill, 
liddlesex, Ontario. — (1) Bricks, and 
iimples of tlie Clay used. (2) WLite Stock 
{ricka. 

MHiNER, COUTTS, & CO., St. 

Jeoi-ge, Charlotte County, New Bruns- 
?ick.— Polished Granite Pedestal. 

MOODY & NELSON, Victoria, 
iritish Columbia. — Silver Ore. 

MOORE, DAVID, Bamaay, B. 8, 
20, Ontario.— Clay. , , , , 

MORTON, C, British Columbia.— 

ilvcr Ore (98). 

MURDOCH, WILLIAM, St. John, 
Few Brunswick. — Siliceous Eartli. 

NEW ROCKLAND SLATE CO., 

bntreal, Quebec. — Pooling Slates, and 
unufactured. articles of slate. 

NICHOLSON, WILLIAM, Mon- 
igue, Ontario.— (1) Clay. (2) Bricks. 

NIGHTINGALE, THOMAS, 980 
onge Street, Toronto, Ontario.— Red 
id White Bricks, Drain Tiles, and Sewer 

pes. 

NIGHTINGALE, T., Yorkville, 
ntario.— (1) White Brick. (2) Red Brick. 

NORTH AMERICAN CHEMICAL 

0., Qoderich, Huron County, Ontario. 
Various kinds of Relined Salt, for dairy and 

ble use. 

NOVA SCOTIA GOVERNMENT.— 

) Obelisk, representing the gold obtained in 
iva Scotia from 18G2 to 1883. (2) Spe"''"""- 
Gold, 



NOVA SCOTIA. 



List of Minerals sent by and to the 

GoVEnNMENT OF NoVA ScOTIA FOU 

Exhibition collectively. 

GENERAL MINING ASSOCIA- 
TION, Sydney Mines, Cape Breton, 
Nova Scotia.—!. Block of Coal (1200 lbs.). 

LOW POINT, BARASOIS, AND 
LING AN MINING CO., Cape Breton, 
Nova Scotia.— (1) 2. Block of Coal. (2) :{ 
Block of Coal. 

INTERNATIONAL COAL MINING 
CO., Bridgeport Mines, Cape Breton 
Nova Scotia — i. Block of Coal. 

SYDNEY AND LOUISBURG COAL 
AND RAILWAY CO., Reserve Mines, 
Cape Breton, Nova Scotia.-<l) 5. Block 
of Coal. (2) 0. Sample of Coke. 

GLACE BAY MINING CO., Glace 
Bay Mines, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. 
—7. Block of Coal. 

GOWRIE COAL MINING CO., 
Gowrie Mines, Cow Bay, Cape Breton, 
Nova Scotia.— (1) 8. Block of Coal. (2) 9 
Sample of Patent Fuel. (3) 10. Coal Fossils. 

OLD BRIDGEPORT MINES, Cape 
Breton, Nova Scotia (H. MITCHELL, 
Manager). -11. Block of Coal. 

S^RINQHILL RAILWAY AND 
COAIj CO., Springhill Mines, Cumber- 
land Co., Nova Scotia (W. HALL, 
Manager).— (1) 12. Column of Coal. (2) 1.-1. 
Block of Coal. (3) 14. Sample of Nut Coal. 
(4) 15. Block of Coal. 

JOGGINS COAL MINING CO., 

Cumberland Co., Nova Scotia.— 16. Block 
of Coal, column. ^, • 

HALIFAX CO., Limited, Albion 
Mines, Pictou Co., Nova Scotia.— (1) 17, 
Block of McGregor Coal. (2) 18, 19. Samples 
of McGregor Coal. (8) 20. Sample of Coko. 

VALE COAL CO., New Glasgow, 
Pictou Co., Nova Scotia.— (1) 21. McBenn 
Coal. (2) 22. Six-feet Coal. 

ACADIA COAL CO., iBtTestville. 
Pictou Co., Nova Scotia.— (1) 23. Samples 
of Acadia Seam, large coal. (2) 24. Nut coal. 

INTERCOLONIAL COAL MINING 
CO., Westville, Pictou Co., Nova Scotia. 
— (1) 25. Samples of Acadia Seam, large coal. 
(2) 26. Nut coal. * 

BROWN, B. H., Sydney Mines, Cape 
Breton, Nova Scotia.— 27. Coal Fossils. 



icimens | BARTLETT, J. H., BridgeviUe. 
Pictou Co., Nova Scotia 28-32. Iron Ore b. 



112 



Canada. 



GOVERNMENT OP NOVA 
SCOTIA, Halifax. Stewiacke, Col- 
ohester Co.— 33. Red Heuiatilc (150 lbs.). 

KENNBY, CHABLES, Salmon River 
Lakes, Quysboro' Co., Nova Scotia.— 

34. Sijocular Iron Ore ('.'00 llw.). 

CALLAHAN, THOMAS, Manches- 
ter, Quysboro' Co., Nova Scotia.— 35. 

Specular Iron Ore (200 Ibi.). 

CUMMINGER, A., Melrose, Guys- 
boro' Co., Nova Scotia. — 3(5. Specular Iron 
(>rc from Boyleston, Guysboro' Co. 

MOSELEY, E. T., Sydney, Cape 
Breton, Nova Scotia.— 37. Red Hematite 
Iron G\e. 

STEEL COMPANY OP CANADA, 

Londonderry Mines, Colchester Co., 
Nova Scotia.— (1) 38.-41. Iron Ores, (2) 
42. Limestone. (8) 43, 44. I'ig Iron. (4) 
45, 4C. liirlron. • ,:/r ..; rft i :>•>/. 

NOVA SCOTIA GOVERNMENT, 

Halifax. — (1) 47. Chilled Iron. (2) 48. 
Log Iron Ore. 

McLaughlin, D., Shabenacadie, 
Hants Co., Nova Sootia. — (1) 49. Silver 
Lead Ore. (2) 50. Mnrble. (8) 51. Maible. 
(4) r)2. Lime. (5) 53, 5 1. Gypaum and Plaatei . 

PIMOCK, E. "W., Windsor, Hants 
Co., Nova Scotia. — 55. Gypsum (200 lbs.). 

CLOUGH, G., Lennox Passage, Cape 
Broton.Nova Scotia.— 5G. Gypsum (50 lbs.). 

NOVA SCOTIA GOVERNMENT, 

Halifax. — (1) 67. Polished Gypsum. (2) 
58. Coucrutionary lamestone. (3) 51). Two 
Siimples of Polished IMarble. , ^ . . . 

MOSELEY, E. T., SydneVr Cape 
Breton, Nova Scotia. — (i) CO. Manganese 
Ore. (2) Pyrolusite (77) from Morrison's Mine. 

STEPHENS, J. W., Tenny Cape, 
Hants Co., Nova Scotia. — (1) 01. Manga- 
nese Ore. (2) 02. Manganese Ore. 

CARTER, W., Truro, Nova Scotia.— 
C3. Manganese Ore (50 lbs.). 

BROWNE, J., Bridgeville, Pictou 
Co., Nova Scotia. — 01. Manganese Ore 
(36 lbs.). 

HENDERSON & POTTS, Halifax, 
Nova Scotia, — (1) 05. Sample of Barytes. 

(2) 06. Sample of Paints. 

COXHEATH COPPER MINING 
CO., Sydney, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. 

—(1) 67. Copper Ore. (2) 08. Copper Matte. 

(3) 09. Iron Ore (flux), (4) 70. Limestone 
(flux). (5) 71. Sin;? from Copper Ore. (6) 72. 
Assays, Charts, Photographs, &c. 



JOHNSTONE, L„ Stellarton, Pictou 
Co,, Nova Scotia. — 73. Copper Ore. 

NOVA SCOTIA GOVERNMENT, 

Halifax.— 74. Copper Ore. 

POOLE, H. S., Stellarton, Pictou Co., 
Nova Scotia,— 75. Cabinet of Minerals. 

GRANT, J., Halifax.— 76. Mineral Co 

EAGAR, M, P„ Halifax, — '< 7. Tw( 

Cabinets of Nova Scotian Minerals. 

RUGGLES, M., Lockeport. — 78 

Cabinet of Nova Scotian Minerals, 

DAVIDSON, B, M., Halifax, Novi 
Scotia, — 79, Antimony Ore, 

ROSS, A, C„ North Sydney, Cape 
Breton, Nova Scotia,— 80. Mica. 

NOVA SCOTIA GOVERNMENT, 

Halifax.— 81. Mineral Map of Nova Scotiu. 

ALBION GOLD MINING CO., 
Montague, Halifax Co., Nova Scotia.-- 
82. Auriferous Quartz. 

CHRISTIE, G. P„ Bedford, HaUfai 
Co., Nova Scotia, — 83. Anriferous Allii 
viinn. 

HAYWARD, A. A., Renfrew Gol 
Mines, Halifax Co., Nova Scotia.— 8 

Auriferous Quurtz. 



NOVA SCOTIA GOVERNMENT 
Halifax. — (1) 85. Obelisk showing Gol 
taken from Nova Scotian Gold Mine^. 
80. Auriferous Quartz. 



(S 



DUPPERIN GOLD MINING CO. 
Salmon River, Halifax Co., Nova Scotia 
— 87. Auriferous Quartz. 

KEMPTVILLB GOLD MININC 
CO., Yarmouth, Nova Scotia. — 88. Auri 
fcrous Quartz. 

ERASER, R. P., Pictou, Nova Scotii 
—89. Copper Ore. 



'Km-; 



ODELL, A., Brockville, Ontario, 
Clays for White Bricks, Red Bricks, 

ODELL & SONS, Ottawa, Ontario. 
(1) Clay, (2) Stock Brick. 

OLLMAN, — , Hamilton, Ontari 
—(1) Clay, (2) Bricks. 

OPPENHEIMER BROS,, Victori 
British Columbia, — Specimens of Au 
ferous Quartz and Silver Ores from Uiii 
Moxmtaiu, 



Canada. 



113 



ORFORD COPPER AND SUL- 
PHUR CO., Capoltown, Quebec. — (1) 
Yellow Copper Oro (DO). (S) Nickel Oro (91). 



OSGOOD, 8. P., St. 
Brunuwick. — Freestone. 



John, New 



PAUL, JOHN, Ramsay, Ontario.— 

(1) Liinc£'.onQ (wbito crystiillinc). (2) Liiuo. 

PEQLER, JOSEPH, Blar chard, R 7, 
L. 8, near Woodham, Ontario. — (1) Clny 
two kinds). (2) Drain Tiles. 

PICK8WOBTH, D. S., Percy R., L. 
17, Ontario. - - (1) C lays taken 10 ft and 
20 ft. below surface. (2) JUricks. 

POCOCK, FREATH, & POCOCK, 

Emerson, Manitoba.— (1) Coal. (2) Mai-s 
of Coal Souras, &c. 

PORT ARTHUR DISTRICT (per 
T. A. KEEPER, Esq.), Port Arthur, 
Ontario. — (1) Virgin Soils. (2) Collection 
of Minenil I'roducts in Cabinets, with spoci- 
lucns. (For details, see Official (Catalogue of the 
Canadian Government.) , . 

POST, JAMES S., East Templeton, 
Quebec— A pati t v. 

POWELL, J. W., Victoria, British 
Columbia.— Gold Quartz (Cassiar), Silver, 
uud Copper (Vancouver). 

PRICE, — , Leslieville, Ontario. — 
[1) Grey Brick for Sewers. (2) Ited Brick. 

RABBIT MOUNTAIN MINING 
DO., Thunder Bay, Lake Superior.— 

silver Glance. 

READ, JOSEPH, & CO., Bay Chaleur 
Quarries, Gloucester, New Brunswick. 
-(1) Sandstones. (2) Hematite. 

RICHARDS, J. G., JUN., British 
Columbia.- Red Hematite (95), and 3IaK- 
letite (96J. ° 

RILEY, EDWARD, Cataraqui R., 
L 16, Kingston, Ontario.— (1) Clay. (2) 

Weks. 

ROBERTSON, — , Carleton, Ontario. 
-Red Brick. 

ROBINSON, HIRAM, Bagot, R. 10, 
"i. 7, Quebec — Celestite. 

ROBSON, B., Loudon, Ontario.— 

1) Clay. (2) Tiles. 



ROBSON, J., Victoria, British 
Columbia — Dressed Marble (107). 

ROMBAUOH, H., Russell, Ontario. 
—(1) Cloy. (8) Bricks. 

ROSS, The Hon. J. O., and REED, 
Dr. JAMBS, Leeds, Quobec— Chromio 
Iron Ore. 

ROSS, WARD BROTHERS, & CO., 

Shipton, Quebec— Asbestos. 

RYAN, M., Predericton, New Brtins- 
wick.— (1) Clny. (2) Stock Brick. (3) Or- 
naniental Bricks. (4) Drain Tiles. 

SAYLOR, A. B., Bloomfleld, Hallo- 
well, Ontario. — Clay Bricks, hand and 
machine-made. 

SCARBOROUGH, CHARLES, Han- 
over, Brant, Ontario.— ,1) Clny. (2) 
White Bricks. (3) Clay. (4) Drain tiles. 

SHEARER, — . Cornwall, Ontario. 
—(1) Clay. (2) White Bricks. (3) Red 
Bricks. 

SHEPPARD, — , Yorkville, Ontario. 
— White Brick. . • . - : y^. v 

SMITH, HENRY, Port Elgin, On- 

tario.-(l) Clny. (2) White I5rick.s. 

SMITH, J. R., St John, New Bruns- 
wick — Natural Mineral Water from Spring at 
Apoliaiiui. 

SMITH, S. E., Sherbroke, Quebec— 

3Iagnetite. 

STEPHENS, GEORGE, Montreal. 
Quebec. —Native Silver. 

STEPHENS, Hants, Nova Scotia.— 

Manganese Ore. 

STEWART, Dr. E. K., Madoc, R. 5. 
L. 7, Ontario.— Litliographic Stone. 

STEWART, P. J., Toronto, Ontario. 
— Pctriaed Cottonwood. 

STEWART, J., Marmora, Ontario.— 

Meneghinite. 

STEWART, J., Madoc, R. 0, L. 1, 
Ontario Shell Marl. 

SUMMERS, DAVID A., Winchester. 

Ontario.— (1) Limestone. (2) Limo. 



THUS NBW BTANDARD DICTIONARY. " Trul,, a XMional »rorJt."--SPKCT.vTOK. 

lUady, price 12*. 6d. each. Part I., A-Ant ; Part II., Ant-Batten. 

\ NEW ENGLISH DICTIONARY ON HIST8RICAL PRINCIPLES. 

Kdlted by JAMKS A. H. MURRAY, LL.D. 

Lo-ndon: HliNBY FROWDE, Clarendon Pre.s Warehouse. Amen Corner, E.G. 



114 

TAIiliMAN, W., & SON, Beam»- 

vUle, Lincoln, Ontario. — Hpecimen of 

Cloy. 



Canada. 



TAYIiOR, A. H., Moore'B Mine, 
Wakefield, Q.— Apfttito. 

TIIiIiSON, EDWIN D., Tilsonburg, 
Ontario.-<l) Cluy. (2) liricks. 

TORONTO AND CARLETON 
BRICK MANUPACTURINC* CO.. 
Carleton, Ontario.— lied Bnck. 

TORRANCE. J. PRA8ER, 16 St. 
John Street, Montreal, Quebec— Tr.lu- 
noriivl Earth iind its Products. 

TOWNSTjEY, — , Carleton, Ontario. 
—Red Brick. 

TRUBMNER, S., Stephen, R. 6, L. 
16, Ontario.-(l) Clay. (2) Bricks. 

TUPPER, Sir CHARLES, G.O.M.a., 
CB 97 Cromwell Road, London, 

8 V' — Amethyst Crystals, from Amethyst 
Hnrbour, Thunder Bay, Lake Superior. 

VANCOUVER COAL MINING 
AND LAND CO., Nanaimo, British 
Columbia.-Specimens of Groy Sandstone 
and Coals. 

VAN HORNE, W. C. (Vice-President, 
Canadian Pacific Railway). Montreal, 
Quebec-AmHthyst Crystals from Amethyst 
Harbour, Timnder Bay, Lake Superior. 

VICTORIA GAS CO., Victoria, 
British Columbia.— Coke and Coal. 

WADE, FREDERICK H., Valley 
Brickyard, Ekfrid. R. 6, L. 2.-(l) 
Clay. (2) Bricks. 

WALKER, W. H., Ottawa, Ontario. 
-Plumbago and Products from the Buck- 
ingham Mine. 

WALLACE GREY STONE CO.. 
Wallace, Nova Scotia.-(l) Blue Sand- 
Btone. (2) Grey Sandstone. 

WALTON, JACOB, Avonport, King's 
Coun^, Nova acotia.-(l) Clay (dark red 
laSed). (2) Common Brick. (3) Pressed 
Brick. (4) Drain Tiles. 

WALTON, JOHN, Aginoourt, On- 
tario.— Clay Tiles. 

WEARNE, O. H. W., Toronto, On- 
tario.— Galena. 

WHITE, CORNELIUS, Shelburne, 
Nova Scotia.— Granite. 

WHITE, THOMAS B., Anderdon, 
BBsex, Ontario.— Dolomite (grey). 



WILLIAMS 8i MURRAY, BoBan 
quet, Ontario.— Two different eamplci o 
Coarse Mt from Village, Port Franki, 

WTLLOUGHBY, WILLIAM, Carlo 
ton Place, Beckwith, B. 11, L. 17, On 
tario.— Brick Clay, 

WRIGHT, C. B., Hull, Quebec. -(1 
Limt^tone. (2) Lime. (3) Hyd. Limestoni' 
used for milking Cement. (4) Hyd. Cement. 

WRIGHT, EDWARD V., Ottawa 

Ontario.— (1) Argentiferous Galena. (2) C«ii 
contrutcd Ore. 

WYLIE, W. H., Carleton Place 
Ontario.— (1) Magnetite taken from snrfiici 
and a few feet boTow surface. (2) Pyriti 
(3) Limonito from near surface. (4) Biiri 
(sulplmtc of Baryta). 



u 



ZAINESVELLE IRON MINING 
CO., Godfrey, Frontenac, Ontario.- 
Maguctic Iron Ore (No. 101)). 

CANADIAN GOVERNMENT 
(GEOLOGICAL SURVEY). Alluvia 
Gold. (For details, m;c Official Catalogue of 
Canadian Government.) 



Class 2. 
Gcohgy. 






BROWN, R. H., Sydney Mines, Cap* 
Breton.— Fossil Plants from the Coal seam i 
the pits of the General Mining Association a 
Sydney Mines, Cape Breton. 

CANADIAN GOVERNMENT, Ot 
tawa, Ontario. — Specimens illustrntin! 
EozooD Canadensc. 

CANADIAN GOVERNMETTI 
(GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF CA- 
NADA), Ottawa, Ontario.— (1) CoUectioii 
of Rocks, illustrating the Archean formation 
of Cr.nada (Specimens numbered 1 to 356). (a 
Complete Sets of the lloports published by tb( 
Survey from 18G3 to 188(5. (Note.- For (tC() o 
glcal Maps, &c., sec " Maps and Reports, in tli 
Educational Division.) 



GROUP v. — MANUFACTURE 
AND INDUSTRIAL ENTER 
PRISE., hi ; 

vit'i'i^ Class 1, 

Men's, Women's, and Childrsn'e Cbthintl- 

ALMONTE KNITTING CO., Al 
monte, Ontario.— Woollen Underclothing 



Canada. 



ANTICOSTI, an Island In the Qiilf 
f St. liawrence, Province of Quebec. 
he property of F. W. Sc T. G. STOCK- 



115 



(TELL.— <1) Sockn from Hair of Island Doe 
K. -- '-- " • ■ • - • 1. (I 



) Coat from Heals caught in Islcnd 
tter Can. (See the Collective Exhibit ..„„ 
10 Island.) 

AUSTON MANUPACTURENQ CO., 
Irighton, Ontario.— Shoo and Corset Laco 
/•otton). 

-CANADIAN GOVERNMENT 
^OST OFFICE DEPARTMENT), 
Ittawa, Ontario.— Letter CarrierB* Equip- 

lont. 

CANTI.IE, EWAN, & CO., Mon- 
■eal, Quebec— Canadian Twaids, Flannels, 
ottons, and Underclothing. 

CARSLEY, S., Notre Dame Street, 
lontreal, Quebec— Umbrella»? 

CHEESEWORTH, J. W., Toronto, 

ork.— Clothing made from Canadian Cloth. 

CLAYTON & SONS, Halifax, Nova 

cotia.— Complete Suits of Men's and Boys' 
lothing. 

CROMPTON CORSET CO., Toronto, 

intario.— Corsets in Satin and Joan. 

DOMINION CORSET WEAVING 
O., 1062 Post Office, Quebec— Corsets. 

DOMINION HAT CO., Hamilton. 

ntario.— Fur Felt Hats. 

DROUIN, M., 166 St. Lawrence 
;reet, Montreal, Quebec— (1) Hats. (2) 
nil-overs. (3) Silk and Military Goods. (4) 
elmets, specially adapted for Canada. 

DUBOIS, MRS., & SON, Toronto, 

Wane — Feather Trimmings. 

EDGECUMBE, P. B., Prederlcton, 

ew Brunewick Straw Hats. I 

EMPIRE BUTTON WORKS, Mon- 

Bal, Quebec— Vegetable Ivory Buttons. 

PAIRAI,L, W. n.. Post Office 155, 
. John, New Brunswick. — (1) Men's 
ishrmkable Shirts and Drawers. (2) Outside 
wts und Hosiery. 

PERLAND, MISS ADELINE, Sorel. 
^®oec.-(i) A Man's Shirt, all hand-made. 
) A bhict, made by machine. 

»ALT KNITTING CO., Gait, On- 
no. — Woollen and Cotton Shirts and 
awers, and Top Skirts. 

3REEN, E. K., SONS, & CO., Box 
y<i, Montreal, Quebec— Felt Hats. 



GUENETTE, EMILE, St. Hyaointhe. 
Quebec — Coat and Veat. 

McKENZIE, MRS. JAMES, Uij. 
Queen's County , Prince Edward Islan 
— Men'a Woollen Socks, hand-made. 

MYERS, P. C, 762 Craig Street, 
Montreal, Quebec— Patent Knitted Cotton 
Caps and Hosiery. 

PENMAN MANUFACTURING 

CO., Paris, Ontario. — (1) Quilts. (2) 
Shirts. (3) Hosiery and Underclothing gonor- 
ully, for both sexes, in Wool, Cotton, &c. 

PIKE RIVER MILLS, Notre Dame 
de Stanbi-idge, Quebec— Woollen Under- 
wear. 

RENFREW, G. R., & CO., Quebec, 

Quebec— Coats, Caps, and Gloves. 

ROBERTSON, C, Charlottetown, 
Prince Edward Island.— Suit made from 
Island Wool. 

ST. HYACINTHE GRANITE 
MIIiLS, St. Hyacinthe, Quebec— Woollen 
Hosiery and Underclothing. 

SHOREY, H., & CO., Montreal, Que- 
bee — Beady-mado Clothing. 

SPOOR, ENOCH HEBER, North 
Stanbridge, Misaisquoi, Quebec— All- 
wool (iloves, band-knittoil by the Exhibitor. 

STRATHROY KNITTING CO., 
Strathroy, Middlesex, Ontario.— Under- 
wear. 

THOBOLD WOOLLEN & COTTON 
MANUFACTURING CO., Thorold, 

Ontario.— Woollen Underclothino- 

TOOKE BROS., Montreal, Quebec 
— WTutn and Coloured Shirts, Collars, and 
Cuffs. 

TYRON WOOLLEN MANUFAC- 
TURING CO., Tyron, Prince Edward 
Island.— Clothes marlo from Island Wool. 

TURNBULL, CHARLES, Gait, 
Waterloo, Ontario.— Ladies', Gentlemen's, 
and Children's Knitted Woollen Underclothiuir. 
full fashioned. . *" 

TURNER BROS,, Montreal, Quebec. 

— Susjienders. 

AMHERST BOOT AND SHOE 
MANUFACTURING CO.. Amherst, 
Nova Scotia.— Laced and Buttoned Boots. 

BELL, J. & T., Montreal, Quebec- 
Boots and Shoes. 

BERLIN FELT BOOT CO., Berlin, 

Ontario.— Felt Boots and Socks. 

I 2 



110 



Canada. 



OOOPBR & SMITH, Toronto, On- 
tario.— Boots and Shoes. '' -"-'- '^''"■'^ '» 

COTE (LOUIS) & BROTHER, St. 
Hyaolnthe, Quebec. — Boots and 8l»oos. , 

D ACK, E., & SON, Toronto, Ontario. 
—Mod's Superfiuo IIand-w;wn and IlaudMniwlo 
Boots and Rhoci. 

FOOARTY & BROTHER, Montreal, 
Quebec. -- Woniou'ri, Girlb', and Children's 
Bowed Boots and Shoos. . ; , ,i ./, " ' 

HEATHOW, W., Victoria, British 

Columbia. — Boots and Shoos. 

MoPHBRSON, J., & CO., HamUton, 

Wentworth, Ontario.— Boots and Slioes. 

MITLIiARKY & CO., Montreal, Que- 
bec—Boots and Shoes. 

ORR, HARREQAN, & CO., Hamil- 
ton, Wentworth, Ontario. — Boots and 
glioes. 

PINKERTON & CO., 38 St. Peter 
Street, Montreal, Quebec. — Boots and 
Shoes. 

RENFREW, a. A., & CO., Qutbec, 
Quebec— Fur Slippers. 

RICHARD & CO., St. Roch, Quebec. 

— Shoo Stiflbnings in Iioather Board and Lca- 
tlicr, manufactured from waste leather. 

SHARPE & MACKINNON, 1687 
Post Office, Montreal, Quebec. — Felt 
Bootj. 

THOMPSON & CO., Montreal, 
Quebec— Boots and Shoes. 

WOODLEY, J. C, Charest Street, 
Quebec. — Boots and Shoes. '■ 

CLERKE, JAMES, & SON, St. John, 
New Brunswick. — Boot Lasts. 

TOURANGEAU, NAPOLEON. 

TOWNSHEND, J. E., 334 St. James | 
Street, Montreal, Quebec— Bootjack. 

UNOAR, S. & M., St. John, New 
Brxmswick, — Shirt Collars and Cufts. 

Class 2. 
Gold and Silversmith't Work and Jewellery, 

ACME SILVER CO. (A. J. PARBZER, 
President). Toronto, Ontario. -Silver- 
plated Ware. 

CANADIAN GOVERNMENT (DE- 
PARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE), 
Ottawa, Ontario. — Silver Brooch of Indian 
workmanship. 



HERDSMAN, JOSEPH W., Beaton 
York, Ontario. — .Tet (loods, in the form o 
jewellery and omaments. 

MONTREAL OPTICAL ANI 
JEWELLERY CO., Montreal, Quebec 

— Fine (Jilt .Towollrry. 

JAMES SMART MANUFACTUR 
ING CO. 

TORONTO SILVER PLATE CO 
Toronto, Ontario. — Silver-plated Wares. 

BISHOr (G.) ENGRAVING 
PRINTING CO., Limited, 169 8l| 
James Street, Montreal, Quebec. 
Elootrotyping, &c. 

Class 3. 

'■ "'■ Furn'iure. Decoration. 

ARMSTRONG, G., & CO., Montreal 
Quebec— Shaker Clmirs and Folding Cot«. 

BENNET FURNISHING CO., Lon 
don, Ontario. — Furniture. 

BOSDET, MRS. PETER, Arichal 
Richmond, Nova Scotia.— Woollen Eu 
Mat. 

BRANDON MANUFACTURIlf( 
CO. OP TORONTO, Toronto, Ontari 

— Collection of Utensils for domestic use. 

BURGER, THOMAS, Liverpoc 
Nova Scotia. — Picture Frames. 

CAMPBELIi, D., Lochute, Arge 
teuil, Quebec. — Window Blinds. 

CANADIAN GOVERNMBN' 

Ottawa, Ontario. — Collection of Pictr.ren 
Oil Colours. (Exiiibitcd in Eastern Entraii| 
Hull of Exhibition) 

CANADIAN GOVERNMEK' 

Ottawa, Ontario. — Carved Show Cpbcs 
Various Woods, 

CIMON, SIMON X., M.P., Mum 
Bay, Charlevoix, Quebec— Wood Pulp a 
Wood Pulp Board, for panelling partitionii a 
lining under carpets, &c. 

COBBAN MANUFACTUEIB 

CO., Toronto, Ontario. — Picture Fro 
Mouldings. 

DALE, ROBERT E., Ottawa, Ontai 
—A Writing Desk in Butternut Woo(l,mn(le 
Robert Dale, who has been blind from tiie i 
of six years. 

DOMINION CORSET WEAVII 
CO., 1062 Post Office, Quebec— Carp 

DOMINION OILCLOTH CO., M( 
treal, Qxiebec— Oil C.'uths. 



Canada. 



117 



DUNN, P.. Cdte 8t Paul, Montreal, 
Quebec— Cari)ct Tacks. 

EOOINaTON, JOSEPH A., Mon- 
real, Quebec— (1) Cnt-filnss Door Panelg. 
U) llovello<l Plato-GlaBS Mirrors. 

EQMOND (VAN), A. O., & SONS, 
leaforth, Blyth, & Exeter Woollen 
:ill8, St forth, Ontario.—" Uniou " Drug- 
tH aud Woollen Druggcits. 

EVERALL, JOHN B., 104 St. George 
Itreet, Montx-eal, Quebec— Solutiou lor 
tcstoring aud Preaerviug WuU Papers. 

QALE, OEORQE, & SONS, Water- 
iUe, Compton, Quebec. — (1) C'ombinution 
ron Ikdateads. (2) I'utunt " Dominiou " Wiro 
lattrcsscs. 



QOHIER & DAQENAia 



't\\ 



QRAY, E. J., Victoria, Britisli Co- 
umbia.— -<1) Stairs, Handrails, &e., in native 
voods. (2) Model of Stairs aud Lift com- 

iiied. 

aUEI-PH, CITY OP, Ontario.— A 

jorgo Walnut-wood Frame, containing views of 
Gtuelpb. 

HARDY, LANSON, Lookeport, Nova 

Scotia.— (1) Window Blinds. (2) Folding 
Jamp Chairs. ..,.., j .. 

HASTINGS SAW MILL CO., Bur- 
>ard Inlet, British Columbia (Agents in 
London, MESSRS. HEATLEY, WOT- 
rON & CO., 11 George Yard, Lombard 

treet, E.C.). — Table, inlaid with various 

°°'^*" "'Cf .."3 ■. : • (C r. .It'^iPV f^\r 

HEAP'S PATENT DRY EARTH OR 
SHES CLOSET CO., Limited, To- 
nto, Ontario. — (1) Self- Acting Bedroom 

Commode, with XJrino Separating Receptacle. 

[2) Inodorous Ottoman Convenience. 

HEW SON, PRANK, Montreal, 
Quebec— Art Decorations. 

HOAR, MRS. ISAAC, Truro, Nova 
Scotia. — Hand-made Hearth Itug, of Canadian 

yain. 



HOODLESS, J., & SON, Bl King 
Street West, Hamilton, Wentworth, 
Ontario.— <1) Furniture: Walnut aud Marble 
Bedroom Suite. (2) Walnut Hidobojird. (8) 
Mahogany and Marble Bedroom Quite. 

HOPE 8i CO., Winnipeg, Manitoba. 
— Furniture. 

HOPKINS, JOSEPH, Hamilton, 

Ontario.— Two Bug Carpets. 

HUOT, LUCIEN, Montreal, Quebec. 

— Mirrors. 

JOHNSON, WALKER, & PLBTT, 
Queen City Planing Mills, Victoria, 
British Columbia.— Doors. 

KENNEDY BROS., Owen Sound, 
Grey County, Ontario.— <1) Automatic 
Bedroom Commode. (2) A Bedroom Suite of 
Furniture, containing three pieces, viz.. Bed* 
stead, Dressing Bureau, and Waslistand. 

KRAMER, FREDERICK, Preston, 
Waterloo, Ontario.— I land-made Furniture : 
—Secretary, Lady's Writing Table, Hewing 
Table. 

KINSMAN, MISS M., Kentvillo, 
Nova Scotia.— Plush Panels. 

LONGLEY, MISS, St, John, New 
Brunswick. — Sofa Pillow, Panel, Table 
Cloth, &c. 

McARTHUR, COLIN, & CO., Mon- 
treal, Quebec— Wall Papers, Borders, &c. 

McPARLANE, McKINLAY, & CO. 

Toronto, Ontario. — Window Shades. 

McGARVEY, OWEN, & SON, 1849 
1851 and 1863 Notre Dame Street 
Montreal, Quebec. — A Complete Chamber 
Set, nine pieces. 

McNAMEE, B., Sand Bay, Leeds, 
Ontario. — Union Carpet (Yarn.) 

MALLABY, PETER, Carlton West, 
York, Ontario. — Uruamentul Mantel and 
Mirror. . . . 

MAY, SAMUEL, & CO., Toronto, 
Ontario.— Billiard Tables and Appurtenances. 

MORIN, L. P. 



M Zb c Toronto (Bl obe^ ?^ 

' THE TOBONTO GLOBE has for years held an unqaestloned position as " THE TIMES of Cansida." 
In oirculatiout inflnenoe. and enterprise, it has no equal among its contemporaries in British irorth 
America! Terms for Advertisements on application. Tiir Daily Uloiik Is sent I'jit Fru to any uddresa In Qrcal 
Britain and Ireland for £1 8(. per annum. Tub Wbgklt Ulobb, U. 2(1. per annam. ' - 

Chief Office :-KINa STBEET, TOSONTO. 
Agency for Oreat Britain and the Continent :— 86 and 87, FLEET STBEET, LOITSOK, Z.C. 



118 



Cana(ld. 



MONTBEAIj CARBIAaB LBA- 
THBR CO. (J. AT.F.X. STEVENSON), 
20 Ijemoine Street, Hochelaga, Mon- 
treal, Quebec. — Upholstering Leathers. 
Patent and Enamelled Leather. 

MONTBEAIj PRINQB AND 
TASSEL WORKS, Montreal, Quebec. 
— Furniture, Trimmings, &c. 

MUIRHEAD & MANN, Victoria, 
British Columbia. — (1) Set of Inside 
Window Blinds of Yellow Cedar. (2) Mantel- 
piece of Ked Cedar. 

MURPHY, JOHN, Montreal, Quebec. 

— (1) Panel Puintinj^of Egyptian Wall Decom- 
tion. (2) Panel Painting uf I^Yench Renaissance 
Decoration. (3) Royal Arms on Glass. (4) 
Bpecimeuii of Graining. 

NATIONAL MANUFACTURING 
CO., Ottawa, Ontario.— Chairs, Tables, 
Folding Camp-Beds, Tei .s, Marquees, Ham- 
mock-Chairs. 



OTTERVILLB 
INQ CO, t r 



MAIVUFACTUR- 



PAQUET & GODBOUT. 

PEABD, JESSIE M., Toronto, On- 
tario. — Panel Screen, painted in oils. 

PBTEBBOROUGH LOCK MANU- 
PACTUBING CO. Peterborough, On- 
tario. — (1) Door Locks, Knobs, Bells, Levers, 
and Pulls. (2) Chain and Foot Bolts. 

PETEES, MISS P. A., Halifax, Nova 
Scotia.— Design in Blossomine Maple for a 
Panel. 

PORT AETHUR DISTRICT, On- 
tario (Per T. A. KEEPER, ESQ., Port 

Arthur).— Cabinet Table made of Native 
Woods. 

RHODES, CURRY, & CO., Amherst, 
Nova Scotia.— (1) Wood Mantels. (2) 
Newel Posts. (3) Pair of Front Doors and 
Frame. (4) Samples of Mouldings and Turn- 
ings in Native Woods. 

ROSS, R. W., Quelph, Wellington, 
Ontario.— (1) Rugs and Rug Patterns. (2) 
Bugs in process of manufacture. 

ROYAL CITY PLANING MILLS 
CO., Limited, New Westminster, Brit- 
ish Columbia.— (1) Doors, Window Sashes. 
(2) An Outside Blind. (3) Inside Blinds. 

SEHL, JACOB, Victoria, British 
Columbia. — F urn iture. 

SBLLON, MRS. S. T. N., Liverpool, 
Nova Scotia.— Stool made from the Horns, 
Hides, and Tails of a yoke of Steers. 



SHEARER, JAMBS, Montreal, Que 
bee. — Doors, Sashes, Mouldings, Blinds, Arch 
traves, &e. 

SIMPSON & CO., Berlin, Waterloc 
Ontario. — Set of Dining Room Furniture. 

SLOAN, JAMES P., 1'oronto, Ontario 

— Mattresses, with Self-stretching Frames. 

STAHLSCHMIDT, W., & CO., Pres 
ton, Waterloo, Ontario. — Offico and Schoo 
Desks, the latter with iron standards. 

STANSTEAD AND ORLEANS VE 
NEER CO., Beebe Plain, Stanstead 
Quebec. — Veneer Goods. 

STAUNTON, M., & CO., 4 and ( 
Sang Street West, Toronto, Ontario.- 

(1) Wall Papers, Borders, &c. (2) Paper 
hangings. 

STEWARD, A. BISHOP, 743 Craig 
Stroi't, Montreal, Quebec. — Carved Wood 
Mirrors. 

STEWART & WHITE, St. John, 
New Brxinswick.— <I) Walnut Hall Stand. 

(2) Walnut Bedroom Suite. 

TEES & CO., Montreal, Quebec. 
(1) Office and Book Desks. (2) Assorted| 
Caskets. (3) Wood Carpeting. 

THOMPSON, JAMES, Post Office 
1757, Montreal, Quebec. — Sideboard 
Dining Table, Sid«^ Table, Chairs, and othc; 
Furniture of C'anadian Woods. 

TORONTO WIPE DOOR MAT CO. 
Toronto, Ontario.- -Patent Steel- wire Doo 
Mats. 

VALLlilRB, P., Quebec, Quebec- 
Furniture. 

WATSON, JOHN C, Montreal, Que- 
bec. — Wall Papers, Dados, Ceilings, &c. 

WHITE, J., Woodstock, Ontario.- 

(1) Geometrical Design Mosaic Table. (2) 
Geometrical Design Mosaic Casket. ( 3) Picture 
Frame, inlaid with different Canadian Woods. 

(4) Casket in Foreign Woods and Mouldiu},'s. 

(5) Looking-glass, inlaid with Canadian Marbles 
and Foreign Woods. (6) Chess Board in 
Canadian Wood.?. 

WHITEHEAD, W. T., Predericton, 
New Brunswick. (1) Portable Office. 

(2) Samples of Wood. (3) Wall Map. 

WILDER, H. A., & CO., 404 St 
James Street, Montreal, Quebec — Spring 
Beds and Bedsteads. 

Class 4. 

Pottery antl Glaet. 

GRAY & BETTS, Tilsonburg, On- 
tario. — Rockingham kcA Bristol Ware. 



Cafuida, 



119 



HART BROTHERS ^ T.AZIER, 

Bellville, Ontario.— Earthenware. 

ST. JOHN'S STONE CHINAWARB 
CO., St. John's, Quebec— (1) Table and 
I'oilet Ohinawaro (plain and dooorated). (2) 
White C'ji'.rite Ware, for general domestic 
)iirpo8CS, 

WELDING, W. E., Brantford On- 
tario. — China and Stone Ware. 

Class 5. , 

Musiml InafrumenU. 

BELL, W., & CO,, Guelph, Ontario 
Lo.idon Office, 58 Holbom Viaduct, 

E.O.).— Organs in choice woods. 

BUOILEAU, E., St. Hyacinthe, Que- 
bec. — Organ Pipes in Wood and Metal. 

BROTHERHOOD, J., Stratford, 
Perth, Ontario. " Teohnioans." (Shown 
witii Messrs. Ileintzman's exhibit of Pianos.) 

CHUTE, HALL, & CO., Yarmouth, 
Nova Qcotia. — Cabinet Organ. 

DOHERTY, W., & CO., Clinton, Hu- 
ron County, Ontario.— Cabinet Organs. 

DOMINION ORGAN AND PIANO 
CO., Bowmanville, Ontario.— Pianos and 

rgans. 

GATES, G. O., Truro, Nova Scotia.— 

Wood lor inside work of Pianos. 

GATES, W. & A., Post Office Box 
93, Halifax, Nova Scotia. —Cabinet 

Jrgaiis. 

HEINTZMAN & CO., Toronto, On- 

aric— (1) Pianos: Concert Grand. (2) 
'arlour Grand. (3) Upright Square. 

HUNTINGDON ORGAN CO. (D. 
JOYD, Manager), Hvintingdon, Quebec. 

-(1) Cabinet Organ. (2) Organs, all difier- 
nt in size and finish. 

KARN, D. "W., & CO., "Woodstock, 
)ntario.— Ti'n different styles of Cabinet 

)rgiuifl. -■, . , ,. ,. . 

KILGOUR, J. & R., Hamilton^ Went- 

irorth, Ontario.— Cabinet Organs. 

LANSDOWNE PIANO CO., Toronto, 
)ntario.— Upright Pianos, all different styles. 



MASON & RISCH, Toronto, York, 
Ontario. — (1) Pianos: Parlour Grand. (2) 
Upright — large, medium, and small. 

NEWCOMBE, OCTAVIUS, & CO., 
Toronto, Ontario. — Pianofoi tea — Gronda 
and Uprights. 

RICHER, O. H., 210 Christopher 
Street, Montreal, Quebec— Two Violins. 

STECKEL, R., Ottawa, Ontario.— 

Nickel Piccolo (Stcckel's system), witli sculo 
of lingering. ^ 

UXBRIDGE CABINET ORGAN 
CO., Uxbridge, Ontario.— Parlour Organa 
of different designs. 

WEBER, G. M., Kingston, Ontario.— 

Violin. 

WILLIAMS, R. S., & SON, Toronto, 

Ontario. — Pianos — Square, Giand, and 
Upright. , V , ■ , >T. 

Class 6. 

Iron and Steel Buildimj Comfruction. Ironmon- 
ijery atvi ShuUm' Work. Ventilatioit, Heating, 
and Liyhting. 

AKIN, A. C— Cast-iron Soil Pipe and 
fittings. 

J. B. ARMSTRONG MAI,UPAC- 
TURING CO., Guelph, Ontario. — 

Specialities in Hardware for Carriages, Bag- 
gies, and Sleighs (shown in tlie Carriage DeiMirt- 
luent). 

ALBION IRON WORKS CO., Limi- 
ted. 

ARMSTRONG, J. S. A., St John, 

New Brunswick.— <1) Building Materials, 
of Concrete or Artificial Stone, with metal ties 
or latches — fire-proof, and cheaper than ordinary 
construction. (2) Models, rrairio Settlers' 
House, Town House, Church. 

BEAUDET & CHINIC, Quebec— 

(1) Nails. (2) Mill Stones. (3) Carpenters' 
Tools. 

BEER, IS AT AH. (Exhibited in Mineral 

Section.) 

BOOTH & SON, Toronto, Ontario. 
— (1) Copper and Brass Goods. (2) Bath 
Tubs. 



iUMPHRE Yg IRON BUILDINGS, 

The whole of the Iron Buildluija erected for the Fisheries, Health, Inventions, 
nd Colonial and Indian Exhibition by J. C. HUMPHREYS (Works, Albert 
fate, Kensington Road), are POlt SALE. For sizes see Page 252 in Catalogue. 
OiBoe at Principal Entrance, South Promenade. Manager alwayi In attendance. 
N.B.— Several Iron Churches, Chapels, Schools, and Public Buildings, now 
a. Bhow, FOR SALE, at the Works (a few minutes' walk, Kensington Road). 



i20 



Cttncida. 



BOYD & CO., Huntingdon, Quebec. 

— Sashos, Doors, Mouldings, and House Finish- 
inge. 

BROWN, P. J., & P. E. MUNN, 30 
St. Helen Street, Montreal, Quebec- 
Glass Signs, ornamental and decorative. 

BB,YANT, G., Sherbrooke, Quebec- 
Sashes, Doors, and Blinds. 

BULMER & SHEPPARD. (Exhibited 
in Mineral Section.) 

BURN & ROBINSON MANUPAC- 
TTJRINO- CO., Hamilton, Ontario. 

— (1) Pressed and S' .mped Ware. (2) Ja- 
panned and Brass Wire Bird Cages. (3) 
Tabular Lanterns. (4) Iron and Brass Wire. 
(5) Tin Plates, (6) Tinned Sheet Iron. (7) 
Sheet Zinc and Brass. 

BURNS, JOHN, Montreal, Quebec— 
(1) Wrought Iron Range. (2) Small '''"nrlly 
Boiler. (3) CopiK>r Tank. 

BUTTERPIELD & CO., Rock Island, 
Stanstead, Quebec— Stocks, Dies, and Taps. 

CAMPBEIiIi, ■WTLIilAM, St. John, 
New Brunswick. — Axe.?, Chisels, Steels, 
Hatchets, Gouged Springs, &c. 



COLE, li. H., & CO., 214 St. Jamea 
Street, Montreal, Quebec— The J. H 

Wood Weather Stripping and Door Sills, for the 
pvcvention of cold draughts, &c., fitted on a 
sample door. 

COOPER, PAIRMAN, & CO., 42 
Poundling Street, Montreal, Quebec— 
(1) Patent Stove Pipe Elbows. (2) Wire Rope 

COPP BROS., Hamilton, Wentworth 
Ontario.— Stoves : (1) Base or Cylinder Bur 
ners (Coal). (2) Cooking Stoves. (3) Ranges 
for coal and wood. (4) Hotel Cooking Stove 
(5) Cooking Stoves for wood. (6) Purloin 
Stove for wood. (7) Box Stove for wood. (8 
Parlour Conhiug Stove for wood and coal. (9 
Copper Reservoir. (10) Six Pols. (11) Three 
Spiders. 

COURLAND, JOSEPH M., & SON, 
Toronto, Ontario. — Coloured and Stained 
Glass. < .ii ' 

DAWSON, EDWARD C, New Glas- 
gow, Nova Scotia.— Tent Pegs. 



CANADA HORSE NAIL CO. (W. 
W. MOONEY & CO.). 

CARREAU, A., 2089 Notre Dame 
Street West, Montreal, Quebec— Patent 
Foot-wurmer and Patent Smoothing Irons, 
Patent Fuel. 

CASTLE & SON, MontreaL— Stained 
Glass Lights. 

CHANTELOUP, E., 387 to 598 Craig 
Street, Montreal, Quebec — Brass and Iron 
Work. 

CIMON, SIMON X„ M.P., Murray 
Bay, Charlevoix, Quebec. — Wood Pulp 
and Wood Pulp Board, for panelling partitions 
and lining under carpets, &c. 

CLARKE, DARLING, & CO., 6 
Turner Avenue, Toronto, Ontario.— 
Automatic Window Bulance. (&e Class 14.) 

CLUTHE, CHARLES, Toronto, On- 
tario. — (1) Ventilator and Chandelier (ex- 
hibited in Class 14). (2) System of Venti- 
lating Houses, Schools, Theatres, &o. 

COQSWELL, E., & CO., Sackville, 
New Brunswick,— (1) Stoves. (2) Charter 
Oak Ranges. 



DOMINION BARB WIRE CO., 42 
Poundling Street, Montreal, Quebec- 
Wire, bright and galvanised. 

DOMINION BRIDGE CO., Limited, 
Room 2, Windsor Hotel, Montreal, 
Quebec — (1) Photographs and Plans o 
Bridge Works and Bridges in Iron and Steel 
(2) Samples of Tests, Forgiugs, and Shapes ii 
Iron and Steel. 



PLETCHER, JOHN, Toronto, On 
tario. — Refrigerators. 

PORSYTH, W., Peterborough, On 
tario.— Hand Pump lor Well. 

POSTER, S. R., & SON, St. John, 
New Brunswick.— Nails and Tocks. 

POWLER, G. C. (Eshibited in Mincrd 
Section.) 

POWLER, JOSIAH. 

PROTHINGHAM & WORKMAN 
Montreal, Quebec— Shovels. 

GALE, GEORGE. & SONS, Water 
ville, Compton, Quebec— (1) Patent Brew 
Moat, and Vegetable Slicers. (2) Spring Bedi 

GARTH & CO., Montreal, Quebeo.- 
(1) Engineers', Steam Fitters', and PlumbeK 
Brass work. (2) Hot- water Furnace, and Ai 
paratv.a for warming. 

GIBSON, ALEXANDER,Mai7Svill( 
New Brunswick.— (1) Cotton Cloth. (« 
Butting. (8) Shingle.'.. (4) Laths, Boards, on 
Deals. (6) Brick. (6) Brick Clay. 



Oanada, 



121 



aiQNAC, O., & SON, 120 Prince Ed- 
irard Street, Quebec. — Mouldings. 

aiLMAN, P. a., Craig & 3et, Mon- 
real, Quebec. — Patent Safety Jampora, for 
revciiting slovc pipes and flues >^king Hre. 

aiLMOKE, GAWEN, Cote St. Paul, 
[ontreal, Quebec. — Augers, Bits, Boring 
'cols. 

GOHIEB & DAQENAia " 

QOLDIE & McCUIiLvOCH, Gait, On- 
ario. — Safes. 

QOOLD, EDWARD L., & CO., Brant- 
brd, Ontario. — Family llefrigeraiors. 



GRAY, SAMUEL. 

GREENING, B., & CO., Hamilton, 
)ntario.— (1) rerforutcd Slieet Metals. (2) 
Wire Rope, Wire Cloth, "Wiro Work. (3) 
tfoulders' Supplies. (4) Boiler-tubo Cleaners, 
iiid Wire Fence and other Staples. 

HALIFAX MANUFACTURING 
30., Halifax, Nova Scotia.— (1) Feuerty's 
h*ient Socket Shovels, Military Shovels, En- 
trenching Tools. (2) Fenerty's Patent Socket 
Interchangeable Pans and Handles. (3) Hun- 
iles of Canadian Aah. 

HAMILTON IRON FORGING CO., 

Hamilton, Ontario.— Iron. 

HARRIS, ALLAN, & CO., St. John, 
New Brunswick. — Brownley'a Impjoved 

Patent Roller Brushes and Sheaves. 

HART EMERY WHEEL CO., Hamil- 
ton, Ontario.— (1) Emery Wheels. (2) 
Piiper Wheels. (3) Saw Sharpener. (4) Emery 
Wheel Stands. 

HAWES & CO., St. John, New Bruns- 
wick.— Doors, Sash Frames, Blinds and Shut- 
ters, Balusters, Newel Posts, &c. 

HAWRAHAN, P. L., Ottawa, On- 
tario.— Refrigerator. 

HEAP'S PATENT DRY EARTH 
OR ASHES CLOSET CO., Limited, 
Toronto.— (1) Automatic Dry Earth Closet, 
iittcd with Wiro Separator. (2) Automatic 
BustlesB Cinder Sifter. 

HENDERSON, D., M.D., 64 Princess 
Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba.— Automatic 
Cut-oif Gas Burner. 

HEWSON, PRANK, Montreal, 

Quebec. — Art Signs in Glass ard Wood. 



HOUGHTON, W. V., Toronto, On- 
tario.— A Scarf Shield. 

HUMBER,M. (Exliibited in tho Mineral 
Court.) 

HURD & ROBERTS, Hamilton, On- 
tario. (Exhibited in Mineral Section.) 

IRWIN HOPPER, & CO., Montreal, 
Quebec (London Office, 110 Cannon 
Street, E.C.). — Roofing Paper. 

IVES, H. R., & CO., Montreal, Que- 
bec. — (1) Patent Smoothing Irons, with ad- 
justable handles. (2) Curd of Barb Wiro 
Fencing. (3) Egg Beaters. (4) Stoves, Stools, 
&c. 

JAMES SMART MANUFACTUR- 
ING CO., Brockville, Ontario. — (1) 
Hardware and Stoves. (2) Brass and Silver- 
plated Goods. 

JOHNSON, walb::br, & plett. 

Queen City Planing Mills, Victoria, 
British Columbia. — Doors and other Mauu- 
fa(!tured Wood woi k. 

- :, . .. ... r. 

KENNED'2 BROa - 

KBRR & KEYS, 61? Lagauchetiere 
Street, Montreal, Quebec— Patent Low- 
water Alarm, lor boilers. 

KELLER, W. N., Toronto, Ontario.— 

Neeillo Threader. 

KINNEY, ISTiAEL, Windsor, On- 
tario. — Sheet-metal Fabric. 

LAIDLAW MANUFACTURING 
CO., Hamilton, Wentworth, Ontario. — 

(1) Solf-ftcding Stoves. (2) Cooking Ranges. 

LEMANG, RICHARD. (Exhibited in 

Mineral Section.) 

LEWIS, P., 12 Conroy Street, Que- 
bec. — An Adjustable Tent Pole and Ventilator. 

LYON, N. T., & CO., 77 Richmond 
Street West, Toronto, Ontario. — (1) 

Loaded Lights, with figures, in Stained and 
White Glass. (2) L«a(^ed Stained and Cut 
Glass. 

McARTHUR, ALEXANDER, & 
CO., 383 St. Paul Street, Montreal, 
Quebec— Tarred Felt, Carpet Felt, Building 
Paper, Sheeting Felt, &o. 

McAVITY, T., & SONS., St. John, 
New Brunswick.— (1) Brass, Nickcl-olated, 
Steel, and Iron Goods. (2) Tackle Bloclt i^^t- 
tings. (3) Pumps. 

McCLARY MLANUPACTURING 
CO., London, Ontario. — (1) Stoves. (2) 
Tin, Copper, and Sheet-iron Goods. (3) Stamped 
Pieced, and Japanned Tin-Waro. (4) Stove 
Boards. (6) Refrigerator, Ac. 



122 



Canada. 



MATTHEWS, Iff., Toronto, Ontario. 
Mineral Oil Lamps. 

MrLljTR, EBASTUS. (Exhibited in 
Mineral Section.) 

MILNER, COUTTS, & CO., St. 
George, Charlotte County, New Bruns- 
wick.— Polished Granite Pedestal. (Exhibited 
in Mineral Section.) 

MITCHELL, ROBERT, & CO., Mon- 
treal, Quebec. — Valves, Cocks, &c. 

MOORER, E. K., & CO., St. John, 
New Brunswick. — Cut Nails and Spikes. 

MORIN, L. P. 

MUIRHEAD & MANN, Victoria, 
British Coliunbia. — Manufactured Wood- 
work. 

MURPHY, JOHN, Montreal, Que- 
bec. 

NIGHTINGALE, THOMAS. (Ex- 
hibited in Mineral Section.) 

OLMSTED BROS., Hamilton, On- 
tario. — (1) CJounter Scales, Platform Scales. 
(2) Vases. (3) Pedestals. (4) Settees. 

0NTAR70 PUMP CO., Toronto, 
Ontario. — Pumps. 

ONTARIO ROLLING MILLS CO., 

Hamilton, Ontario. — Cut Nails, Wrought 
Nails. 

OTTERVILLE MANUFAC- 
TURING CO., Otterville, Ontario.— 
(1) Carpnt Sweepers. (2) Folding Camp-Chair. 
(8) Combiiibd Cliair and Cane. (4) Samples 
of Dowel Rod Fence-Making Tools (Post-hole 
Diggers, Wire Strainers), (b) Hand Corn Plan- 
ter. (6) Brewers' Bung-Brushes for Beer Kegs. 
(7) Wrench-drive Well Points. 

PAQUET & GKJDBOUT. 

PAYZANT, TRUMAJJ", Lookeport, 
Nova Scotia. — Oil Extractor. 

PETERBOROUGH LOCK MAKTJ- 
FACTURINQ CO. 

PHILLIPS, T., & CO., Orillia, Sim- 
coe, Ontario.---(l) One Set Tin Stove Fur- 
niture. (2) Tabular Lantern, with T. Phillips' 
Patent Impwved Wing attached. 

PILLOW, HERSEY, & CO. 

PIPER, E. O., Toronto, Ontario.— 
(1) Bailway Lamps, Ship Lamps, Stroot Lamps. 
(S) Lawn and Statirn Seats. 

PONTBRIAKD BROa, Sorel, Que- 
beo. — SawB. 



POWER, W. E., Sn CO. 

PROWSE, GEORGE R., Montrea 
Quebec. — Wrought-iron Cooking Ranges. 

RAMSAY, A, & CO., 16 Inspeeto 
Street, Montreal, Quebec— (1) Erabosse 
Glass. (2) Glass etched by Acid, and sliowin 
various designs for Ornamental and Advei 
tising Pur|X)6e9. Intended to be seen b 
transmitted light. 

REED, G. W., Post Office Box 168( 
Montreal, Quebec— Refrigerators. 

ROBB, A, & SONS, Amherst, Novi 
Scotia. — (1) Parlour or Hall Stove, surface 
burning base heater. (2) Portable Cookinf 
Range, for soft coal. (3) Parlour " Franklin ' 
Open Grate. (4) Parlour Stove, close front 
(5) Heating Furnace, for soft coal. 

ROBINSON, G. M., Kingston.— Pa 
tent Tuyau Iron (cast >nd wrought iron) for 
Smith's Forge. 

ST. JOHN BOLT & NUT CO., St. 
John, New Brunswick. — Bolts, Long 
Screws, Rivets, Washers, Nuts. 

SHEARER, JAMES. 

SHIRLEY & DIETRICH, Gait, 
Waterloo, Ontario. — Saws. 

SKINNER & CO., Gananoque, On- 

tario. — (1) Nickel, Brass, and Silver-platec 
Iron Frames and Hooka. (2) Wood Frumts 
(3) Scythe Sheaths. 

SMITH & CLARKE, Victoria, Bri- 
tish Columbia. — Mouldings and other 
Manufactured Wood. 

SMITH, T. B., Truro, Nova Scotia.- 

Hono Stones for sharpening edge tools. 

STARR MANUFACTURING CO., 
Halifax, Nova Scotia.— (1) Skates. (2) 
Shovels and Spades, steel and iron, handles of 
ash. (3) Nails, Spikes, Nuts, Wasliers. 

STEWART, JAMES, & CO., Hanul- 
ton, Wentworth, Ontario. — Stoves. 

SYDNEY & LOUI8BURG COAL 
& RAILWAY CO., Sydney, Cape 
Breton. — Coke. 

TALLMAN, W., & SON, Beams- 
ville, Lincoln, Ontario. — (1) Builder's 
Brick. (2) Drain Tiles. (3) Specimen of 
the Clay used. 

TAYLOR, J. & J., Toronto, Ontario. 
— Fire and Burglar-proof Safes. 

TAYLOR, W., Carleton Place, On- 
tario.— <1) Oil Cabinet, made from Canadian 
hardwoods, with brass pumps. (2) Set of 
Liquid Measures of polished copper, with brass 
bands. 



Canada. 



123 



TODD, J. O., Waterloo, Quebec- 
Jmoothing Irons and Tailor'^ Gooae. 

TOBONTO IiEAD & COLOUR CO., 

Toronto, Ontario.— (1) Paints in prepared 
brraa. (2) White Leads. (3) Verniilion 
md Red Lead ground in Oil. (4) Vermilion 
Iry. 

TOKRAiTCB, J. FRASER, B.Sc, 16 
(t. John Street, Montreal, Quebec. — 

1) Patent Boiler Covering. (2) Fire Bricks. 
8) Stove Linings. (4) Pipe Coverings, &c. 
5) Polishing Powder. (6) Patent " Infusorial " 
"ruit Case. 

TOWITSHENT), J. E., 334 St. James 
Street, Montreal, Quebec— Bootjack. 

XrSlON PUMP CO., Portland, New 
Brunswick.— Covey & Grant's Patent Chain 
'ump. 

WARNOOK & CO., aalt, Ontario.— 
Implements, Tools, and Edge Tools. 

WARREK, HENRY H., Cote St. 
?aul, Montreal, Quebec. — Hammers, 

hedges, Edj;e Tools. '\^> .. . :..• >i 

WHELI'LEY, J. A., & CO., St. JohP, 
ffew Brujiswick. — (1) Ice Skates. (2) 
idler Skatfs. 

WILLIAMS, J. M., & CO., Hamil- 
;on, Ontario. — (1) Sheet Metal, Tin, &c. 

2) Stoves aud Banges. 

WILSON BROS., Merritton, Lin- 
loln, Ontario.— Hammers, Hatchets, Small 

Ixes. M .•; 

WILSON, R. T., Dundas, Ontario.— 

1) Axes. (2) Tools. 

WINDSOR FOUNDRY CO., Wind- 
er, Nova Scotia.— (I) Cooking Banges and 
loves. (2) Heating Stoves. . ^,, ,, , 

WINTERMATE & HILL, Tilbury 
/entre, Essex, Ontario.— Fork, Rake, Axe, 
ledge, Pick, Hammer, and Chikicl Handles. 

WITHROW & HILLOCK, Toronto, 
)ntario.—(l) "Queen's" Refrigerator. (2) 
lilk Refrigerator. (3) Family Refrigerator. 
1) Cooling Room. 



Class 7. 
Woven and Textile Fabrics, and Accestorie». 

BELDINO, PAUL, & CO., Montreal, 

Quebec— Sewing Silks, Ribbons, &c. 

BLACKBURN, T., & CO., 242 St. 
James Street, Montreal, Quebec— Puteiit 

Waterproof Covering for Textile Fabrics. 

BOSDET, MRS. PETER, Ariohat, 

Richmond, Nova Scotia Woollen Rug 

Mat. 

CANADA COTTON MANUFAC- 
TURING CO., Cornwall, Ontario.— 

Cotton Manufactures. 

CANADA JUTE CO. (THE), Limi- 
ted, Montreal, Quebec— Jute anl Cotton 

CANADA THREAD CO. 

CHARLOTTETOWN WOOLLEN 
CO., Charlottetown, Prince Edward 
Island.— Tweeds, Domestic Wools. 

COATICOOK KNITTING CO., 
Coaticook, Quebec— Knitted Goods. (Ex- 
hibited with D. Morrice, Sons, & Co. 

COBOURG WOOLLEN CO., Co- 

bourg, Ontario.— Canadian Tweeds. 

CORRIVEAU SILK MILLS, Mon- 
treal, Quebec— Silks, Satins, Ribbons, &c. 

DUNDAS COTTON MILLS CO., 
Dimdas, Ontario.— Cotton Goods. 

EDGECUMBE, F. B., Fredericton, 
New Brunswick.— Homespun All-wool and 
Union Cloth Socks and Mitts. 

EGMOND (VAN), A. G., & SONS, 

Seaforth, Blyth, and Exeter Woollen 
Mills, Seaforth, Ontario. — (1) Fancy 
Check Wool Flannels, Fancy Check Union 
Flannels, Spotted Halifax Tweeds. (2) Woollen 
Tweeds. 

ELLIOTT & CO., Almonte, Ontario. 

— Canadian Tweeda. 

GAULT BROS. & CO., Montreal, 
Quebec — Tweeds, Cottons, and Flannels. 



SADDLERY SPECIALITIES FOR LADIES AND GENTLEMEN. 

LEVEL SEAT SIDE SADDLES. 
NARROW GRIP HUNTING SADDLES. 

Patent Safety Appliances for both. 

CIRCULARS AND PRICED LISTS ON APPLICATION. 

'. V. NICHOLLS & CO., 2, JERMYN STREET, LONDON, S.W. 



124 



Cknada. 



QRAND RIVER KNITTrNGMILLB 
CO., Paris, Brant, Ontario. — Smyrna 
Ruga and Knitted Gooda. 

HARRISON, JEREMIAH, & CO., St. 
John, New Brunswick.— Spcola for Scwiiig 
Cotton. 

HOCHBLAQA COTTON CO., Mon- 
treal, Quebec— Cotton, Bkiichcd and Un- 
bleached. 

KENGSTON COTTON MANU- 
PACTURINQ CO., Limited, Kingston, 

Ontario. — Grey Cotton Cloths. 

IiOMAS, A., & SONSj Slierbrooke, 
Quebec. — Flannela. ->q ^.-juij. i>i^iji..j'. 

MAQOa TEXTILE & PRINT CO., 
Montreal, Quebec— Printed Cotton Gooda. 

MERCHANT MANUPACTXTRINa 
CO., Montreal, Quebec. — Cottona, Bleached 
and Unbleached. 

MILLS & HUTCHISON, Montreal, 
Quebec— Canadian Tweeds. 

MONCTON COTTON MANUFAC- 
TURING CO., Moncton, New Bruns- 
wick. —Cottona. 

MONTREAL COTTON CO., Mon- 

treal, QuebeC"(l) Sutteens, Linings, Beetled 
Twilla. (2) Variety of Dyed Cotton Spools. 

MONTREAL FRINGE & TASSEL 
WORKS, Montreal, Quebec. — Silk 
Fringes, Tasaela, Corda, Furniture Trimmings, 
&c. 

MORRICE, D., SONS, & CO., Mon- 
treal, Quebec — Cotton Gooda, Flannels, 
Tweeds, Knitted Goods, &c. 

NOVA SCOTTA COTTON MANU- 
FACTURING CO. (W. STEVENSON, 
Manager), Halifax, Nova Scotia.— (1) 
Grey Cotton Sliiitiny and Shotting. (2) Grey 
and Coloured Warpa, single and double. 

ONTARIO COTTON MILLS CO., 

Hamilton, "Wentworth, Ontario. — "White 
and Dyed Ducks, Awuinga, Woven Ducks, 
Cottonades, Shirting, and Cotton Sail Ducks. 

PATON MANUFACTURING CO., 
Sherbrooke, Quebec — (1) Tweeds, Travel- 
ling Bugs and Piaida. (2) Military Goods. 

PENMAN MANUFACTURING CO., 
Paris, Ontario.— Knitted Goods. 

PERKS, WM., & BON, Limited, St. 
John, New Brunswick. — (1) Fancy 
Checked ard Striped Shirtings. (2) Cotton- 
ades. (3) Ball Knitting Cotton. (4) Cotton 
Yam, Cotton Warp, Two-ply Warp Yarn. (5) 
Hosiery Yarn. 



ROSAMOND WOOLLEN CO., Al 
monte, Ontario. — (1) Woollen Cloths 
Tweetls, Worsteil Coatings, and Suitings 
(2) Canadian Tweeds and Cloths. 

ROSS, R. W., Guelph, Wellington 
Ontario. — Manufactured Textile Gooda. 

ST. HYACINTHE MANUFACTUR 
ING CO., St. Hyacinthe, Quebec- 
Woollen Flannels. 

SLING8BY, WM., & SONS, Brant 
ford. Brant, Ontario. — Blankets made frou 
Canadian Wool. 

STORMONT COTTON CO., Corn 
wall, Ontario. — Coloiu-ed Check Cultona, 
Ginghams, Cottonades, &c. 

THOBARN, WM., Ontario. — Grej 
Flannels. 

WANZER, R. M., & CO., HamUton, 
Wentworth, Ontario. — Specimens of Work 
by Sewing Machines. , 

YARMOUTH DUCK & YARN CO., 
Limited, Yarmouth, Nova Scotia.— (1) 
Cotton Sail Duck. (2) Sail Twine. 

YARMOUTH WOOLLEN MILL 
CO., Yarmouth, Nova Scotisu— Clotlis 
manufactured fiom Nova Scotia Wool. 



..it: .V;-^A 



Class 8. 



Carriages, Carts, and Waggons. Harnest am 
Saddlery, SaddUrs^ Ironmongery. 

ADAMS & SON, Paris, Brant, On 
tario. — (1) Farm WaL'gon. (2) Teau 
Waggon. 

ARMSTRONG (J. B.) MANUPAC 
TURING CO., Guelph, Wellington, 
Ontario. — (1) Specialitits in Hardware fu 
Buggies, Carriages, and Sleighs. (2) Caitiaga 
Springs, Sheet Steel Seats, &c. ■ * v • 

BAIN WAGGON CO., Woodstock 
Ont.ario. — Farm Waggons. 

BLACKWELL, K. W., Comer o 
Canal and Cond6 Streets, Montreal 
Quebec — Car Springs of various kinds, aiw 
Steel Castings. 

BOURNE, WM. B., New Amai 
Prince County, Prince Edward Islanc 
— One Single Covered Phaeton. 

BOYD, JOHN, Baltimore, Ontari( 
— Single Carriage, with top side bars an 
elliptic springs. 

BROWN BROS., Danville, Quebao. 
(1) Farm Waggon. (2) Democrat Waggon. 



Canacla. 



125 



BROWU", J. W., & CO., Kingston, 
)ntario. — (1) Landau Carriage. (2) Exten- 
ion Top Carriage. (3) Cnadian Buggy. (4) 
'jinadian Phaeton. (5) Trotting Sulky. (6) 
'wo Canadian Cutters. 

CANADA HOB8E NAU. CO. (W. 
L Mooney & Co.). 

CANADIAN PACIFIC RATLWAY 
JO., Montreal, Quebec— (1) Manitoba 
farmer's Waggon. (2) Native Red Biver 
jart. 

CHOQUETTB, H., & BRO., St. 
lyacinthe, Quebec. -Carriages and Sleighs. 

CHOQUETTB, J., St Hyacinthe, 
(Quebec. — Express and Buggie Haruci^. 

CLARKE, F. Ij., 114 Queen Street, 
Montreal, Quebec— Sicigh Bells and Gonga. 

CROTHERS, HENDERSON, & 
WILSON, St John, New Brunswiok. — 
1) Pliact'jn Top Buggy. (2) Covered Waggon. 

CRUIKSHANK, JAMES, & SONS, 
Weston, York, Ontario. — Farmer's Wng- 
gou, with detachable springs. - ,„• ,•. ((.i m 

DE WOLFE, JOHN M., North-West 
Common, Halifax, Nova Scotia.— (1) 
Light Carriages. (2) Spokes and Hubs. 



DOMINION 
CO., Montreal, 

and Stiffeners. 



LEATHER- BOARD 
Quebec. — Leather-board 



DUITDAS HORSE SHOE & DROP 
FORGINa CO., Dundas, Ontario.— (1) 

Horse Shoes. (2) Carriage Irons. 

ELLIS, WM., London, Ontario.— New 
Patent Curry Comb. 

FISHER & BLOniN, Fabrique 
Street, Quebec — Harness and Saddlery. 

FOWLER, JOSIAH, St. John, New 
Brunswick. — Carriage Springs and Axles. 

QANANOQUE CARRIAGE CO., 
Gananoque, Ontario. — (1) Two Top 
Buggies. (2) Top Phaeton. (3) Two-whoel 
Top Cart. 

HAMILL, W. J., St. Catherine's, 
Ontario. — (1) Gentleman's Road Waggon. 
(2) Skeleton or Track Wa^^jjon. (3) Trotting 
Hulky. (4) G«ntlcman'd HpecA or Trotting 
Hleigh. 

HAMILTON WHIP CO.— Hamilton, 
Ontario. — Whips — general assortment. 

HARRIS, J., & CO., St. John, New 
Brunswick.- A pair of Washburn "Peerless" 
Steel-tyred Car Wheels, titted on Axle. 



HAY, JAMES, & CO., Woodstock, 
Ontario.— (1) Chairs. (2) Rattan Chairs. 
(3) Children 8 Carriage. 

HORTON BROS., Charlottetown, 
Prince Edward Island.- One Phaeton or 
Top Buggy. 

HUDSON'S BAY CO., Winnipeg, 
Manitoba (Agent at the Exhibition, 
T. H. INCE, 156 Oxford Street, Lon- 
don, W.). — Dog Sledge and Harness com- 
plete. (Shown -with the Collective Exhibit of 
the Company.) 

HUTCHINGS, E. F., Winnipeg, 
Manitoba.— (1) Manitoba Ox-rart Harness. 
(2) Train of Manitoba Husky Dog Harness. 
(8) Cowboy Outflt. 

KELLY & MURPHY, Portland, New 
Brunswick.— (1) Double Sleigh. (2) Top 
Buggy. (3) Extension Top Carriage. 



KILDUFF, PETER, 
tario. — Horse Shoes. 



Ottawa, On- 



LACROIX, HENRY, St. Paul Street, 
Montreal, Quebec— (1) Two Buggy Gearf. 
(2) Sicigh. (3) Top Cart. (4) Buggy. 

LAWRENCE, JAMES, & SONS, 
Bradford, Ontario.— (1) Buggy. (2) Car- 
riage Trimming Work. (3) Horso Shoes. 

LEDOUX, B., 131 St. Antoine Street, 
Montreal, Quebec— (1) Close Brougham. 
(2) Four-stated Sicigh. 

LINTON, LAKE, & CO., Gait, On- 
tario. — Carriage Axles, Machine Set, and Cap 

Screws. 

McCONNEL, JOHN, Guelph, On- 
tario. — Top Pliae ton Buggy. 

McKINNON, D. W., North Sydney, 
Cape Breton. — Section of Waggon B(jdy, 
showing Exhibitor's Patent End Gate Fasten- 
ing. 

Mcknight, p. W., 33 St. Stanislas 

Street, Quebec— (1) Covered Buggy. (2) 
Two-seated Waggon. (3) One Sleigh. 

McLaren, j. r., junior, ea 

College Street, Montreal, Quebec— fl) 
Children's Sleighs, AVaggona, and Carts. (2) 
"Star" Toboggans. 

MILLER, EBEN, & CO., Fredericton, 
New Brunswick, — Canopy-top Phaetons 
patent shifting top. 




Spoke and Fetlock Joiut. 



Patent 



120 



Canada. 



MONTBEAIi CARBIAGE 
LEATHER CO. (J. Alex. Stevenson), 
20 Lemoine Street, Montreal Quebec. — 
Samples of Oarringo Jjcather, viz., Dash, 
Wiuker, Top, and Collar Leather. 

MORGAN BROS., Hamilton, Ontario. 
—Whips. 

NORTON BROS., Queen Street, 
Charlottetown, Prince Edwax*d Island 
(Agents in London, Messrs. T. HUB- 
BOCK & BON, 24 Lime Street, E.C.) 

Gontleraaii's Driving 13uggy. 

PENDER, JAMES, St. John, New 
Brunswick. — Horse-shoe Nails. 

PENMAN MANUPACTURLNQ 
CO., Paris, Ontario. — Patent Horse Rugs. 

PILLOW, KERSEY, & CO. - 

PRICE & SHAW, Portland, New 
Brunswick.— (I) Single Sleigh, (2) Side- 
bar Extension-top Carriage. 

QUESNEL, THOMAS, Montreal, 
Quebec— (1) T Double Cart. (2) Village 
Sleigh. (3) Pony Sleigh. 

ROBINSON, Q. W., Princess Street, 
Kingston, Ontario. — (1) Ladies' Phaeton. 
(2) Doctor's Covered Cart. (3) Covered Buggv. 
(4) Pony Cart. (5) Shifting-sejit Sleigh. (6) 
Pony Sleigh. (7) CiiUd's Sleigh. (8) Pair of 
Patent Shaft Couplings. (9) Spring Sent. (10) 
Skeleton Top. (11) Stick Seat. (12) Two- 
seated Covered Pliaetou. (13) (Janopy-top 
Phaeton. (14) |Canopv-top Ponj Phaeton. 
(15) Covered Buggy. (16) Trotting Sleigh. 
(17) Trotting Sulky. (18) Democrat Waggon. 
(19) Surrey Buggy, open. 
• 

RXJDD, WILLIAM, & CO., Dresden 
Ontario. — Road Cart. 

ST. THOMAS CAR WHEEL CO. 

TISDALE (P. G.) CO., Brantford, 
Ontario. — Iron Feed Boxes. 

VICTORIA WHEEL CO., Gait, 
Waterloo, Ontario. — Carriage IVIatcriul of 
Hubs, Spokes, Neck Yokes, and Bent Stuff. 

WARNOCK & CO., Gait, Ontario.— 

Patent Carriage Spiings, with Steel Axles. 

WOODBURN SARVEN WHEEL 
CO. (THE), St. Catherine's, Ontario.— 
(1) <"!arriage, Waggon, and other Wheels. (2) 
Wheel Material. 

YOUNG, K C, Bridgetown, Nova 
Scotia. — Horseshoes. 



Class 9. 

Leather and SJciiu. Leather Work and 
Needlework. Lace Work. 

BELMONT TANNING AND BOOl 
AND SHOE MAN JPACTURING CO., 
Victoria, British Columbia. — (1) Lealiiei 
from Cattlo raised in British Columbia: One 
WIujIo Hide, Half a Hide. (2) Sample a 
Hemlock Bark. 

BREITHAUPT, LOUIS, & CO., 

Berlin, Waterloo, Ontario. — (1) Sole 
Harness, and Upper Leather. (2) Kip and 
Calf Skins. 

CANADIAN RUBBER CO., Mon- 
treal, Quebec— Rubber Goods— Shoes, Hose, 
Bolting, iVc 

CLARKE, A. R., & CO., Toronto, 

Ontario. — Morocco, Goat, Calf, and Sheepskin 
Leathers. 

CLOUTIEB., Z A.CHARIE, Bt 
Jacques, Montcalm, Quebec. — Two 
Sashes, hand-made. 

COTE (LOUIS) & BROTHER, Gt 
Hyacinthe, Quebec — Machine for Mctisur- 
ing Leather and Skins. 

DRUMMONDVILLE TANNERY 
(Shaw Brothers & Cassils), Montreal, 
Quebec. — Salted Texas Leather. 

DUCLOS & PAYAN, St. Hyacinthe, 
Quebec. — Buff Splits and Stilfenings. 

GALIBERT BROTHERS, 22 St 
Catherine Street, Montreal, Quebec- 
Kid and Morocco Leather. 

GOURDBAU, FELIX, St. Roch Que- 
bec, Quebec— Leather. 

GUAX, DESIR:^, St. Roch Quebec, 
Quebec. — Leather. ■. ■ . i.'>.<v 

HARRIS, HEENAN, & CO., 124 
Queen Street, Montreal, Quebec. 

Leather Belting. 

HEATHOW, W., Victoria, Britiah 
Columbia. — Leather. 

JOHNSON & McGILL, Victoria, 
British Columbia.— (1) Side of HarneM 
Leather, Native Hide. (2) Side of Sole 
Leather. 

LAND8BERG & BARNEY, Pre- 
lighsburg, Missisquoi, Quebec. — Hole 
Leather. 

MONTREAL CARRIAGE 
LEATHER CO. (J. Alex. Stevenson), 
20 Lemoine Street, Hochelaga, Mon- 
treal, Quebec — Patent and Enamelled 
Leather. 



Canada. 



127 



MOONXnr, a. a., & CO., Montreal, 

uebeo. — Goat, Calf, and Sheop Skins. 

PION, A., & CO., 252 Prince Ed^ 
rard Street, Quebec— Prepared C«lf and 

teep Hkins. 

POLIQUIN, J. H. D., St Koch de 
uebeo, Quebec. — Leather. 

RALSTON, PETER, & SONS, Mon- 
eal, Quebec— Buff Leatlier. 

RICHARD Sn CO., St. Rocb, Quebec. 

■Shoe Htiffenings in leather board and leather. 

ROBIN & SADIiER, Montreal, Que- 
BC— Leather Belting. 

ROCHETTE, C, Quebec, Quebec— 

atent Boot and 8ho8 StiffenerH in preasod 
ather. 

ROCHETTE, GASPARD, St. Roch 
e Quebec, Qviobec— Patent Leather. 

ROCHETTE, O., St Booh de Que- 

ec, Quebec— Leather. 

SEIDLEB, P., Visitation f Street, 
lontreal, Quebec— Leatlier— Kid and Cor- 
ovan. 

WINDSOR TANNINa CO., Wind- 
or. Nova Scotia.— Sole Leather. 

BENNETT, C. L., Department of 
'inance, Ottawa, Ontario. — Leather 

i'ork. 

DUCLOS, MRS. SILAS, St Hya- 

inthe, Quebec— Table Cover in Crozy- 
ork. 

EVELEIQH, J., & CO., Notre Dame 
treet, Montreal, Quebec— Trunk.^, Bnge, 
id Leather Goods. 

FRANCIS, PRANK (an Indian 
Ihief), Andover, New Brunswick.— 
ulinn Fancy Work. 

GAUTIER, CALIXTE, St Hya- 
inthe, Quebec (Contributor through 
le 3t. Hyacinthe Agricultural Society). 

-Counterpane. 

HARLOW, J. C, Shelburrie, Nova 

cotia.— (1) Trunk, " Lausdowne Saratoga." 
5) Tmnk, "Princess Saratoga." 



HOAR, MR& ISAAC, Post Office 
Box No. 3, Truro, Nova Scotia.— (1) 
Fancy Network. (2) Woollen Mat. 

MACDONALD, MISS, Halifax, Nova 
Scotia. — Crazy-work Table Cover, '"ado of 
900 pieces of ailk. 

McKAY, M. B., Pictou, Nova Scotia. 
— Needlework in Wool. 

MASON, LAVINIA, Ingram Arm, 
Halifax, Nova Scotia.— (1) Crochet Quilt. 
(2) Crochet Tidy. 

NAMOiaHKINQ, I. R. (Indian 
Chief), Fawn, Ontario.— Indian Fancy 
Articles. , ■■ '>■] -y^ . ,, . 

PAYAN, MRa P. P., St Hyacinthe, 
Quebec— Crazy Quilt and Sofa Pillow. 

PION, NAPOLEON, St Hyacinthe, 
Quebec (Exhibitor through the St. Hya- 
cinthe Agricultural Society). — Counter- 
pane. 

POTTER, AMELIA JANE, Post 
Office Box 4471, Halifax, Nova Scotia 

Patchwork Quilt. 

ROSS, MRS. JOHN A., New Glas- 
gow. Nova Scotia.— (1) Point Lace. (2) 
Switch of Hair. 

WADE, MISS B., Belleisle, Annapo- 
lis, Nova Scotia.— Embroidery , on Black 
Satin. 

WETMORE, MARY R., St (Jeorge, 

New Brunswick.— (1) Screen in Btilin 
Work. (2) Handkerchief, Brooch, and Lace, 
&c. — all hand work. 



Class 10. 

Turnery. Basket, Brndi, and Wooden Ware. 
Fancy Articles. Toys. 

AARONSON, ANDREW A., Post 
Office, Victoria, British Columbia In- 
dian Curiosities. 

ASSANEE, NOAH (an Indian 
Chief), Penetanguishene, Simcoe, On- 
tario. — Indian Manufactures. 

BALDWIN, P., Quebec. — Match 
Splints, Material for Matches. 



Sm JOHN BENNETT, 65 & 64, Cheapside, London. 
Watch, Clock, and Jewellery Manufacturer, by Appointment to Her Majesty. 

ADIES' GOLD KEYLESS HALF-CHRONOMETERS. In 18-carat hnntincr half- 
bunting or crystal glam cases, plain Hlsljwl or richly engraved, i plate, finely j.w.IIed inuvemcms. chronometer 
»)alAnce,ip«-ciallvad:iiit.Hlfor allcllmairs. £13t<)£35. ». i^roitouiner 

ADIES- GOLD KEYLESS HUNTING or HALF-HUNTING WATCHES. In stroni? 

/.nl"'**,*"''* '"*•• ""P^f'o'^ fi"*'*". f""y Jewelled ino?einent«>. Elegant In appearance, accurate ai:d reUtMr. 



128 



Canada. 



BBCKWITH, J. B., Kentville, Nova 
Scotia.— (1) Omiimontal Bond Work, (2) 
Textile and Basket Work. 

BOECKH. CHARIiES, & SONS, 
Toronto, Ontario. — (1) Brusbcu, Brooms. 
(2) IloUow-wnro, Woodwarc, Ac. 

BOLTON TENEER CO., Montreal, 

Quebec. — (1) Vuneor Barrels and Kep^'. (^) 
Hardwood Vonocrs, uiid Vouctrs gouerally. 

BOYD, JOHN, 1864 Notre Dame 
Street, Montreal, Quebec. — Brusbcs, 
Whisks, and Corn Brooms. 

BRANDON MANUFACTURING 
CO. OP TORONTO, Toronto, Ontario. 

— (1) Wooden Gooils — Ghildron's Wajigons and 
Carts. (2) Children's Sleighs. (3) Cldldnn's 
Toys. (4) Garden Wheelbarrow. (5) Vcg(itiiblo 
Wheelljarrow. (6) Four bundles of Brusli 
Handles. (7) One Broom Rack. (8) 'J\vo 
Bnot-blaeking Cabinets. (9) One Couimcxli-. 
(10) Two Clothes Horses. (11) Two Step 
Ladders. (12) Four " Union " Churns. (13) 
One bundle "Diamond" Mops. (14) Kitelion 
Woodenwarc. (15) Three bundles of Wash- 
boards. 

BRAZ^EAU, P. X., & CO., Post Office 
118, Montreal, Quebec. — Indian frootls. 

BRUCE, JAMES, Caughnawaga, 
Quebec. — Lacrosses and Indian Curiosities. 

BURLAND, BROWN, & CO., 164 

Post Office, Montreal, Quebec. — Canadian 
Inventions and North Amorioau Indian 
Curiosities. 

CHITTENDEN, C. V. H., Victoria, 

British Columbia. — Collection of Indian 
Curiosities, and Fancy Bai;kct, Bead, Grass, 
»nd Quill Work, &^., made by the Natives of 
Queen Charlotte Island:", British Columbia. 

CHRISTIE BROTHERS & CO., 
Amherst, Nova Scotia. — Coffers and 
Caskets. 

DIXON, JAMES S., Berthiervllle, 

Berthier, Quebec. — Views of Berthier-ou- 
haut and vicinity. 

DOWNS, ANNIE, Agricola Street. 
Halifax, Nova Scotia. — Birch-bark and 
I loss Picture. 

DOWNS, EDITH, Agricola Street, 
Halifax, Nova Scotia. — Birch-bark and 
Moss Picture. 

DOWNS, MARY, Agricola Street, 
Halifax, Nova Scotia. — Birch-bark and 

Moss Picture. 

EDDY, E. B., Hull, Ontario.— Wooden- 
warc. 

PITCH, EDSON, & CO., Etohemin, 
Levis, Quebec. 



FRANCIS, FRANK (Indian Chief; 
Andover, New Brunswick. — Indim 
Fancy Work. 

FRANCIS, MICHAEL (an Indian) 
Rocky Point, Prince Edward Island 

— Wooden Shovel, Indian make. 

OATES, O. O., Truro, Nova Scotii 

— SpeciiHCiis of Wood for inside work of Piaiui! 

aOULETTE, O. v., Gananoqu» 

Ontario. -(1) Handles for E<lgo Tools. (8 
Implements and Tools of every desoriptitm. (3 
Escutcheons. (4) Furniture Kuobs and It, 
settcs. (5) Patent Wheel Heads. 

HAWES & CO., St. John, TSbm 
Brunswick. — Clothes and Towel Rucks 
Bread and Mont Boards, Table Legs, &c. 

HEARN & HARRISON, Montreal 
Quebec— Stereoscopic Viowa. 

HUDSON'S BAY CO., Winnipeg 
Manitoba (Agent at Exhibition, T. H 
INCE, 156 Oxford Street, London).- 
Collection of Articles of Indian make. 

JOHNSTON, JOHN, Scugog, On 
tario. — Indian liaskets and Fancy Work, umiii 
from Split Wood, Sweet-scented Honey Wood 
Birch Bark, and Porcupine Qulls. 

KECHECHEMON (a Chief), Salen 
West, York, Ontario. — Fancy Work 
Baskets, Paddles, ice. 

LANG, C, Victoria, British Colum 
bia. — Seaweed Picture Frame. 

McKEE, WILLIAM, 635 Craij 
Street, Montreal, Quebec. — Bar IJeii* 
Clubs, Dumb Bells. 

McLAREN, J. R., 63 College Street 
Montreal, Quebec— Wood Turning. 

MARVEN, MRS. W. H., St. John, 
New Brvmswick. — Bark Pictnns. 

MAYNARD, R., Post Office, Bo: 
75, Victoria, British Columbia.- -Pbo 
tographic Views. 

MEQIS, PETER (Indian Chief) 
Parry Sound, Ontario. — (1) Basketi 
IMats, Birch Bark Articles. (2) Bead Worii 
(3) Snow Shoes, &c. 

MITCHELL, THOMAS, Hamiltor 
Ontario. — Corn IJrooms and Wliisks. 

NELSON, H. A., & SONS, Montrea 
Quebec — Corn Brooms and Whisks. 

NEWBERY, ARTHUR, Charlotte 
town. Prince Edward Island.— Pbot' 
grapluc nnd other Views and Maps "f Princ 
Kdward Island. 



Canada. 



129 



_ NORMAN, N. T. (care of H. A. 
NELSON & SONS), Montreal, Quebec. 
-Hnby Jumpers. 

OBCHAHD, R. W., Br .ntford, On- 

Iftrio.— (1) LacroHho Sticks of flifTcint niako 
iiul Bize. (2) Snow Sl)oon. (3) Toy Lacroaee 
JtickM. (4) Tobogkjatis, &c. 

PANE, JAMES (Chief, Miamoc 
[ndians). Shubenacadie, Nova Scotia. 
-Indian Manufaoture*. 

PARADIS, HUBERT, St. RomaiUd, 
Levis, Quebec— MatchcM. 

PEACOCK. WILLIAM, Montreal, 
Quebec— Cricket Bats. 

PHAIR, J. HENRY, Predericton, 
New Brunswick. —(1) Birch Bark and 
Bark Pictures, (lud Portfolios. (2) Ivory. 

PITT, NICHOLAS, 117 King Street, 
Montreal. — Jlodol in Wood of Ico I'alace, 
Montreal Carnival, 1881. 

POPE, MARGARET, Summerside, 
Prince Edward Island.— (1) Two Panels : 
Indian aud Squaw pointed thereon. (2) Two 
Tobogfcan Canadian AVinter Scenes. (3) A 

lush Banner Knife Painting. 

PORT ARTHUR DISTRICT, On- 
tajio (per T. A. KEEPER, Esq., Port 
Arthur).— Indian Arrow Heads, War Clubs, 
Pipes, Sheath Knife and Case. 

POWELL, J. W., Victoria, British 
Columbia. — Three Carved Figures by Hydjdi 
ndians, representing Medicine Spirits. 

PROSPER, PRANK, Summorside, 
Antigonishe, Nova Scotia.— (1) Canoed. 
(8) Toboggans. (3) Snow Shoes. -, /, . 

RENFREW, a. R., & CO., 85 Buade 
Street, Quebec (Agent in England, J. 
A NOTT, e Gordon Street, W.C, Lon- 
ion).— Furs, Indian Curiosities, &o. 

RHODES, CURRY, & CO., Amherst. 
Nova Scotia. — Turnings and Mouldings in 
Native Woods. 

ROGERS, MRS. J. N., St. John, 
New Brunswick.— Bark Work. 

ROYAL CITY PLANING MILLS 
30., Limited. New Westminster, Bri- 
tish Columbia. — Turnings in various Woods. 

8HARMAN, A., 16 Knightrider 

Jtreet, London, E.C.— ComposiMon Picture, 
rem birch bark and moss, representing an old 
luin near Hostermana, North V^'eet ^rm, Hali- 
ax, Xova Scotia. 



SIMMS, T. S.. Ac CO.. St. John. New 
Briua iwiok. — Brushes and Corn Broonia. 

SMITH, PROFESSOR, Lachuto, 
Quebec — ISIiuiaturo I'ottagc, nmdo of cork 
and spruce boughs. 

STEMSHORN, C, 141 Hollia Street, 
Halifax, Nova Scotia. — Indiwu Goods: 
(1) Indian Basket, Bead, and Quill Work. (2) 
^loocanins. (3) Pipes. (4) Fancy Articles in 
Bark, Skin, and Feathers. 

SUSSEX WOOD MANUFACTUR- 
ING CO.. Sussex, New Brunswick.— 

(1) Tool Handles. (2) Spoold. (3) Olhor 
Turned Work. 

THOMAS, ALEXANDER (an 
Indiaii), Rocky Point, Queen's County, 
Prince Edward Island.— Three Baskets 
(Indian nuiko). 

THOMPSON, W. J., St. John, New 
Brunswick.— (1) Fancy Goo^ls in Basket, 
Bark. Feather, Porcupine Quill, and other 
Work. (2) T .boffsauH. (3) Snow Shoes. (4) 
Moccasins. (5) Cannes, &c. 

TONEY, MRS., Sawmill Creek, 
Annapolis, Nova Scotia. ~ Basket and 
Fancy Work. 

TOMAS, FRANCIS (Indian Chief), 
Predericton, New Brunswick.— Indiau 
Wares. 

WHITE, DAVID C, HamUton, 
Ontario. — Cirnamoutal Wood Turning. 

WHITEHEAD & TURNER, Quebec. 

— Brooms, Bruiihes, and Woodenware. 

WILLIAMS. H., Toronto, Ontario. 
— Indian Curiosities. 

WILMOT, PETER (Indian Chief). 
Truro, Nova Scotia.— Indian Work iu wood 
and bark. 

WINTERMATE & HILL, Tilbury 
Centre, Essex, Ontario.— General Assort- 
ment of Woodenware. 

Class 11. 

Paper, Stationery, Painting and Drawing 
mater iah. Printing, Bookbinding, <fcc. 

CANADIAN GOVERNMENT 

(POST - OFFICE DEPARTMENT), 
Ottawa, Ontario.— Post Office Stationery, 
&c. 



ATKINSON BROS., 35-37 King 
E^reet East, Hamilton, Ontario. — 
Chiii^mas Card?. 



180 



Canada. 



BISHOP. OEORGE, ENORAVINa 
& PRmTINQ CO., Limltod (OEOROE 
BISHOP, Managing Director), 1GB »t. 
James Street, Montreal, Quebec— Lu- 

gravinR, Lithography, Printing, Thoto-engrav- 
ing, Dio-Binking, Colour Stamping, Electrotyp- 
ing, &o. 

BRITISH NORTH AMERICA 
BANK NOTE CO., Montreal, Quebec. 

— Stcol riatoEnKravinp, including Bank Notos, 
Bailway Bonds, I'oBtago Stamps, Po«t Cards, iVc. 

BURIiAND LITHOGRAPHIC CO., 

Limited , Montreal, Quebec— Mnpa and 
Lilhograpliio Work. 

CANADA BANK NOTE ENGRAV- 
ING & PRINTING CO., Montreal, 
vluebec— Ste.a Engraving, Autotyi)o Colour 
Printinj;, Maps, &c. 

ROLPH, SMITH, & CO., Toronto, 
Ontario.— (1) Lithographic Drawing, plain 
end in colours. (2) EmbosBing and Illumi- 
nating. 

SOMERVILLE, BENALLACK, & 
Co., Montreal, Quebec. — Specimens of 
Commercial Jjithographio Work. 

STEVENS, H. T., Monoton, New 
Brunswick.— Blank Account Books and Biic- 
cimens of Printing. j i .■ '"' 

TORONTO LITHOGRAPHING 
CO., Toronto, Ontario. — Bpeoimeng of 
Lithographing and Engraving. 

BEATTY, SAMUEL, Toronto, 
County York, Ontario.— Newspaper on- 
titled The Canadian Breeder. 

BIGGAR, B. B. (Exhibited in Class 12.) 

BROWN BROS., Toronto, Ontario. 
— Accour' Books, Bookbinding, Diaries, Leather 
Goods, &o. 

CANADA PAPER CO., Montreal, 
Quebec. — Canadian-made Papers. 



CANADA PRINTING INK CO., 
Toronto, Ontario.— Printing Ink. 

CANADIAN COMMISSION, Exhi- 
bition Building.— Copies of the Nev-ipapers 
published in Canada. 

"CANADIAN MANUFAC- 
TURER" Publishing Co., Limited, 
Public Library Buildings, Toronto, 

Ontario.— Specimen Sheets of the Canadian 
Manufacturer. 

V CHEESEWORTH, WILLIAM L., 
Toronto, Ontario.— '.Vhe Tttil<ii's Competj' 
(Jium, Measure, and Account Book, 



DOMINION PAPER CO., Montret 
Quebec— Printing, Book, Coloured, Hangir 
and Manilla Papers. 

DOMINION TYPEPOUNDIN 
CO., 15 Chennevllle Street, Montren 
Quebec— A Case of Job Typo. 

ELLIS, ROBERTSON, & CO., E 

John, New Brunawlok.— .lob Printing 
Album. 

PLEWWELLINO, PRED. B., E 
John, New Brunswick.— Printing. 

FORTIER, JOSEPH, a58 E 

James Street, Montreal, Quebec— Blui 

Account Books, and Spooimens of Buokbindin 

FREEMAN, H. J., Summersld 
Prlnoe Edward Inland. — Bookbindtuj 
" The Suinmersido Journal." 

HICKS, S. N, 223 McGill Stree 
Montreal, Quebec — Show Cards, Adve 
tisiug Mediums, Deoorativo Mottoes. 

HUNGBRPORD, W. A., Bellevill( 
Hastings, Ontario.— " Hunter & Hungei 
ford" Patent Wrapping-paper Holder an 
Cutter. 

INGBRSOLL UNION PUBLISH 
ING CO. (J. P. MORREY), Ingersol 
Ontario.— " Morrey'a Business and Farmer 
Directory." 

IRWIN, HOPPER, & CO., Montrea 
Quebec (London Office, 110 Canno 
Street, B.C.).— (1) Water, Fire, and Aci 
proof Paper; and (2) Paper Stock for tl 
Manufacture of Acid Chambers, Fuimels, ai 
Tubings. (3) Gunpowder Cartridge Case 
(4) Roofings; and (5) for Lining Petrokui 
Vats. (6) Packing Cases and Trunks. 

LAWSON, J. MURRAY, Yarmoutl 
Nova Scotia.— (1) Title Rcooid of the Shi| 
ping of Yarmouth. (2) Title Record of tl 
Shipping of Yarmouth, with Appendix. 

"LB MONDE" JOURNAL, Moi 
treal, Quebec (J- LESSARD, Agen 
1650 Notre Dame Street, Montreal/ 
Photograph of the Press from which the Jouji 
is printed. 

McNAIRN, J. H., & CO., Townt 
Ontario.— Tissue and other Thin Pap* 
coated with ParalHn. 

METHODIST BOOK & PUBLISI 
ING HOUSE (WILLIAM BEIGG 
Book Steward), Toronto, Ontario. 
Printing, Binding, Electrotyping, and Btcr 
typing. 

MOTT, T. PARTHON, St. Job 
New Brunswick.— The " Trade Rcpoi.J 
Newspaper. 



Canada. 



181 



BW BNQJjAND PAFBB CO., 

Qtreal, Quebec— ChkI, Printing, Ma- 
, unJ Wrapping Pftpors 

AWBONB KEYLESS 8TRET- 
ER 00., Toronto, Ontario.— I'aUsnt 

lods ArtiuU' Strot,chura. 

— ODWELL. OEORGB T. B., 

onto, Ontario.— Hand Stamp for Etching 

itfCl. 

tOLLAND PAPER CO., St. J^rdme, 
X Montreal, Quebeo. — Vuriotien of 
ht: Note Paper, Foolacap, FlatcapH, and 
ta, Bristol- board, Book and News Paper, 
rod Paper. 

lOLPH, SMITH, & CO., Toronto, 

tario.-(l) Christmas Cnnis. (2) Labols. 
Menus. (4) Wedding Invitations. (6) 
[)er-plato Engraving. 

ICHLIOHT & FIELD CO., Toronto, 
tario. — (l) Office Filing Cabinets. (2) 
tor and Bill Fil< u. (3) Binding Cases. (4) 
CO Labour-saving Oevioes. 

EARS, J. C, Toronto, York County, 

tario. — Wbito Enamelle<l Letters and 
;ures for Signs, &o. 

'IPPITT, BURDITT, & CO., St. 

in. New Brunswick.- The " Provincial 
rioulturist " Newspaper. 

■ TORONTO GLOBE " NEWS- 
lPEB, 26 & 28 King Street, To- 
ito, Ontario (London Offloe, 86 
87 Fleet Street, E.C. Agent, 
A Judges).— (1) Files of " Tlie Toronto 
>be" as now published, with speciiiien 
ies of the paper as originally issued when 
blislied in 1844, to show tbe development of 
malism in Canada durmg the past forty 
rs. Illustrated Plato presented with Special 
■istmas Number, 1885. (2) Begistor for 
ladian Visitors. 

TORONTO PAPER CO. (J. YOUNG. 
inager), Cornwall, Stornaont, On- 

io.— Paper. 

^TELD, W., London, Ontario.— (1) 

•kg, Newspapers, and Periodicals. (2) 
Sravings and Lithographs. 

HLSON, J. C, & CO., 684 Craig 
«et, Montreal, Quebeo. — (1) PB,per, 
listing of Manilla of different kinds. (2) 
Paper Bags and Envglopes, 

Class 12. 

Machinery and Machine TooU. 

lERTRAND, F. X., St. Hyacinthe, 

ebec— Shiiiglo Machine, in motion. 

IGGER, B. B., Montreal, Quebec— 

Hing Press, Type, Paper, and Fittings for 
"spaper Wofk, showij iu operation, 






BUTTBRPIBLD Se CO., Rook Island, 
Stanstead, Quebeo. — Stocks, Dies, and 
Taps for band use and uaohinos. 

CANADA THREAD CO. 

COCHRANE, W. P., Hamilton, 

Ontario — Doublo Holbr Mills, for Crusl.ing 
(Jrain and Making Flour, known as " Coohrano'a 
Flour Roller Mills," with relief-gear mochanisra. 

CARREAU, A., Montreal, Quebec- 
Patent Httam Boiler. 

COTE (LOUIS) & BROTHER, 8t. 
Hyacinthe, Quebec— Machine for Measur- 
ing Leather and Skins. 

1 t 

COWAN Sc CO., Gait, Ontario.— 
(1) Doublo Cope Tenoning Maoliinc. (2) A 
Power Morticing Machine. (8) A Pony Surface 
Planer. 

CREELMAN BROTHERS, George- 
town, Ontario (Agent in England. 
Mr. W. M. HARRISON, 128 Portland 
Street, Manchester) — Knitting Machines: 

(1) Special Ribbing Machines (manufacturing). 

(2) Plain Machine (manufacturing). (8) Ribb- 
ing Machine (family). (4) Plain Machine 
(family). 

„,^ENNIS. C. W., Toronto, Ontario.- 

Washing Machine. 

DUBOIS, LOUIS, E.. Toronto, 
Ontario.— Improved Pedal for Hand Looms. 

DUNN, P., C6te St. Paul, Montreal, 
Quebec— Cut Nail Machine, with self-feeder, 
in motion. 

FRECHETTE, ISAI^. St Hyacinthe. 

Quebec— "Eureka" Shingle Machine. 

GAJaDNER, ROBERT, & SON, Mont- 
real, Quebec— Biscuit Machinery. 

GRAY, SAMUEL, Victoria, British 
Columbia.— Model of Twin Stairs, Li-Iit and 
Ventilating Shaft, and Screw Elevator combined. 

QURNEY & WARE, Hamilton. 

Ontario.— Weighing Machines. 

HAMILTON INDUSTRIAL 
WORKS CO., Hamilton, Wentwortli, 
Nova Scotia.- -Clothes Wringers, Mangle* 
Washing Machines, Churns, Tirpet Sweepers. 

HARIRIS, HEENAN, & CO., 124 
Queen Street, Montreal, Quebec- 
Leather BeltMig. 

HARRISON, JEREMIAH, & CO. 

HAY, PETER, Gait, Waterloo. 

Ontad'io.— Machine liuives. 

K 2 



132 



Cttnttda, 



HOPKINS, JOSEPH, HamUton, 
Ontario. — A Model Hand Carpet Loom, made 
by an amateur meohanio. 

IN Gill S & HUNTER, Toronto, 

Ontario.— "Corloas" Steam EnRiiie, 100 H.P. 
" Weetinghouso " Engine, 35 H.P. 

KENNEDY, WILLIAM, & SONS, 
Owen Sound, County Grey, Ontario.— 

Pearson's Patent Sharpened I'ropclltT Wliecl, 
with movable blades. 

KERR & KEYS. 

McGregor, gourlay, & co., 

Gait, Waterloo, Ontario. — Iron Machinery 
Power for working Wood. 

McKECHNIE & BERTRAM, 
Dundas, Ontario. — Lathes, Planers, Mould- 
ing Machine, Cutting-oft" Machine, Bolt Cutter, 
Iron Shaper, Milling Machine. Drilling Macliiiie, 
Wood-mortising Machine, Bead Saw, in motion. 

MARTEL, A. P., 165 Amhurst Street, 
Montreal, Quebec— Self-acting Motor. 

ONTARIO PUMP CO., Toronto, 
Ontario. — (1) One 10-fet^t " Halladay " 
Standard Pumping Windmill, with Pumps 
attached, in working order. (2) One 18-fect 
'« Halladay " Standard Railroad Windmill. (3) 
One 14-feet "Halladay" Standa.w Windmill, 
geared, with Towere. 

PETTNER, B. J., 39 W lliam Street, 
Montreal, Quebec— (1) Boot and Shoe 
^lachinery, in motion. (2) Patent Cutting 
Boards. , 

QUACO WOOD MANUPACTUR. 
ING CO., St. John, Ne v Brunswick.— 
Spools, Bobbins. 

RAYMOND, CHARLES, Guelph, 
>ntario. 

MnchincB. 



Ontario. — Hand and Treadle Sewing 



RIEPERT & SOMERVILLE, Mont- 
real, Quebec. — Automatic Liquid Measuring 
Tanks. 

ROBIN & SADLER, Montreal, 
Quebec— Leather Belting. 

RODWELL, GEORGE T. B., 
Toronto, Ontario. — Combination Rubber 
Stamp Machine. 

ROSS, R. W., Guelph, Wellington, 
Ontario.—" Novelty " Rug ^lachine. 

RUSSELL, J., St. John, New Bruns- 
wick.— Snow Plough. 

SHELLS, A., 129 St. Philippo Street, 
Montreal, Quebec — Patent Sewing-Macbiue 
Needle Threader. • 



THOMPSON & CO., Sherbroci 
Quebec. — Bobbins and Spools. 

TORONTO KNITTING MACHII 
CO., Toronto, Ontario. — Family Knii;i 
Machine. 

WANZER, R. M., & CO., Hamilti 

Wentworth, Ontario.— Sewing Machj 
and Specimens of Sewing-Machino Work. 

WHITE, ROBERT, Montw 
Quebec. — Shoe Counter Machine?:y. 

WILLIAM HAMILTON MABI 
PACTURING C O., Poterborouj 
Ontario. — (1) Saw Sharpeners for Mill Su 
in motion. (2) Saw Bench for Dressing 
Hammering Mill Saws. (3) Saw Swadge 
Swadging Saw Teeth, workwl by hand. ( 
lUnstrHtions of Sawmill Machinery built 
used by the Exhibitors in the Manufuctun 
Lumber. 

WILLIAMS MANUPACTURU 
CO., Montreal, Quebec— Sewing Machii 

WILSON, PRANK H., & CO., Yi 
mouth. Nova Scotia. — Two-power Capsta 

WOOBURN, J. R., & CO., 

John, New Brunswick. — Machine 
motion) for pulverizing Sugar and other fria 
substances to an impalpable (Mwder. 

ALBION IRONWORKS C 
Limited, Victoria, British Columbia 
Photographs of Marino and Land Engines, ¥\ 
caiming Machinery, «S;c. 

WALLACE, HOWARD D., 

George, New Brunswick.— Photograpl 
Stoiie-dreeeing Machine. 



Class 13. 
Navigation. Ship and Boat BuildiHtj. 

ANDERSON, THOMAS, Winds 
Nova Scotia. — Model of a Schooner. 

ANLY, A. Y., Port^Medway, No 
Scotia. — Glass Balls and Trucks forVess 

BACHMAN, ALBERT, Shelbur 
Nova Scotia. — Patent Main-sheet Block 

BENHAM, LOUIS C, Lockep( 
Nova Scotia, — SI" pa Blocks, /if/Hum 
centre. 

BUTLER, ALBERT, Yarmoi 
Nova Scotia.— (1) Dories. (2) Dory. 

CANADIAN QOVERNMEl 
Ottawa, Ontario.— (1) Indian (North 
Canoe made from Cedar. {2) Indian Pine" 
Canoe. (S) Indian Cotton wo jd Canoe. 



Canada, 



133 



CANADIAN GOVERNMENT 
)BPAIITMBXT OP AQRI- 
gLTUKE), Ottawa, Ontario.— Modol 
S'oi-thern Canoe, with Paddles, Sails, &c. 

CANADIAN QOVERN'IENT 
fflPARTMENT OP MARINE AND 
ISHERIES), Ottawa, Ontario.— 

udul of Government Steamer " Lanadowne." 

CHISHOLM, GEORGE H., Fort 
edway, Nova Scotia. — Model of a Monitor 
Muu-of-War Ship. 

CLUTHE, CHARLES. 

CONRAD & ANDERSON, Lunen- 
irg, Nova Sootia. — (1) A Boat. (2) Three 
awl-fishing Dories. 

COOMBS, HENR7 P., St. John, New 
runswick (for Self and Others).— (1) 
oJel of an improved Metallic Life Boat. (2) 
odel showing the application of Life-saving 
pplinnces to ordinary Ships' Boats. 

CROWELL, ISAAC C, Shelbume, 
ova Scotia. — One Bank Fishing Dory, full 

!C. 

ELLIS, ISAAC D., Maitland, Hants, 
ova Scotia.— Model of a Ship. 

EMBREE, H. W., & SONS, Port 
awkesbury. Cape Breton, Nova 

otift.— <1) Model of a Yacht. (2) Improved 
inily Row-Boat, fitted with Sail. (3) An 
ginal Esquimaux Kayak from the N.£. const 
Labrador. 

ENGLISH, WILIiIAM, Peter- 
irough, Ontario (Agents in England, 
OWLAND, WARD, & CO., 166 
iccadiUy, London, W.). — Open Canoes. 

FAIRBANKS, LEWIS P., Dart- 
outh, Halifax, Nova Sootia.— Model of 
esign for better application of Screw Propeller 
Sliips of Wiir, Merchant Ocean Steamers, 
id Vcsselii navigating Canals. 

FERGUSON, JAMES S.. Pakenbam« 
atario. — Salmuu-fishing Cauoe. ^' ■ ■ 

GALE, ROBERT, Harrison Street 
)rtland. New Brunswick.- Model of 
tent Anchor. 



GILBERT, GEORGE G., St. John, 

New Brunswick. — Anchor - Catter and 
Fidher, patented, und entitled Purdy's "Patent 
Anchor-Catter." 

GORDON, THOMAS, Lakefield, 
Peterborough, Ont ario (Agents in 
England, Messrs. ROWLAND, WARD, 
& CO., 166 Piccadilly, London^ W.). 

— Assorted Canoes. 

GRIDLEY, W. H., Yarmouth, Nova 
Sc jtia.— Patent Ship's Tiller — wrought iron, 
hand-forged. 

HARLOW, STEPHEN, Lockeport, 
Nova Scotia. — Models of Fishing Schooners 
and of Brigantines. . ,. 

HARRIS, ALLEN, & CO., St. John, 

New Brunswick. — Ship's Gongs. 

HASTINGS SAW MILL CO., 
Burrard Inlet, British Columbia. 
(Agents in London, Messrs. HE ATLEY, 
WOTTON, & CO., 11 George Yard, 
Lombard Street, E.C.) — Spars. 

HERALD & HUTCHISON, Gore's 
Landing, Northumberland, Ontario. — 
Tliree Cunoe.^, made from Ccilar, Basswood, 
Oak. Rock Ehn, and Butternut, and sometimes 
Black Walnut, fastened with copper anu copper 
nails. 

HOOD, ARTHUR, Shelbume, Nova 
Scotia. — Model of Schooner, •' Arthur." 

HUDSON'S BAY CO., Winnipeg, 

Manitoba. — Birch Bnrk Canoe. (6V the Col- 
lective Exhibit by the Company.) 

KING, C. C, Shelbume, Nova 
Scotia. — (1) Model of a Fishing Schot>uer. 
(2) Model of a Coaster. 

LANGILLE. TITUS. Mahone Bay. 
Nova Sootia.— (1) Model of a Ship. (2) 
Model of a Brigantine. (3) Moilel of a Fiahin<; 
Schooner. (4) Miniature Fishing Schooner. 

LAWRENCE. WILLIAM D., Mait- 
land, Hants, Nova Scotia.— Models of 
Ships built iu Exhibitor's yards: "W. D. 
Lawrence." Clipper Ship. Clipper Ship. 

LOVITT, WILLIAM P., Yarmouth, 

Nova Scotia. — Models of Ships. 



111 



E8TAB. 
100 YEARS. 



BARTON & COMPANY. 



ESTAB. 
100 YEARS. 



WINES, S PIRITS, and L IQUEURS. 

FULL DE TAILED PRICE LIST ON APP LICATION. 

For Abbreviated Parttcnlars see Foot Notes on pa$es 



CM 



2 »* W 

hi 



134 



Canada. 



liOZE, PETER, Lunenburg, Nova 
Scotia.— Ships' Blocks. 

McDonald, RODERIOK, Jordan 
River, Shelbume, Nova Scotia. — (1) 
MckIcI of a Bark. (2) Model of a Schooner. 

McDOtroALl,, William, south 

Maitland, Hants, Nova Scotia.— Models 
of Ships built anil building in Exhibitor's yards: 
•' McDougall." Barque, " Salmon " (building). 

MARSH, BENJAMIN, Lunenburg, 
Nova Scotia.— <1) Caulker's MtxUet. (2) 
Caulking Iron. 

MARSH, STEPHEN, Lunenburg, 
Nova Scotia. — Model Boats and Ships. 

MOPPATT, Q. B., North Sydney, 
Cape Breton. — (1) Mrdoia of Coasting 
Schooners. (2) Model of a Brig. (3) Model 
of a Yacht. 

MOORE, JAMES, Jordan ftlver, 
Shelbvme, Nova Scotia. —Ship's Tiller. 

MORRISON, J. C, Shelburhe, Nova 
Scotia.— Fishing Dory. 

MUNCEY, T. A., Cape Traverse, 
Prince Edward Island. — Model of lee 
Boat. 

ONTARIO CANOE CO., Limited, 
Peterborough, Ontario (Agents, J. C. 
CORDING & CO., 19 Piccadilly, 
London, W.). — Various Canoes. 

PIPER, E. O. ^ 

QUA CO WOOD MANUFAC- 
TURING CO., St. John, New Bruna- 
wick.— Ships' Blocks. 

STEMSHORN, C, 141 Hollis 
Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia.— Birch- bark 

Canoe. 

STE\/ART, FREEMAN, & CO., 
Jordan River, Shelbume, Nova Scotia. 

— Model of a Ship built by Eshibitors. 



W., Maitland, 
-A Ship's Windlass. 



THOMPSON, F. 
Hants, Nova Scotia.- 

THOMPSON. W. J. 

TREPRY, R. P., Bridgewater, Nova 
SCotia. — Fair of Patent Anchor Supporters aua 
Tripixjrs. 

WAGNER, ISAAC, tiiverpool. Nova 
Scotia.— Motlel Ship. 

WILLIAMS, JOHN, Shelbume, 
Nova Scotia.— Bank Pishing Dory. 

WINDSOR FOUNDRY CO., Wind- 
sor, Nova Scotia.— <1) Ships' Power Cap- 
stans. (2) Ship's Caboose. (8) Ships' Mooring 
Bitts. 

WOLFE, JOSEPH W., Lunenburg, 
Nova Sootia.— Model of a Seine Buat. 



Class 14. 
LifC'Saving Apparatus. 

CRISTIE, R., Truro, Nova Scotia 

Model of Fire Escape. 

COOMBS, HENRY F. (for Self 
Others), St. John, New Bninswi 
— (1) Model of nn improved Metallic Lifeh 
(2) Model showing the application of L 
saving Applianoes to ordinary Ships' Boats. 

EMBREE, H. W., & SONS, Pi 
Hawkesbury, Cape Breton. — Model d 
Lifeboat. 

OtLMAlSf , F. J. 

GLOBE FIRE - EXTINGUISI 
CO., London, Ontario. — Hand-Grenij 
Fire-Extlngsjjshers. 

HENlJERSON, D., M.D. 

JENSEN, W., Victoria, Britid 
Columbia (Sole Agents, ROSE & C( 
Engineers' Hose Manufacturers, MaJ 
Chester, England).— Patent Fire EBCttpc(l 
to .")0 it.). 

KERR & KEYS. 



Class 15. 

Baihcay and Telegraph Work. Telephony 

BUTLER, THOMAS PAGE, Mo 
treal, Quebec. — Patent Nut-lock for Railw 
and other purposes, fitted on wooden sections 
rail with ordinary railway fishplate. 

CANADIAN GOVERNMEN 
(t)epalrtmeni of Hallways and Canab 
Ottawa, Ontario.— (1) Drawing of a Stt 
Bridge. (2) Tiews of Scenery along the li 
of the Intercolonial Bailway. 

CLARK, DARLING, «E CO., 

Turner Avenue, Toronto, Ontario.— { 
Compensating Spring Balances as applioil 
Uailwiiy Carriages. (2) An Autonxatic WinJ( 
Balance. 

CLENDENNING, W., & SON, Mo 
(.real, Quebec. — Patent Railway-car Hcatc 

CLUTHB, CHARLES, Toront 
Ontario. — Ventilator and Chandelier for Ra 
way Cars and other ConTeyances. 

FROTHINGHAM & WORKMA 

Montl^al, Quebec— Railway Tools. 

GISBORNE, FREDERICK (Sup< 
intendent of Government Telegrai 
Service), Ottawa, Ontario.— (1) Mo 
Semnplinrtf. (2) Iron TtLgruph Pole. ( 
Aiiti-indUotiou Cable. (4) lusulator Te 
phone. (6) Drawings of t-aiue. 



Canada. 



135 



HABHIS, E., & CO., 8t. John, New 
Jrunswick. — (1) Intercolonial (Dominion 
jovernmeut) Railway Standard Freight Car 

ruck. (2) Pair of Wuehbum " Peerless " 
3ttel-tyred Car Wheels, tittcd. on Axle. 

HASTINGS SAW MILL CO. (Agents 
London, MEBSBS. HEATLEY, 

rOTTON, & CO., 11 George Yard, 
Lombard Street, E.G.), Burrard Inlet, 
British. Columbia. — Kaihvay Ties. 

MITCHELL, QEOEGE, Newcastle, 
llTorthumberland, New Brunswick. - 

ailway Standard Draw-Bar, with Autoinivtic 
fCouplcr and Link. 

O'NEILL, HENBY, 31 Moreau 
Street, Montreal, Quebec. — Improved Rail- 
way Semaphore. 

ON-,lBld PUMP CO., Toronto, 
Ontario.— 18 ft. " Halladay " Standard Rail- 
road Windmill. 

PIPEB, E. O." 

BOSEBEUGH, DE. ABNEE M., 121 
Church Street, Toronto, Ontario. — 
Mechanical Telephone Exchange System. 

ST. THOMAS CAB WHEEL CO., 

St. Thomas, Ontario.— Charcoal Cast-iron 
Chilled Car Wheels. 



ClAS3 16. 

Food Preparations, 

AYLMEB CANNING CO., Ayhner, 
Elgin, Ontario.— (1) Canned Meats and 
Poultrj-. (2) Canned Vegetables and Fruits. 
(3) Evaporated Fruits, 

BABEAN, JULIUS, Victoria, British 
Columbia. — Hams, Shoulders, Bacon, Lard. 

BEAK & CO., Victoria, British 
Columbia.— Prime Mess Beef. 

BENT, GILBEBT, & SONS. (Exhibited 
in the Fisheries Department.) 

BEODIB & HABVIE, 10 & 12 
Bleury Street, Montreal, Quebec— Pre- 
pared Food Products. 

OLAEE:, W., Montreal, Quebec- 
Canned Meats. 

PEAEMAN, P. W., Hamilton, 
Ontario.— Ham, Bacon, Lard. 

POBBEST & CO., Halifax, Nova 

Sootia.~(.,'unned Salmon and Lobster. 

"GOLDEN CEOWN" PACKING 
CO., Halifax, Nova Scotia.— Prt served 
Meats. 



GOODAIBE, LAWEENCE, Victoria, 
British Columbia Mess Bait Beef. 

GEANT, JAMES A., & CO., Inger- 
soil, Ontario.— (1) C. C. Bocon. (2) Long- 
rib Bacon. (3) Ham. (4) B. Baton. (6) 
Wiltshire Bacon. (6) One Whole Hog. 

GEANT, JAMES E. (Exhibited ia the 
Fisheries Department.) 

GEEGOEY & CO., New West- 
minster, British Columbia.— Salt Salmon. 

HAMBLEN, J. B., & CO., Pictou, 

Nova Scotia.— Preservetl Lobster. 

HATHEWAY, HAEDINAY, St. 
John, New Brunswick. — Boneless Cod- 
fish. 

HOEGG, D. W., & CO., Predericton, 

New Brunswick. — Tinned Beef and Mutton. 

JOHNSTON PLUID BEEP CO., 
Montreal, Quebec— Johnston's Fluid Beef. 

KEEE, S. G., & SONS, Canning, 
King's County, Nova Scotia. — (1) 
Evaporated Vegetables for Soup. (2) Sliced 
Strained Potatoes, evaporated. (3) Evaporated 
Stiuasii, Turnips, Carrots, Cabbages, and 
Onions. 

LONGWOBTH & CO., Charlotte- 
town, Prince jildward Island. — Preserved 
Mackerel and Lobsters. 

McDonald, mcdonald, & co., 

Souris East, Prince Edwai-d Island. — 
Boneless Hate and C<xl-tish. 

Mcdowell, mcneill, & 

McDowell, Elvers Inlet, Victoria, 
British Columbia. — Canned Chuus from 
Bella Bella Cannery. 

McLEOD, A. C, Park Comer, 
Queen's County, Prince Edward Island. 

— Lobsters, " Keystone " brand. 

McNUTT, D. & P., Malpequo, Prince 
Edward Island. — Lobsters in Tins. 

NOBLE, E. B., Eichibucto, County 
Kent, New Brunswick. — Canned Lobsters. 

O'LEABY, HENEY, Eichibucto, 
New Brunswick.— Canned Lobatera. 

TAYLOE, ALPEED, Mabon, Inver- 
ness, Nova Scotia.— Salmon. 

TODD, J. H., & BON, Victoria, 
British Columbia. — Cauneil Salmon, from 
Richmond Canuory, North Ann, Fraser River. 

TOEEASE, A., New Wostminster, 
British Columbia.— Salt Salmon. 



isr. 



Canada. 



TTTBNER, BEETON, A; CO., Vic- 
toria, British Columbia. — Caunod Salmon 
and C'll^n^<, from the InvtTiiesH, IMLttiihnhiftji, 
Halnaoral, and WonnocI: Cannerien. 

VAN VOIiKBNBURGH BROS.. 
Victoria, British Columbia. — (1) Mess 
Beef. (2) MeHrt I'ork. 

WATKINS, J., H«^'>helaga, Quebec. 
— SiiiuktHl Hftius (iiid Buci ^. 

WELCH, RITHEIi, & CO., Victoria, 
British Columbia. — Canned Salmon. 
" Maple iHnif,"" •' Wellington," and " Dominion " 
brands. 

YOUNO. a. Ii-, St. John, New 
Brunswick. — Fresh, Smoked, and Suited 
Fish. 

ONTARIO CANNING CO., Hamil- 
ton, Ontario. — Canned Fruita and Vege- 
tables. 

ABBOTT, MRS., Union Road, 
Queen's County, ^Prince Edward 
Island.— Cheese. 

ANDERSON, AJLEXANDER, Crow 
Bay, Northumberland, Ontario. — 

Cheese. 

KIRKPATRICK & COOKSON, 
Montreal, Quebec.~Da\ry Products. 

McIiEOD, R. E., Sussex, Kew Bruns- 
wick.— Clieese. 

McNAMEE, B., Sand Bay, Ijeeds, 
Ontario. — Dairy Butter. 

MmLAR, J. D., Ingersoll, Oxford, 
Ontario. — Clieese, of large and small size. 

ST. ELEANOR'S CHEESE FAC- 
TORY, St. Eleanor's, County Prince, 
Prince Edward Islands— Cheese. 

SCOTT. MRS. DUNCAN K., North 
River, Queen's Cotinty, Prince Edward 
Island. — Butter. 

TITUS &; CO.. Eftissex, New Binins- 
wlck- — Butter from Sussex Creamery. 

TRURO CONDENSED MILK AND 

CANNINO- CO., Truro, Nova Scotia 

(\) C >uden8e«l Milk. (2) Condensed Coffee 
(Reindeer Brand). 

YODNO, D. J., Truro, Nova Scotia. 
— Condensed Milk and Coffee. 

BAGNALL, RICHARB E., Clyde 
Mills, Queen's County, Prince Edward 
Island.— (1) Coarse Oatmeal. (2) Fine Oat- 
meal. 

BRACKMAN & KER, North Saa- 
nioh, British Columbia.— Flour, Oatmeal, 
end Split Peas. 



BRODIE & HARVIE, 10 «c 11 
Bleury Street, Montreal, Quebec— Sel^ 
raising Flour. 

CANADIAN POOD CO., Toront<\| 
Ontax'io. — FurinaocoiiH Food prepared fro«| 
Cereals. 

CATELLI, C. H.; 57 Perthuis Stree^l 
Montreal, Quebec. — Macenroni, Vermicelli| 
and Alimentary I'aste. 

EWING, S. H. & A. S., {Montrea;! 
Quebec. — Vienna Baking Powder. 

FISH & IRELAND, Lachute Mill^l 
Argenteuil, Qu.ebec.— " Boravena " Mill| 
Food. 

GILCHRIST, ARCHIBALD,! 
Guelpl\ Ontario. — Hermetically - sealed! 
Peaches and Grajie .Tuice, in gh -■« bottles. 

GOLDIE, JAMES, Guelph. Ontarial 
— Two grades of Winter Wheat Flout, roller| 
pmcess. 

JOSTER, J. R., Moncton Steam 
Flour Mills, Moncton, New Bruns- 
w^ick. — (1 1 Corn Meul. (2^ Buckwheat Mt«l. 
(3) Gralmm Flnnr. 

LUNAN, WILLIAM. & SON, Sorel, 

: Richelieu, Quebec. — " Princess " Bakiu;,' 

Powder. 

McKAY, THOMAS, & CO., Ottawa, 
Ontario. — Flour and Oatmeal. 

MORGAN BROS., Hamilton, On- 

tario. — Flour nianuft'rtnrcd from Caund^i 
Wheat only, on the roller system. 

MURTON, H., Guelph, Ontaric- 

Oatmeftl, Split Peas. 

OGILVIE, A. W., Si CO., Montreal, 
Quebec. — Flour. 

PEARMAN, M. W. D., Halifax, 
Nova Scotia. — Woodhill's German Bakin;,' 
Powder. 

" PURE GOLD •• MANUFAC- 
TURING CO., Toronto, Ontario. 
Baking Powder. 

SAYLOR, A. H., Consecon, Ontario. 
—(1) Wlur.t Flour. (2) pRttry Flour. (3) 
Buckwhiwt Flour. (4) Granulated Wlieut 
(5) Com Meal. 

SMITH, CHARLES, Campbellford, 
Ontario. — Flour manufactured at Exhibitor'* 
mill. 

THOMPSON, ISAAC, SuiTolk Mills, 
Queen's Covmty, Prince Edward Island. 
— Oatmeal. 

WHITLAW, BAIRD, & CO., Pari^ 
Bamt, Ontario.— Flour. 






Canada. 



137 



Class 17. 

ConditiwHU, Sugar, Confectionery, StimiiJante, 
Tobacco$. 

[i ABBOTT, JOHN T., & CO., Halifax, 
iTova Scotia. — Cocoa, Chocolate, Broina, 
)bcoa-butter, &c. 

ALLEN, W. H., Sc CO., Toronto, 
)ntario. — Flavouring Extracts and Fruit 
!48cnc«i. 

BOURRET, TURCOT, & CO., Mon- 
Teal, Quebec. — Vinegar manufacturod from 
Jpirita nt Wine. 

BRYDEN BROS. & CO., St. John, 
New Brunswick.— Pilot, Soda, and Navy 
3hip Biscuits. 

CANADA SUGAR REPINING CO., 
Kontreal, Quebec— Sugars. 

CHRISTIE, BROWN, ft CO., 
Toronto, Ontario. — Biscuits. 

CLARK & ROBBLEE, Summerside, 
E*rince County, Prince Edward Island, 
—(l) Preperved BlueboiTica. (2) Preserved 
Ruspberries. 

EARLE, THOMAS, Victor/ a, British 
Columbia.— Spices, nuinufacturcd in Victoria, 
British C'ulumbia. 

EVANS, SONS, & MASON, Limited, 
Blontreal, Quebec. — Lime Fruit Juice. 

' SWING, S. H. & A. S., Montreal, 

,uebec.~(l) White, Black, ami Rod Pepper 
,2) Cassia, Cloves, Ginger, and other Spices. 

PORTIER, J. M., Montreal, Quebec. 

-Manufactured Tobaccos. , i 

FOUCHER, P. A. M., St Jacques, 
fontoalm, Quebec. — Tobaccos. 

OARROD 8c CO. Toronto, York, 
)ntario. — Sauces and Pickles. 

HALIFAX SUGAR REPINING 
70., Iiimited, Halifax, Nova Scotia 

lagar. 

HAMILTON VINEGAR WORKS 
'0., Hamilton, Ontario.— Pickles, Jams, 
ud Jollies. 

HARRISON, THOMAS, Dartmouth, 

fova Scotia,-" Chow-chow." 

HICKBY «B STEWART, Charlotte- 
own. Prince Edward Island.— Tobacco. 

IMPERIAL MINERAL WATER 
O., Hamilton, Ontario.— (1) Ginger Ale. 
) Fruit Cliampagne. 



JACKSON, HENRY A., 43 McKay 
Street, Montreal, Quebec. — '* Tomato- 
Botccn " Sauce, a relish with meats, &c. 

JOLIETTE CANADIAN TOBACCO 
MANUFACTURING CO. (Compagnie 
Manufacturidre de Tabac Canadien de 
Joliette), Joliette, Quebec. — Tobacco 
niatiufiictared from leaf grown iu the Proviuco 
of Quebec. 

LYMAN, SONS, & CO., 384 St. Paul 
Street, Montreal, Quebec. — Extract uf 
Coffee. 

MoDOUGALL, ALEXANDER, New 
Westminster, British Columbia. — 

Honey. 

McLACHLAN, S., & SON, Owen 
Soimd, Ontario.- (1) Confectionery. (8) 
Bisou 

MOl^CTON SUGAR REFINING 
CO., Moncton, New Brunswick.— Granu- 
lated and Yellow Sugars. 

MORRISON, W. A., 168 Peel Street, 
Montreal, Quebec— Muplc Sugars and 
Syrups. 

MYLES, ANDREW, Portland, St. 
John, New Brunswick. — Fruit Syrups : 
(1) Rjvsplierry Vinegar, Raspberry. Strawberry, 
I^mon, Lime-juice; and (2) Winter Grceu 
Syrups. 

NIXON, WILLIAM, Granby, Shef- 
ford. Quebec— Basswood Honey. 

NORTH AMERICAN CHEMICAL 
CO. 

NOVA SCOTIA GOVERNMENT, 

Halifax. — Fruits in Syrup: — (1) Apples, 
Bliickkrries, Cherries, Citron Melon^ Crab 
Apples, Cranberries, Currants, Grapes, Pears, 
Plums, Quinces, Raspberries, Strawberries. (8) 
Tomatoes. 

PELOQUIN, CHARLES, St. Hya- 
cinthe, Quebec (Contributor through 
the St. Hyacinthe Agiricultural Society). 
—(1) Honey. (2) Tobucco. 

PRATT, M., St. Hyacinthe, Quebec 
(Exhibitor per the St. Hyacinthe Agri- 
cultural Society). — Maple Sugar and Syrap. 

"PURE GOLD" MANUFACTUR- 
ING CO., Toronto, Ontario.— (1) Cana- 
dian grown and propnrod Chicory. (2) Celeiy- 
salt. (8) Curry I'owder. (4) Powdered Her' s. 
(5) Ground Spices. (8) Flavouring ExtRct*. 

REED, GORING, & CO., Hamilton, 

Ontario.— Cigars. 

RICHARD, J. B, A., Joliette, Quebec. 

— Tobacco grown in the Province of Quebec 



138 



Cancida. 



RICHARDSON, GEORGE ISAAC, 
26 St. James Street, Montreal, Quebec. 

— Tumato Catsup and Sauce. 

RILEY, THOMAS B., Charlottetown, 
Prince Edward Island.— Tobacco. 

ROBERTSON BROTHERS, Toronto, 
Ontario. — Confectionery. 

ROWE, JOHN T., Charlottetown, 
Prince Edward Island.— Chicory. 

SELWYN, MISS, Ottawa, Ontario.— 
.Tarn and Jelly madu &om the fruit of the 
" Shopherdia Argentea." 

SMITH, M. R., Victoria, British Co- 
lumbia. — Fancy Biscaitfi and Cakes. 

TASafi, WOOD, ik CO., Montreal, 

Quebec— Cigard. 

TUCKBTT, GEORGE B., & CO., 

Hamilton, Ontario. —Tobaccos. - 

VANQUELLE, J. B., St. Hyacinthe, 
Quebec (Contributor per the St. 
Hyacinthe Agricultural Society). — 
Maple Sugar and Synip. 

WATKINS, J., Hochelaga, Quebec- 
Preserved Fruits. 

WHITMAN, IiEVl R., Knowlton, 
Brome, Quebec— ftlaple Sugar and Syrup. 

WOODBURN, J. 7L, & CO., St. John, 
New Brunswick. — Confectionery. 

WRIGHT, J. D., 48 Colbome Street, 
Toronto, Ontario.— Flavouring Extracts. 



Class 18. ' ' 

Fermsnted Drinks. Other Beverages. Matt and 
Hops. 

BARR:iS &; CO., 188 Fortification 
Lane, Montreal, Quebec. — Canadian 
Wines : Ports, Slierries, Gliirets, Sautornes, Ver- 
mouth, and Sacramental Wine. 

BOSWELIi, J. K., & SON, Quebec- 
Ale and Porter. 

BRIGHT, THOMAS A., Toronto, 
Ontario.— Wine. 

C ARIiING BREWING & MALTING 
CO., London, Ontario. — Ale, Porter, 
La^er Beer. 

CARTER BROTHERS, ViotoYia, 
British Columbia.— Ale and Porter. 

DAWES Sb CO., Laohine, Quebec- 
Canadian Alea and Porter, in wood and bottle. 



GOODERELAJi & WORTS, Torontc^ 
Ontario. — Canadian Malt and Rye Whutkia; 
and pure Spirit 

GOODERHAM, W. O., Toronto, Oiv 
tario.— (1) Canadian Rye Whisky. (2) Mai 
(3) Cologne Spirit 

GOWBR, C, Victoria, British Co 
lumbia. — Ale, Beer, aud Stuut. 

HAMILTON, a C, Sc CO., Brantfonl 
Ontario, and The Vineyards, Pels 
Island. — Wines from Grupea of Canodiai 
Growth. 

JONES BREWING CO. (ROBEB1 
BRIMS), Halifax, Nova Scotia — Ale au 
Stout 

JONES. SIMEON, St. John, Ne\i 
Brunswick.— Ale aud Porter. 

KEITH, A., & SON., Halifttx, Novt 
Scotia. — Ale and Porter. 

LABBATT, JOHN, London, Ontario 
— (1) Draught Ale. (2) Bottled Ale in quarts. 
(3) Bottctl Stout in quarts. (4) Barley Mult 
(5) Ale and Stout.] (6) Hops. 

LOEWEN & ERLE.— <1) BotUed Beer. 
(2) One Barrel of Beer. 

McCREADT, THOMAS, & SONS, 
Portland, New Brunswick.— (1) Wliiu 
Wine. (2) Cider. (3) Vinegar (Govemmeni 
ProoO. 

McLaughlin, C. H., Toronto, 
Ontario.—Malt. 

MORRIS & HYNDMAN. Charlott» 
town, Pnnce Edward TBland. — MaU. 

MULLIN, P. B. O., Halifax, Novs 
Scotia.— <i) Ale and Porter. (2) Ale on 
draught 

OLAND, S., SONS, & CO.. HaUfa^ 
Nova Scotia. — ^Alo and Stout 

ONTARIO GRAPE GROWING 
AND WINE MANUPACTUBINC 
CO., St. Catherine's, Welland, Ontario 
— Canadian Grape Winee. 

PRESCOTT BREWING AKI 
MALTING CO., Prescott, Qrenvillo 
Ontario. — Ale and Porter. 

SEAGRAM, JOSEPH E., Waterloo 
Ontario,— <1) Canadian Molt and Ryo WIil 
kics. (2) Paro Spirits. (8) Alcohol. 

TROOP, GEORGE A., St. Johi 
New Brunswick.— (1) White Wine. (S 
Cider. (8) Malt (4) Vinegar. 

WALKER. HIRAM, ic SONI 
Walkorville, Ontario.— (I) Canadian Bj 
Whiskiia. (2) Cologne Spirit. 



Canada, 



13ft 



BORTHWICK, WILLIAM, Ottawa, 
Ontario. — Natuml SaHnu Miiicr.il Water in 
Ki'ji^B. Natural 3Iint ral Water in Bottle. Na- 
tural Mineral AeratcU Water. 

OURD, CHARLES, & CO., Montreal, 
Quebec— Nut urd Mineral Waters. UelfitHt 
Ginj^ir Ale. 8odu Water. Cbampagnc-l'idtT, 
Lemonade, Seltzer, Vichy, Kisecngen, Potash, 
and Aerated Medicated Waters. 

HABT, J. A. (Exhibited in Kvana, Sonn, 
& Maaou'a Case, Clusa IG, Group Y.) 

IMFEBIAL MIITBILAJi WATER 
CO., Hamilton, Ontario. — Soda, Seltzer, 
Potush, and Litliia Wutert. 

PHILLIPS, ALEXANDER, Post 
Office, Box 76, Victoria, British Co- 
lumbia. — Carbonated Bevenigcs. 

TAYLOR, HENRY, Stratbroy, On- 
tario.— (1) Ginger Ale. (2) Double Soda 
Water ....... « 

Class 19. 

Firearms. ' 

McDonald, COLIN, Nanalmo, 
Britinh Columbia.— A Kentucky Ititle. 

Class 20. 

Chemical and rharmaceutical Productg. 

ANGLO-AMERICAN ART CO. OP 
TOHONTO (C. R BB8WETHERICK), 
Toronto, Ontario. — Mediums tor mixing 
Coloors for artiatii. 

ABCHDALE, WILSON, & CO., 
Hamilton, Ontario. — Pliarmaceutical Fre- 
porutions. 

BARSALOU, J., & CO., Montreal, 
Quebec. — Soap. 

BAYLI8 MANUFACTURING CO., 
Montreal, Quebec. — Viirui8he<s Paints, and 
Gums. 

BLACKBURN, T., & CO., 242 St. 

James Stieet, Montreal, Quebec- 
Patent Watei proof Covering for Textile fabrics. 

BRAULI , P. L., St. John's, Quebec 

— (1) BruultH Negiitivo Varnish for Plioto- 
graph NegutiA ee. (2) Coni{H>8ed Gentia Bitters, 
ou Appetizer i ii cure of Dyspepsia. 

CANADA CHEMICAL MANURE 
AND PER1TLI8BR CO., Rothesay, 
New Brunsvirick. — Chemical Manures in 
bottles. 

CABLETOIT, WILLIAM. Trenton, 
RastingB, Ontario.— Extracts of Dandelion, 
from top of plant and tho root 



ESTY, E. M., Moncton, New Bruns- 
wick. — (1) Fragrant Philoderma. (2) Iron 
and Quiniuo Tonic. (3) Cod Liver Oil Cream. 

EVANS, SONS, & MASON, Li- 
mited, Montreal, Quebec. — (1) Pbar- 
inacuiitical Preparations and Proprietary Medi- 
cines, Druggists' Sundries. (2) Perfumery. 

EVANS, JOHN B., 104 St. George 
Street, Montreal, Quebec— Solution for 
Itedtoriug and Preserving Wall Paper. 

FROST, E. H., Rockland View, St. 
John, New Brunswick.— (1) Shoo DrcsH- 
ing (Excehior brilliant gloss). (2) " National 
Policy" Crystal Mucilage. (3) "National 
Policy " Ink. (4) Perfumed Black Kid Glovo 
Dressing. 

GATES, C, SONS, & CO., Middle- 
ton, Annapolis, Nova Scotia. — Proprietary 
and Patent Medicines. 

GREENWAY, R., 104 St. George 
Street, Montreal, Quebec— Hair Dye. 

GUTMANN & FRANK, Victoria, 
British Columbia.— Oils. 

HARRINGTON BROTHERS, St. 
John, New Brunswick.— <1) Proprietary 
Medicines. (2) Robinson's Phospiiorised Emul- 
sion. 

HENDERSON & POTTS, Halifax, 
Nova Scotia. (1) Paints. (2) Slioe Black- 



LAMB, PETER R, Sc CO., Toronto, 
Ontario.— (1) Glue. (2) Flint Paper. (3) 
Blacking. (4) Fertilisers. 

LYMAN, SONS, & CO., 384 St. Paul 
Street, Montreal, Quebec— (1) Pharma- 
ceutical Preparations. (2) Chemicals. (8) 
Paints and Lead. (4) Putty. (5) Inks. (6) 
Penumes, &c. 

McCASKILL, D. A., & CO., 180 St. 
James Street, Montreal, Quebec— Var- 
nishes and Japans. 

McDonald, J. E., & t50., victoria, 
British Columbia. — Laundry Soaps. 

MERCEB, WILLIAM, London, On- 
tario. — Polish for Renovating Varnished Wood. 

MILLER, JOHN J., Upton, Bagot, 
Quebec — Hemlock Bark Extract. 

MILLER'S TANNERY EXTRACT 
CO., Limited, Millerton, Northumber- 
land, Nova Scotia (London Office, 8 
Leather Market, Bermondsey). — Tan- 
ning and Dyeing Extracts. 



140 



Canada. 



MORSE SOAP CO., Toronto, Onta- 
rio. — Sotips. 

MORTON, DAVID, Hamilton, Went- 
wortli, Ontario. — Laundry tioap. 

MOTT, T. PARTHON, St. John, New 
Brun8wio?£. — Composition Lic^uid (ot Slutinj; 
Blockboaraa. 

NELSON, W. J., Bridgewater, Lunen- 
burg. Nova Scotia. — " Minard's Liniment." 

NORTH AMERICAN CHEMICAL 
CO., Qoderioh, Huron County, Ontario. 
— Collection of Cbomicnls. 

PARKER, JOSEPH, 143^ Champ- 
lain Street, Montreal, Quebec— (1) Boot 
Polish. (2) Fruit Sftlino. 

PBNDRAY, W. J., & CO., Victoria, 
British Columbia. — Toilet and Laundry 
Soaps. 

POURTIER, MICHEL, 36 St John 
Street, Quebec. — '• Sothetion ■* — u remedy 
for diseuBoa of the respiratory organs. 

PRESCOTT EMERY WHEEL CO., 

Presoott, Ontario.— Emery Wlie<l», made 
of Bolid emery, und pressed together, after 
mixing, with cement or dnx. 

"PURE GOLD" MANUPACTUR. 
INO- CO., Toronto, Ontario.— (1) Carbon 
Paste Blacking. {2) Powdered Borax. 

PUTTNER BROS., Halifax, Nova 
Scotia. — " Budd's Cream Emulsion of Cod 
Liver Oil." 

RAMSAY, A., & CO., Id Inspector 
Street, Montreal, Quebec. — (1) Sulphide 
of Zinc — a new pigment, composed of zinc and 
sulphur, uon-poiBouous, unalterable in impure 
njtmosphcres, and possessing four times tlie 
covering power or body of pure white lead. (2) 
Six Panes of Glass and Six Pieces of Wood 
painted with Uie sulphide of zinc, to illustrate 
its quality. 

RICHARDS, D., Woodstock, Oxford, 
Ontario. — Laundry Soap. 

SAUNDERS, WILLIAM, & CO., 
London, Ontario. — Phntmaceutical Pro- 
ducts. 

SPRATT, JOSEPH, Victoria, British 
Columbia. — Fish Guano. 

STANDARD FERTILIZBR AND 
CHEMICAL CO., Limited, Post Office 
Box 170, Montreal, Quebeo.~(l) Chemi- 
cal Products. (2) Artificial 3Iaau<xs. 



STEWART, ALEXANDER, 20 Ger- 
main Street, St. John, New Brunswick. 

— Luuiulry Soups. 

STRACHAN, W., & CO., Montreal. 
Quebec— I'ctrolcum, Lubricating, and Lard 
Oils. 

WALKER, JAMES, Hamilton, Went- 
worth, Ontario. — Soups— product of tiUlow, 
H'sin, and alkali. 

WATERMAN, ISAAC, T ondon, 
Ontario. — (1) Canadian Petrolonni ami Pro- 
duft«, Parattin Products, in different statues, 
and CandluB, Ac. (2) Refuse Gas Oils, Fuel 
Oils, &1-. 

WATTS, A., & CO., Brantford. Brant, 
Ontario.— Soup — " Ivory »Bar," *• John A," 
" Tiger," " Klensodor Electric. ' 

WILSON, A. A., Sc CO., 219 St. Paul 
street, Montreal, Quebec. — (1) Mixed 
Coloured Paints. (2) S'.ar Ghiss, llreproof. 

YOUNG & WALTON, 21 De Erea- 
soles Street, Montreal, Quebec — IKiu- 
loek Uaik Extract. 



Class 21. 

Sanitary Appliances. 

AKIN, A. C, St. Hyacinthe, Quebec. 
— Cubt-iron Soil Pipe aud Fittings 

BOUNYN, WILLIAM WINQ- 
FIELD, Halifax, Nova Scotia. 

HEAP'S PATENT DRY EARTH 
OR ASHES CLOSET CO., Limited, 
Toronto, Ontario. — Automatic Dry Eanli 
Closet, fitted with urine separator. 

HUMBER, M., Victoria, British 
Columbia. — Bricks and Drain Tiles. 

KENNEDY BROS. 

MEHERCULES CHEST AND 
ROWING MACHINE CO. (THE). 
(Exhibited in Fancy Articles Department.) 

NORMAN, N. T. (Exhibited in Fancy 
Articles Department.) 

POWER, W. E., &; CO. 

STACKHOUSE, C. G., L.D.8., Ottawa, 
Ontario. — Artificial Teeth, Dental Vul- 
cauisera, Flaska, Articulators, Impreasioa Cups, 
Amalgams, Cements, &o, 



Canada. 



141 



Class 22. 

Surgical, Optical, and PhiU)«ophicalIn$tru- 
mrnls. 

CLUTHE, CHARIjES, Toronto, 
Ontario. — Tiusauii and Surgical Appliances. 

GRANT, HENRY, & SON, Montreal, 
Quebec— HpectuoleB anil Eyu-KlaseeH, innnn- 
facttired from nativo pebblo fuund in the 
vicinity of the Rocky Mouutains. 

HEARN AND HARRISON, Mon- 
treal, Quebec. — (1) Stcn'oai-opcB, Groplio- 
Bcnpt!8, Spectacles, Ccllulosed £yc-|<;lai>808, &c. 
(2) StereoMcopio ViewB. 

LEON, L. K., Toronto, Ontario.— 

Patent Adjnatmeut for Spectaolus uml Eye 
Glasses. 

MONTREAL OPTICAL AND 
JEWELLERY CO., Montreal, Quebec. 
— Sj)cctac!es and Eyo-glasBeu. 

SHELL, A., and HART, M., 668 
Craig Street, Montreal, Quebec. — Spec- 
tacle!} and Eye-glosseii (Alaska stone). 

WILLIAMS, H., Toronto, Ontario.— 
Optical (iooils made from British Columbia 
Pebbles. 



Class 23. 

Fhotofjraphy. 

ALBION IRON WORKS CO., 
Limited, .Victoria, British Columbia. 

—Photographs of 3Iarine and Land Engines 
and Canning Machinery. . — .. „ 

BRAULT, P. L., St. John's, Quebec. 

— Photographs, colourod and uiicoloured. 

CAMPBELL AND SON, Toronto, 
Ontario. — Photographs of Scenery. 

CANADIAN GOVERNMENT. 

CLAPHAM, CHARLE9 C, Montreal, 
Quebec. — Group Tinted Photographs : Sir 
Jolin Macdoimld and Ministers. 



CLARK AND BOWNESS, Sum- 
merside. Prince Edward Island. — 

Photographs. 

FRANCIS, A. W., Woodstock, On- 
tario. — Photographs of liuiMings and Scenery 
in the County of Oxford, Ontario. 

HABERER, EUOENE. 616 St. Denis 
Street, Montreal, Quebec. — Binl's-eyo 
View of tlie City of Montreal, from Victoria 
Bridge to llocholaga Cotton Mills. 

HALIFAX CITY COUNCIL, Hall- 
fax, Nova Scotia.— Photographic Views. 

HARBOUR COMMISSION OF 

QUEBEC— Collections of Photographs and 
Pliius of tlio ILirbour of Quebec and of the 
Graving Dock at Levis. 

HASTINGS, J. C, Victoria, British 
Columbia.— Photographs. 

HENSHAW, F. C, Montreal, Que- 
bec. — St. George's Snow Shoe Club mustering 
for a Tramp. 

JACK, PET'ER, HaUfax, Nova 
Scotia. — Photographs of Scenery on the Sack- 
ville River, Nova Scotia. (Taken by Lieut. 
Gladstone, R.N.) 

"LE MONDE" JOURNAL, Mon- 
treal, Quebec (J. IiESSARD, Agent, 
1650 Notre Dame Street). — Photographs 
of the Pn\-<a from which the Journal is printed. 

LETSON, WILLIAM A., Liverpool, 

Nova Scotia. — Photographic Views. 

McINTYEE, PETER, Charlotte- 
town, Prince Edward Island. — Photo 
graphic Viuw:i, in frame, of Churches, Parochial 
Houses, Schools, &o. 

MONTREAL HUNT (THB\ Mon- 
trcal, Quebec. — Photographic Picture, sliow- 
ing interior and exterior of Club House, Stables, 
Grounds, <L'c. 

NEWBERY, ARTHUR, Charlotte- 
town, Prince Edward Island. — Photo- 
graphic Views. 

NOTMAN, WILLIAM, AND SON, 
Montreal, Quebec. — Photographs. 

PARK & CO., Brantford, Brant, 

Ontario. — Photographs. 



CLARKE'S New Patent 

"FAIRY" LAMPS AND "FAIRY" LIGHTS 

DRAWING AND BALL ROOMS, CONSERVATORIES, 

EVENING FETES. TABLE DECORATIONS, &o, 

SAMUEL CLARKE, Patent P3nraimd and Fairy Lamp and Light Works, 

CHILD'S HILL, LONDON; and NEWABK, NEW JCKSSY, X7.S.A. 



142 



CfatMda. 



PARKBB, O. F., Yarmouth, Nova 
Bootla. — I'hotographB. 

PRINCE BDWABD ISLAND 
GOVERNMENT, Charlottotown. — 

Photographs of portion of City of Ciiariottc- 
town. 

REED, AliEXANDER P., Dart- 
mouth, Nova Scotia. —Photographs. 

RICHARDSON, LETITIA, 182 St. 
James Street, Montreal, Quebec— IMiuto- 
grapha of Montrcul , 

SINCLAIR, QEOROE L.. Dart- 
mouth, Nova Scotia. — Pliotogrfiphs. 

SMITH, ANDREW (Principal of the 
Ontario Veterinary College), Toronto, 
Ontario. — Pliofc-graphs of the Ooilcgo, tlio 
DisMfcting-room, Optmting-rooni, iind Dwilling 
of t hu Bunior Oiuh at tlie Outurio Vuteriuiiry 
College. 

SOULB AND MARSHALL, Park- 
dalu, York, Ontario.— Photograplia. 

STEVENS, H. 8. (Mayor of Monoton), 
Moncton, New Brunswick.— Photographs 
of Publio Buildings in Moncton. 

BTUBBERT, JAMBS A., North 
Sydney, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. — 
Photographs. 

VALL^B, LOUIS P., 39 St. John 
Street, Quebec— Pliotographio Views and 
Portraits. 

WHITNEY, JOHN L. (Mayor of 
Kingston), Kingston, Ontario. — Pholo- 
graphb of the City of Kingston. 

WINDSOR HOTEL CO., Montreal, 
Quebec — Combination Picture, showing views 
of the Windsor Hotel, interior and exterior. 



Class 24. 

General Application of the Arts of Drawing and 
Modelling, 

BAKER, ROBERT, Toronto, On- 
tario. — Model of Bond Street Ongregational 
Church, Toronto, with Drawing of the same. 

CANADIAN GOVERNMENT 
(THE), Ottawa, Ontario.— Medal struck 
in Coiuinemorutiou of thx Confederation of the 
British Nortli American Provinces. 

DESJARDINS, ALFRED, 186 Iber- 
ville Street, Montreal, Quebec. — Oolleo- 
tWn of OAnftdiivu Coins, 



GROUP VI.— EDUCATION AND 
INSTRUCTION. 

Education Department — ONTARIO 
GOVERNMENT, Toronto ; Minister of 
Education— Hon. GEORGE W. ROBS', 
LL.B., M.P.P. ; Commissioner of Edu- 
cation— 8. P. MAY, M.D., C.L.H. 

COLLECTIVK EXIIIDTT. 

I. — NonMAL AND MoDEIi KOHOOI.M, PUHLIO ANP 
HiGU yciIOOlJJ, CoLLLCilATE LssTITliTE, &C. 

1. Ilidorical and Staligtical, — Educational 
Reports ; Journal of Education ; Statutes and 
llegulations for High ami Public Schools; 
Charts, showing progress of High and Public 
Schools, County Mmlel Schools. Training Insti- 
tutes, &c. ; Map of Ontario, showing the Pnblio, 
Separate, and High Schools, Collegiate Insti- 
tute, &c. 

2. School Method and Organization. — School 
Rogisfors; Examination Papers; Text Books 
on History of I'lduoation, School Management, 
Toaihinti, &c. ; Manual of Hygiene; Scripture 
R( ndinu's for Publio and High Schools ; School 
Architecture. 

Piiotographs of Schools, C!olIogP8, &c. — Nor- 
mal and Model Schools, Toronto and Ottawa; 
Public Schools, Brantford, (imleneh, Hamilton, 
Ingcrsoli, London, Morrisburgh, Napaneu, Ot- 
tawa, Peterborough, Toronto, Wondstoek; In- 
dian Schools, Sault Stc. Mario, High Schools, 
Belloyillc, Godenoh, Port Perry, Stratford, 
Woodstock ; Collegiate Institutes, Bninttbrd, 
Guolph, Ingorsoll, Ottawa, Peterborough, St 
Catherine, Toronto. 

3. Srhiiol Furniture and Fittinga — Bennnt 
Furnishing Co., London. School Desks, W. 
Stuhlsehmidt, Preston. Bohool Desks, Map 
Supply Co., Toronto. Numeral Frames, Erasers, 
Ac, 8(l'«y & Co., Toronto. 

4. Kindergarten 
Chairs. 

5. Fhysianl Education. — Gymnasium, Dumb 
Bells, Indian Clubs, Meberculea Chest and 
Rowing Plaehines. 

6. Text Books for Public SchooU. — Reading 
and English Literature, Book-keeping, Arith- 
metic, Geogiaphy, Grammar and Composition, 
Hi-tory, Algebra, Geometry, Chemistry and 
Agriculture, Physios, Music, Drawing. 

Canada Publishing Co., Toronto. — Collection 
of Text Books, Canadian Drawing Course Copy 
Books. 

7. Text Booktfor High S'ihoola and CollegiaU 
InstituiaM. — English, Latin, Greek, French, 
German, Mathematics, History. Geography and 
Antiquities, PhVbio d Science, &c. 

8. Beading (fhartt, Phonetic Charts, Beading 
Lcssoni*. 

C. P. Simpson, Lenmington. — Tabulated 
Phonetic Alphabet Chai-ts. 

9. Dratcing, Drawing Models, Drawing Book$, 
do. 



Kindergarten Tables and 



Ctmada. 



14S 



Belby A Co., Toronto.— Drawing Models and 
leometrical Figuroa. 

10. Miuio. 

B. 8. Williama ft Son, Toronto. — Public 
Icbool Cabinet Organ, Public and High School 
'iano. 

Canada School Publishing Co., Toronto. — 
lusio Charts and Bonks. 

11. Oeography and Adronomy. — Topogrn- 
ihicHl Illustrations: Trrrosl rial Cloboo, Raised 
nd Physical (Jlobes. Maps, K<isL'd Maps. 

Map and Scliool Hiipply Co., Toronto. — Maps, 
iumpe, Asia, Africa, America, Dominion of 
lanada, Ontario, Map Case, &o. 

Canaia School Publishing Co., Toronto. — 
lailway Map of Ontario. 

Astrunomical Illustrations : Celestial Olobea, 
)rrerie8, &o. ; Astronomical and Physical 
harts. 

12. Chronology.- ■Qenoe,\o^co,\ and Ohrono- 
•gical Charts, Ancient and Mo lem. 

13. Ethnography. — Portrait Busts of diatin- 
[uished Canadians ; Portrnits of Indians. 

14. Anatomy and Phyniohgy. — Mnnikin, Ana- 
omioal Models, Anatomical and I'hyoiologioal 

harts and Diagn^ms. 

15. Zoology. — Andnbon's Mammalfl of North 
Itnerioa, Zoological Diagrams. 

IG. Botany. — Botanical Charts and Diagrams, 
)bj6ct Lessons, Models of Plants and Fruit 

17. Geological Charts. 

18. Philosophical Cluirtt. 

19. Physical and Chemical Apparatus. — Ap- 
»ratus for illustrating Matter, Force, and 
lotion ; Graviiatitm and Molecular Attraction ; 
lydrostatics ; Properties of Gases; Acoustics ; 
leat ; Light : Frictional Electricity ; Dynamical 
Jlec^tricity, Chemical Apparatus. Migcclluneous. 

Map Supply Co., Toronto. — Colh-ction of 
School Appiiratus for experiments with Guses, 
leotricity, &c. 

20. Pupils' Work. — Specimens of Writing, 
)rawing, Map Drawing, Arithmetic, Coinposi- 
ioTj, Sewing, Kindergarten, &c., from rur.il 
ohools and schools in cities, towns, and villages. 

I. Mechanics' Institutes and Bbancu Abt 
Schools. 

Specimens of Drawings and Examination 
ffotk, Charts and Diagrams, &c. 

W. Edwards, Sdcretary, Ontario Mechanics' 
nslitutes Association, Toronto. — Roll and Re- 
ord and Accession Books for public libraries. 

Lacey R. Johnson, President Mechanics' In- 
titute, Ciirleton Place. — Working Model of 
Sndisb Locomotive. 

A. Parker, Carleton Place. — Ornamental 
nlaid Wood Table. ' 

James McVety, Carleton Place.— Model of 
)welling House. 

J. O'Brien, Guelph. — Collection of Wood 
Irving. 

Antlioay Miihone, Garden Island. — Model of 
^ Dram of Timber, as prepared for running the 
apids of the river St. Lawrence. 

A. Gumming, Garden Island. — Working 
Jodel of a Harbour Tug Steam Enj[ine. 



m. Art Sohooui. 



Ontario School of Art, Education Depart- 
ment, Toronto. — Specimens of Drawing in 
Grades B and A : Oil Paintings, Water Colour*, 
MfHlelling in Clay and Plaster Casts, Sculptur© 
in Marble, Chasing on Brass, Repou8s<< Work, 
Eleclro-Metallurgy, Carving on Wood.' 

School of Art, London. — SiHwimens of Draw« 
ing in Gmdes B and A. : Maohinu Drawings, 
Oil Paintings, Water Colours, Modelling in 
Clay ond Casts, Painting on China. 

School of Art, Ottawa.— Specinjcns of Draw- 
ing in Grade B ft A: Mechanical Drawing, 
Life Studies, Water Colours, Oil Pa.ntin>;M. 

Schof.l of Art, King^ton. — SiHJCimons of 
Driwing in Grades B and A: Architectural 
Drawing. Mechanical Drawing, Wutor Colom% 
Oil Paintings. ' 

IV. Inbtitctions fob the Blind and Dkaf 

AND Dumb. 

Ontario Institute for the Blind, Brantford.— 
Historical and Statistical Reports, Charts, &o. ; 
Photography of Buildmgs; Pupils in Work- 
shops, ftc; Appliances for Teaching. Pupils' 
work: Reading and Writing, Willow Work, 
Crochet Work, Bead Work, Machine and Hand 
Scwinjj, Slachinc-knitted (Joods, Hand-knitting. 

Institute for the Deaf and Dumb, Belleville. 
—Reports and Charts, Photography of Buddings 
and PupUs, Text Books, &o. 

V. Colleges of Agbicultcbb and Vetebi- 

NABY SCIENCK. 

Onti.rio Agricultural College nnd Experi- 
montid Farm, Guelph.— Snecimens illustrating 
the Geology of Ontario, Rocks whicli chiefly 
compose the earth's crust Minerals which con- 
stitute the majority of rooks. Animals which 
have influenced the formation of soil ; Speci- 
mens illustrating Syst-inatic and Economic 
Botany ; Collection of Minerals us d for refer- 
ence in the Museum, Anatomical Mod- Is of 
Horse and Cow, Head of Duvon Deer, Head of 
Prince Albert Windsor Boar; Collection of 
Insects; Collection of Agricultural Seeds ; 
Charts bhowing experiments made on the farm. 
Reports, &c. 

Entomological Society, Ontario.— Reports. 

Ontmo Veterinary College.- Andrew Smith, 
V.S., Principal and Proprietor, Toronto. Large 
Photographs of Buildings, Dissecting Rooms, 
Students at work, Operating Rooms, and Gi»- 
duatory Classes. 

VI. School of Pbactical Science. 

Photograph of Building and Reports, Speci- 
mens of Drawing from the Department of 
Eujfineering. 

Vn. COMMEBCIAL COLLEGES, &0. 

Institute Canadian Francais, f)ttawa.— Crayon 
Drawing, Indian Ink and Pencil Sketobw, 
Mechanical Drawings, ^o, 



144 



Canada. 



MoUwrologioal Os«nr?fttory, Toronto. — Photo- 
grapli of Uuilding. 

W. A. Austin, Principal Bnii^nrsa Ck)Ucgo, 
Brookvillo. Books illuatrating Theory and 
Actual BuRinnKR Department, Text Booka, Btu- 
dents' Work, Pon ond Ink Hketohoa, Ac. 

C. A. Fleming, Principal Buaincaa College, 
Owen Hound. — Speciinena Ornamontul Pcnmun- 
■hip. 

R. E. Gallagher, Principnl Business College, 
Hamilton. — Specimens Ornamental Penman- 
•hip. 

VIII. Universities, CoLLKasa, 8cBooi.8 or 
Medicine, &o. 

Photographs of Albert Univcraity, BelleTille ; 
Victoria University, Cobourg ; Toronto Univor- 
eitv, Toronto ; University Trinity College, 
Toronto: " Koamoa" (V.P. .loirnal) ; "Acta 
Viotoriana " (a monthly journol). 

Upper Ciiniula Collojjte, Toronto. — Statistical 
Charts and Reports, specimens of Drawings and 
"Writing. 

Alma Lodios' College, St. Thomas. — Spoci- 
mens of Drawiug. 

Ontario Ladies' College, Whitley. — Specimens 
of Drawing and Wat^ir f'olours. 

Tjaf lies' Col lege, Brautfonl. — Oil Paintings 
and Water Colours. 

Ladies* College, Hamilton. — Oil Paintings. 

Ladies' Colleiie, Woodstock. — Drawingb, Oil 
Paintinga, and Water Colours. 

Lorctto Abbey, Toronto. — Photograph of 
Bnilding, Oil Paintinga, Oil on Velvet, Water 
Colours, Crayon Drawings, Embroidery, Wax 
Work. 

Loretto Convent, Hamilton. — Oil Paintings 
on China, Water Oolourn, Modelling in Clay, 
Fancy Wool, Hon i ton Lace. 

School of ISIcdieine, Toronto. — Chart and 
Photograph of Buildings. 

Boyal College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
Kingston. — View of Building. 

Osgoode Hall, Toronto. — Photographs of 
Bnlldinga and Library. 

Do I;a Snlle Institute, Toronto.— Photograph 
of Building. 



OANADLA.N OOVERNlIEi^rT (DB- 
PABTMBNT OP EDUCATION), 
Ottawa, Ontario. — Collective Exhibit of 
Educational Books, Maps, Drawings, Models, 
and Apparatus. 

CATHOLIC SCHOOLS OP THE 
PROVINCE OP MANITOBA, Winni- 
peg. — Collective Exhibit of Kducutiounl Ai>- 
pliances, Booka, Exerclaea, &c. 

COUNCIL OP ARTS AND MANU- 
PACTURES OP THE PROVINCE 
OP QUEBEC (S. C. STEVENSON, Sec- 
retary), Montreal, Quebec— Drawings by 
Pupils in the Free Evening Drawing Classes, 
nnaer iiie control of the Council of Arts and 
Manufacturoa of the Province of Quebec. 



COX, EDWIN, 4; CO., 114 
Pranois Xavler Street, Montreal, Qu 
beo. — Frame of Illuminated Work, <lono 
band. 

DERB:^, L. T., 2r4 Selgneur Stre< 
Montreal, Quebec— Pnstt;! Portrait. 

KIRKWOOD, W., Kemptville, Ore 
vllle, Ontario.— Portrait In Indian Ink 
Sir John Macdonald, and one of an eldci 
gentleman. 

NEW BRUNSWICK GOVERl 
MENT, St. John, New Brunewick.- 

Collectivo Exhibit of Educational Model 
ApparutuH, Bo ika. Maps, &o. 

NEW ROCKLAND SLATE CO. 

NOVA SCOTIA QOVERNMEN' 

Halifax. — Collective Exhibit;— (1) Hoho 
Desks. (2) Teacher's Desk. (8) Kchn 
Duaks, (4) School Cabinet of Nova Hoot 
Minomla. (6) Enton\ologioal Collection, 
twouty-four cases. (0) Case containing Pn 
scribed Text Booka. (7) Drawings of Pn 
scribed Plans for School-houaea. (8) EijI 
Photographic Views of Educational Building 
(9) Collection of Maps, Copy-books, Ksmvi 
Teiit-booka, &c., &o., Illustrating Work an 
System of the Institution for the Deaf an 
Dumb, Halifax, Nova Scotia. (10) Collectio 
lllustrntlni; the Hvstem of the Halifax Hchoo 
for the Blind, with Specimens of Ptipila' Worl 
(11) Large Portfolio contttining S|)ecini('n§ 
Needlowork. (12 1 Colleotlou of Maps drawi 
by Pupils. (18) Collection of Drawing b; 
Pupils. (14) Portfolios containing Speciraeti 
of Puplla' Work In Drawing, Map-rap.kinj 
Grammatical Analysis, Parsing, PcnmiinRhi| 
&c. (16) Specimens of Educational Form 
(16) Collection of Reports, School U> 
]\Ianuals, Courses of Stuay, University Oalei 
dars, &c. (17) Small Collection of Sundria 
Woodwork by Pupils, drc. 

OTTAWA SCHOOL OP ART AHl 
SCIENCE (Q. P. STALKER. Esq 
Principal), Ottawa, Ontario.— Illuminate 
Designs by the students. 

PR INCE EDWARD ISLAND 00 
VERNMENT, Charleatown, Prino 
Edward Island.— Collective Exhibit of £dn 
cational Apparatus, Models, Drawings, Booki 
Maps, &c. 

ST. JOHN, NEW BRUNSWICK 
ACADEMY OP ARTS AND PRE 
NIGHT, SCHOOL (JOHN C. MILB 
A.R.O.A., Principal; H. C. MILB 
Assistant), St. John, New Brunawlok.- 
Original Freehand Drawings from Natnr 
without aid of outline or lithographs, i 
Ciiarcoal and Crttyon. 



ITAHLSCHMIDT, W., & CO., Pres- 

*■ , Waterloo. Ontario School D«sk« 

Iron Htundorcla. 

AUOHAN, MISS ANNIE L.. St. 
.rtins, New Brunawiok.— l»oii and luk 

..AliDBN, OEOROB, Hamilton, 
itorio.— Cmyon I'ortruit, copied from a 
ii'logriiph. 

WILKINS, LOUISA A., Windsor, 
Ants, Nova Scotia. —Crayon l^rawinf. 

Books and Publications. 

BAKER, HON. L. B., Yarmouth, 
ova Scotia. -" HUtory uf the County of 
iriuouth," by the Kov. J. R. Campbell. 



Canada. j 4^ 

MONTGOMERY, D., Charlottetow^, 
Prince Edward Island. — EdiuiUionnl 
liookH, MnpH, rH|MT8, Scc. 

PBRIARD, A., 23 St James Street, 
Montreal, Quebec— Lowir Cmuidiuu L«wr 

lioUKM. 

PROVENCHBR, THE ABB]6 L., 
Cap Rouge, Quebec— Work on Nataral 

liiHtory. 

SMITH. WALTER H., Montreal, 

Quebec— (1) Vouuor'M Aliuttimc f..r 1885. 
(2) Smith's Plari'itory Almauoc for 188«i. 

8TRANOE gc CO., Toronto, Ontario. 
—Sheet Music and Music Books. 

WA08TAFF. J. H, St. John, Now 
Brunswick.— Itapid Index. 



BBAUCHEMIN & VALOIS, Mon- 
eal, Quebec- Books. ■ 



CANADIAN GOVERNMENT CDB- 
ARTMENT OP INTERIOR), Ot- 
wa, Ontario. — Surveya in North- West 
srritorios; Plana of Townships west of the 
Mnd, third, fourth, and fifth meridians, 
eomjMinicd by a general Map of part of the 
)rtli-West Territories, including the Province 
Manitoba (in eight bound vo1uix.jb). 

CRITIC" PUBLISHING CO., 

alifax. Nova Scotia. — Printed matter 
aring upon the Resources of Canada. 

DAWSON BROTHERS, Montreal, 
lebec— Books priuted in Canada, and Bind- 

',i made there. 

BAOB, W. J., & CO., Toronto, On- 

ric— (1) School and College Text Books. 
■ Writing Copies. (8) Reading Books. (4) 
ill Maps. 

GAZETTE " PRINTING CO., 
ontreal, Quebec— Printed Books and 

mphlets. 

IBNDBRSON, JAMES, Winnipeg, 
mitoba.— Manitoba and North-West Direc- 
es from 187C to 188G (14 vols.). 

NOERSOLL UNION PUBLISH- 
G 00. (J. P. MORREY). (Exhibited 
Class 10.) 

iAWRENCB, J. W., St. John, New 
onswick.— A book, entitled " Foot.irints, 
Incidents in the Early History of New 
nswick." 

JtoALPINE, CHARLES D., St. John, 

wr Brunswick.— Plans of St. John City in 
li and in 1836. 



Class 2. 

Maps. 

BROWN, JAMES, 64 Yonge Street. 
Toronto, Ontario.— Stands and Elevators 
tot Maps, with maps attached, invented and 
manufactured by the Exhibitor. 

CANADIAN GOVERNMENT (De- 
partment of Railways and Canals). 
Ottawa, Ontario.— Map of ihe Dominion 
of Canada. 

CANADIAN GOVERNMENT fGEO- 
LOGICAL SURVEY OP CAJtfADA. 
Ottawa, Ontario).— Collection of Maps. 
{hot dotpils see Official Catalogue of the 
Dominion Government.) 

mS-r^^^^^'^ GOVERNMENT 
TELEGRAPH SERVICE, Ottawa. 

Ontario. — (l) Sectional Map of Canada. 
(2) Sphere Map of the World. 

«5^^^°^^ COMMISSIONERS OP 
MONTREAL, Monti-eal, Quebec-(l) 
Mup of River St. Lawrence from Quebec to 
Montreal. (2) Map of the River from Montreal 
to Kingoton. (3) Map of Harbour of Montreal. 

McMILLARD, J. St A., St. John, 
New Brunswick.— Map of New Brunswick. 



GROUP VII.— PINE ARTS. 

Class 1. 

Oil Paintings ami Water Colours are sliotm in 
(he. OaUcry of the Royal Albert Hall. Fur list 
see jHige xcvii. 



146 



Canada. 



Class 2. 
Sculpture. 

BEtJLLAC, B., 1674 Notre Dame 
Btrc'^jt, Montreal, Quebec. — Beligious 
Statues. 

Hl^BERT, L. P., 83 Bury Street, 
Montreal, Quebec— 8tatun of Sir Hector 
Laugevin, Miuiuter of Public Works of Canada. 

Class 3. 

Engrc /ingt on Steel and on Wood, Etching*. 

FIiEWWEIiIilNG, C. H., St. John, 

Nevr BriuiBwick. — (1) EugravinRS on Wood, 
vritli llook of Prints from the Engravings. 
(2) Engraved liloika. 



' JONES, J. L., iToronto, Coun 
York, Ontario.— (1) Wood Engraved Bloc 
finished. (2) Spccnnens of Wood Engravi 
and Designs. 

KOFPEL, C. W., 187 St. James Stre 
Montreal, Quebec. — Wood Engraving. 

HOLPH, SMITH, & CO., Toron 

Ontario. — Wood Engraving. 



WISEMAN, JAMES 
James Street, Montreal 
Engravings, Portntits, Views, &c. 



3 L., 16S i 
, Quebec— Wd 



•W ..Td - 



'w; 



•w. 



.■- ,-i t 



AdvertitemenU. 147 



To Her Majesty the glS^^^^C* To H.R.H. 

QUEEN. ^SB^I^PP^ ^*^® Prince of Wales. 

|G. E. FRODSHAM& to. 

* ' ONLY ADDRESS— 

;i, GRACECHURCH STREET, E.C» 

ESTABLISHED 1796. 

riDanufacturcre of ©cat f 

NGLISN WATCHES, 

PERFECT IN CONSTRUCTION ' 

ACCURATELY COMPENSATED. MINUTELY ADJUSTED. ' 

ESPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR 

HOT AND COLD CLIMATES. ^ 

OUR GOLD mLESS LEVER, 0><e><n„' 

\H DUST-PROOF CASES, Jj I if 1 llS 

A SPECIALITV UNEQUALLED. ^**' M.VUI 

OUR SILVER KEYLESS LEVER, OD Da 

IN DUST-PROOF CASES, ' JjU OS. 

CANNOT BE SURPASSED. OUR OWN U\KE. ^V VW| 

PRI0¥s. •" J 

Gold Keyless Pocket Chronometer, full Jewelled, /.^o * ^ 

Compensated and Adjusted. x/I^* 

Gold Keyless Minute Repeater, Ruby Jewelled, ^-^^ 

and Adjusted. ' j£75. 

Gold Keyless Minute and Second Chronograph, full r^^ 

Jewelled and Adjusted. X»7S 

Gold Keyless Half Chronometer, Ten Holes r^n. 

Jewelled, Compensated, &c. Jti40» 

Gold Keyless Three-quarter Levers, Ten Holes /-,- 

Jewelled and Adjusted. jbO* 

Silver Lever Watches, Compensated Balance, from £6, 

Marine Chronometers, £25. 
ENGLISH QUARTER, CHIME, AND TURRET CLOCKS. 



148 



AJverttsemenh. 



RARSOMES, SIMS & JEFFEBIES, L 

jgCovicultutal ^noincets, 



ORWELL 
WORKS, 



IPSWICH AND LONDON 



e, QRACEOHUROH 
STREET, 



For Burning 
Coal, Wood, 
Straw, and 
Vegetable 
Fuel, 



Stationary Engines. 
Vertical Engines. 
Winding Engines. 
Pumping Machinery 




BAKSOMES' PORTABLE ENOIMEB. 



BANSOMES' COMPOUNI) ENGINES. 



FACTOBV.— B." S. & J.'s Factory, eatablished in 1876, covers 13 acres, and 
employs 1200 to 1400 hands. Theix-.' productions, which are in use in every 
part of the world, have been awarded the highest honours at all the 
International Exhibitions in England and abroad. 



Also with Straw-Bruising Apparatus. 



Ansell's Patent 





BANBOMES' THBA8HIN0 MACHINEBT. 



BAN80ME8' TEA SOBTEB. 



VISITORS TO IPSWICH.-S. S. & J. will be much pleased to see Visitors 

. trom the Colonies and India interested in Agricultural Machinery at tbeir 

Works, and to show them the Special llaohines and Implements they 

manufacture. Anyone desiring to visit the Works will please communicate 

direct with the Company. 



For all Countrlet, 
Soils, and Uses. 




BANS0ME8' H0B8E BAKE8. 



BANS0HE8' PLOUGHS OF ALL KINDS. 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUES & PRICES POST FREE ON APPLICATION. 



( 149 ) 



-/■• '/ ~ t 



NEW SOUTH WALES. 

Is tlicso brief pagos it is only 'proposed to give ft short account of Not? South W'tileii, the 
great "Mother Colony" from which has sprunjj all the other En-^lish dependencies of 
Australasia. 

Without going into any detailed accounts of the voyat^cs of the early Spanish, Dutch, and 
Portuguese navigators in the waters of the Pacific, it is sufficient to recall the fact, that the 
first Englishman who beheld the Australian coaat was tho world-renowned buccaneer, William 
Dampier, ono of tho greatest of English seamen. Darapier men-Iy saw a portion of tho 
Dortliera coast of the vast Island-Continent, and the present gi-neration of ** AuHtralian 
English" owe little to that erratic seafaring genius, inasmuch as his adverse rejtort retarded 
Bottlcmont for many years. Ho briefly denounco<l the country as a desert, and tho inliabitants 
as the most wretched savages on the face of tho earth, a character which subsequent etlino- 
logists have been only too ready to endorse. 

It was not until the year 1770 that Captain Cook sailed into Botany Bay, and, unfurling 
tho Britibh flag, took possessiou of tho Island-Continent in tho name of the British Crown. This 
was in the reign of George III., a reign ill-starred, in that England then lost for ever her great 
North American colonies ; but during which also, by her unconqu(>rablu supremacy at Bea, she 
was enabled to compensate herself for her losses in tho Atlantic by new and glorious acquisitions 
in tho Pacific. Fitly, therefore, does Captain Cook's monument proudly stand in Hyde Park, 
Sydney, overlooking tlie Antiixxlcan metropolis which has sprung up on tho shores of tlie series 
of cxquiaito bays which form tho Harbour of Port Jackson. 

It was not, however, until tho 13th of May, 1787, that any scrioud attempt to ittilise these 
uuw )>o8scssious of the British Crown was made. 

Then it was that Englnnd's great Imperial Minister — William Pitt — de<i|)atched Cap^Jiin 
Arthur Phillip, R.N., with certain ships to these newly-acqnired territories, and wit li orderu to 
funn a settlement at tho Bay which Cook had named from the luxurious vegetation of its 
eloping shores. 

Phillip finding Botany Bay an unfit sjmt for his settlement, sailed round to Port Jackson. 
There ho laniied his 7.')0 j)ersons and founded Sydney, so called after the then Secretary of 
State, and established the nucleus of the great Colony of New South Walen, of which ho was the 
first governor. 

Governor Phillip was succeeded by Captain Hunter, and then by Captain King, whose 
admiriihio reign was followed by the troublous times of Governor Bligh ; to whom, after the 
"iuteri:?guum" of Lieutenant- Cols. Johnstone and Paterson, succeeded Governor Maoquarie, from 
whose time tho prosperity of tho Colony may not unfitly bo dat(>d. 

Passing over the time of tho early explorers, such as Dawes, Patterson, Hacking, Cayley, 
Nana, and Bass, whose discoveries were confined to tlie coast line, we come to that of William 
Charles Went worth (afterwards tho most illustrious of Au.^tralian stntesmen), who, with (ircgory 
Ulaxlaud and Lieutenant William I^awson, in May, 18i:t, cfTertcd a pa88aq;e acro!>8 the Blue 
Mountains, and discovered tlu; groat plains of tiie interior. 

From this achievement of these throe pioneers, therefore, may be traced what ia accurately 
described as tho "opening up" of the country. Governor Aliieqnariu turned their discoveries to 
iiccount by sending Surveyor Evans and Major, afterwards Sir Thomas, Mitchell, to ojien up a 
jMua, following whoso disoovories of the "Wide We8t<'ru Slojum" came the merino sheep 
(introduced by Macarthur), and tho inauguration of tho jmstoral era of tho Colony. 

After the pastoral era (wo are compeUcMl in this brii f summary to procied by '* leaps and 
bounds") came the era o*" the gold discoverioo. This was followed !)y the full tide of emigration. 
Tho province of Port Phillip separated from the " Mother Colony "in ISfil, and became the 
Colony of Victoria; and siihstquenlly, in 185S>, tho district of Moreton Bny was constituted ft 



150 New South Wales. 



Bepamte colony under tho nnmo of Queensland. From theso days the history of 'Now South Walet 
is one of ever increasing progress and prosperity. Tho " sottlement," with its population d 
1,000 persons, has developed into a great solf-goveming colony, with a population of nearly i 
million, and with a metropolis, world-renownod for tho pre-eminent beauty of its site, of somi 
300,000 souls. This briefly ia tlio history of New South Wales from Uio days of Governor Phillij 
to thoBO of Lord Carrington; and it ia a not unworthy or ignoble record of a century'i 
work in what tlio late Walter Baf^ehot would call •' Nation-making." 

Now South Wales is situated between tlio 28° 15' and 37° 35' south latitude, and tho 141" 
and 153° 85' cast longitude, and comprises nu area of 310,700 square miles, which in round 
nnmbera is some 200,0tJ0,0U0 acres, and about tiirco times tho 'extent of Great Britain and Ireland 
Sydney, the capital of the Colony, stands on tho shores of Port Jackson, a harbour of romantic 
beauty and surpassing loveliness, not having its equal in tho world. Wooded to tho water*! 
edge, and stretching inland in a hundred finely rounded bays, land-locked and secure, where all 
tho mercantile and armed fleets of tho world might ride at anchor at one time. Tho city extendi 
some four miles north and south, by a breadth of six miles oast and west. It has been estimated 
to contain about 125 miles of streets, and some 40,000 houses, with a population, inclusive o{ 
its extensive suburbs, of close on 1^00,000. Tho Botanic Gardens, Government Domain, Uydc 
Park, Princo Alfred Park, Belmoro Park, Victoria Park, Weutworth Park, Moore Park, and 
other public reserves, cover an area of 800 acres, and uro all easily accessible for purpf«es of 
recreation, forming, like those of London, the "lungs" of the rapidly iticreasing city. Not only 
is the population of the metropolis of the Colony increasing with wonderful rapidity, but tho 
city is being yearly more and more beautified by tho splendid new buildings that have been 
erected, both for business ond residential purposes. 

The main wealth of a country is of courso its territory, and it is to tho rich agricultural 
lands aa well as to the boundless pastoral plains of New South Wales that its present progress 
and future prosperity must l>o chiefly attributed. Glancing at the pastoral interest, it readi 
like a romance — though the romance bo cpdiedded in Mr. Goschen's favourite form of 
figures. In 1792 the live stock of New South Wales, which wa« then tho whole of Australia, 
consisted only of 23 head of cattle, 11 horses, 105 sheep, 43 pigs, and a few goat^. In 1885, or 
during a period of 90 years, the numbers had increased to 9,000,000 cattle, 80,000,000 sheep, 
1,500,000 horses, 1,000,000 pigs. These numbers include tho live stock of New South Wales and 
tho other two colonies which separated from her, viz., Victoria and Queensland — as well 
OS those of Tasmania, South Australia, Wostem Australia, and New Zealand, which during tho 
same period have l)oen chiefly stocked from tho ofTspring of tho Mother Colony. In the annaU 
of the world's history, no country can show such a marvellous progress in pastoral ontorpriso; 
and the lucky "accident" of the introduction of the merino sheep, from which by careful 
breeding and natural diflerentiation from tho original Spanish type, New South Wales, at 
the Paris International Exhibition of 1878, " obtained the Grande Medaille d'Honneur," in 
competition against the whole world. 

With the increaso of population, and by the action of land laws specially designed to settle tho 
peoplo on small farms, agricultiuo has more tlmn kept pace with its older pastoral rival. Some 
80,000 persona are engaged in agricultural pursuits alone, and 852,000 acres are under wheat, 
barley, oat», maize, and other cereals. This quantity is actually under crop, but some 34,000,000 
acres comprise the agricultural holdings of the Colony, of which perhaps 28,000,000 acres are 
enclosed. 

The following table, compiled from the returns of 21st March, 1885, shows the quantity of 
land under cultivatiou and the produce of each crop : — 

' ■ ! >• '»,. Acreage, 

Wheat 27.5,2491 

Maize 115,(i00| 

Barley 7,03.^ 

Oats 19,472i 

Bye 1,110* 

Millet 118i 

Potatoes 12,417i 

Tobacco 1,046 

Sorgham and Imphu . 41 . . . . . , 



Produce. 




4,203,394 1 


susheia 


2,989,585 


«< 


148,869 


i< 


425,920 


»» 


16,789 


M 


1,843 


„ 


81,334f 


tons. 


9,914J 


owts. 


187 


M 



New South Wales. 



161 



While 7,000 acrea clawed as produotiTe and 10,500 as nnproductive represent the acr««ge 
f the sugar oane produoing 21,835,072 lbs.; and 4,584 acres in vines yielding 441,612 gallons 
f wine, 1,432 gallons of brandy, and 1,465} tons of fruit for the table. There are 6,911^ aorM 
f orangeries producbg 4,097,666 dozens of oranges. 



Ap:grogate value of Oold mines in N. S. W. up to 1884 

Yiuld for 1884 

Aggregate value of Goal mines^n N. S. W. np to 1884 
Value of « output" for 1884 



£35,361 ,5.')0. 

£390, 229. 

£15. 709, 291. 

£1,303,077. 



The following table, which is compiled from the ' Statiutioal Register of New South Wales 
or 1884,' published by the Govomment, will show the relative valucvs of the two great miiieral 
>roduct8 for the last ten years : — 



/ 
1 


GOLD. 


COAL. 




Year. 


on. 


Valoe. 


Tons. 


Value. 








£. 




£. 






1875 


229, 385,. 55 


881.480 


1,2.'53,475 


765.134 




*,t ■ 


1876 


155.166,37 


681,689 


1,319,918 


803,300 






1877 


122.629,24 


463,130 


1,444,271 


858,5«98 


• 




1878 


117,977,88 


423,184 


1,575,41)7 


915,228 




'1 . 


1879 


107,640,38 


399,187 


1,583,381 


950,879 






1880 


116.750,52 


434,641 


1,466,180 


615.337 






1881 


145,532,05 


550,111 


1,775,224 


603.248 






1882 


129,233,28 


491,5.>4 


2,109,282 


948,966 






1883 


122,256,58 


452,611 


2,521,457 


1,201,942 


• • - 


t . 


1884 


105,933.43 


390,229 


2,749,109 


1,303,077 


- ■ 



In addition to her gold and coal, Now South Wales is rich in copper, silver, tin, iron 
erosene shale, antimony, asbcutos and bismuth. 

The value of her various minerals for 1884 alone is estimated at £2,250,171. Whllo the 
Aggregate mineral wealth of all kinds to the end of that year reaches a grand total of 
£64,068,585. 

Besides those minerals, diamonds, rubies, opals, sapphires, and other precious stones are foand 
n various parts of this rich and highly favoured Cclony. 

The following, showing in tabular form the shipping trade of the various Australian 
colonies during the year 1883, shows that New South Wales, notwithstanding the healthy rivaliy 
of the younger Colonies, maintains the lead. , 



Name of Colony. 


Inwarda. 


Ontwards. 


ToUl. 


Veiaels. 


Tons. 


Veaaels. 


Tone. 


Veaeeb. 


Tons. 


New South Walea . . 
Queensland .... 
f^uth Australia . . 

Victoria 

Wostern Australia . . 

Total . . . 

New Zealand . , . 
Tasmania .... 

Grand Total 


2,587 

986 

1,062 

2,023 

219 


1,935,189 

455, ess 

748,926 

1,464,752 

194,273 


2,774 

867 

1,074 

2,064 

212 


2,071 048 
426,506 
755,839 

1,499,579 
194,829 


5.361 
1,808 
2.136 
4,087 
431 


4,006,237 

882,491 

1,504,765 

2,964.331 

389.102 


6,827 

806 
667 


4,799,125 

494,926 
230,002 


6,991 

861 
648 


4,i^7,801 

607,565 
241,630 


13,818 

1.696 
1,805 


9,746,926 

1,002.491 
471,722 


8,289 


5,524.143 


8,490 


5,696,996 


16,779 


11.221,139 



To which may be added, that the total nnmber of feflsels entered inwards for the year 1884 
<ras 2,985, with % tonnage of 2,284,517 ; while outwards the figures are— veesels, 3,010, tonnage 



152 New South WaUg. 



2,376,441 : making a total of 5,945 vesaola and 4,6(i0,i)58 tonnage, aa against 5,301 vcaaeli wi 
4,006,237 tonnage for 1883 ; while tho return of the vessels regiHtered in the Colony shows 
corresponding increase. 

Althougli theso figures afford some slight idea of the enormous material progress of tl 
Colony, it is necessary to add u few words in order to illustrate the social aud intellectual en 
dition of this important portion of our world-wide Empire. 

With regard to religion, all the sects stand on the same Icrel of equality, there being i 
" Establiuhud " or State Church, Theso churches arc supported entirely.by voluntary subocrip 
tions, as all ''State aid " ceased in 1862, except some small outstanding liabilities to the thfl 
existing incumbents. Itoughly s|>eaking, out of a population of 050,000 there aro some COO.On 
rrotentants, tliu great majority belonging to the Church of England, and about 280,000 Itonui 
Cutholica, the remainder being made up of various nationalities. It may be added that tb 
Protestant bishop of Sydney, the accomplished Dr. Barry, is the Bletropolitan : and that i\ 
head of the Roman Catholic Church, Dr. Moran, is tho first Cardinal who has been appoint« 
by tlie Pope to any British dependency. Tho Catholic and Protestant cathedrals of St. Mar 
and St. Andrew am two of the greatest architectural ornaments of the City. 

The education of tho rising generation has not been neglected by tho State. The Pnbli 
Instruction Act was passed in 1880, and under its provisions the teachers are classified as cir 
servants. Owing to the compulsory clauses, great progress has been effected in the matter d 
increased attendances, and now schools. The decennial return shows an increoMO from l,5Si 
schools in 1875, to 2,535 in 1884. and from 124,750 scholars to 202,510. If we add to theso lattc 
figures the numbers of those attending private schools, we should probably find a school popniatio 
of some 280,000, or almost ono-thirtl of the entire population of tlio Colony. Tho gma 
expenses of working tho Public Instruction Act — in school sites, building, furniture, &c., exceed 
£700,000 annually. 

The crown of the educational system of the Colony is tho University of Sydney, incorporated 
in 1851, and which owes its existencu largely lo tho patriotic efforts of the great Austrslua 
statesman, AVentworth. aided by Sir Charles Nicholson, and other prominent colonists. 

It enjoys a public grant of £10,000 annually, but has been enriched by princely bequests from 
wealthy colonists, the largest of which is that of Mr. Challhi, for £180,000. Its degrees and 
diplomas are botli recognised through tho British world, and its Professors and Lecturen, 
including, until his death, the illustrious Badham, have always been men of high academic 
distinction. 

Following the worthy example of the City and Guilds of the Ix)ndon Institute, the Board d 
Technical Education established a Technical College in August, 1 S83. 

Sydney also possosses a Museum, Free Public Library, and National Art Gallery, when 
much of tho genius and culture of tho Old 'W.vrld has been introduced into tho Now. 

It remains to add tlwt the public piess of the Colony bus kept pace with its othei 
progressive institutions; and in the admirable daily and weekly journals, the rcsidcDts o 
Sydney have the moans of knowiug what is going on ull over the civilised world. 

Even a summary so necessarily brief as this should ser?e to show that otur race in Now South 
Wales, though under brighter skies, and under somewhat more democratic social conditions, ImTo 
not in any way fallen back from their sires of the old land in tho unceasing strtiggle for cxisteo^'t 
that marks the progress of communities as well as the live* of individuals. 

JVctr South Wale$ Government Emigration. — Emigrants are selected bj the Agent-Gencnl 
or his oifloors, and selection is limited to such adults as can pay towards the cost of tbeir 
{wss&gc as foUow)] : £0 for each married couple, single men £4 each, and £2 each for singlo womra. 
Children under throe jnars of age, in charge of their parents, have a free |iassage ; and children 
of three and under fourteen years are charged for at tho nito of £1 each. Tho selection is msde 
from England, Scotland, and Ireland, as far as practicable, proportionately to the nimiber of 
people of theso nationalities alrondy in the Colony, m shown by the last census ; but 10 per oeai 
may be B<lected from otli r European countries. Sound health and goo<l moral chamctw »» 
indispensable qnaliflcntions. Married couples must not exceed forty years of ogo each jK'reon, 
and are taken with or without children ; unmarried men or women must not exceed thirty-fivs 
years of ago ; and not more than one-third of tho whole number of adults shall be unmarritd men. 
WJicu the ago e^coocja these limits, tho contribution fur {lassaga-moncy is iucrua«t-d t 



NetB South Wdlea. j53 

_ hani«j«, farmers, miners, yine-<lro«ser8, labourers, aad do^ostlT^rv^ri^irch^i^itr. 

sda iTtew to ho raqmrem^nt. of the industrial callings of tho Colony. Small wTkinc 

p.to.«t. ,n any bianch of colonial industry are doomed highly eligible. Families witir7pre^ 

«< en«M» of Tcry youn^childrea are considered ineligible. Full particular, as to the Govern- 

i IfU'^r .""^"'"^'T "» '^'^^ " «'« l«to«t facts and statistics co„cen,ing the Sr 

i;!' W^ I?', V 7' •"% *" t'^^'lf °° "PP"''''""" '' "'" «ffl~ "^ *^« Agent-General for New 
«th >\ale8, 5 V ictona Clinmbers, Westminster, 8.W. 



\..'"! 






>.. .t •., 



*i ■< • * 



V.'' . " ■ " ' ' f ' \ ■■,■-■■ 7 •"* r 

••*■••■. r , 

■ ■■ ' • \, 



■ i> 

r. 



154 AdvertUemmtt. 



THE SYDNEY MORNING HERALD 

la the oldest cKtnbliithed Newtpaper in the AuBtrelian ColonicB, and In New South Walc 
liAs maintained tlie lii;;he8t {XMition for many years past. It circulates widely throughuu: 
iifiw tSouth Wales, Victoria, Quecusiaud, and other parts of AuHtmlia. 



THE SYDNEY MAIL, 

ILLUSTRATED WEEKLY NEWS JOURNAL 

This paper has been repeatedly enlarged and continuously improved, with a view U 
adapting it equally to the wants of town and bush roHidents. It aims to supply the lates; 
triiKtworthy intelligence to all classes of the community, its news budget being compilcc 
in the oldtidt new»paix;r office in Austrtdin. Special attoniinn is devoted to S|)ortin;; 
Agricultural and I'ttstoral, and Mitiin<;; Subjects. The Illiistrations are drawn anc 
engraved by the la'st prucurable Artists, and the Fiction, Essayn, and other Literary con- 
tributions arc from the pens of writers of acknowledged ability. 

On reference to the Journal itself, it will be seen that ngoiicioa are established through 
out ALL THE COLONIES, including New Zealand, also San l-'rancisco. Now Caledouia 
Honolulu, &c. 

THE ECHO, 

AN EVENING PAPEH, 

Is Published every Afternoon. It contains the news of the day up to the hour of 
publication, aUo general reading matter. 

The intention of the Proprietors is to make the ECHO (which has a lar:»o and rapidly 
increasing circulation) a bright, racy, out'Spoken, and entertaining evening patter. 



LONDON OFFICE: 

8, GEORGE YARD, LOMBARD STREET, 

Where Advertisements and Subsorlptions are rooeived, and Files of the 

Newspaper may be seen. 



AGENTS. 



The undermentioned Newspaper and Advertising Agent"? are authorized to receive 
Advertisements for the SYDNEY MORNING HEIiALD.SYDNEY MAIL, and ECHO:- 

London Mr. GEOROE STREET, SO, Cornhill. EC. 

, Messrs. C. MirCHELL & Co., I'i & U. Hod Lion Court, Fleet Street, EC 

„ Messrs. BATES, HENDY & Co., 4. Old Jewry. E.C. 

„ Mr. F. ALCiAR, 11, Clement's T-ane, Lombard Street, E.C. 

„ Messrs. GORDON & GOTCH, St. Bride Street, Fleet Stroct, E.O. 

Birmingham... Mr. R. B. KIrtK, 90, New Street. 

Liverpool LEE & NIGHTINGALE, 15, North John Street. 

Bristol JAMES & HENRY GRACE, Royal Insurance Buildinn. 

Edinburgh ROBERTSON & SCOTT, 18, Hanover Street. 

, KEITH & Co., GH, Goorgo Stiect. 

Glasgow W. rOBTEOUS & Co., 15, Royal Exohange Flaoa. 



New South Walet. 



155 



SECTION A.— FINE ARTS. 
Class 1, 

Painting* and Drawintjt, 

. COCKS, O., Kiama.— Ponorantlc view 
tbo Coast District of Kinma. 

t COLLTNaRIDQE. A H T H U B, 

jrde.— OiiBund Wntcr Colours. 

3. OOLLINGRIDOB. O E O R Q E, 

ftwkesbury Kiver.— Water-Coloiir Draw- 
ls. 

|. HEBN, OHABLES R— Water-Colonr 
uwing, "Katoomlm Fall^i, Illuo Mountainti." 

5. PIQUENIT, W. C, Sydney.- Oil 

Jntinp, " A Billiibong on tlio Murray Kiver, 

S.W." Price £100. 

6. PIGUENIT, W. C, Sydney. — Oil 
iating, " Svdney in 1*182, from North Siioro, 
owiDK GurJen I'alacc, destroyed by lire, 22nd 

pteniber, 1882." Price £100. 

7. BAYER, JAMES W., Sydney.— 

Painting, " View on the Kurnyong." 

B. TURNER & HENDERSON, 
dney. — Hand-painted Water-Colour Drnw- 
fs of Australian Wild Flowers and Scenery. 

g. VIVIAN, WALTER H., Sydney.- 
Landiiottpes painted on Eucalyptus leaves. 

10. WATSON, P. FI^ETOHER, 

rdney.— Four Sketches. 

n. WOODHOtrSB, E. B., Campbell- 

Q.~()ll Pivinting. 

12. WOODHOUBE, E. B. Campbell, 
wn.— Oil Painting. 



Class 2. 

Setilpturet, Die-Sinhing^ and Emhoiiing. 

n TURNER 8e HENDERSON, 

'dney.— Herald 10, Mercantile, and Colour 
abogjiing, and Die- Sinking on Paper. 



Class 3. 

Arrhiteelural Dramng$, ModeU, Jte. 

14. AUSTRALIAN JOINT-STOCK 
BANK (Directors of), Sydney.— Wutor- 
Colour Drawing of New Heud Office, Auxtmlian 
Joint Ht<^*k lijnk, (Jeorgn nnd King Streets. 
E. H. C. lilackmann and I'urkes, ArcliitectH. 

15. DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC 
INSTRUCTION, Sydney.— Denigns and 
Photcgniphs of Public School HutldingH, pre- 
pan-d in tho .(Vrchittot's UUioo of tbo Depart- 
ment. 

16. ELLIS & SLATYER, Sydney.— 

Arcliiteetural Drawings. 

17. PRITCHARD, WILLIAM. Arohi- 
teot, Sydney. — Drawing of Sydney Kxcliunge, 
showing thu building. 

18. PRITCHARD, WILLIAM, Archi- 
tect, Sydney. — Drawing of Sles^o-i. Mort & 
Co.'s Wool Stores, Circular Quay, Sydney. 

19. PRITCHARD, WILLIAM, Archi- 
tect, Sydney —Drawing of Blcs^irs. Golds- 
borough's Wf)ol Store*, Sydney. 

20. SMITH, ROBERT BURDETT, 
M.]?., Sydney. — Silver Miuiaturo Statue of 
(Aiittain Cook, enK't<Hl in Hyde Park, Sydney. 

ai. BHEERIN Ss HENNB8SY, 

Sydney.— A rohiteotoral Drawing. I>esign of 
St. Patrick's College, being ercctetl at Manly, 
near Sydney. 

22. STUART, THOMAS PETER 
ANDERSON, MJ)., &o.. Professor of 
Anatomy and Physiology, University 
of Sydney.— Design of New Medical School, 
Sydney UniTersity. 

23. SYDNEY MUNICIPAL COUN- 
CIL, Sydney.— Plans and Drawings of the 
Town llall, and Centennial Hall, Sydney. 



Class 4. 

■. ■ ' 

Engraving*, Lithographs, &c. 

24. COLONIAL ARCHITECT OP 
NEW SOUTH WALES, Sydney.— Li- 

thographs of Garden Pnlaee, in which waa held 
Sydney Intemiitiuuul Exhibition of 1879. 



lARINE MACHINERY AND STEAM VESSELS 

Of all Types and 81sm. Cargo and Passeogar SUamars, TaohU, Togs, ItaonohM. 
Compound and Triple Bzpansloa Xn^es. lAjrlne aad Zjand Boilers. 



mOAIPS PATENT PROPELLER and VALVE BKVSR8ING LAUNCH ENOINSB. 

ROSS & DUNCAN, 

•''v> WHITBFIBLD WORKS. QOVAN. GLASGOW. 



156 



Nfw Siiutli Wales. 



a<. OOLLINORTDOB, ARTHUR. 
Ryde, Sydnoy.-— Wood Eugmvings. 

26, COIiLINORIDOE, OEORQE, 
Hawkesbury River. -NVOod Eugmviuga. 

27. OIBBS. SHAIiliARD Sc CO.— 

8pt'cinicn» of I'hroiiio-litliograpliy. 

a8. TURNER & HENDERSON. 

Sydney.— <"hrorno-lithognii)hotl Hpcoimcns of 
Australian Wild Flowcra. 



Clash 5. 

Photography. 

20. AMATEUR PHOTOORAPHIC 
SOCIETY OP NEW SOUTH WALES, 

Sydney.— rbotogrophs. 

g>. ARMIDALE MUNICIPAL 
UNCIL.—PhotogrftDhio Views of Armi- 
dnle and the Now England District. 

51. BATHURST MUNICIPAL 

COUNCIL.— Photographs of Views in the 
City of Bathuret. 

32. BAYLISS, CHARLES. Sydney.— 
Panoramic View of Sydnoy and Harbour, 
nnd Views of Public and Morcantilo Buildings, 
tjuburbon and Country Residences, &c. 

33. BOAKE. B. C. Sydney.— Photo- 

prupLlo Trophy, commemorative of the N<.'W 
South WalcH Military Expedition to the Soudan, 
ronsiHting of portraits of offloers and members of 
the Contingent. 

34. CAMPBELLTOWN MUNICI- 
PAL COUNCIL.— Photographs. 

35. CANEY & CO., Mount Victoria. 

— S'.lver Print Photographs of Subterranoun 
Views of Fish Rivor Cuvou and Blue Mountains. 

36. CASPERS, RUDOLPH, Ooul- 
bum. — Photographic Views of Buildings and 
Scenery. 

37. COLONIAL ARCHITECT OP 

N. S. WALES, Sydney Photographic 

Views of Public Buildings. 



-jS. COMMISSIONERS FOR NX 
SOUTH WALES, Sydney.— Panorai 
Photo, View of Sydnoy from Uarden I'ulaoe 

39. COMMISSIONERS POR NH 
SOUTH WALES, Sydney.— Piiotogroi 
Views of tlio Streets, &c., of Syduoy. 

40. COMMISSIONERS FOR NEl 
SOUTH WALES, Sydney.— Pliotogroph 
Views of Sceuory of tho (Jolony. 

41. DEPARTMENT OF PUBLE 
WORKS, Sydney.— Photographs of Mou 
tain Scenery, Public Buildings, Railway Work 
&e. 

42. DIXSON & SONS, Sydney.-Ph 
tognifdi of Dixeon's Tobnooo Works, Park 1 
Eliz iboth Streets, Sydney. 

43. DdRNER, HENRY, Qoulburn.- 

Photographs. 

44. DRINKWATER, O H A R L E 
Tamworth. — Photographic Views of Tod 
wortii, &c. &c. 

45. FORBES MUNICIPAL 00X75 
CIL, Porbea. — Photographs. 

46. GEYER, HENRY, Photographa 
Hay. — Landscape Photographs, illustratin 
Town of Hay and District. 

47. GOVERNMENT PRINTEl 
(Tnomai Richards), Sydney. — Plioti 
graphy and Photo-Mechanical Printing. San 

{ilea of Photography and of Photo-Mcdmnia 
'rinting, executed at the Government Printer 
Department, Sydney, New South Wales. 

48. HAY MUNICIPAL COUNCIl 

— Photographs of difTeront ports of tho ton 
of Hay. 

49. HERPORT, GUSTAVUS, Photo 
grapher, Yaas. — Photograpiis of Miirrun) 
bidgec River, and other Scenery. 

50. HOLTERMANN, B. O., Th 
Trustees of the late, Sydney.— Larj 
Panoramic View of Sydnoy and Horbour. 



A NaWSPAPaa for MSBOHAMTB, BANKXR8, BHABXHOIiDIlRB, OOLONIBTS at HOMK an 
ZMiailANTB, and aU Intereated in the MAQNITUDB and aBOWTH of BRITISH INTSRS8T 
in AUSTRALIA, NEW ZBALAND, TASMANIA, and tha WBSTXBN FAOIFIO. 

EARLY, OFFICIAL, and COMPLETE INFORMATION. 



Kew South Wale». 



ni 



51. KERRY & JONES, Photo- 

mphers, Sydney.— Photogruphio Views of 
S. W. Sct'uory. 

■ a. KIAMA MUNICIPAI. COUN- 
fii, Kiama.— rhotogrnphio Views of Scuiies 
and iiroiiml Kinina. 

53. LEIBINGER, CARL. Sydney.— 

lotn^rxphti nhowing thu ilepnrture hdiI rt'turu 
tLo N. S. W. (.'uatitiguiit tutiio ^k)lulan. 

54. LORENZINI, AUaUSTO, 

■fdney. — Two Pliotographs of Uull-rooiu at 
e resUlouce of Mr. C J. Roberta, C.M.G., M.P., 
rdnoy. 

55. MORIARTT, E. O., Engineer-in- 
hief for Harbours and Rivers, Sydney. 

■Photoj^nipliic Views, illustrating tho Sydney 
cw Water Supply System. 

56. MORI ARTY, E. O., Engineer-in- 
Qief for Harbours and Rivers, Sydney. 

-Pkotographio Views, illustrating the Uuutvr 
iver District Water Supply. 

57. MUDQEE MUNICIPAL COUN- 

IIL.— Photographs of Mudgee. 

gl. NEWCASTLE MUNICIPAL 
UNCIL.— Newcastle Photographs. 

59. NEWMAN, J. HUBERT, Photo- 
rapher, Sydney. — Portrait of tho late 
robbirthop Vaughan. 

60. PAINE, JOHN, Sydney.— Photo- 

Ortiplis of N. 8. Wales, aud Sydney Harbour and 
uildiogd. 

61. RANDWICK MUNICIPAL 

lOUNCIL.— Photographb. 

62. RUSSELL, H. C, B.A., Oovem- 
lent Astronomer, Sydney.— Photographs. 

63. SAUNDERS, ROBERT, Sydney. 

-Photographs, representing three separate 
tone Quarries, at Pyrmont, near Sydney. 

64.SINQLETON MUNICIPAL 
OtJNCIL.— Photographs of Public Build- 
fs, Streets, and Private Residences, Singleton. 



6s BLADE, WILLIAM, Sydney.— 

Laii'lsc'aiK) iiud Architectural I'hotogmplis. 

66. BLADE, WILLIAM, Sydney.— 
Photo, Portrait of tho Hon. W. B. Dallev, i).i)., 
M.IiC. 

67. TENTERFIELD MUNICIPAL 

COUNCIL.— Photo-jniphic Views of Tciitor- 
Hcld. 

68. TAMWORTH MUNICIPAL 

COUNCIL.— l'hot(.graphs. 

69. WARK, WILLIAM, Kiirrajong 
H(cfiiCllt8. — Twelve Photogrtiphs of Luiulscapo 
Scenery. 

7a WEST MAITLAND MUNICI- 
PAL COUNCIL.— Photographs of Town 
aud Surrounding Scim ry. 

71. YOUNG MUNICIPAL COUN- 
CIL. — I'liotogniphic Vicwu of Youug. 



Claps 6. 
Works 0/ Art nut Specified. 

72. BRAY, JAMES S, Sydney.— A 
Picture representing n "Wreath of Flowers," 
wholly made out of Feathers from Australl&u 
BinU. 

73. QOSTELOW, E. B., Sydney.— 

Work of Art. etjtitled " The Pencil nnd Pen, 
their uses to Man," and comprising Pencil, 
Crayon, and Ink Drawings, Mapping, and 
Penmanship. 

74. L AINQ, EMMA, Sydney.— Pen-and- 
ink Etching, " Australian Flowers." 

7S LYON, COTTIER & CO., Sydney. 

— Stained Glass Window. Subject, " Emblu- 
niatic Figure of Australia." 

76. RICKETTB, JOHN J., Sydney.— 
Specimen of Illumination. 

77. ZAHEL, L. J., Sydney.— Dcssirt 
Service, Hand-painted with Australian Wild 
Flowers. 




u Irilish Sittstniliisiait 



nCIAL CORRESPONDENTS: TELEGRAMS: WEEKLY RECORD OF £300,000,000 
USTRALASIAN INVESTMENTS, d TRADE ANNUALLY EXCEEDING £100,000,000. 
SVEBT THUSSDAT, Price 4d. Supplement Nnmbert, 8cL Tearly, £1 post tten. 

.0. 



158 



New Souih Wales. 



SECTION B. — EDUCATION 
AND APPLICATION OP 
LIBERAL ARTS. 

Class 8. 

Educational Appliances, Models of Schools, 
School Furniture, and Books. 

78. CHISSELL, WILLIAM J., 

Department of Mines, Sydney. — Suther- 
land'd " History of Austriilia," from 1G02 to 
1876. Transcribe J into Phonograpliy. 

79. MYERS, MARK, Sydney. — 

" Kienzi," by Lytton, written in Phonography. 

80. PRINGLE, JAMES M.,Bathurst. 

— Geometrical Drawing Board with Models, for 
use in Science and Art Classes. 

81. REEVE, GEORGE J., Sydney.— 

Book of Australian Speeches, Lectures, and 
Poems. Written in Plionography by the 
Exhibitor. 

Class 9. 

Maps, Charts, Plans, and Geographical 
Apparatus. 

82. GOODCHAP, CHAS. A., Com- 
missioner for Railways, Sydney. — Map, 
showing the Railway System of tbe Colony of 
New South Wales, with luiles in operation, lines 
in course of construction, lines authorised, »&c. 

83. LAMBTON, STEPHEN H., 
Secretary, General Post Office, Sydney. 

— Map showing tlio Postal and Telegraph Lines 
in tlic Colony of New South Wales. 

84. M\-ISTER FOR MINES, 
Sydney '1) Geological Map of New South 
Wales, (l.; Miueralogical Map of New South 
Wales. (3) Map showing Borings for water 
and minerals. [_See also Class 46a.] 

85. RUDDER, ENOCH W., Macleay 
River. — Geological Map of the Macleay Eiver 
District. 

86. ROWLEY, GEO. B., Survey 
Office, Sydney.— Station Map of New South 
Wales. 



87. RUSSELL, H. C, B.A., Gov« 
ment Astronomer, Sydney. — 

showing Raintall of N. S. Wales. 

88. SURVEYOR - GENERAL 
N. S.W. (P. P. Adams), Sydney.— Jlj 
&c., of Colony. 

89. TECHNICAL COLLEoJ 

Sydney.— Geology Class Map. 



Class 10. 

Specimens of Work done hij Pupils in ScJw 

90. TECHNICAL COLLEGE, 

ney. 

91. CAMDEN PA.RK PUBI 
SCHOOL, Camden Park. 

92. PORT STREET MODEL PT 
Lie SCHOOL, Sydney. 



93. GLEN 
SCHOOL. 



INNES PUBLl 



94. GOONELLEBAH PUBLl 
SCHOOL, Richmond River. 

95. JEMBAICUMBEl^^B PUBI 
SCHOOL. 

96. JERILDERIE PUBLl 
SCHOOL. 

97. MOLONQ PUBLIC SCHOOL. 

98. MOUNT KEMBLA . PUBLl 
SCHOOL. 

99. WATERLOO PUBLIC SCHOO 

100. WHITTINGHAM PUBLl 
SCHOOL. 

loi. WICKHAM PUBLIC SCHOO 

102. WINDSOR PUBLIC SCHOO 

Class 12. ' '''' '■ ' " 

Printing and Bookbinding. 

103. FAIRFAX OS SONS, JOHl 
"Herald" Office, Sydney. — Files 

" Sydney Morning Herald," " Sydney Mail 
« Echo." 



Kttabliihed in 1868.] 



SCHOOU OF 



[i:stabli3h€ii in 18*1 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING AND SUBMARINE TELEGRAPHY 

12, Princes Street, Hanover Square, London, "W. 
(Manager.— W m. LANT CARPENTER, BA, B.Sc, F .C.S., A.S.U 

Open d»lly, except Suturday, from 10 to 6, throughout the year. Pupils r»n Join at any timr. Upwards oJ 3,J(1 
have already passed tlnougu the cotirse. Copies of TeBilmuniala from some of tho moiit Kralnent Sclentilic on 
Practical Klectriciaus of the day, as well M a, very full Prospectus, may bo hud on application to the Secretary. 



New South Wales. 



159 



104. PAIRrAX & SONS, JOHN, 
Herald" OflQee, Sydney. — Photographs. 

105. RICHARDS, THOMAS (Govern- 
ent Printer), Sydney.— (1) Printing, Book- 
ndiug, Hnd Account Books. (2) Ckilkction 
Booku, illustrating operations and processes 

irried on at the Government Prinfinjj Office, 
yduey, New South Wales, comprising speci- 
lens of Letterpress, Lithograpliic, Photo- 
thographic, and Plioto-Mecliiinical worlc, and 
imples of Bookbinding and Engraving, and <if 
ccount Books manufactured tor the Public 
ervice. 

106. RICHARDS, THOMAS (Govcrn- 
lent Printer), Sydney. — Stereotypes, Electro- 
ypes, Type, and Furniture. 

107. HOLMES & CO., J. L., Sydney.— 
pecunena of Letterpreag Printing, in black 
ud tints. 

108. LYNB, CHARLES, Sydney.— 
New Guinea : an Account of the Establish- 
lent of the British Protectorate on the 
outhem Shores of New Guinea." Sampgou 
/ow, Marston, Searle, & llivington, London, 
885. With Illustrations. 

109. "WOODS & CO., JOHN, Limi- 
sd, Sydney.— (1) Specimen of Wood's Aus- 

Jralian Diaries. (2) Specimen of Litho. 
Posters, and Window Bills. (8) Specimen of 
general Printing and Embossing. 

Class 14. 

Scientific Instrumenti. 

110. RUSSELL, H. O., B.A., Govem- 
aent Astronomer, Sydney. — Scientilic 
nstraments. 

111. "WIESENER, T. P., Sydney.— 
lade by an Apprentice (M. Mendel) in his 
rorkshop. Compound Microscope. 

Class 15 a. 

Scientific Jleporle and Puhlicntions. 

112. COMMISSIONERS FOR NEW 
lOUTH WALES FISHERIES, Syd- 
ley.— Catalogue of Australian Fishes, Mol- 
ufica, and Seals and Whales. 

__ 113. COMMISSIONERS FOR NlfW 
JOUTH WALES FISHERIES, Sydney. 

-Works on Ichthyology. 



114. COMMISSIONERS FOR NEW 
SOUTH WALES, Sydney.— Proceedings 
and Publications of the Linnean Society of 
New South Wales. 

115. FITZGERALD, ROBT. D., 
F.L.S., Surveyor-GeneraPs Office, Syd- 
ney. — Australian Orchids. 

n6. GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY 
OF AUSTRALASIA (Sir Edward 
Strickland, K.C.B., President), New 
South Wales Branch.— Journal of Vio- 

ceediugs of Society. - j/ 

117. LIA/ERSIDGE, A., P.R.S., Pro- 
fessor of Chemistry, University of 
Sydney.— Scientific Reports and other Pub« 

lications. 

118. ROYAL SOCIETY OP NEW 
SOUTH WALES, Sydney.— .Toumal of 
Proi'eediugsof tlie Royal Society of New South 
Wales, from 18G7 to 1884. Vols. I. to XVIII. 
(inclusive). • < 



119. RUSSELL, H. 
ment Astronomer, 

Publications. 



C, B.A., Govern- 
Sydney. — Scientilio 



SECTION D. — FURNITURE 
AND OTHER OBJECTS FOR 
THE USE OR DECORATION 
OF DWELLING - HOUSES 
AND OTHER BUILDINGS. 



Class 22a, 
Toy$. 
120. RUSSELL, JOHN 



.a-";i 



MILLER, Sydney. 
Colonial wood. 



EDMUND 

Bullion Bank, made of 



Class 22b. 

Furniture and Uphohtery, 

121. COMMISSIONERS JPOR NEW 
SOUTH WALES, Sydney.— Dining-roora 
Suite of Furniture, constructed by Messrs. Wal- 
lach Brothers, York Street, Wynyaid Square, 
Sydney, to the order of the Commissioners. It 
is made of Cedar from the Richmond River. ; 



Trade Mark— 

Obelisk of Luxor. 



(( 



ALL 

CICAKETTES 

MAKKEO 

LUXOR." 



I( 



LUXOR 



» CIGARETTES. 

PURE TURKISH TOBACCO. 
WARRANTED HAND-MADE. 

THREE DISTINCT QUALITIES —SPECIAL— FIRST— SECOND. 

ALEXANDRIA CIQAHETTS CO., Ltd., 63 & 64, New Broad St., London, E.C. 
AGENTS WANTED FOR ALL THE COLONIES. 



160 



New South Walei. 



122. COMMISSIONERS FOR NEW 
SOUTH WALES, Sydney. — Bed-room 
Suite of Furniture, con&tructed by Messrs. 
Purmor & Co., of Pitt and Market Streets, Syd- 
ney, to the order of the Commiaaioners, from 
Colonial Cedar. 

123. COMMISSIONERS FOR NEW 
SOUTH WALES, Sydney.— (1) DiiiiDj?- 
room Suite of Blackwood ; (2) Bed-room Suite 
No. 1 of Colonial Beech wood; (3) Bed-rcoiii 
Suite No. 2, of Colonial Rosewood ; and (4) six 
Occasional Tables of Blackwood, Black Pine, 
Myall, Forest Oak, Beefwood, &c., constructed 
to the order of the Commissioners, by Messrs. 
Turberville, Smith, & Brown, Sydney. 

124. COMMISSIONERS FOR NEW 
SOUTH WALES, Sydney. — Show-casea 
made from Colonial Timbers, bo as to show 
their adaptability for pUrposos of iise or orua- 
mentation. 

125. HAY, ARCHIBALD, Newcastle. 
— One Wardrobe. 

126. HODGSON, H. W., Sydney.— 
Venetian Blinds. 

127. HULBERT, BENJAMIN, Syd- 
ney. — Billiard Table and Fittings, made from 
Colonial Blackwood, embellished with carvings 
of Australian ferns, &o. 



.,:;; Class 28. 

'"'• GlasBware of all hinds. 

128. BISHOP, C, Sydney. — Glass 
Bottles. 

129. POWNALL & CO., H., Sydney. 
— Etched and Engraved Glass Tumblers, and 
Water Sets, &c. 

130. WEBB, PRANK PIQOTT, Syd- 
ney. — Engraved Glass Decanters, &c. 



Class 24. 

Stone Utensils, Pottery, Porcelain, and 
Earthenware, 

X31. MACARTHUR, GILBERT, 
Clyde Pottery, Camperdown, — Two 
Pairs Garden Vewes. 



Class 25. 
Metalware, Ilardware, and Cutlery. 

132. ELLIS & SLATYER, Sydney,. 
The Improved Patent Roller, for movij 
weights of various kinds, made of iron. 

Class 27. 
Urushtcare. 

133. FOUNTAIN, T., West Maitland| 
— Millet Brooms (half-dozen), small bundle ( 
Millet Heads. 

134. JONES, HUGH HENRY, Rajl 
mond Terrace, Hunter River.— Milltf 
Brooms. 

135. SMALLWOOD, D. J., Pitt To\ 
Hawkesbury River. — Brooms made fnul 
Native Currant Tree, Brooms made from Ni- 
tivc Curly Grass. 

Class 28. 

Basketware. 

136. PACKMAN, HENRY, Sydney 
— Chairs, &c., of Colonial workmanship am 
material, in Basketware. with samples 
material. 

Class 30. 

Decorative Worh, including Carving and 
Art Ware. 

137. GRANT & MALCOLM, Sydney. 
— Brackets and Ceiling Ornaments, &c. 

138. HATHERLY, WILLIAM, New- 
castle. — Engraved and Painted Shells. 

139. WILLIAMS, CHARLES, Syd 
ney. — Painted Imitations of Woods am 
Marble. 

Class 33. 

Ornanumtal Work in Chid, Silver, and other 
Metals, 

140. JONES, EVAN, Sydney.-GoW- 
smith's and Silversmith's work from Australian 
material. 



JEFFREY & CO., 

MANDFACTURKEIS AND EXPORPERS OF ALL CLASSES OP ^ ^ 

ARTISTIC WALL PAPERS (free from Arsenic), 

Eiubos^Md LcHtliPM and l^eaiher Papers, Iland-prlnted Decoratlona, Flocks. Lacquered Qdi Papers, Celling 

ftud JNu»ery Pap«rg, ana) all 0LA.s8Ga of Cheap Macrinr Fkiktei) Wall Papbbs. 

Highest Awards, inolading THE OOLD UXDAL, Parisi 1878. 

TWO OOLD MEDALS Health Exhibition, 1881 

Factory :-84, ESSEX ROAD, LONDON, N. 



Neto South Wales. 



161 



141. MITCHBLIi, PHILIP, Jeweller, 
^oney. — Bust of (ieneral (iordon, mmlo of 
erling silver from miuo at Silvertou, mouuted 
I jiedcstal of Colonial sandal wood. 

142. SYDNEY BRANCH OP THE 
OYAI. MINT, Sydney.— Coins, Medals, 

c, struck at the Sydney Mint. 



SECTION E.— FABRICS. 

NCLUDING APPAREL, TOILET RE- 
QUISITES, AND OTHER ARTICLES 
OF PERSONAL WEAR OR USE. 

Class 35a, 
1 ' Wool 

143. BLACK, JOHN, Musclebrook.— 
rown at Musclebrook. Sis Fleeces Angora 
bhair. 

144. CHISHOLM BROTHERS, Kip- 

ilaw, (Joulbiim.— Grown at Kippilaw, 
fpper Woliondilly. Six Fleeces Fine Combing, 
om Bams 13 months old. 

145. CHISHOLM BROTHERS, Kip- 
ilaw, Gtoulbum. — Grown at Kippilaw. 
fpper Woliondilly. Six Fleeces Fine Combiu?, 
om Ewes 13 months old. Descendwi from 
ims imported from Silesia 85 years ago. 

146. COLLAROY COMPANY, Limi- 
d, CoUaroy, Merriwa.— Grown at Col- 
roy, Merriwa. One bale of Ewes' skirted 
leece Combing. Pure Australian Merino, 
oUaroy bred. 

147. COLLAROY COMPANY, Limi- 

id, CoUaroy, Merriwa.— Grown at Col- 
loy, Merriwa. One bale Ewe Hoggets' Comb- 
ig. Pure Australian Merino, CoUaroy bred. 

148. COLLAROY COMPANY, Limi- 
id, CoUaroy, Merriwa.— Grown at Col- 
roy, Merriwa. One Ewe's Fleece, lightly 

irted : cut, 14 lbs. ; growth of fleece, 3C5 days, 
ure Australian Meruio. 

149. COLLAROY COMPANY, Limi- 
>d, CoUaroy, Merriwa. — One Ram's 
leece, cut 20 lbs., lightly skirted. Pure 

ustralian Merino. 



150. COLLAROY COMPANY, Limi- 
ted, CoUaroy, Merriwa. — Fleeces — Ewes' 
unskirtjd; Ueece combing. I'uio Auistralian 
Merino. 

151. COLLAROY COMPANY, Limi- 
ted, CoUaroy, Merriwa.— l'2."i llw. Vuk 
Australian ^Merino. 

152. COOPER, R. C, Willeroo, Tar- 
ago. — Olio biilo Combing Ewe Hogget, uu- 
skirted. 

153. COX, Hon. OEORaE HENRY, 
Winboum, Mulgoa.— Six Fleeces Saxon 
Merino Ewes, fiiio Coinbing. 

154. COX, Hon. GEORGE HENRY, 
Winbourn, Mulgoa. — Six Fleeces Saxou 
Meiino Ewea, fine Combing. 

155. COX, Hon. GEORGE HENRY, 

■Winboum, Mulgoa. — Six Fleeces Saxon 
Merino Rams, Combing. 

156. DANGAR, MACDONALD 
BROS., Wagga Wagga. — Six Fleeces, 
Merino Ewe Fleeces, Combing. 

157. DANGAR, MACDONALD 
BROS., Wagga Wagga. — Six Fleeces, 
Merino Ewe Hogget Combing. 

158. DARCHY, Mrs. S., Oxley Sta- 
tion. — Superior Combing (scoured) from 4- 
tooth Ewes. Australian Merino. 

159; DOWLING, VINCENT, Lue, 
Rylstone.— One Bale Fine Combing. 

160. DOWLING, VINCENT, Luo, 

Rylstone. — Six Fleeces Greasy Combing. 

161. FETHERSTONHAUGH, CUTH- 
BERT, Goorianawa. Mundooran. — Sis 

unskirted greasy Rams' Fleeces, Australian 
Merino. 

162. GIBSON & CO., JAS. T., ■D-nion 

Works, Bourke. — Six Fleeces, Combing. 

163. GIBSON & CO., JAS. T., Union 
Works, Bourke. — Skin Wool. 

164. GIBSON & CO., JAS. T., Union 
Works, Bourke. — Strong Combing. 

165. GIBSON & CO., JAS. T., Union 

Works, Bourke. — Combing Wool ; ordinary 
flock. 

166. HAMMOND, THOMAS W., Old 
Junee, Riverina. — Six Fleeces from 2- 
toothowea; fine Combing Merino, 12 months' 
growth. 



ASHFORD & BROOKS. 

.ONDON : 153 & 154, Gresham House, Old Broad Street, E.C. 
BIRMINGHAM : Bingley Warehouse, King Alfred's Place. 

Hegristered Telegraphic Word for both addresses— ASHBROOE:. 
Mr. FRED, BROOKS will bt glad to meet any Colonial Friends visiting the Exhibition. 

,, ,.,.— ..,...._ ' Communicate as above. -, . 



162 



New South Wales. 



X67. HAMMOND, THOMAS W., Old 
Junee, Riverina. — Six Fleeces from aged 
breeding ewes; flue combing Merino, 12 moutiia' 
growth. 

168. HANNAH, DAVID, Cowabee, 
Coolaman. — Six Fleeces, greasy clothing. 

169. HANNAH, DAVID, Coolaman. 
— Six Fleeces. 

170. HAYDON, BERNARD, Bland- 
foi'd.— Six Fijcces. 

171. HIQGINS, R. a, Sydney.— SL\ 
Fleeces. 

172. HIQQTNS, R. Q., Sydney.— One 
bale Cross-Brcd. 

173. HUME, P. W., Burrovd. — Six 

Ewes' Fleeces. 

174. HUME, P. W., Burrowa. -- Six 
Kama' Fleeces. 

175. JAMES, C. H., & GRAY, Corowa. 

— Six Fleeces greasy Merino. 

176. JAMES, C. H., & GRAY, Corowa. 
—One bale greasy Merino. 

177. JAMES, C. H., & GRAY.— Forty 
lbs. scoured Merino. 

178. JENKINS, G., New England.— 
Six Fleeces. 

179. JENKINS, G., New England.— 
Six Ewe Fleeces. 

180. LEE, JAMES, Molong, Larras 
Lake. — Six Fleeces. 

181. LEE, JAMES, Molong, Larras 
Lake.— Six Fleeces. 

182. MACDONALD,J.M. LINDSAY, 
Wallabadah.— Six Ewes' Fleeces. 

i8?.MACDONALD,J,M. LINDSAY, 
Wallabadah — Six Bama' Fleeces. 

X84. M'GREER, P., Tumut. — Small 
Sample Wool. 

185. MANCHEE, J. C, Willow Tree. 
-—Six Ewes' Fleeces. 

186. MANCHEE, J. C, Willow Tree. 

—Six Earns' Fleeces. 

187. MANCHEE, J, C, Willow Tree. 
— One bale Ewes' Fleeces, 



188. MANCHEE, J. C, Willow Tv. 

— One bale Wethers' Fleeces. 

189. MANCHEE, J. C, Willow Tn 

— One bale Ewe Hogget's Fleeces. 

190. MULHOLLAND, G. J., Wag; 
Wagga. — Six Flock Rama' Fleeces. 

191. MULHOLLAND, G. J., Wagj 
Wagga. — Sis Flock Ewes' Fleeces. 

192. MULHOLLAND, G. J., Waga 
Wagga.— One bale Genernl Flocks. 

193. ONSLOW, Mrs. ARTHUR A. ^ 
Camdon Park. — Six Fleeces Greasy Merinc 

194. ONSLOW, Mrs. ARTHUR A. "W 
Camden Park.— Six Fleeces Greasy Merli 

195. ORMOND & BROOKE BR03 
Wentworth. — Six Uuskirted Fleeces. 

196. PEEL RIVER LAND AKl 
MINERAL CO., Limited.— Six Ran 
Fleeces, unskirted. 

197. PEEL RIVER LAND AK 
MINERAL CO., Limited. — One b« 
Comlnng Wool, Skirted. 

198. PEEL RIVER LAND AN 
MINERAL CO., Limited. — One k 

Clothing Wool, Skirted. 

199. PBNZER, J., Dubbo.— Six Fieec 

Merino Eanis. 

200. ROBERTSON, R. G. A., Dee] 
water. — Six I^leeces Greasy Combing Miriit 

201. ROBERTSON, R. G. A., Deei 
water. — Six Fleeces Greasy Combing Merino 

202. SLOANE, A., Mulwala. - Si 
Fleeces Greasy Combing, Merino E-^es. 

203. SLOANE, A., Mvdwala.— One Ija 
of Greosy Wool from maiden Ewes, Merino. 

2U|. SLOANE, A., Mulwala. — 8 
Fleeces washed Combing, Merino Eff( 
skirted. 

205. SUCKLING, J. L., Blandford. 
One bale Hoggets' Merino. , = 

206. SUCKLING, J. L., Blandfcrd. 
One bale Merino Ewca' Fleece. 

207. SUTTOR, F. B., Bathurst-^ 

Ewe Fleeces in Grease, Merino Combing. 

208. SUTTOR, P. B., Bathurst.- 
Fleeces in Grease, Merino Rams. 



« Q^^nc^ 2)atli? {Tclcgvapb an^ Mcckl)? tribune, 

PUBLISHED IN SYDNEY, N. S. W. AUSTRALIA. 

London LiTBMftif OFFiCBa : 140, FLEET STREET. Advertisiso Offices : 44, STltAND. 

THE DAILY TELE'GRAPH has the Largest Circulation of any morning newspapi 
in New South Wales. Its increase last year was upwards of Four Million Copie 
Its morning sale on the trams a nd railways Is greater by four to one than that of ai 
other newspaper. _. 



New South Wales. 



a '°^^^^'^^^]^ F- ^" Bathur8t.-301b8 
Booured Morino Combing. 

210. 'rOBTN & SONS, A.. Coonamble. 
—One bale Scoured Fleece, Ewes. 

211. TRAHiL BROS.. Ca88ili8.-Ono 
bftle Merino, Greasy Combing Wool. 

c"^- "^^^^' HENRY, Kylstone— 
Six Rams' Fleeces, Greasy Combing. 

213. WALKER, H.. Rylatone.-Six 
Ewea' I leeces. Greasy Combing. 

214. WHITE. H. C, Mudgee.-&ix 
Fleeces Greasy Mermo. 

215. WHITE H. C, Mudgee.-Six 

Fleeces Greasy Hogget. 

216. WHITE H. a. Madgee.-One bale 

Greasy Combing Wool. 

217. WHITE, J. P. & H., Scone.-Six 

Fleeces, Greasy. 

218. WILSON. HON. WM., Corowa. 
-Six Menno Ewea' Fleeces. 

219. WOODHOUSE.E.B., CampbeU- 
»wn.— Six Fleeceo, Combing. 

220. WOODHOUSE, E. B., OampboU- 
own.— Six Fleeces, Combing. 

Class 36b. 

Wool Fabrics. 

l,^?Jm^^^^^'3SIONBRS FOR NEW 
S ^^^^^' Sydney. - W'oolirn 

Class 38. 

Fane]/ Needletcork. 

b!^ CALVERT. Mrs. MARY MUR. 
PAY, MarrickylUe.— Pair of Braces 
rorked in lino Silk. 

,223. HELLYER, Mrs. E. A., 07 

WhSSfn^' «^^-y-Twospecimens 

m RYAN, M., Mathoura, via 



163 



_ -JS- RYAN, __ _ 
■)eiiiliquin.— Crewel Silk Work. 

li^ii?® T^^' ®- ^"^'l^^ School, Wan. 

|imel a.-Tem-cotta Wall I'lnquo, havA- 

;mte(l. SnmU Table-top in Art Nicdlework. 

_ TOR 

JoosoatY 

USB 



Class 39a. 
Furs and Shins. 

Sassafras 



via 



227. ALLEY. G. U., 

Nowra.— Native Skins. 

228. COMMISSIONERS FOR NEW 
SOUTH WALES, Sydney.-^p^ 

229. COMMISSIONERS FOR NTTIV 
SOUTH WALES, sJSnf^-rS^. 

j^J^30.^DEERINO & SON, Taralga.- 

231. LODER, T. J.,Taralga.-CoUection 

01 JSKins. 

232. LODER, T. J., Bank of N. S. 
Ffl«f ' Taralga.-One Pair .>f Gloves nnd one 
w , o'^ocks, made fiom the Fur of the N S 
Wales Opossum. 

BnS;>„??^^^?' ^- R-. Little Plains. 
Bombala. — Collection of Furs of Native 

Auuaals. 

234. WILSON, A. S.. Lawson, Blue 
Mountains.-Twelvo Tanned Suako Skina. 

Class 39b: ' ' 

Apparel, Haberdashery, and TraveUing 
Equipments. 

235. LEPLAW, A. M., Corunna. vi» 
Wagonga.-Colonial Woolwork, Knitted 

Class 41. ; - 

Hats and Caps. 

Jf.\ ^^S^^l ^' Sydney.-Hat« 

made from the Australian Cabbage-trte Palm 
CorypTia augtralis. . ™* 

natl' ^^^^^ ^ ^°*' C. F.. Sydney— 



. -f. 



SECTION P.-RAW PRODUCTS 
AND MANUFACTURES PROM 
PRODUCTS NOT INCLUDED 
IN OTHER SECTIONS. 

Class 46a. " *^ 

Minerals and Metals and Mining Models. 

238. AUSTRALIAN KEROSENE 

OIL & MINERAL CO., Limited, 

Sydney.— Shale (Boghead Mineral) from th« 

Company a nunc at Joadja Creek, near Berrima. 



H YDROLEIN E 



THE 

NEW WOOL 

SCOUB. 



iSl^ ""wnnf^ifol^^il**^^ replacing: Soap In England for cleansing 
u Der ^ri ^^^ ^® washed with Hydroleine at the rate of 
*j « ^^^^ Manufacturers— 

J. HARRISON & Co., Limited, Watling Street Works, Leicester. 

a 2 



164 



New South WaUi. 



239. Bi».RRIER RANGES SILVER- 
MININQ ASSOCIATION, Limited, 
Silverton Barrier Ranges.— Silver Oris. 

240. BLACKALL & HUNT, Tarn- 
worth. — Cbrome Iron Ore. 

241. BliATCHFORD, JOHN HUX- 
HAM, Bell'a Creek, Braidwood.— Speci- 
mens representing the different Ores in tlie lode 
of the " El Capitan Gold and Silver Mining 
Co.," Captjiiu's Flat, Molonglo Kiver. 

242. BROKEN HILIi PROPRIE- 
TARY CO., Limited, Silverton, Barrier 
Ranges. — Silver and Lend Ores. 

243. BROWN & KELLY, Trangie.— 

Stauiiuii'eroua Curbonute of Copper. 

244. BULLI COAL MINING CO., 

Bulli.— Sample of Coal. 

245. BURWOOD COAL - MINING 
CO., Newcastle.— Sample of Cool. 

246. CARLOS' GAP COAL MINING 

& SMELTING CO.— Iron, Cobalt, Lime- 
stone, Coal. 

247. CARR, M. W., Proprietor, "Red 
Cross" Mine, The Gulf, near Emma- 
ville. New England. — Sfficimenfl of Tin 
Ore. 

248. COAL CLIPP COAL CO., Coal 
CUff, Illawarra.— Block of Coal CUff Coal. 

249. DEITZ, Temoreu— Mining Models. 
A pair of Puddling Machines, showing the 
manner of graduating the wash-dirt down to 
gravel, also the manner in which it is sluiced to 
obtain the gold ; also mode of elevating tlic 
water required. 

250. ESKBANK COLLIERY CO., 

Eskbank, LithgoAV.--Coal. 

251. GRETA COLLIERY, Greta 

Cubes of Coal from the Greta Mine. 



252. HAYTON, G., 

Brown Hematite Iron Ore. 



Newbridge. — 



253. IRBY, E., Bolivia, Tenterfleld.— 

Collection of Silver Ores. 

254. IZAACSOHN, M., Mondle.— Col- 
lection of Auriferous and other Mineralogical 
and ueolugical Specimens. 



255. KENNEDY, G., Tenterfleld.— Sp, 

cimcns of Lode Tin, lately discovered witlii 
8 miles of Tenterlield. Specimens of Grit Ston 

256. LITHGOW VALLEY COL 
LIERY CO., Limited, Lithgow.— Tw 

Cubes of Coal from the Lithgow Valley Mine. 

257. LIVERSIDGE, ARCHIBALD 
P.R.S, Professor of Chemistry, Uni. 
versity of Sydney. — Collection of Go 
Sp'.'cinicua, Gom.H, and Precious Stones. 

258. LIVERSIDGE, ARCHIBALD 

F.R.S., Professor of Chemistry and 
Mineralogy in the University of Syd- 
ney. — List of Scientific Papers by. 

259. MINISTER FOR MINES, Syd 
ney. — C<illection of Minerals from New Souti 
Wales, arranged nndt r the .direction of C. S. 
Wilkinson, L.S., F.G.S., Geological Surveyor ii 
charge, by J. E. Came, Curator of Mining anc 
Geological Museum. 

260. MINISTER FOR MINES, Syd 
ney. — Mining Maps, ic 

261. MINISTER FOR MINES, Syd 
ney. — Mining Reports, 4c. 

262. 



263. MELVILLE, JOHN SMITH 
Alexandria.— Two Plates Star Antimony. 

264. MOUNT PLEASANT COI 
LIERY, WoUongong.— Coal. 

265. N. S. W. SHALE & OIL CO.] 
Limited.— Sample of Shale. 

266. NEWCA.STLE COAL MTNINQ 
CO., Limited.— Section of Seam of Coal. 

267. OPPENHEIMER, A., Sydnejj 
— One Ton of Ore (Auriferous Antimony). 



268. OSBORNE WALLSEND COI 
LIERY, Mount Keira, WoUongong. - 
Two Cubes of Coal from top seam, lilauan 
district. 

269. PASCOE, W., Bathvirst— SamJ 
Coal 

270. PILLAR, J. W., Tenterfleld-j 
Collection of Silver, Tin, and Copper Ores. 

271. ROBERTSON, J. B. R., Oa 
hampton Park, West Maitland.— Fci 



Crown 8w., Oloth, price 53. 

NEW SOUTH WALES AHD TIGTORIA IN 188S 

By DOUGLAil M. GANK 

BYMOFSIS OF COHTXNTB.— 1. SixtynilDe Days at Sea.--2. Melbonrae 3. Th« ChineM Id Aininlii 

4. Sydney.— &. Australia, and the Voyage thither, considered tn regard to Oonsiunptioii. — e. Fortsi 
SefktT* and tbeir Ciiiuiccs.— T. A Bash Township.— -S. Sport on the filu* MounUins of N.S.W.— 9. .^^portool 
Plains uf tbe Interior. 

London: SAMPSON LOW, MAOTTON, SEABLE, & EIVINaXON, Cr«wn BoUOiiig*, 168. Fl««t StrcM, 8A 



S 
V 

lol 
lo 

s 



lA 



Xetv South Wales. 



1G5 



272. BOBINSON, H. P., Tenterfield. 

— Speoimon of I'lumbago, from a roof at Uudor- 
cliff. 

z/3. STOCKTON COAL CO., 

Limited, Stockton, Newcastle.— Coal. 

274. SUNNY CORNER SILVER 
MINING CO., MitchelL— Silver Ore. 

275. SUTHERLAND, HON. JOHN, 
Syaney. — Ferro-Maugancac Oxide, taken from 
ft simft :50 feet, Green Swamp, near Bathurst. 
The lode crops out on the Hurfaee for three; 
railcB, and it is from 3 to 10 feet wide, in a 8)ate 
and limestone country. 

276. TAIT, FRANCIS, M.P. — fJold 
and Silver-bearinp Pyritous Lodestufl", from 
lode 20 feet wide, Cookbundoon. 

277. VICKERY & SONS, E., Proprie- 
tors of the Greta Colliery, Greta. — Two 
Cubes of Coal. 

278. UMBERUMBERKA SILVER- 
LIIAD MINING CO,, Silvertou.~Silver 
Ores, characteristic of the lode. 

279. WALBIER, H., Tong Bong, near 
Bylestone. — Coal. 

280. WALLERAWANG COAL CO., 

Limited, Irondale Colliery, Piper's 
Plat, Hartley District. — Samples of Coal. 

281. WATSON, R. A., Sydney.— Auri- 
ferous Pyritous Quartz, from United Miners 
Mine, Major's Creek, N. S. Wales. 

282. WISEMAN'S CREEK SILVER 
MINING CO. Wiseman's Creek.— 
Copper Ore. 

283.-YOUNG & LARK, Sydney.— 
Jlinerals. 

Class 46b. 
Indigenous Timber and other Forest Froducls. 

284. ALLEY, GEORGE UNDER- 
WOOD, Sassafras, via Nowra. — Indi- 
genous Timbers : — Forest Oat, Gum, Hickory, 
Messmate, Musk, Sassafras. 

285. COMMISSIONERS FOR NEW 
SOUTH WALES, Sydney.— New South 
Wales Timbers in ordinary commercial use, aud 
of marketable value, in planks 6 feet G inclies 
long. 

286. DAVIS, THOMAS, Terrlgal, 
Brisbane Water. — Samples of Colonial Tim- 
bers, described by the Exhibitor. 



287. HIGGINS, ROBERT GEORGE, 
Sydney. — Timber Specimens from the Western 
Interior Districts of New South Wales. 

288. M'ALLISTER, P., Warren. — 

Piece of Colonial Pino, with knot resembling 
bird rising out of the water. , 

289. MINISTER FOR MINES, Syd- 
ney. — Forestry E.Khibits. — Colleotion of Tim- 
bers procured for the New Soutli Wales Com- 
raission by the Officers of the Forest Conser- 
vancy Branch, Department of Mines of New 
South Wales, by the authority of the Minister, 
and prepared at the exjMinse of the Commission. 

290. MINISTER FOR MINES, Syd- 
ney. — Leaf Specimens, with numbers to corre- 
spond with Timber Specimens from Department 
of Mines. 

291. MINISTER FOR MINES, Syd- 
ney. — Seeds of Timber Trees. List of Seeds, 
the numbers and distinguishing letters on 
which correspond with those attached to the 
Timber and Leaf Specimens. 

292. MINISTER FOR MINES, Syd- 
ney. — Timbers for Wood Engraving. 

293. MINISTER FOR MINES, Syd- 
ney. — Turnery Exhibits, prepared from Tim- 
bers collected by the Officers of the Forest Con- 
servancy Branch, Department of Mines, Sydney, 
for the Colonial and Indian Exhibition Com- 
mission. 

294. MINISTER FOR MINES, Syd- 
ney. — Tanning and other Barks. 

295. MINISTER FOR MINES, Syd- 
ney. — Fibres aud Fibre Barks. 

296. MINISTER FOR MINES, Syd- 
ney. — Gums. 

297. ONSLOW, Mrs. ARTHUR A. 
W., Camden Park, Menanglc. — Stono 
Pine Nuts. ^.;.._ 

298. POWER & UTTLEY, Dubbc— 

Samples of Timber growing in tiio Dubbii Dis- 
trict, and used for house and bridge building. 

299. SMALLWOOD, D. J., Caddia 
Road, Pitt Town, Hawkesbury River. 

— Bracelets and Necklaces made from Seeds. 

300. SMALLWOOD, D. J., Caddia 
Road, Pitt Town, Hawkesbury River. 

— Cabbage Tree Bands for making hats. Gi- 
gantic Lily Leaves, used for tying. Native 
Sarsaparilla Native or Woodei. Pears. 



STEEL, SPBIN GS, STEEL CASTIN GS, FILES, &c. 

'^ SAMUEL OSBORN & CO., SHEFFIELD. 

lOHDON: Victoria Mansions, Westminster, AFNOID PYE-SMITH, Resident Partner, 
SYDNEY: MacBRAIR, OSBORN & CO., 249, Clarence Street, 

r*% :5-.. /bee defailfd ^^vcrlismfni in OJJi^al Catalog^ie, pag^ .^ . !..s.U;. 



166 



New South Walet. 



301. SMALLWOOD, D. J., Pitt 
Town, Hawkesbury River.— Native Wal- 
nut Soofis aud Worn! ; wood used for btuckiiig 
guns, &o. ; the boughs oro used for forago. 

302. TATE BROTHERS, Sydney, 
Agents for John Donaldson, Wingham, 
Manning River.— Lurgo I'lauk of Cedar. 

303. VOIiCKERS, HENRY A., Oraf- 
ton. — Hainpli'8 of Soeds of Native Trees, 
Hhrubs, and Flowers, &o., &o, 

304. WHEREAT, E.R.,Tenterfleld.— 

Collection of Colonial Woods in smull blockS; 
with burk ou, and polishod ou ouo side. 



Class 47. 
Oils. 



SS. AUSTRALIAN 



KEROSENE 
OIL' & MINERAL CO., Limited, Syd- 
ney; Works, Joadja Creek, near Ber- 
rima. — Kerosene Oil. 

306. COMMISSIONERS FOR NEW 
SOUTH WALES FISHERIES, Syd- 
ney. — Oils from Fish other than ediblo pur- 
poses. 

307. ONSLOW, Mrs. ARTHUR A. 
W., Camden Park, Menangle. — Olivo 
Oil expressed from olivea grown at Camden 
Park in 1884. 

308. WALSH, ELLIOT, & RENNIE, 
Botany and Sydney. — Neatsfoot Oil, 
Trotter Oil. 

Class 48. 

Soap, Tallow, Wax, and other Oleaginou$ 
Substances. 

309. AUSTRALIAN KEROSENE 
OIL & MINERAL CO., Limited, Svd- 
ney; Works, Joadja Creek, near Ber- 
rima.— Candles. 

310. DICKSON & SONS, S., Waver- 
ley. — 1 cwt. Soap. 

ONSLOW, Mrs. ARTHUR A. 



w^,i 



Camden Park, Menangle. — Beeswax. 

312. PIPER & CO., Tamworth.— Soap, 
Candles. 

313. SMALLWOOD, D. J., Pitt 
Town, Hawkesbxiry River. — Beeswax. 

314. WALSH, ELLIOT, & RENNIE, 

Botany.— Tallow (beeQ, Tallow (mutton). 



Class 49. 

Hides, JJorni, Hair, &e. 

315. PARKER, P. J., Bathnrat— Glue, 
Shank Bonos, Horns. 

316. WALSH, ELLIOT, & HENNIB, 
Botany.— IXonui, Bout^, Uidca, dco. 



Class 60. 

Leather and Manufactures of Leather. 

317. ARNOLD, ALFRED EDWARD 

Marrickville. — Leather oomproased in uoe 
and fancy articles. 

318. BBOQ & BON, Paddington, 

Sydney. — Twenty sides of Solo Leather. 

310. CARR, JABEZ, South Dubbo.- 

Leather made from Haw llides, purchased in 
tlio Dubbo District. 

320. CRAWFORD, A. R., Moona 
Plains, Walcha. — Halters, Hobbles, &c. 

321. DAVENPORT & SONS, Sydney. 
— Sole Leather, Dreesod Leather, Boots and 
Shoes. 

322. PARLEIGH, NETTHEIM, ft 
CO., Sydney; Factory, Stanley Street, 
Concord. — Sole Leather. 

323. FORSYTHE & SONS, JAJflffES, 
Sy(mey.— Bole Leather. 

324. HARRISON &WHIFFEN,Syd. 
ney. — Leathers, Fur Skins, &c., &o. 

325. HAYWARD, GEORGE, KelEO, 
near Bathurst. — Basils (bkins). 

326. LUDOWIOI, J. C, Sydney.-^ 

Mul Belt Manufactures, &o. 

327. M'GRATH, J. J., Wagga Wagga. 

— ^Saddle used as Stock Saddle, peculiar to New 
South Wales, designed by the Manufaotuier. 

328. STEPHENS, 8., Narrabri- -Stock 

Saddle. : 

329. THOMPSON, Q. A., Kelso.— As- 
sorted Leathers. 



CLARKE'S New Patent __^ 

"FAIRY" LAMPS AND "FAIRY" LIGHTS 

Jhese Lamps are made entirely of Glass, and fitted wUh Opal Sbadcs. The Patent •*Pairy " IjlfirW^J^ 
Double WiclwTglving a beau.iful (ift. steady light. The l«Bt hour', burning ii w brlUlMt m ihe.flrrt. wid «• m* 
affected by the Btrongegt draught. They burn 10 hours. 

SAMUEL CLARKE, Patent Pyramid and Fairy Lamp and Light Worifl, 

CHILD'S HILIi, LONDON; and NBWABK, NEW JBBBBT, T7.B.A. 



New South Wales. 



167 



!330. WAIjKBR, J. E. P., Cooma and 
oulburu. — Saddles. 
331. WAIiSH, BIjIjIOT & BEiraXB, 
otany. — Loutliera and Basils. 

V • Class 61. 

Bilk — liaie, Cocoon and Thread. 

332. BRADY, C. A., Tumbiilgum, 
weed River. — Aiutralian Silkworm Co- 

K)n8. 

333. THORNE, a.. Castle Hill, Parra- 

latta District. — Silk Cocoons; Silkworm 
;gg8 ; Dried Sjiecimens of Mulberry Leaves. 

Class 56. 

Building Materials, 

334. BROWNE, T., "West Maitland.— 

uilding Stone. 

335. O'NEILL, C, M.LC.E.— Patent 

,riificial Caithness Flagging for Footpatli, 
c, (See. 

336. ROBERTSON, J. B. R., West 

laitland. — Two samples Frftostone, from a 
aarry on the above Estate ; blue and white. 

337. SAUNDERS, R., Sydney.— 

aniples of Stone from the Exhibitor's Quarries, 
yrinont, whicli the principal buildiuga iu 
ydney are built with. 

338. VrVTAN'.W.H., Manly.— Building 

tones. 

OTE : See under Clasii 46a, Minerals, for other 
exhibits. 

Class 57. 
Oums and Besins. 

339. COOK, W. H., Sydney.— Grass Tree 
runi. 

wo. HARRISON & WHIPPEN, 
ycoiey. — Gums. 

341. SMALL WOOD, D. J., Pitt Town. 

[niuB. 



:j43. emery, D. J., Tumut.— Tobacco 
Leaf. 

344- 8NODDON, A., Tumut— Tobacco 
Leaf. 

3j|S SUTTON, A, W., «r CO., Sydney. 

—Five Samples Tobacco Leaf, grown in N, S. 
Wales. 



Class 62. 

MateriaU u$ed /or Bleaching, Tanning, and 
Currying. 

346. HARRISON & WHlA ' J i' EN, 
Sydney. — Tanning Barks. 



cas 



347. MANNINO BROTHERS, New. 

tie. — Extract of Soap. 



^ea 



Class 60. 

Tobacco. 
BROWN, K G., Tumut.— Tobacco i 



348. PARRY Sn CO., Sydney.— Extract 
of Soap. 

- / I.' 

349. SMALLWOOD, D. J., Pitt Town, 
Hawkesbury River.— Vt'ut tie Bark. 

3Sa THOMPSON, a. A., Kelso.— 

Samples of Black Wattle Bark for Tanning. 



Class 63. . ^ .. 

Other Products and Manufacturen not Specified. 

351. ALLEN, C, Quirindi.— Momit 
Wingen preparations. 

352. HTTiTi, G., Sydney.— Oil Paste Shoo 
Blacking. 

353. HOGBEN, E., Sydney.— Balsam 
Mixture (Aniseed). 

354. McBRIDE, S., Sydney.— Articles 
made from Cat-gut. 

355. MANNING BROTHERS, I.ew- 
castle. — (1) Baking Powder ; (2) Egg Powder. 

356. PA BUY & CO., Sydney.— (1 

Baking Powder; (2) Egg Po^vder. 



357. PFiATE, Lawrence, Eathurst.— 
I Bakuig Powder, && 



SIE JOHN BEMETT, 65 & 64, Oheapside, London. 
Watch, Clock, and Jewellery Mannfactnrer, by Appointment to Her Majesty. 

ENTLEMEN'S GOLD KEYLESS CLOCK WATCHES, of the highest quality, 

striking «n jxiMant the honrs, and qaarters, and also repeatiog the boors, qnarters and minutca, £100, £125, £I30. 
J^DIES' GOLD KEYLESS WATCHES, perfect for time, beauty and workmanship. With 
pUln poltabed or richly-eagraved 18-carat gold cases, folly Jewelled, strong crysul gUaa, air, damp and dost tight, 
£5to£l8. 



1(>^ 



Ntu: Sonlli Wales. 



SECTION a. — MACHINERY 
AND IMPLEMENTS, MEANS 
OP TRANSPORT, APPLI- 
ANCES AND PROCESSES 
USED IN THE COMMON 
ARTS AND INDUSTRIES. 



rtj.. 



INX'LUDING MODELS AND DESIGNS. 
Class Go. 

liaihcay riant and HoUi'ikj Slocl; 7'ranvraijg, 

358. COMMISSIONER FOR RAIL- 
Ways, Sydney. — Two Franios of Ktiilwiiy 
Tnicke, fitted witli Messrs. Cowdory rind Thomas' 
Automatic. Ouplinn^s, as in nso on tlio Now 
South Wales Railways. 

359. COMMISSIONER FOR RAIIi- 
WAYB, Sydney.— Railway Rails, pateutcd 
by Messrs. Cowdery and Thomas. 



'■'^:" Class 66. 

I Telegraphy, Telephones, Heliographs, &c. 

360. KOPSCH, Charles F. G., Sydney. 

'—Three Galvano-MeUieal luductida Coils (own 
design). 

Class 67. 

Civil Enrjineering and Archifecture. 

361. M'DONALD, J. A., M.I.C.E., 
Assistant Engineer, Roads and Bridges 
Department, Sydney. — New form of " Ex- 
pansion Roller for largo Iron Bridges ;" invented 
hv Exhibitor, and patented in New South 
Wales. 

Class 68. 

Ocean, Coast, awl River Navigation. 

362. HUNT BR RIVER NEW STEAM 
NAVIGATION COMPANY, Sydney. - 
Water-colour Drawing of S.S. " Namoi." 



JOM 



COMPANY, Sydney. — Water-colour Draw- 
ing of P.S. " Newcastle." 



364. ORIENT 
TIC 



STEAM NAVIQJ 
'ON COMPANY (LIMITED), QoorgJ 
Street, Sydney. — Modtls, Diagrams, Phot] 
giapliH, and Lithographs of Steamers )| 
Australian Trade. 



JTJBli 



PENINSULAR & ORIENTA^ 
STJBlAM NAVIGATION OOMPANVI 
George-street, Sydney. — rhf>*ot^apliM 
r. & (). Coinpany'B S.S. " Mabdilia " anj 
"Khedive," and of Company's Offices, Gcnrgel 
street, Sydney. 



Class 74. 

Airated Waters and Bottling Machines. 

366. MONK, D. J., Sydney.— Improve': 
Pat(!nt Stopper for Aeraleil Water and Wim 
Bottles, and improved form of Bottle ; the iii. 
vcntion of the Exhibitor. 



SECTION H. — FOOD PRO 
DUCTS. 

Class 78. 

Stujars, Syrups, &c. 

Z(n. COLONIAL SUGAR RE^ 
FINING COMPANY, Sydney. 
SngaiB, t&c., from New Soutli Wales ('(ine, 
grown on Northern Rivers. 

368. COLONIAL SUGAR RE- 
FINING COMPANY, Sydney.- 

Sugars, &c., from Fijian Plantations and Mills 
of the Company. 

369. MILLAR, D., Harwood Island, 
Clarence River. — Sugars. 

370. MORRISON, G., Clarence River. 
— Unrefined Sugars (*i Samples), grown on 
Richmond River. 

371. NICOLL, B. B., Sydney.— Samples 
of Sugar grown on the Richmond River. 



-8 



72. PERIGO BROTHERS, Sydney, 
olden Syrup. 



BARTON & CO., WINE MERCHANTS, LONDON. 

M'etK-End Offices: 9«, AT. FAMES' STBEET, If. 



PORT. 



Light or full-bodied. 



20/- to 30/- 



Chotce dry, rlcli and excellent 

ilavour, from tb« wood uid old 

in bottle. 



40/- to 60/- 



Fine N«tnrsL 



48/- to 72/- 



VINTAGKS. 
1820, 1834, 1847, 
1861, 1858, 1864. 



Neio South Walcn. 



109 



'■' : Class 79. 

Ilrradefiifff, and Arllclea made thfrefrom. 

373. BROWTiTE, a. W., Deniliquin 

lour. 

374. BUCKLEY, W., Tumut.— (Shown 

irougli tbo Tumut Agricultural Society. — 

iitnical. 

375. COHEN & LEVY, Tamworth.— 

Imir. 

376. COHEN &LEVy, Tamworth 

nrn Moftl. 

377. CONLON, MBS. B., Windsor.— 

iiize Meivl. 

378. CONLON, MRS. B., Windsor.— 

liiizena. 

379. COX, W. a., Qoulbum.— Flour.' 

380. DALTON BROTHERS, Sydney. 

lour. 

381. PAINT, G., Amiidale.— Flour. 

382. HARDMAN BROTHERS. New- 
own. — Biscuits. 

383. KITE, W., Bathurst.— Flonr. 

384. McQEB & QUINN, Parkes.— 

'lour. 

385. M'OILLIVRAY, D., Gilmore.— 

'lour. 

386. MATTHEWS & SON, Bathurst. 

-Wheateu Flour. 

387. MOORE & CO., Armidale.— Flour. 

388. PARRY & CO., Sydney Self- 

aising Flour. 

389. PARRY & CO., Sydney.— Maize 

leal. 

390. PEATE, L. G., Bathurst.— Self- 

aising Flour. 

191. REYNOLDS, J., Wagga Wagga. 



391- -I 

-Flour. 



392. RICHARDSON, J., & CO., Armi- 
dale. — Flour. 

393. SMALL WOOD, D. J., Pitt Town, 
Hawkesbury River. — Mftizo Moul. 

•■ ' ^. ■'. 

394. SUMMERS, J., Tumut. — Maizo 
Meal. 

395. UTZ, P., Glen Innes.— Floar. 

396. WADE & CO., J., Dungog and 
Sydney.— Maize Bran. 



Class 80. 
Arroicroot, Tapioca, Sago, dte. 

397. COLE & SON, W., Toinago.— 

Aviowroot. 

398. CONLON, Mrs. B., Windsor.— 

Arrowroot. 

399. MUNN, A. L., Merimbula. — Mai- 
zeua or Coru Flour. 

400. SMALLWOOD, D. J., Pitt Town, 
Hawkesbury River. — .A rrowroot from Po- 
tatoes. 

401. SMALLWOOD, D. J., Pitt Town, 
Hawkesbury River. — Arrowroot 

402. WADE & CO., J., Dungog and 
Sydney.— Com Flour. 

403. WADE & CO., J., Dungog and 
Sydney. — Kico Starch. 



Class 81. 

Butter, Cheege, and other Fatty Substances. 

404. ALLEN, W., Bega District.— 

Cheese, 

405. BELL, J., Robertson. — Butter. 

406. BLACK BROS., Monara.— Cheese. 

407. BLACK, J. M., Bega. — Cheese. 



ENAMEL PAINTING, 

AT COST OP ORDINARY PAINT. 



10WARD & SONS, DECORATORS, 25, BERNERS STREET, W. 



170 



New South Wdlea. 



408. BLENOOWB, T., Burrawang.- 
Buttor. 



409. BRANDON, 

Butter. 



T., Bxurawang.— 



410. BRBSNAHAN, D., Burrawang. 

—Butter. 



411. BROWN, W., Robertson.— Butter. 

412. BURRAWANG FARMERS' 
CLUB AND WEST CAMDEN AORI 
CULTURAL SOCIETY.— Various Ex- 

liibits. 

413. CURTIS, J., Robertson.— Butter. 

414. GAY, R., Robertson.— Butter. 

415. QRAHAM, J., Burrawang. — 

Butter. 

416. GRICE, J., Burrawang.— Butter. 

417. HAND, R., Bega.— Chcoso. 

418. HINDMARSH, W. R., Robert- 
son. — (8h>wn by the Buinvwiuig Fanuors' 
Club and West Cumilou Agricultural .Society.) 
—Butter. 

419. M«GRATH, J., Burrawang.— 

(Shown by the Burrawang Farmers' Club and 
West Camdon Agriouitural Society.)— Butter. 

420. M'PAUL, R„ Robertson.— (Shown 
by tiio Burrawang Farmers' Club and West 
Camdon Agricultural Hooiety.)— Butter. 

421. MANNING, J., Bega District.— 

(Shown thiough the Bega Agricultural Society.) 
— Cheese, made from milk of cows fed upon 
natural grasses. 



422. MILLER, J. R., Burrawang.- 

(Sliowfi by the Burrawang Farmers' Club ad 
West Camdon Agriouitural Society.) — Butter. 

423. MOORE, J., Burrawang.— (Sho*] 
by the Jiurrawang Farnurs' Club and Wa 
Camden Agricultural Socioty.) — Butter. 

424. MOSES, R., Burrawang.— <Sbofi 
by the Burrawang Farmers' Club and W«i 
Camden Agriouitural Society.) — Butter. 

425. OTTON, H., Bega District. - 
(Shown through the Bega Agricultural andPai 
toral Society.)— Cheese, made from milk of oowi 
fed upon natural grasses 

426. RODGERS, R., Bega District.- 

(Shown through the Bega Agricultural Society.) 
— Chwse, made from milk of cows fed upoi 
natural grasses. 

427. SEERY, M., Burrawang.— (Showi 
by the Burrawang Farmers' Club and Wns; 
Camden Agricultural Society.) — Butter. 

428. SEERY, T., Burrawang.- Shoffc 

by tlio Burrawang Farmers' Club and Wcsl 
Camden Agricultiual Society.) — Butter. 

429. TOOTH, R. L., Bega District- 

(Shown through the Bega Agricultural and 
Pastoral Society.) — Chetse, made from mili 
of cows fed upon natural grasses. 

43a WILLIAMS, D., Robertson— 

(Shown by the Burrawang Farmers' Club andj 
West Camden Agricultural Society.) — Butter. 



[T/te remaining portion of the New South Wales Exhibits can he ascertained from the SpeeidI 
Catalogue, tchich may he procured on application at the Neio South Wales Court, and which 
will also appear in the second edition of this Catalogtw.'] 






.f 



I ■; 









; ■v'' f\ 



Advertisemen ts. 171 



Telegrams—" Retsof, Lon»o\."J [Tclophono No. 8777. 

ESTABLISHED 1829. 

FOSTER & SONS, 

ALE, BEER, S 

AND V „,■. '^^ :.M' ' . ■ (■•. ^l 

YDER MEBCHANTS. 

ffiRERE WATER MARUFACTUMS, 

FOR THE HOME AND EXPORT TRADES. 




HEAD OFFICES: 

27, BROOK STREET, BOND STREET, W. 

HOME STORES: 

242 and 244, MARYLEBONE ROAD; and 
2-16, LISSON GROVE, N.W. 

EXPORT DEPOT: 

[OTORIA STORES, NORTH WOOLWICH, E. 

LONDON. 



INERAL WATER MANUFACTORY, ' 

242, MARYLEBONE ROAD, N.W. \ 



AGENTS FOB— 



w k Co., Burton-on-Trent. A. Guinness, Son & Co., Dublin. 
M. B. FOSTER & SONS 

lave the Exclusive Supply of Bottled Beers to 

THE COLONIAL AND INDIAN EXHIBITION. 



172 



AihcrlisemcnUt. 






?5Ej^5r^:g|;ppir-*^?5S^^^g^;^ 




JAMES MCE WAN & CO., 

WHOLESALE & RETAIL IRONMONGERS, IRON MERCHANTS, & IMPORTERS of MACHIBl 
MELBOURNE, NEW ZEALAND, and SUVA, FIJI. 



©entral ©(Sets, JTurnisljing SfjoiDrooms, aria 
Ktlail Drpartiufutji— 

81, ELIZABETH STREET. 



SCXIjolfsalc JUarrboiisfS— 
4, 6, & 10, 

LITTLE COLLINS ST. WESII 



5ton anS fHctai lUm^jamt antt fflacljinerD Qrpat— 319, ELIZABETH STREET, 

]XIKI.]tOUKMC:. 

33tanclj JiSHarrtjousc anl ©fficcs-SUVA, FIJI. 

GALVANIZED CORRUGATED IRON, FENCIN^WIRE, WIRE NETTING 

And oUier STATION KEQUISIFICS. specially Imiwrtcd. 

Magnificent Stock of Sterling SILVER GOODS and first quality ELECTBO-PLATE, 

In every varirty of ttyle, Irom tin loading EiigUsh, Contlrieiiiil, ami Auifricati mauufacturers. 

CUTLERY FROM THE BEST ENGLISH HOUSES. 

The largest and choicest selection of GAS LAMPS and BRACKETS, MARBL 

CHIMNEY PIECES, and GENT3RAL IKONMONaEIlY, in the Colony. 

Agents for W. A. Wood's Reaping and Binding Machines, Robey' 
Engines, Fawcett's Brickmaking Plant, &c., &c. 

~ JAMES McEWAN & CO. 

Export Metal, Hardware, and General Merchants for the Australisii 

Colonies, New Zealand, and Fiji, 

27, LOMBARD STREET, LONDON, E.C.^ 

Contractors for ths Supply of Eailway, Engineering, Gas and Water Plant, Material 
for Ship Building and Public Works, and Machinery of all kinds | and Importers « 
Australian and New Zealand Produce on Consignment. 



SOLE AGENTS FOR THE COLONIES for MARCH'S PATENT STREET SWEEPEE 



( 173 ) 



VICTORIA. [ 

.', By Jamks Thomson, ■,, 

Secretary lo ihf- lioiial Gommissiuu for Viclurla. 

the comparatively liniiteil space, allotted for tho introductory noticrcs of each of ilio 
(Ionics repreaentod at tlio Exhibition, it ia not possible to give anytliing- liko a detailed 
Bcription of their varied producta and resources, or of their remarkable inaterial and aocial 
velopment and progresB. Thia ia more particularly tlio cnso with the colony of Victoria, one 

the youngest membera of the great family of the Britiah Empire, but wliose hiatory and 
Ivaucement ia amongat tho most interesting and wonderful events of the century. With tho 
cw of furnishing the people of Great Britain with tho later; and moat reliable information 
specting tho Colony — ita progress, reaourcea, and future prospects — the Government hii, 
irough the Royal Commission for Victoria, prepared a handsomely illustrated ' Handbook of 
iotoria,* for circulation in connection with tho Colonial Exliibition. Thia work contains 
)ecially written articles by genilemen poaseasing extenaive and diversified Australian 
perience,and who are recognized as authorities on the subjects which they have severally 
jdertaken. The history and progress of the Colony, its leading industries, and the aocial and 
aterial condition of the people, are all fully dealt with, while numerous engravinga are given of 
haracteristic scenery, public buildings, mines, vineyards, and other objects of interest. It ia 
ainly from Mr. Julian Thomas's interesting article on Victoria that the present notice haa 
;en taken, want of space only compelling ita curtailment. 

The colony of Victoria lies at tho aouth-easteru extremity of the vast Australian continent, 
etween tho 34th and 39th parallels of south latitude, and tho 14l3t and 150th meridians of east 
jugitude. Ita extreme length is about 420 miles, its greatest breadth about 260 miles, and its 
xtent of coast line nearly GOO geographical miles. On the north and north-cast it is bounded 
y the colony of New South Wales, and on the west iby tho colony of South Australia. On tho 
outh-east its shores aro washed by the Pacific Ocean, and on the south by the Southern Ocean, 
he area of Victoria is 87,884 square milea, or 56,245,700 acres, being about a thirty-fourth of 
le whole continent of Auatralia, and nearly as large aa England, Walea, Scotland, and 
reland combined. Although not the largest of the Australian colonies, Victoria is the most 
pulous, now containing, it is estiraatetl, one million inhabitants, being 40 per cent, of the 
pulation of all Australia. It also with justice claims to be the richeat and most prosperous 
f England'a coloniea in the Southern hemisphere. 

Several attempts were made in the early part of tho present century to colonise that part of 
l^ustralia now known as Victoria, but they ended in failurea, and it was not until tho year 1835 
hat permanent aettlement was commenced on the site at preaent occupied by tho city of 
Heibourne. Good land was discovered in various parta of tho district then known only aa Tort 
'hilip, and a ateady atream of population soon act in. Melbourne, the Infant city, was named 
ifttr tho Prime Minister of EnjrlaAl at that time, and it aoun rose into importance. In 1850, 
mly fifteen years after ita aettlement. Port Philip had a revenue' of £230,000. its Exports 
imounted to nearly a million sterling, and its population had increased by rapid strides to 
?6,000. Thia was a year before tho discovery of gold, which " uplifted the Colony in a night to 
Ihe position of a nation and a power in the world, and advanced her destinies huudreda ot 
vear» at one bound." In the year 1851 Port Philip became a separate colony and was 
uaiued "Victoria," in honour of the young Queen who had recently ascended the throne of 
Kngland, and who has ever aince ruled the vast Empire of which Australia forms a part. 
The discovery of gold in 1851 gave tlio IColony a wonderful impotua at the time ; when 
people from all parta of the world haatone<l to the Californian gold-fields, Australia suffered 
in losing hundreds of her people, who flocked thither. This in the end, however, proved a 
1/leBsing, for when th'> goM-suekers returned they were struck with the similarity between 



174 Victoria. 



the rock and soil of their adopted land and that they had just left. They sought for g 
and found it. A man named Esmond discovered it in quartz rock at Clunea. Then it i 
found at Buninyong and at Ballurat. When the reports reached Melbourne, members 
all classes were seized with the gold mania, and there was a "rush" to the gold-fiel 
Desks, offices, shops, ships were deserted. Closely following the Ballarat finds came those 
Mount Alexander and Bendigo. which fanned the flames of excitement to a frenzy. T 
people were " drnnk with the hope of gold." From every quarter of the globe ships saili 
into the once peaceful harbour. 'Victoria was crowded with searchers for fortune ; in oi 
year nearly 80,000 immigrants being added to the population of the Colony. Fr.)m that tin 
it has advanced with giant strides. Well may Victoria and its capital bo termed ma 
vellous ! Well may old men who remember C(jllins Street as a broken forest shake the 
heads when they gaze upon the fashionable crowd on the "Block," and feel like Tullivi 
that •' the world is too much for them." Who would recognise in the Melbourne of 1886 11 
" bush town " of thirty years ago ? Then the streets were full of gum-tree stumps and deep ru 
The principal thoroughfare, Elizabeth Street, was for months in the year a flooded quagmi 
in which on one occiision a waggon and team of horses were absolutely swallowed up, ai 
bullock drays were daily bogged. Iron buildings and bark " humpies" were seen on eve 
hand, and what is now the important municipality of South Melbourne was a field of ten 
known as Canvas Tovm. The old pioneers who have not " made their pile " tell strani 
tales of the doings in those early days when Gold was King, and each man did that whi 
was right in his own eyes. Yet the records of crime are very slight. The rude, rough, ba 
life on the gold-fields, whilst it produced a few bushrangers, tempted by the enormous gpoii 
within their grasp, was not productive of petty off"encea. With gold flowing from eyei 
man's hand and pocket, hunger and want were unknown there. Melbourne may not hai 
been very moral in those days, but of » habitual " criminals it had few, and the vagwi 
and the pauper were unknown. 

Melbourne is now one of the most beautiful capitals in the world, and it is also the mo 
populous and important -.ity in the southern hemisphere. Including its suburban municipalitia 
eighteen in number, Al lying within a radius of ten miles from the Town Hall, It contain 
325,000 inhabitants. Mr. Anthony Trollope well described it as "one of the most succaij^ 
cities on the face of the earth." It is well laid out with wide and regular streets, with brd 
Bide-walka well paved and lighted. Tree planting in the streets lias been extensively carriei 
on, giving a pleasant shade as well as refreshing the eye. The buildings are not only handsome 
but many are of •^eat architectural merit. The cathedrals and churches, schools, Parliamen 
Houses, Treasury, Town Hall, Post Office, Law Courts, Custom House, University, Museum, Pra 
Library, National Gallery, clubs, theatres, and other public institutions are worthy of specia 
admiration. The banking corporations are settled in buildings which would adorn Lombard o 
Threadneedlc Street. The wharfs on the banks of the Yarra now give accommodation to larp 
ocean-going steamers. The shops and warehouses are equal to those of most cities in the Oli 
World. Everything necessary to make life content and easy can be procured in Melbourne. Al 
the suburbs are connected with the heart of the city by railways and the most perfect system ol 
tramways iu the world. And the mansions in the fashionable suburbs are only less gratifying 
evidences of the prosperity of the people than the thousands of pleasant cottages which one sea 
on every road within a few miles of the city. Any visitor to the Colony must be struck with th( 
perfect arrangements for water supply. There is hardly tHe smallest cottage without its batl 
room. The most important reservoir is the Yan Yean, which is an artificial lake at the foot ol 
the Plenty Ranges, nearly nineteen miles from Melbourne proper. The numerous parks and 
reserves and public gardens in and around Melbourne are heritages sacred to the health and 
enjoyment of the people, which astonish the " new chum " from crowded European cities, whert 
one is taxed for space to breathe. This is above all a place for the people. In no large town of 
the world has a working man so many enjoyments as in Melbourne, or so many privilege* 
There is no State Church here, but free State schools give secular instruction to children whose 
parents may bo willing to accept it. Children between the ages of six and fifteen who do not attend 
the State school must give evidence that they are educated at a private ■ohool up to a given 
standard. The whole country, as well as the metropolis, is dotted with State schools. The Frei 
Library, Museum, and Picture Galleries, and the Botanic aad Zoological Gardeui affori f«« 



m 



Victoria. 175 

eoreation and instruction to the labourer and mechanio, as well as to the clerk or shopman. 

elboume is plentifully furnished with provident, charitable, literary, scientific, and social 
nstitutions to suit all classes and creeds. In the matter of amusement, the inhabitants of the 
notropolis are furnished with four theatres nnd several musio-halld. At the Exhibition Building 
,nd at the Town Hall grand concerts are weekly given. Besides the Mayor and Town Clerk, tLo 
two greatest civic functionaries outside Loudon, Melbourne possesses a "city organist," whose 
losition in the musical world is as that of the Poet Laurer.te in literature. But tbeatro and 
loncert-loving aa are the Victorians generally, it is in outdoor sports that they chiefly relax. 
Cricket, lawn tennis, football, rowing, yachting, and bicycle riding are the most popular amnse- 
iients. In cricket our native youth iiave made their mark against the Gentlemen and Players of 
England at Lord's. There arc no more perfect arrangements of the kind in the world than those 
t the Melbourne Cricket Ground, where the members' pavilion is not only a " grand stand," but 
lossesses dining, billiard, and bath-rooms. Football is as popular here as in some parts of 
England. It is pro[)Osed that a football team shall be shortly stnt to Great Britain from 
Victoria. Next to cricket, horse-racing absorbs the aifections of the Victorian people. In any 
new township a racecourse is one of the first things laid out. Young Australian natives of bo' h 
lexes are as much at home iu the saddle as Arabs or Comanche Indians. Melbourne possesses 
wo first-class racecc jses within a few minutes' ride by rail from the city. Ac Flemington the 

■eatest race in Australia, the "Melbourne Cup," is run early in November (our spring). From 
jvery part of the continent people of all classes then flock to Victoria's metropolis. The " Cup 
Week" is the Carnival of Australia. If Flemington is like Epsom, Caulfield course may be said 
;o be the Ascot of Melbourne. The stranger at the Cup meeting will perhaps get a better sample 
f Victorian customs than anywhere else. There is an annual attendance of not less than 100 000 
)eople on Cup Day, yet the " new chum " will be surprised to see that policemen are conspicuous 
y their rarity, that there is scarcely a trace of drunkenness, and that amongst the vast crowd tlio 
nembers all well dressed, and with money in their pockets, nothing but good-humoured order 
irevails. Here, where every one's working hours are so much shorter than in other parts of the 

orld, the toiler with band or brain has no temptation to make a Saturnalia of his holiday. 

here is less drunkenness in Victoria and as little crime as anywhere in the world. 

Victoria, however, should not be judged only by its metropolis. The inhind townships 
leserve mention. Ballarat, the second city in the Colony, is situated exactly 100 miles from 
llelbourne. It well bears the title of the " Golden City." In the early days, the gold-yielding 
(owers of Ballarat, were simply marvellous. No district in the world produced so much gold 
n such a short space of time. It has been stated that, in many iastanc-es, " claims," not more 
ban 8 feet square and, about the same depth, yielded from £10,000 to £12,000 each. At the 
i'rince Regent mine, men made as much aa £16,000 each for a few months' work. At one claim 
i tubful of dirt yielded £3,325. The « Welcome Nugget," found in 1858, was sold for £10,500*. 
Chose days have gone, but Ballarat, as it is now, is still more wonderful than when gold was, in 
rery truth, "more plentiful than blackberries," when it was " scattered a thousand times like seeds 
ipon the earth." Anthony Trollope, some thirteen years ago, said with justice, of Ballarat that 
t struck him with more surprise than any city in Australia, that " in point of architectural 
ixcellence, and general civilized city comfort, it w certainly the metropolis of the Australian gold 
ielils." Sturt Street, the principal thoroughfare, is a mile and a half long, 200 feet wide, and has 
I fine row of trees in the centre. The principal builtlings on either side are the City Hall, Post 
Office, Mechanics' Institute, banks, theatre, hospital, and several large churches. The population 
a 40,000. The reservoirs from which the water supply is obtained have a storage capacity of 
100,000,000 galLms. These works cost £300,000. Lake Wendouree now adds to the charming 
sped of the city ; hundreds of small yachts, miniature steamers, and rowing boats in numbers 
loal on tiie lake, which is sto<;ked with perch, trout, and carp. The Botanioiil Gardens, ou the 
ther bide of the lake, are prettily laid out and well kept. The finest wool in the world is pro- 
iuced near Ballarat, and on Sir William Clarke's estate, a tew miles from the town, and on the 
mall farms in the forest of Bungaree splendid crops are grown. Ballarat, of which a picture 
nay be seen close to the Golden Arch in the Victoria Court, is now not only " a city of gold," 
)ut is an important inland centre. A charming picture of Ballarat as it appeared in 1851 i« 
>hown iu the Fine Arts Section of the Victoria Courts, and a comparigon with the view of the 
city in 1886 will show its remarkable progress. 



^76 Victoria. 



an 



SaadhurBt, or, aa it was formcily tcrmetl, Boudigo, is a Uttlo over 100 luilcBfromMelbouru 
It has fibout the same population as Ballarat, 40,000. Id 1851, shortly after the first go 
diBOovery, Sandhurst was found to contain that precious metal in such abundance that in a shoa 
time it became famous for the number of its immense nuggets, the best known of which was tl 
"Victoria Nugget," which was bought by the Victorian Goverment and presented to H 
JIajesty. In 187'^ Sandhurst took rank as a principal Victorian city. It is certainly equal , 
any European city of th^" same size. The most prominent buildings nro the Masonic Hull, th 
Town Hall, and hospital, together with a very fine theatre. The streets of Sandhurst ar 
beautifully planted with English trees, the cool shade of which is as pleastmt to visitors as b 
the residents. In the centre of the town is a public fernery known us •' Rosamond's Bower.' 
Pall Mall is the principal business thoroughfare. The streets iiave a total length of about IDI 
miles. Sandhurst is rich in other ways besides gold. The district produces yearly more thai 
1,000,000 bushels of grain, 17,000 tons of hay, and some 100,000 gallons of ,<?ood wine. Fruits 
all kinds grow most luxuriantly in the volcanic soil. An excellent panoran^ic view of Sandhu 
as shown close to the gold arch of Victoria. 

Schools of Mines have been established at Sandhurst and Ballarat, to which are attache 
museums, containing geological and technological specimens, models of mining machinery an 
rammg plant, sections of mines, and geological maps and plans. At these schools instruct'-ji- 
18 given not only in the various branches of science connected with mining operations in th 
theory and practice of mining and safe conduct of mining works, mining surveying and 'minini 
engmeering, but also in many other subjects not necessarily connected with mining. Student 
at the Sandhurst school number about 380, and at the Ballarat school about 500. The nnnua 
income of the two institutions is about £5,900, of which all but £1,900 is granted by Government 
Schools of Design have also been established at twenty-five other places in Victoria, in connexioi 
with a Royal Commission for promoting technological and industrial instruction. There ar 
over 2,800 pupils on the rolls of these schools. An exhibition of the works of pupils is hoi 
yearly in Melbourne, and local exhibitions are held in other towns. 

Geelong, which takes rank as fourth in Victorian cities, is picturesquely situated in Cor» 
Bay. At one time it was thought it would continue to rival Melbourne, and from its fine 
harbour, position, and rich back country there waa a good foundation for the idea. But an ida 
it remains, although Geelong is ever ready to come to the front. Some important wooHm 
factories are situated here, and « Geelong tweeds " are celebrated in the colonies There is no 
danger of any «• Mississippi wool " getting into this fabric. In the Western District of Victorii 
tliere i re many important towns, Warmambool being the chief centre as well as an important 
Bhippmg port. Belfast and Portland rank next to Warmambool aa sea-port towns. Hamilton 
nearer to the South Australian border, is the capital of a fine pastoral district. In the east Sal 
is the oMef town in Gippsland, an extensive and prosperous division of the Colony which wa. 
<.!80overed by Mr. Angus MacMillan in 1839. Echuoa, on the Murray, is the principal city in 
the North of Victoria. In the old days this was a crossing-place for stock from New Soutl 
Wales. From Echuca there is a vast river traffic. During the winter months, when tb. 
Murray a waters are swelled by the thousand tributaries from the Australian Alps, steamers plj 
to Alburj on the one hand, and to South Australia, New South Wales, and far inland rivers oe 
the other. Echuca, a river-port, is only second to Melbourne in the amount of its shippini 
tonnage inwards and outwards. Castlemaine, Stanwell, Maryborough, Kyncton, Hamilton 
W^armambool, and Horsham, are all handsome Victorian towns; these, with the names c^ 
number of others, being shown in the Court. 

It is but 50 years since the first settlement was made in Victoria; now it possesses a millioi 
of inhabitants. Melbourne, its capital, is the largest city in the Southern hemisphere, iC 
population bemg 320,000. The country is traversed by a network of 1,700 miles of railway, ana- 
dotted with prosperous townships. Its imports are valued at £20,201,633, its exports at 
£16,050,465. Last year gold yielded 778,618 oz. ; pastoral produce about £10,000,000- ngricul 
tural produce £6,500,000. Manufacturing interests have been fostered in the capital and othei 
towns of the Colony; the yearly value of manufactured goods is computed nt £13,500,000. Tiiere 
are State schools and churches and newspapera everywhere— of the latter, five "dailies" 



Victoria. if if 



elboume. The Colony poBgesseB an Observatory and a Government Astronomer, who, like the 
ovemment Botanist, is a scientist of world-wide repute. Victoria has also a military and nan! 
(roe, and the shores aro well protected. Vi- torians are proud of their Colony, but they wo aim 
roud of being Australians of British blood. More than 95 per cent, of the Victoricn popolation 
I British, or of British parentage, and England and Groat Britain are y at apoken of as " home," 
Dd in spite of the establishment of the Melbourne University, which grants every degree eioept 
lose in Divinity, a large number of Victorian youths aro y-arly sent "home" to school and 
)llege (partly, it is said, because the examinations are much easier there.) That the British 
ice in Victoria docs not suffer deterioration is amply proved by the fact that in each of the 
Iniversity boats in the memorable struggle of the 3rd of April last was a Victorian bom 
» iman; Bfr. S. Fairbairn, who rowed No. .5 for Cambridge, and Mr. Robertson, who puUed 
[o. 3 in the Oxford boat. On several previous occasions Victorian natives have occupied similar 
ositions.whUe as member* of various Australian elevens, they have well maintained the honour 
f their adopted home in the cricket field. There ia room for many of the Britiah race ; 
)r although, by the side of the flocks and herus of the squatter, one sees the com- 
eids and potato-patches of the small farmer, and the vineyards of the wine-maker, there 
plenty of forest yet to be cleared and good land to be cultivated. There is a tendency 
Victoria, as in all the colonies, to centralization in the cities and townships, the urban popu- 
ition amounting to more than half the population of the whole Colony. The factories and 
;echanical trades absorb perhaps too krge a proportion of our youth. Girls, too, prefer to 
ork sewing-mp.chinesin the clothing warehouses to domestic service, althoui^h they would find 
le latter a better paid and easier employment. Tho immigrants most wolcome*! in Victoria 
ill be female servants and country labourers, men who can fight churlish Nature, or train he» 
softer moods, as the early pioneers of the Colony did. 

To the early pioneers of Victoria may be traced much of the spirit of enterprise and 
srseverance which>&s always characterised the Colony. From Henty and Batman and Fawkner 
id llobertion, to the men of the last decade, farmer or sailor, or trader or miner, they were aU 
16 very salt of the eartii. During the gold fever, the brains and tho blood, the mental courage 

» well as tho bone and muscle, of Europe flocked thither ; and the fittest' survived. Victoria 
B ever been essentially a pioneer Colony. It owed nothing to Government aid; in fact its 
riy prosperity was retarde<i by Government interference. It was founded solely by individual 
lergy; and its people have evet remained pioneers. It is in their blood. Vic iorians, Burke 
id Wills were the first to cross the continent in 1860. They lost their lives, but made their 
lines immortal. A massive monolith of granite was placed over their graves in the Melbourne 
emetery, and a fine bronze statue of the two explorers, from a design by Charles Summers 
ill remains an object lesson for our youth. The Burke and Wills expedition cost the people' 
Victoria £57,000. The end justified it, for within tvo years of the death of the leaders from 
arvation "tierces of beef were displayed in Melbourne, salted down from cattle pasturing on 
e spot where they perished." Far away in the " back blocks " in the centre of the Continent, 
tbe sugar lands of the North, on every new gold-field, Victorian muscle and energy and capital 
e to bo found. Ia the South Sea Islands, in the pearl fisheries of Torres Straits and Western 
ustralia, Victorian pioneers are foremost ; and Victorian enterprise has done much towards the 
iploration of New Guinea. Although they claim Victoria to be the richesi, the most populous, 
e most prosperous, and the most energetic of all the Australian colonies, yet Victorians were 
e first to raise their voices for tho Federation of the Colonies, the Political Unity of Australia. 
len the peoples of all the provinces, at present divided by local prejudices and jealousiea 

^U be joined together; and some day in the future, following out the manifest destiny of the 
ritisli race with the dear old motlier country, and her eldest-born the United Staixjs of Ajnerica, 
ill be linked together in a strong bond, ruling land and seaa and giving laws to all the world. ' 



^78 



AdverttMinenfi. 



THREE 



GOLD MEDALS 




FOR 
WATCHES ft CLGCK8. 



Chas„ FRODSHAM 8l Co, 

Wntch, Clock, and Chronometer Manufacturers, 

BY 8PL..AL WABBAHT OF APPOINTMENT TO HEE MAJESTY THE QVEEN and 
TH^IB BOYAL HIGHNESSES THE PBINCE AND FBINCESS OF WALES, 



KEEPERS OF HER MAJESTY'S CLOCKS AT BUCK INGHAM PAUCE. 

WATCH, CLOCK, AND CHRONOMETER MAKERS TO THE 
BRrriSH AND FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS. 




GOLD KEYLESS 3/4 -PLATE LEVER, wiih 
Chronometer Balance, in Open-face Case, 
in sizes for Ladies or Gentlemen, o'jr om 
manufacture, from ... £22 

Do. do. in Hunting Cases, from ... £25 

Do. do. in Half „ „ ... £26 



MINIATURE GOLD KEYLESS LEVER 
WATOH for Ladies, from ,., ... £10 

Repeaters, Chronographs, Centre-Seconds and 
Calendar Watches of the finest qualities. 

Englisli GMmmg and Stril^iiig Clocks aM Tii&epieGes. 

Clocks for Drawing, Dining and other Boome, Halle, &<! 
Price lii^t Vree ou Applicatioii. 



ON LY ADDRESS- 

84. STRAND, LONDON, W.C 



Victoria. 



170 



DIVISION A.— WOHKS OF ART. 

The whole of the Fine Arts Gallenj in the Vic- 
toria Court has been airanged under the 
jHTBonal giiperinlcndenee of Messrs. Arthur 
Tooth <t -Son*, 5 tfc G Jlaijnutrktt, London, 
S.W.-] 

Class I. 

)// Paintings. — Paintings on Canvas, oh Panel, 
and on other Ground i. 

A'BECKETT, MISS EMMA 
lONNIE, 77 High Street, Prahran.— 

)ue pair Torra-cotta Plaques. 

ANNANIi, JOSEPH, Hetherlie, 

W Punt Road, Prahran.— A Spring Morn- 

"; near Fernsliaw, by tho lato J. WJiitobead. 

ASHTON, GEORQE ROSSI, 95 

JoUina Street East, Melbourne. — An 
Australian Uniitcr. 

BELL, MISS E., late of Melbourne, 
low of 47 Broadhurst Q^ardens, Pineh- 
ey Road, London. — Decorative TanelB 
bown in Reception Room of Victoria Court. 

BRUPORD, FREDERICK HORA- 
10, Merton Sti'eet Albert Park.— 
'hree Landscapes: (1) The Kiver Hopkins 
ear Fmmlingliam. (2) The Upper Yarra. 
3) The Yarra near Warburton. 

BURTT, J. W., 142 Collins Street 
last, Melbourne.— (1) Suburban Melbourne. 
!) Portrait of J. liosisto, M.P., President of the 
ictorian Commission. 

CEDERBERQ, JOHN PETER, 

>8car IL Villa, 46 Alfred Street, Col- 

Bge Lawn, Prahran.— Mid -Winter, a view 

om Albert Park, showing the lagoon, Govern- 

ent House, a port of South Melbourne, with 

Melbourne in tho distance. 

DOWTjING, ROBERT, Australian 
[utual Buildings, Collins Street West, 
[elbourne.— (1) Portiait of His Excellency 
ir Henry B. Loch, (ioveiiioi of Victoria. (2) 
oing out with the Tide. 

PELTON, ALFRED, Flinders Lane, 
Lelboume.— Mount Macedon, by Eeilly. 

FLETCHER, A., Fine Arts Gallery, 
1 Collins Street East^ Melbourne.— (1) 
Waterpool at Coleraine, by L. Buvelot. (2) 
aterfall at Riddell's Creek, by J. Mather. 

FULLER, S. PEARCE, Planet 
hambers, 8 Collins Street East, Mel- 
)urne.— Oil Painting : View in tho Strath- 
gie Eangea, Euroa. 

GIBSON, RICHARD, Queen Street, 
filboume.— Four Paintings. Priio Oattle: 
I ^^^ DucliesB. (2) Second Duke of Alva. 
) Tiiird Duchess of Derrimut. (4) Tweutv- 
ttrBi Duko of Derriinu t. 



GLANVILLE. DOYLE.— 

GREGORY, CHARLES, late of Mel- 
bourne, now of Bridgofoot House, 
Ripley, Surrey.— Thorns. 

HULME, EDWARD, SEN., Milawa, 
Oxley.— (1) Diggers' Camp on the way to a 
New Eldorado, witli Black Guide. (2) Even- 
ing Glow, U2)per King River. 

KEESING, SAMUEL R.— Pink Ter- 
race, llotomalianu, N.Z. 

MATHER, JOHN, 95 Colling Street 
East, Melbourne.— (1) On tiie Black Spur, 
Fernshaw. (2) On tlie Upper Yarra. (3) At 
Hoalesville, Evening. (4) Mount St. Leonards. 

MOORE, JOHN, Wangaratta.— (1) 
On the Castra Road, Tasmania. (2) Ou the 
Ovens River, near Myrtleford, Victoria. (3) 
View between Wangaratta and Glenrowan. 

MORANT, JOHN C, 85 Collins 
Street East, Melbourne.— Various Paint- 
ings. 

MOUCHETTE, MADAME, Ober- 
ville, St. Kilda.— Portrait oi JM. Alouchotto. 



ODDIE, JAMES, Ballarat.— Portrait 
of Self, by E. Goodwyn Lewis. 

PANTON, J. A, Windsor, Mel- 
bourne.— (1) Cadcll's First Steamer on the 
Murray. (2) Eaglo Rock, Angahock. (3) 
Lake Corangamite, 

PANTON, MISS, Windsor, Mel- 
bourne.— (1) Head of Old Woman, fronj 
Nature. (2) Head, from Nature. 

PATERSON, J. P., 3 Earnbank Ter- 
race, Cardigan Street, Carlton.— Five 
Paintings : (1) Morley's Track, Fernshaw. (2) 
Evening on tho Y'arra. (3) The Old Fall» 
Bridge. (4) On the Lerderberg, Bacchus 
Marsh. (5) Evening at FeruBhaw. 

PRICE, MISS JANE R., Baechworth. 

— Western Australian Euoalypte. 

PURVES, MISS, lately of Melbourne, 
now of De Vere Mansions, South Ken- 
sington, London. — Hand-painted Punelg 
(shown in rooms, Victoria Court). 

RIGBY, MISS LUCY, Greenville, 

Acland Street, St. JEilda Paintings : (1) 

Study of Poppies, from Nature. (f») Picni« 
Point, near Brigliton, (3) Faience Plaque — 
Sceno near Werribee. (4) China Plaque — 
Wuratah and Eucalypt Blossoms. 

ROBERTS, TOM, 95 Collins Street 
East, Melbourne. — Four Paintings : (1) 
Coming South. (2) Mary; a portrait. (8) 
DareWiv deck. (4) Winter Morning after 
Baiu, Gbidinei'd Creek. 

N 2 



180 



Victoria. 



ROLANDO, CHARLES, Cleveland 
House, Flinders Lane Ilaat, Melbourne. 
— (1) Early Morning on tlio Watts Kiver. (2) 
Bunsct on tlio Watts. (3) Noontide, Fernshaw. 
(4) Tho Wilkin Valloy, Mou-^ t Kakapo (snow 
clad) in the diatanco. (6; X/cwdcutters, Feru- 
Bhuw. (6) Jlorley's Track, Fcmslaw. 

BASSE, MISS HARRIET M. B., 63 
Myers Street, Oeeloug. — Landsoapo : 
Western Bead], Corio Bay. 

SCOTT, ARTHUR, Mennlngoort, 
Campdrdown. — (1) The Western DJHtrict 
Plains. (2) Dairy Paddook, Mcnniugoort. 

SCOTT, MISS ROSAMOND, 4 Wei- 
lington Terrace, Wellington Parade, 
East Melbourne. — (1) At Beech worth. (2) 
At Tallarook. 

SPRiaO, W. G., Market Buildings, 
Market Street, Melbourne. — On tho 
Otway P.iinges, by E. Von Gucrard. 

STIRLING, MRS. ELIZABETH 
ANNIE, Survey OflQ,oe.. Omeo.— Native 
Flowers. 

THOMAS, MISS MARGARET, late 
of Victoria, now of London.— (1) Portrait 
of tiio lato Charles Suminurs. (2) Portrait of 
an Artist. (3) A Circassiau Girl. 

THOMSON, W. K., Kamesburgh, 
North. Road, Brighton, Melbourne. — 
(1) On the Murray, by H. J. Johnston. (2) 
View at Tallarooli, by H. J. Johnston. (3) 
Morning, Fernshaw, by llolando. (4) Sunset, 
Fernshaw, by llolando. Views near Yarra- 
■wonga, Victoria, l)y J. A. Turner : (5) Alarmed. 
(6) Pursued. (7) Hard Pressed. (8) Wounded. 
(0) Bailed up. (10) Wearily Homeward. (11) 
Using a Leader. (12) A Coming Squall. (13) 
Travelling by Water. (14) Log Fencing (near 
Waiigaratta.) (15) Ringing Timber (a Murray 
Bolectiou). (16) On a Woolshed Track (Murray 
district). (17) On the Wallaby Track, Free 
Quarters. 

TRUSTEES OP BALLARAT FIIfE 
ART GALLERY.— Old Ballarat, by E. 
Von Guerard. 

TWYCROSS, JOHN, Glenhuntly 
Road, Caulfield.— Dromana from the Bay, 
showing Mount Martha and Arthur's Seat. 



VAN DEN HOUTEN, MR8| 
11 Henry Street, Windsor.— (1) Bcenoi 
Macedon, In tho Bush. (2) Scene at Fen 
shaw, Camping for the Night. (3) AustraliA 
Bush Scone, Black Hills at Kynetou. 

WALLIS, MRS. ALFRED EDWHS 
Bank of Victoria, Colao. — Auairaliai 
Summur. 

WILSON, CHARLES VERN05, 
Glencore, Domain Road, South Yam 
— On the Banks of the Varra. 

WOODHOUSE, FREDERICK 
SEN., 16 Market Buildings, Collini 
Street West, Melbourne.— (1) Group 
Merino Sheej). (2) Coursing. (8) Shooting 
(4) Greyliouiid and Wholps, (5) Laudacap 
with Cattle. 

Class II. 

Various Paintings and Drawinqs. — Miniaiun 
Water-colour Paintings, FatteU, and Dr(iicii><j 
of every kind ; Puinliwjs on Emimel, Earlk 
enwurc and Porcduin ; Cartoons for Staind 
glass Windoics and Frescoes. 

A'BECKBT, MISS EMMA MINmi; 
79 High Street, Prahran. — Water-cola 
Drawings. (1) Wattle Bloseora, tlie Yam 
Heidelberg. (2) Homesick. (3) A Study. 

ASHTON, G. R., 95 Collins Street 
East, Melbourne. — Water-colo-ir Drnwingi 
(1) Toi-el-Kebir. (2) Playmates. (3) Alone 

ASHTON, J. R., 95 ColUns Street 
East. — Water-colour Drawing : On tin 
Uawkesbury, N.S.W. 

BENNETT, CHARLES S., 29 Dar 
ling Street, South Yarra.— Ten Water 
colours c^escriptive of Victorian Scenery. 

BRIEN, LIZZIE, Domain Road 
South Yarrft. — Drawing-room Dado, hand 
painted : Australian Plants and Birds. 

CALVERT, SAMUEL, 87 Littl 
Collins Street East, Melbourne.— "Wata 

colour Drawings. 

CAMPBELL. MALCOLM A., 

Collins Street West, Melbourne.— Wata 
colour Painting : A Bend of the River. 



ALLT BROS" & CO., 

AUSTRALIAN AND GENERAL WINE MEROHANTSI 

Ag-ents for gE]lFOI.l> &. Co. and E. li¥. TTRIC^HT. 

88, NEW BROAD STREET, LONDON, B.C. 

Price Lisle eent free on Application. ... 



Victoria. 



181 



D'AIiTON, HENRIETTA, Olen- 
ower, Stawell. — Framo of Wator-colour 
uintings : Victorian Wild Fluwerd. 

FOSTER & MARTIN, 29 and 31 

Collins Street East, Melbourne.— Two 

Tater-colour I'oitraits of Ludios. 

FOSTER, C— Wutcr-colour Dm wing. 

JENNINGS, MISS ALICE, 66 Len- 
ox Street, Richmond.— (1) Cup, Saucer, 
d Plato Australiuu Birds' Featlierd. (2) Cup, 
Auccr, and Plato Anstraliiin Silver Wattle 
losBom. (3) Cup and Saucer, Victorian Scenc-i. 
) Mounted ria4iue, Australian Native 
lowera. 

JOLLY, ROBERT, & CO., 18a Little 
oUina Street East, Melbourne. — Twelve 
)ecimea8 of Austrulian Flowers, band-painted 
cm Nature, by Miss Ilauunond. 

MASON, CYRUS, Octavia Street, St, 
ilda.— Sketches of the Uridf^es over the 
arruYurra KiVer, Melbourne, 1884. 

PARSONS, MRS. OEORQE, Cham- 
cod Road, St. Kilda.— Wator-colour 
ctures: (1) After tlio Storm, nt Riddell's 
reek. (2) The Camping Place, Healesville. 
i) At Narbcthong. (4) The Ovens River, at 
iglit, Mount Feathertop in the distance. (5 
10) Views in the neigl)ourhoo<l of Melbourne. 

ROBERTSON, MRS. ANNIE IR. 
ENE, Cheltenham House, Toorak 
oad, South Yarra. — Cheval Draught 
retn ; Water-colour, Australian Scenery ; and 
do of Australian Flowers. 

ROWAN, MRS. ELLIS, Dereweit, 
acedon. — Niuety-five Water-colour Draw- 
ls of Australian Flowers. 

RUSSELL, ROBERT, 90 Johnson 

reel, Collingwood. — (1) Framed Water- 
lour Drawings of Old Melbourne. (2) tt- 
gs on Glass. 



SWEET, EDWARD GEORGE 
E3IGH. Cambridge Street, Marybo- 
iigh.— Water-colour : View of Maryborough. 

THALLON, JOHN, 95 Collins Street 
lat, Melbourne. — Water-colour Drawings: 
) Landscape. Bacchus Marsh. (2) Low Tide, 
me. (3) Gum Trees, near Blackwood. (4) 
1 the Werribee River. (5) Back Reach, 
rrento. (6) Landscape, with Cattle. 

THE BAND OP HOPE & ALBION 
)NS0L8 CO. (R. M. SERJEANT, 

anager), Skipton Street, Ballarat.— 
ater-colour view of locality of mine. 

THE EXHIBITION TRUSTEES 

ON. L. L. SMITH, Chairman. 

MS E. SHERRARD, Secretary), 

Ambition Buildlngs.Melboume.— Sisty 

ater-colour Drawing;* of Victorian Fishes 



WARE, SARAH, Treasury, Omeo.— 

Folio of Water-colour I'aintings: Australian 
WUd Flowers. 

WILSON, CHARLES VBRNON, 
Olencore, South Yarra — Indian Ink 
Drawing : A lU-st. 



Class III. 






Scvlpttire and Die Sinhnnj. — Sculpture in High 
U< lirf, Bitn-rtliifit, CliiiMil mill Htjiouf*^ Worls: 
Mtdali, (Jumeon, J-Jntjrared Stoneg. 

PERRY, GRAHAM R., Leopold 

Street, South Yarra.— Sculpture : Oliver 
Twist asks for more. 

LION, MDLLE., Melbourne.— Scnlp- 
ture in high relief: Portrait of a lady. 

McEWAN, JAMES. & CO., Mel- 
bourne.— One Sicilian Marble Mautelpieco 
carved with Native Plants iu high relief; made 
bv Exhibitors. 

MACKENNAL, J. S., 198 ColUna 
Street East, Melbourne.— Sculpture in 
high relief: Phaeton Diiving the Chariot of 
the San. 

TECHNOLOGICAL MUSEUM (J. 
COSMO NEWBERY, B.Sc, C.MG., 
Superintendent).— Victorian Chys, with 
illustmtions of their adaptability for var'ons 
classes of Pt)ttery, Tiles. &c., fmin the Inlus- 
trial and Technological Must um ; prrpared for 
exhibition at the Museum Laboratory by Mr. 
A. L. »Ii)l3 : (1, Twenty-four Blocks Raw Clay, 
exemplifying fconie classes of native material. 
(2) One Sample of Calcined and Ground Fie Id- 
spar, from Seymour. (3) One Sample of Kaw 
Fieldspar, from Seymour. (4) One Sample of 
Raw F'leldspar, from Omeo. (5) One S.imple ot 
Ca!eine«l and Ground Fieldspar, fronj Omeo. 
(6) One Sample of Calcined and Ground Quartz, 
from the Bradford Lend, Maldon. (7) Quo 
Sample of Raw Quartz, from the Bradford Le^d, 
Maldon. (8) Four Buata in RihI Terra-cotta, 
after original casts tiken from Victor-an Abo- 
riginals. (9) Four Plaques in simpie Clays, 
after Minton. (10) Sixty Terra-cotta Slabs, 
from casts of the Parthenon Frieze, reduced by 
Hemming. (11) Twenty-four \'aiea iu timple 
Clays, from examples in the Museum. (12) 
Twelve Crucibles in Granitic Clay, from Bulla. 

(13) Two Slabs in Granitic Cluv, from Bulla. 

(14) Two Panels in I^ed Terra-cotta, "Boys," 
from casts in the 3Iu8eum after Hubert Longe. 

(15) Two PaneLi in Glazed Tiles, original 
design. 

THOMAS. MISS MARGARET, (for- 
merly of Melbourne, no-w of London). — 

lilodfl of a Buot cf FivlJing.fcxeciitcd iu marble 
for Shire Hall, Taunton, Somerset 



182 



Victoria. 



Clash IV. 

ArchileclHral Drawings and Modch. — Sludica 
and DeluiU , JUlevationt and Flans 0/ Bitild- 
ingt. 

FEDERAL COFFEE PAL ACE CO., 
LIMITED, 7 Collins Street East 
(JAMES MIRAMS, Esq., M.P., Secre- 
tary). — PoiHjM<tivo View of liuildint? to bn 
ert'otoil for tlio Fodcral CoflfLC I'aluco Conipuiiy 
at tho Corner of CoIUds uad King tStroctti, 
Melbourne. 

HANNAN, a. T., 125 Raglan Street, 
South Melbourne. — Model of a Fivo-rooinc (1 
Weatlierbourd Villa, veruudaU ixoat und buck ; 
acale 1 in. to 1 ft. 

ISAACS, ISAAC, 47 High Street, 
St. Eilda.— Comploto sot of Designs for u 
Public Town Hall, &c. 

JOHNSON, GEORGE RAYMOND, 
62 Collins Street East, Melbourne.— 
Perspoetivo Drawings of Public Buildinga, dc- 
eigned by Exhibitor. 

PREMIER PERMANENT BUILD- 
ING LAND AND INVESTMENT 
ASSOCIATION (JAMES MIRAMS, 
Esq., M.P., Secretary), 7 Collins Street 
West, Melbourne.— Architectural Elevation 
of Building to bo erected for tiio Society. 

TRADES HALL COUNCIL OF 
VICTORIA (W. E. MURPHY, Secre- 
tary).— View of Council Chamber, Trades Hall, 
Melbourne. 

THE COUNCIL OF ORMOND 
COLLEGE, within the University of 
Melbourne (Principal, JOHN H. 
MACFARLAND, Esq., M.A.).— Drawing 
of Ormoud College. 

Class V. 

Engravings and Lithographs, 

CALVERT, SAMUEL, 87 Little Col- 
lins Street East, Melbourne.— Specimens 
of Drawing and Engravings on Wood ; proofs 
and engraved blocks. 

DEPARTMENT OF POST OFFICE 
AND TELEGRAPHS, Melbourne 
(The HON. JAMES CAMPBELL, 
M.L.C., PoBtmaster-Gtoneral). — Samples 
of Stamps used in the (Jolony of Victoria. 



OOLDSBOROUGH. B., ds CO., L 

MITED, Bourke Street West, Me 
bourne (F. B. STEWART, Manager). 
Chromo-lithographs of Iho principal Wool nn 
Grain Stores oolonging to tho Company in Mc 
boi'.rne and Sydney. 

INQLIS, WILLIAM, & CO., 37, 38, 

39 Flinders Street East, Melbourne. 

Litlio^Tiiplis und Uehi>;Ms fur Kiigraviug, 

NAISH, CHARLES, 12 CoUegi 
Parade, Kew. — Specimoim of I'ostago Stii.np 
und i'o^tal Notes, dcHi^nod and engraved; uIk 
Proofs of Steel und Copp(T-plato Engraving. 

PATERSON, JAMES SCOTT, 
Elizabeth Street, Melbourne.— Spocimei 
of Engraving. 

8YME, DAVID, & CO., The A? 
Office, Melbourne. — Eighty Framed tii 
gravings from tho IJlndratcd Australian Nm 
published by Exhibitors. 

TROEDEL, CHARLES, 43 Collin 
Street East, Melbourne. — Engraving nm 
Letter-press Printing. 

WATSON, RICHARD HAHEl 
(care of J. S. PATERSON, 55 Eliza 
both Street, Melbourne).— Specimen 
Eiigraving: Tlio Lord's Prayer. 

WILSON & MACKINNON, Tbi 
Argus Oftice, Melbourne. — Framed Ed 
^ravings from The AutLndusiitn tihctrhcr, pub 
llahod by Exhibitors 

WOODHOUSE, FREDERICK, 
JUNR., eej Bourke Street West, MeL 
bourne. — Eigiit Fiamed PhotogrupliB i 
Australian Racehorses, colouicd by hand. 

DIVISION B.— EDUCATION AM 
INSTRUCTION, APPARATU 
AND PROCESSES OF THE LI 
BERAL ARTS. 

Class VI. 

Education of Children, Primary Iiulrudm 
Instruction of Adults. 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIO 
(The HON. DUNCAN GILLIES, MiD 
ister ; G. WILSOIT BROWN, Secretary 
J. MAIN, Inspector-General).— Compl« 
Educational Collection, illustrative of 
State-school system of Victoria, comprisii 
Models of Schools, Map of Victoria, showing ii 
whole of State schools of the Colony, Specimei 
of Pupils' Work, &c., &c. 



tl 



MARINE MACHINERY AND STEAM VESSEL 

Of all Types and Bizei. Cargo and Passenger Steamers, Yachts, Tngi, Iiaunohes. 
Oompotmd and Triple Szpanslon Sn^es. Marine and Land Boilers. 



DUNCAN'S PATENT PROPELLER and VALVE REVERSING LAVNCU ENGINE 

ROSS & DUNCAN^ 

WHITEFIELD WORKS, GOVAN, GLASGOW. • 



Vietoria. 



183 



MADAME MOUCHETTE, Artlat, 
khool of Art, Oberville, St. Kilda.— 

xamplca of Bcajpturo. Drnwing and Paintinf; 
n OilH and Wiit<:r-<>oloiirH, also cxumplea of 
luitation Tiipcstry, by bor Pupila. 

RICKARBY, CATHERINE T., 

lotherwi>od Btreot, Riohmond. — OI)j«'ct 
HNonH, alpbubetiotiUy arruit^od, and utbur 
ixlubitH. 

ROYAL SOCIETY Or VICTORIA, 

Victoria Street, Melbourne (ALBX- 
UNDER SUTHERLAND, Hon. Secre- 

ary) — A Set of the Wocicty's TraujuctiouB, in 
wenty-one volumos. 

RYLAH, OEOROE A. (on behalf of 
TATE SCHOOL), 831 Omgo.-Sy.^tem 

)f Tottt-bing, MoiIoIb of Ap^mrutUH, Spocimcn 

)f Pupils' Work. 

VICTORIAN DEAF AND DUMB 
ifSTITUTION, St. Kilda Road, Mel- 
»oume (P. J. ROSE, Superintendent). — 

|)e('iiiieii ExorciBea on Writtin Lftnj;imgf, 
Vrithmotic Work, and Penmaiiahip ; aluo Druw- 
Dga by tbo Pupils. 

Class IX. 

Printing, Books, Newspapert <fc Periodicals. 

AUSTRALASIAN SHIPPING 
IJEWS, Melbourne (ARTHUR W. 
:)LEVELAND, Editor).— Ko},'ubir copies of 
lacii isiiuo of tbo Australasian Shippitig Netcs. 

BANFIELD, J. W., Ararat.— Bound 
oluiuo of Ararat Advertiser, and copios of eacb 
mm to bo supplied regularly during currency 
if Exhibition. 

CHAMBER OP COMMERCE, Mel- 
oume (B. COWDEROY, Secretary).— 
Jock of Rcporta of the Victorian Chamber of 
>>mmerce. 

CROSS, MARGARET MAY (CROSS 
I CO.), Herald Office, Daylebford.— 

look of Specimens of Commercial Typography. 

DEPARTMENT OP GOVERN- 
lENT PRINTER, under the control 
f The HON. JAMES SEBVICE, Pre- 
nler and Treasvirer of Victoria (JOHN 
i'ERRES, Government Printer).— Booka 
>nd Specimens of Letterpress and Lithographic 
'tinting in all its brancnes. 

INGLIS, WILLIAM, & CO., 37, 88, 
89 Flinders Street East, Melbourne. 
-Letter-presa Printing, Publicationfl, Ac, 

LAWRENCE & O'FARBELL, 86 

lueen Street, Melbourne. — Haniisomely 

iound Volume of The Australian Brewers' 

Journal, Mineral Water, Wine and Spirit Tradet 



LEWIS, C. P., St. Arnaud.- Bound 

Voluiiio of St. Artumd Mtrcury. 

LUKE, HENRY ALFRED, The 

Gippsland Mercury OfQce, Sale.- Hound 

I-'ih) of tlui Gipimland Mtrcunj, uud regular 
copies of mob iH.iiie. 

MACKINNON & WALCH, Mel- 
bourne. — 'J'wcivo Copies of Ues(;riptivu Work 
relating to tbo Colony of Yietoriit, entitled 
' Vicloiia in Australia.' 

MUELLER, BARON FERDINAND 
VON, K.C.M.Q., M.D., F.R.S., Govern- 
ment Botanist, Melbourne.— Ueeent I'ub- 
licatioiis ronntctt'd with the Vegetable Ro- 
suurces of Auiitniliu, and other works. 

NEWLANDS, WILLIAM HIND, 
Printer, Atlas Workf), Castlomaine. — 
Book of Hpeeimens of Printing: Oeni.'rnl Job- 
Work, pliiiii and artistic, in black and colours. 

PHARMACEUTICAL SOCIETY 
OF AUSTRALASIA, College of Phar- 
macy, Swanston Street, Melbourne (H. 
8HILLINGLAW, Secretary).— Bound 

C(>i)ie8 of Society's TninHUctioiiH. 

PROPRIETORS OP THE HERALD, 

Swanston Street, Melbourne. — Bound 
Copy of tho ILrald, an evening newspaper, 
pubiisiieil (iuily in the City of Melbourne; 
average circulation, !J(),000. Copiea of current 
issue will bo supplied during tho period of tho 
Exhibition. 

PUBLIC LIBRARY, MUSEUMS, 
AND NATIONAL GALLERY OP 
ViCTORIA (Prosidont, HON. SIR 
GEORGE VERDON, K.C.M.G., C.B., 
F.R.S. : Librarian, T. F. BRIDE, LL.D.). 
— CatalooUo of the Publiu Library of Victoria. 

PUCKEY, JOHN, 2 Maud Terraoo, 
Islington Street, Collingwood. — The 
outlines of a book, iu manuscript, on Arith- 
metic Siiuarcs. 

SANDS & MoDOUGALL, 46 Collins 
Street West.— Show Case, Stereo, and Klec- 
trotypes, S|Kcijnens of Lithographic Work, 
Wax Specimens of Engraving, Specimens of 
Embossing and Letter-press Printing. 

STILLWELL Sc CO., 78 Collins 
Street West. — (1) Tbo Australian Medical 
Journal ; tlio organ of tho jVIedical Society of 
Victoria. (2) Bradnhatc's Guide to Victoria, 

SYME, DAVID, & CO., Age Office, 

Melbourne. — Regular copies of the Age, aud 
tlie Leader during tho currency of the Exhi- 
bition. 

VIOTOllIAN ENGINEERS' ASSO- 
01 AT ION, the Exchange, Collins 
Street West, Melbourne (JAMES E. 
SHBRRAHD, Hon. Secretary ).— Bound 
eopiea of tho Papers and Trausactiona of the 
Society. 



184 



Victoria. 



VICTORIAN SOCIETY FOR THE 
PROTECTION OF ANIMALS (THO- 
MAS LATHAM. Inspector), 55 Bourke 
Street East, Melbourne. — Two Books : 
Aniiuiil lloi)ort« of tlio Society. 

WALOH, GARNET, Melbourne.— 

Volume en'itkd, Victom in 1880. 

WEST Sc KINO, Omeo.— (1) Ciitaloguo 
of exliihitfl. (2) SpociiucuB of Printing. 

WILSON & MACKINNON, The 
Argus Office, Melbourne.— Kegular copies 
of tho Anjiix, ftuil tho Auntralnsiuit during 
currency oftlio JOxhiliition. 

WIMBLE, P. T., & CO., 70 Little 
Collins Sti-eet East, Melbourne. — 

Printed Proofs, nhowiug sumplos of Printing 
Inks muuufaclurod by F. T. Wimble & Co. 

Class XI, 

General AppU'vation of the ArtA of Drawing 
and ModtUimj. 

GAUNT, Thomas, 14 Bourke Street 
East, Melbourne. — Ono net Ohoss Men, 
reproaenting Austniliiiu Aniniuls. 

MUELLER. BARON F. VON, 
K.C.M.G., M.D., F.R.S., Government 
Botanist, Melbourne. — (1) (.liiss Ciibo 
oontttiuing lliirtv-six Wax Models of Victoriun 
Fungs. (2) Wax Model of tlio Victoriun 
Wumtub-plant (^Tilopia Onadin, V. v. M.) 
under gbus sliado. (3) Wax Model of tbo 
Murruy-Lily (^Crinuinjlacviditm, Herbert). 

TECHNOLOGICAL MUSEUM (J. 
COSMO NEWBERY, B. So., C.M.G., 

Superintendent), Melbourne. — H75 Mo- 
dels of Fruitii, &e., grown in Victoria, from tbo 
Industrial and Tecbnologicnl Museum. — 
Modelled and coloured at the Muheiun by Jliss 
A, B. llodgkinson and Miss J. McMillan. 

•. i Cla.s3 XII. 

riiotixjntphio J'rooj'i and Apparatus. 

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHIC AS- 
SOCIATION OF VICTORIA, Royal 
Society's Hall, Victoria Street, Mel- 
bourne, (J. H. HARVEY, Hon. Secre- 
tary).— (1) Twelve Groups, Views of Victorian 
Bcenery. (2) Tmnsparencies for MagicLanteru 
(3! Views of Vietoriau Scenery, and Street 
Scones in Victoriua Towns. 



ARARAT SHIRE COUNCIL (. 
MoLEAN, Secretary), Shire Hall, Ara 
rat. — Pbotograpliio Views witbin tbo Shiro 
Ararat. 

AVON SHIRE COUNCIL (W 
LEONARD BOLDEN, Secretary) 
Council Chambers, Stratford.— Photo 

grapldo Views of luterestiixg Objects wiiLlo 
the Sbiro of Avon, 

BAILEY, ARTHUR RUDOLPH, 

Royal Studio, Sturt Street, Ballarat- 
Pbotograpbio Views of Streets of City o! 
Ballarat, &c. 

BAIRNSDALE SHIRE COUNCH 
(H. BREDT, Secretary).— PhotograpliM 
Views of Buirnsdulo and Neighbourhood. 

BANK OF AUSTRALASIA, Collinj 
Street West, Melbourne (EDWARD B 
PARKES, Superintendent).— Pbotograpl 
of Bank Premises in Melbourne. 

BANK OF NEW ZEALAND, CoL 
Una and Queen Streets, Melbourne (T, 
M. STEWART, Manager).— Photogntpk 
of Bank of New Zealand PromisoB in JKl' 
bourne. 

BOARD FOR THE PROTECTION 
OF ABORIGINES, 69 Temple Court, 
Melbourne (CAPT. A. M. PAGE, 
Secretary). — I'hotogrttpbic Views of tlit 
Stations establishod as Homes for tho Alo 
rigines of Victoria, Portraits of Aborigiiiuk 

BOROUGH COUNCIL OF EAQLI- 
HAWK (WILLIAM WOOD, Town 
Clerk, &o.). Town Hall.— Pbotogruphi* 
Views of Public. Buildings, Mines, »tc., withii 
the Borough of Eaglebawk. 

CALVERT, SAMUEL, Vita Studio, 
77 Swanston Street, Melbourne.— Plioto- 
graphs: Portraits of Australian W or thii'H,&(. 

CENTRAL BOARD OF HEALTH 
FOR THE COLONY OF VICTOBU 
(J. W. COLVILLE, Secretary).-riiot> 
graphic Views of tho Sanatorium at Out-paw- 
paw and the Calf-lymph Dep6t at Itoyul Purt 

CHUCK, THOMAS, Photographed 
Sturt Street, Ballarat. — Eidarged Urboi 
Photographs of Australian Scenery. 

CITY COUNCIL OF PRAHRAl 
(ALBEBT L. ELY, Town Clerk>- 
Photographic Views of City of Prahrau. 



Trade MkUH — 

Obelisk of Luxor. 



ALL 
' CICA,IUiTTUS 
MARKED 

"LUXOR." 



(( 



" OMREmS. 

PURm 'JURKISH TOBACCO. 
WABRANTED HAND-MADK. 

THREE DISTINCT QUALITIES :-8PECIAL-FIR8T-8EC0ND. 

ALEXANDRIA CIGABETTE CO., Ltd., 63 A 64, New Broad 8t., London, E.a 
AGENTS WANTED FOR ALL THE COLONIES. 



LUXOR 



Victoriit. 



185 



CITY OP MELBOURNE BANK, 
limited, Collins Street West, Mel- 
ourne (JOHN 8HIELS, Acting 

[imager).- -I'lioto^^ruph of Kl(>vft(i(in l*li\n 
■ New Dank rroiniHca for (^ity of Melbournti 
Huk, LiinittHi, curuur ofCulliim aiul Elizabeth 
tntts, Jleibourno. 

OOLLINQWOOD CITY COUNCIL 
k. M. MORTLEY. Town Clerk).— 
Loto>,'rui>h8 of Sci'uery, lluildings, Uridgia 
c, in tlio City of CoUiiiKwootl. 

CONNOR, E. CHARLES, Suporin- 
mdent. Reformatory, Ballarat.— Thoto- 
mpli ut thu lii-foruiutory, nulliinit. 

CONVENT OF THE GOOD SHEP- 
ERD, Abbotaford (ST. MARY C. 
URTAIN, Superioress). ~ Viowa of 
jlmtifonl ami Oukluigh C'onveutt>. 

COPPIN, HON. GEO. SELTII. 
ino Grove, Lennox Street, Richmond* 
rhiitographa of Dwi'lliiijjauil (.»rouu(ls. 

COUNCIL OP TRINITY COL- 

EQE, within tho University of Mol- 
Durne (ALEXANDER LEEPER, 
8Q., M.A., LL.B., Warden). -I'lioto- 
iqihs of Uiiililinga, uud Ciroups of Stiuliiitd of 
Colli'gt'. 

DEPARTMENT OP EDUCATION 

ho HON. DUNCAN GILLIES, 

linistor ; Q. WILSON BROWN, 

crotary: J. MAIN, Inspeetor-Qene- 

ll).— I'liotograiihs of (St:ite Sciiooln. 

DEPARTMENT OP TRADE AND 
USTOMS (Tho HON. G. D. LANG- 
IDQE, M.P., Commissioner: A. W. 
USQROVE, Secretary).— Photogiuph.s. 

DEPARTMENTS OP RAILWAYS 
lecretary, P. P. LABERTOUCHE).— 

jlUctidiiof IMiotographs, illuslratiiig IJaihvays 
' Violoriu. 

ELLERY, ROBERT L. J., P.R.S., 
overnment Astronomer, Tho Obsor- 
tory, Melboiu'no.— I'liotographH of Ubbor- 
tory, iind six tiilargod I'hotogiapiia of tho 
oou tukon by tho Grout Mtdbouiiio Kolloctor. 

ENGLISH, SCOTTISH, & AUS- 
RALIAN CHARTERED BANK, 

elbom-ne.— Photograph of Bank Premiaos, 
ttUiiiB Street, Melbourno. 

FINCHAM, GEORGE, Organ 
uilder. Bridge Road, Richmond 

ur),'e Photograph of (Sruud Organ, liuilt for 
!>' lutiniatioiml Kxhibition, Molbourao, 1880. 

PITZROY CITY COUNCIL (JOHN 
. JONES, Town Clerk), Town Hall, 

itzroy.— Photograplid : Twciitv-foiir Viowa 
■ Public Buildina*, &c., within" tho City of 
itirov. 



POSTER & MARTIN, 29 & 31 Col- 
lino Street East, Melbourne. — I'hoto- 
graphs. 

OROUZELLE ET CIE., 11 Roy a 
Arcade, Melbourne. — Group of I'hoto- 
graphf. 

GUILPOYLE, W. R., P.L.S., Direc- 
tor of tho Melbourne Botanic Gardens. 

— Photographic Viowa of Uut4iniu QiirdouB. 

HALLEY, J. J., Socrotary Congrega- 
tional Union, Congregational Hall, 
Russel) Street, Melbourne. — Photographio 
Viiwa of t<iviii»l Cougri'galioMal Chun-hea in 
Victoria. 

HAYMAN, J. B., Simpson's Road, 
CoUingwood, and Gertrude Sti"eet, 
Pitzroy.— I'hotograi-h of Tannery, CoUing- 
wood. 

HOTHAM TOWN COUNCIL (C. E. 
RANDALL. Town Clerk).— i'hotogmphic 
Vii'wa of Town of Hothaiu. 

IRVINE, DAVID,* Beaconsfleld 
Hotel, St. Kilda.— Photographic View ot 

llotii. 

JAMES. JOSEPH ALPRED, Mayor 
of Castlomaino.— Phittographa of Public 
linildiuga in Ciallcuiuiiic 

JOHNSTONE & CO., Tyne Poundry, 
Yarra Bank, Melbourne.— Photographs 
of Tyno Foundry, and of liridgea, atcnm ongines, 
and other luuchinury utuuufaelurod by thu 

lirni. r 

JOHNSTONE. O'SHANNASSY, & 
CO., Limited. 65 & 57 Collins Street 
East. — Kxauipka of Photographs*. 

LANCASTER & SAMWELLS, 
Oineo, Gippsland. — Photographic Viowa : 
Thu Australian Alpa, &c. 

LINDT, JOHN WILLIAM, 7 Collins 
Street East, Melbourne.— V'hotograplia of 
Cbaracttrislic Australian Scenery: (1) Views of 
New Guinea, illustrating tho characteristic 
fauna and flora of tliu island, tlio uianuera antl 
customs of the lUitivea, ami tho general land- 
Bcape scenery. Taktui during tho Kxi^'dition 
cwiuducted by the late Sir Peter Sorutchley, 
High I'oinniisaioner. (2) Gonro Pioturos of 
Aboriginals. (3) I'ublio Buildings, &c. (4) 
SpiHJimens of I'ortraiture. 

MELBOURNE CITY COUNCIL 
(B. G. PITZGIBBON, Town Clerk).— 

I'liotographrt if t'lty ol JleUwurne, 

MELBOURNE CLUB, Collins Street 
East, Melbourne (P. A. AGNEW, Secre- 
tary).— I'holographio Views ot Club. 



186 



Victoria. 



MELBOURNE CRICKET CLUB 
(3. J. WARDILL, Secretary), 8 Ex- 
change Hall, Collins Street, Melbourne. 
— Photographic View of Melbourne Cricket 
Ground, showing grand stand, pavilion, &c., 
1885. 



Agricultural 



MELBOURNE SAVINGS BANK 
(JOHN ALSOP, Actuary), Savings 
Bank, Market Street, Melbourne.— Pho- 
togriiphs of Bank Buildings. 

MENZIES, CATHERINE. Monzies 
Hotel, Bourke Street West, Melbourne. 
— Photograph of Menzica' Hotel. 

MUELLER, BARON FERDINAND 
VON, K.C.M.G., M.D., F.R.S., Govern. 
loaent Botanist, Melbourne. — Album of 
Photographic Pictures, each plate illustrative 
of a distinct Victorian timber tree. 

NATIONAL AGRICULTURAL 
SOCIETY OF VICTORIA (ANDREW 
PLUMMER, ESQ., M.D., J.P.,, Chair- 
man of Victorian Board of Agriculture, 
Member of Council of Agricultural 
Education, &c.. President ; THOMAS 
PATjSRSON, Secretary).— Tliree Groups 
Exhibits shown at National 
Society's Show, 1885. 

O'SHANASSY, M. P., Tara, Camber- 
■well. — Photographic View of Private Eesi- 
denco. 

PBIRCE, J. DUNCAN, 69 Temple 
Court, Melbourne. — Photographic Enlarge- 
ments on Argentic bromide paper. 

PHARMACEUTICAL SOCIETY 
OP AUSTRALASIA (H. SHILLING- 
LAW, Secretary), College of Pharmacy, 
Swanston Street, Melbourne. — Photo- 
graphs of Interior and Exterior of the College 
of Pharmacy, Lavatories, &c. 

PORT PHILLIP & COLONIAL 
CO., Clunes (R. H. BLAND, Manager). 
—Photographic View of the Company's Mining 
Plant at Clunes. 

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF 
VICTORIA (ANTHONY L. PRYDE, 
Secretary), Assembly Hall, Collins 
Street East, Melbourne. — Photographic 
Views of some of the principal Presbyterian 
Churches in Victoria. 



QUEEN INSURANCE C( 
33 Queen Street, Melbourne. — Phoi 
graph of Company's Premises. 

SALE BOROUGH COUNCIL (C. 
GEOGHEGAN, Town Clerk, Sale, &c 
— Photograp'nic Views of Local Institutions. 

SANDHURST CITY COUNCIL fW 
D. C. DENOVAN, Town Clerk).— Fiftj 
one Photographic Views of city and mine 
within its boundaries. 

SARGOOD, The HON. P. T., M.L.C 
Ripon Lea, East St. Kilda. — Three Ph( 
tographic Views of Private Residence. 

STEWART & CO., Photographen 
217 & 218 Bourke Street East, He 
boum.e. — Photograph s. 

STIRLING, JAMES, Survey Offla 
Omeo. — Photographic Views of tho Australia 
Alps within Omeo Shire. 

TOWN COUNCIL, BALLAEA! 
EAST (VTILLIAM SCOTT, Mayor).- 
Photographio Views of the Town of Ballan 
East. 

TOWN COUNCIL, BALLARA 
CITY (CHARLES SALTER, Mayors- 
Photographic View of BaUarat City. 

THE COLONIAL MUTUAL LIH 
ASSURANCE SOCIETY, Limited 
(T. J. MARTIN, (Jeneral Managa; 
84 & 86 Collins Street West.— Plw* 
graphs. 

THE COUNCIL OP ORMOUl 
COLLEGE, within the University i 
Melbourne (Principal, J. H.MACPi' 
LAND, ESQ., M.A.).— A Photograph 
Ormond College. 

THOMSON, W. K., Kamesbi] 
North Road, Brighton, Melboume.-| 
Photographic Views ot Residence. 

TOWN COUNCIL OF WARRN. 
BOOL (H. A. C. MACDONALD, To 

Clerk). — Twelve Views of Warrnambool «i 
Vicinity. 

UNITED SHIRE OP BEEC 
WORTH (J. W. MOHTON, Tow^f 
Clerk). — Photographic Views. 



jTHE MELBOURNE "AGE" (Circulation 60,000 Daily). 
« LEADER » (Weekly). « AGE ANNUAL " (Yearly). 
"ILLUSTRATED AUSTRALIAN NEWS" (Monthly). 

The " Age " has a Circulation largely In excess of any other Australian Newspaper, 
or any other Morning Juuinal in tiie RrUish Empire, London only excepted, and 
preseniB the best uitdlum lor Advertisenicnis. 

A selection of frnraed Illustrations from "The Illustrated Australian Newt "la on 
view on ttie walls uf the Victorian Court. 



LONDON OFFICB 

roM 
ITews and Telegram 
140, F LEET ST REET. 

General Agent i: 
JAB. McEWAN & CO, 
27, LOMBARD 8TREE1 
hOUDOS, S.C. 






Vicimia. 



187 



UNITED SHIRE OP METCALFE. 

-Photographic Views within the Shire of 
[etcalfe. 

VICTORIAN ASYLUM AND 
CHOOL FOR THE BLIND, St. Kilda 
load, Melbourne REV. WILLIAM 
loss, Superintendent). — Pliotographic 
'iews of Buildings and Inmates at \\ ork. 

VICTORIAN DEAF AND DUMB 
NSTITUTION, St. Kilda Road, Mel- 
ouine. — Photographic Views of the Build- 
igs, Interior Views of the Schoolroom, Dining 
[all, and Dormitories. 

WIMMBRA SHIRE COUNCIL 
iOBERT GRANT, S^iire Councillor), 
llmgrove, Armalade. — Photographic 
iews of Wimmera Shire. 

WINTER, The HON. WILLIAM 
RVENG, M.L.C., Noorilim, Murchi- 
on,— Group of Photographic Views of Kesi- 
ence. 

■ • Class XIV. 

Medicine, Hygiene, and Public Relief. 

AUSTRALIAN HEALTH SO- 
IIETY, Melbourne (MR. JUSTICE 
[IGINBOTHAM, President; JOHN 
K BURROWS, Secretary).— Two bound 
jlumea of Society's publications, and Sanitary 
'racts for distribution. 

CENTRAL BOARD OF HEALTH 
r. W. COLVILLE, Secretary).— Bound 
olume of Board's Reports. 

DAHLKE'S FILTER COMPANY, 
EUBEN THOMAS ADAMS, City 
»ad. Prince's Bridge, Melbourne. — 
iltres of all kinds. 

KYLE, JOHN, Coburg. — Deodoriser, 
isinfectant, and Fertiliser, known as Bud- 
eree. 

McINTOSH, DAVID M., & SON, 

F[anufacturers, Nicholson Street, 
ootscray.— Turkish Bath. 

THE AUSTRALASIAN DEODOR- 
Smo, DISINFECTING, AND FER- 
ILISING COMPANY, LIMITED, 
9 Queen Street, Melbourne.— Hunter's 
atent Vegetable Disinfectant, and Samples of 
artificial Manure. 



Class XV» 

Maihematical and Philosophical Instruments. 

ELLERY, ROBERT L. J., F.RS., 
fovemment Astronomer, the Obser- 
atory, Melbourne. — An Astnmomical 
hronograph with Parabolic Pendulum 
ovemor. 



GAUNT, THOMAS, 14 Bourke 
Street, East, Melbourne. — (1) Microscope 
Stand. (2) Telescope Stand. (8) Tliree 
Telescopes. (4) Syphon Barometer. (6) 
One Largo Thermometer. (6) Two Hand Ane- 
momete.-s. (7) Surveyor's Level. (8) Three 
Microscopes. (8) Three Microscope Lamps. 
(10) Tiireo Microscope Coiulenters. (1 1) Three 
Tliermometers for Brewers' purpo* s. (12) 
Microscope Section Cutter. (13) Microscope 
Mounting Table. (14) Three dozen Micro- 
scopic Objects. 

■ '•■■ ,'.;.f..'. 

Class XVI. 

Maps and Geographical and Cosmographical 
Apparatus — Plans in lielief. 

CENTRAL BOARD OF HEALTH 
FOR THE COLONY OP VICTORIA 
(J. W. COLVILLE, Secretary).— Model 

of the Quarantine Station at Point Nepean. ^ 

CRELLIN,WILLIAM,Napier Street, 
Fitzroy. — Reading Instrument and Calcu- 
lating Machine. 

DEPARTMENT OF LANDS ^JSTD 
SURVEY (The HON. A. L. TUCKER, 
M.P., President; A. MORRAH, Secre- 
tary), — Maps of Continental Australia, Vic- 
toria, &c. 

DEPARTMENT OF MINES (The 
HON. A. F. LEVIEN, Minister; 
CHARLES W. LANGTREE, Secre- 
tary). — Set of Geological Maps, Gold-fields 
Maps, and other publications issued by the 
Department. 

DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND 
CUSTOMS (The HON. G. D. LANG- 
RIDGE, M.P., Commissioner; A. W. 
MUSGROVE, Secretary).— Charts of the 
Victorian Coast and adjacent Islands. 

DEPARTMENT OF RAILWAYS 
(Secretary, P. P. LABERTOUCHE).— 

Raised Map of Victoria, showuig existing and 
proposed lines of Railways. 

ELLERY, ROBERT L. J., P.R.S., 
Government Astronomer, the Obser- 
vator-^ Melbourne. — Books. 

HAYTER, HENRY HEYLYN, 
C.M.G., Government Statist, Mel- 
bourne. — Victorian Year-Book and other 

statistical works. 

MUELLER, BARON FERDINAND 
VON, K.C.M.G., M.D., F.R.S., Govern- 
ment Botp.nist, Melbourne. — A Geo- 
graphical Koilosphere dimidiated. 

STIRLING, JAMES, Stirvey Office, 
Omeo. — Topographical and Geological Maps, 
Publications to Scientific Society's re Austra- 
lian Alps* ' '■ ■ ' •« '■ ■■ I V ' r ■». , ; 'v . 



188 



Victoria. 



BAND OF HOPE AND ALBION 
CONSOLS COMPANY (THE) 

(R. M. SERJEANT, Manager, Skipton 
Street, Ballarat). — Statistics of Mine. 

VICTORIAN DEAF AND DUMB 
INSTITUTION, St. Kilda Road, Mel- 
bourne (F. J. ROSE, Superintendent).— 
Statistics and Annual Reports. 



DIVISION C— FURNITURE AND 
ACCESSORIES. 

Class XVII. 

Furniture. — Sideboards, Book-eases, Tables, 
Dressing-tables, Sofas, Couches, Billiard-tables, 
Ac, manufactured from Australian Woods. 

ALCOCK & CO., 132 Russell Street, 
Melbourne. — (1) liilliard - table, manu- 
factured of Queensland Tulipwood. (2) Bil- 
liard-table, Victorian Blackwood. (3) Com- 
bination Cabinet Pool Money- receiver and 
Marking Board. (4) Electric Marking ar- 
rangements. (5) Revolving Cue Stand and 
Cues. 

CARR & SONS, 132 Spring Street, 
Melbourne. — Venetian Blinds. 

COOPER, WILLIAM HENRY, 

High Street, Avoca. — Picture Frame, made 
from Victorian and other bush seeds. 

McEWAN, JAMBS, & CO., EUza- 
beth Street, Melbourne.— (1) Two Hip 
Baths, Japanned, in Oak and White Marble, 
and in sienna and green. (2) One Japanned 
Deed Box, in Maple and Walnut. (3) Three 
Japanned Travelling Trunks, in maroon. Oak 
and Walnut. (4) Two Japanned Coal Vases, 

1>aiuted by hand, and inlaid vrith ,Mother-of- 
'earl. 

MOWBRAY, ROWAN, & HICKS, 
33, 36, and 37 Collins Street, Melbourne. 
(1) Complete Dining-room Suite, consisting of 
Sideboard, Dinner Waggon, Dining-table, Man- 
telpiece and Overmantel, twelve Small Chairs, 
two Carving Chairs and Couch. (2) Complete 
Bedroom Suite, consisting of Wardrobe, Dress- 
ing-table, Wathstand, Towel Horse, Chest of 
Drawers, Commode Pedestal, three Chairs. All 
manufactured out of colonial woods, and of 
original design. 



PENAL DEPARTMENT OF VI( 
TORIA, Melbourne (WILLIAM QQE 
BRETT, Inspector- General).— Cabinet ( 
Whatnot. 

ROCKE, W. H., & CO., Collins Stree 
East, Melbourne. — Dining - room Suit 
complete, of original design, made of Auatra 
lian Blackwood, and manufactured enturely b 
Exhibitors : Sideboard, Dinner Waggon, Chiai 
neypiece or Mantelshelf with tall Overmantel 
Extension Diuing-table, twelve Ciiairs, Couch 
and two Easy Cliairs, made entirely of colonia 
woods. 

STEINPELD, LEVINSON, & CO. 
83 to 88 Elizabeth Street, and Littli 
Collins Street West, Melbourne.— Com 
plete Bedroom Suite. 

TORY, THOMAS, Omeo, Victoria.- 
Loo -table, made from indigenous shrubs m 
timber trees of the Australian Alps. 

WILLSON, HELEN FERMOH 
Flinders Lane West, Melbourne.— Tabli 
Top, Huon Pine, painted with colonial furus. 

Class XVIII. 

Upholsterers' and Decorators' Worh. 

PATERSON, C. S., BROS., 33 CoUin! 
Street East, Melbourne. — Decoratit) 
Panels. 

PENAL DEPARTMENT OP VIC- 
TORIA, Melbourne (WILLIAM 
GORE BRETT, Inspector-Qeneral).- 
Speeinif'ns in Oil of Oruumeutal Writing and 
House Decorating Work. 

ROYCROFT, JOHN ROBERT, 16 
Leveson Street, Hotham. — Painted imita- 
tions of Woods and Marbles, ten panels. 

Class XIX. ' '' 

Crystal, Glass, and Stained Glass. 

AUSTRALIAN GLASS COMPANY, 
Limited, Melbourne.— Glassware, &c. 

GIBBS, MRS. JAMES HATCH, 
Melbourne, Victoria.— Arrasene Work. 

MELBOURNE GLASS BOTTLI 
WORKS COMPANY, Graham Street, 
South Melbourne (LAMBTON L 
MOUNT, Manager).— Glass Bottles. 



VENTILATI NG, COOLING AN D DRYINGj 

BLACKMAN AIR PROPELLER. 

' WATER-M OTOR VEN TILATOR. 

Sole Makers— 

»PHE BLACKMAN AIR PROPELLER VENTILATING CO., LIMITED, 
GT, Fore Street, uu4l f^%i, Austiu Friars, I^ondon, E.C. 



Victoria. 



189 



Class XX. 

Pottery, Ac. 

CAWKWELIi, HENHY ATKIN- 
ON, High Street, Malvern.— Mosaic and 
ncauBtic Tibs, for pavements, hall floorg, Ac. 

NOLANT, LUKE, Park Street West,' 
runswick. — Majolica Cane and Rocking- 
im Ware, Stoneware, Chesterfield Ware, Stone- 
we Jars, Preserve Jars, Rustic Ware. 

TECHNOLOOICAIi MUSEUM, 
elbourne (J. COSMO-NEWBEBY, 
M.a-., Superintendent). —Pottery ware. 

BBNDiaO POTTERY CO., Limited 
!HE), Epsom, near Sandhurst (G. D. 
UTHRIE, Managing Director).— Orna- 

ental Parian and Majolica Vases and other 
rt Pottery, with a General Collection of 
istol and Stoneware Articles, Jars, Butter 
ots. Jam Pots, &c., &c. 

VICTOBIAN BRICK & ORNA- 

ENTAL TILE CO., Limited (THE), 
51 Collins Street "West, Melbourne. — 
rt Tiles for decorative purposes, in various 
lours; printed and haud-paiuted, glazed and 
iimellcd. 

Class XXI. 

Carpetg, Mats, <tc. 

BIRCH, HELEN CORDELIA, 44 

rgo Street, South Yarra.— Three Fancy 
weed Hearth Rugs, 

CLARK, S. R., Eurrier, Brunswick; 
ity Depot, Sydney Buildings, Plin- 
srs Street West.— Fur ftlats. 

MILLER, JAMES, Rope Works, 
ioray Street North, South Melbourne. 

Mats. 

PENAL DEPARTMENT OP VIC- 
ORIA, Melbotime (WILLIAM GORE 
RETT, Inspector-General).— One Roll 

•inch Coir Matting. 

QUIN, JAMES, 104 & 106 Domain 

oad. South Yarra.— Fur Mats. 

SCHOPIELD, J., & CO., Yarra 

lata.— Mats made from Skins of Native 
nimals. 

VICTORIAN ASYLUM AND 
3H0OL POR THE BLIND, St. Kilda 
oad, Prahrtm (THE REV. WILLIAM 
DBS, Superintendent).— Four Mats. 

MUNRO, ALEXANDER, & CO., 

arravilia Woollen Mills, Melbourne. 
Rugs and Mats made from prre Australian 

ocl, ... 



STOKES & MARTIN, 29 Little Col- 
lins Street East, Melboum^.— (1) Electro- 
plated Fern-tree Trophy. (2) Electro-plated 
Mounted Emu Eggs. 

Class XXITI. 

Bronzes and various Art Castings. 

McEWAN, JAMES, & CO., Elizabeth 
Street, Melbourne.— (1) Handsome Marble- 
top Table. (2) Handsome Hat and Coat 
Stand, bronzed. In the centre over the mirror 
is an Aboriginal's bead, set in a group of ferns. 
On right side of marble slab is a pair of 
kangaroos, and a tree, on a branch of which is 
perciied a laughing jackass with snake in beak. 
On the left, a pair of emus, a tree with cockatoo 
perched on a branch. In centre of marble slab 
is a group of ferns. Door panels are licads of 
Aboriginals, surrounded with spears, shields, 
aud other native war implements. (3) Cast- 
iron Chair in Bronze to match. (All manu- 
factured by exhibitors.) 

RICHARD, P. C. W.— Art Metal Work 
in Iron and Copper, hand-vrrought, samples 
and photographs. 

Class XXIV. 
Clochs and Watcher. 

GAUNT, THOMAS, 14 Bourke 
Street East, Melbourne. — Gold Watcii, 
(lold Watch Case Enamelled, and Diamond 
Marine Chronometer, Marine Timepiece Move- 
ment, Carriage Clock. 



Class XXY. 



X 



Apparatus and Processes for Heating and 
LiijJiting. 

JEANS, SAMUEL ENGLAND, 
High Street, St. Kilda.— Jean's Patent Gas- 
cooking Stove No. .3, with copper boiler, roaster, 
and oven, with four boiling burners on top. 

McEWAN, JAMES, & CO., Elizabeth 

Street, Melbourne. — Cast-iron Kitchener, 
fitted with oven and roaster. Gas Stoves, WatM 
Heaters, Fenders, Grates, &c. 

LONGMORE, PRANCIS, Plinders 
and King Streets; and 138 Bourke 

Street Bast, Melbourne Perfumery of 

various kinds : Eau de Cologne, Cherrv Tooth 
Paste, Lavender Water, with ^lusk and Roee. 

Class XXVII. 

Leather Work, Fancy Articles, and Basket Work. 

CLARKE, EMILY PRANCES, 1 
Pairmouth Terrace, Toorak Road.— 

Flowers made of Feathers of Australian Birds. 

FAWCETT, A. M., MRS., Omeo.— 
Fretwork. 



190 



Victoria. 



ALEXANDER MUNROB & CC 
Yarraville Woollen Mills, Melboun 
— Tweeds made from Pure Austruliun Wool. 

WILDE, JAMES, Dorset Cottag 
Mollisou Street, Collingwood. — Fan( 
Silk Loom, in motion, for weaving silk brocad 
for ladies' and gentlemen's wear; also quautii 
'of Silk Goods manufactured by macliine. 

Class XXIX. 

COIfVENT OF THE GOOD SHEI 
HERD, Abbotsford (SISTER MAB 
C. CCTRTAIN, Superioress).— New Si 
in Cocoons ; Unprepared Floss Silk. 

Class XXX. 

Clothing and Accessories, including Booti at 
Shoes, 

HENDERSON, SAMUEL, Clayto 
and Gipps Streets, Richmond.— Ehirt 
Collars, and Cuffs. 

JEFFRIES, GEORGE, 50 CoUin 
Street East, Melbourne. — Hond-m« 
bespoke Boots and Shoes and Lawn Ttnn 
Shoes. 

KELLY, JOHN M., Truphitt House 
138 Russell Street, Melbourne (Boot 
maker by special appointment to Hi 
Excellency Sir Henry B. Loch, KC.B 
Governor of Victoria, &c., &c.).— Buol 
and Shoes, shown in handsome case of Austn 
lian cedar. All hand-sown; made and c\m 
by resident artisans. 

LINCOLN, STUART & CO., lOi 
Flinders Lane East, Melbourne.— Meal 

Clothing made from Victorian Twetds r.j 
Cloths, coroprisinjr: Men's Sac Suit, Walkinj 
Suit, Frock Suit, Btilitia Suit, Cadet Suit, Am 
tralian Contingent Suit, and general assortmen 
of Clothing as worn in Australia. 

McGUIGAN, JOHN, 75 Elizabetl 
Street, Melbourne. — Racing, Shootinj 
Walking, and Dress Boots, Court-dress SliM 
Patent Oxford do., Clump Sole, &c. Ludio 
Boots and Shoes in every variety and style. 

THE LONDON AND PARIS HA 
FACTORY, North Fitzroy, M< 
bourne. — Hats made from Victorian Wg 
and Rabbit Fur; also Dress Hats, &c., fra 
imported materials. All made in the Colony- 



FLATOW, JOSEPH, MRS., 45 
Madeline Street, Carlton,— (1) Collection 
of Sponges; also Dtisigns in Souwced, Coral, 
and Sliells. (2) Pictures and Frames orna- 
mented with Pressed Flowers, Ferns, and 
Gnisses. 

PULLER, ELIZABETH, MISS, In- 

verleigh. — Flowers mado of Nativo Birds' 
Feathers. 

JACKSON, LIZZIE, MISS, 3 Forest 
Street, Sandhurst. — Cu«hion worked on Silk 
and Wool: Australian Wutlle-bird and Wattle 
Blossom. 

ROBERTSON, FRANK, 21 EUza- 
betjb. Street, Melbourne. — Four-leaved 
Screen, composed of coloured plates of Austru- 
liun subjects, forming a pictorial history of tho 
progress of the Colony. 

VICTORIAN ASYLUM AND 
SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND, St. Kilda 
Road, Prahran (THE REV. WILLIAM 
MOSS, Superintendent).— Baskets, Nets, 
and Cotton, and Woolwork of ail kinds by tho 
pupils. 



DIVISION D.— TEXTILE FABRICS, 
CLOTHING AND ACCESSORIES. 

Class XXVIII. 

Woollen Yarn and Fabrics. 

BALLARAT WOOLLEN MILL CO., 
Limited (THE) (DAVID MELVIN, 
Manager, Sunnyside, Ballarat).— Clotli 
and other Wocillen Fabrics, Blankets, Tartans 
(indigo blue). Plaids and Wool Rugs (coloured). 

CASTLEMAINE WOOLLEN MILL 
CO., Limited (THE).— Blankets, Flannels, 
and Serges. 

PENAL DEPARTMENT OF VIC- 
TORIA, Melbourne (WILLIAM GOEJ3 
BRETT, Inspector -General). — Samples of 
Tweed, Blankets, and Rugs. 

VICTORIAN WOOLLEN AND 
CLOTH MANUFACTURING CO,,, 
Limited (THE) (R. S. NICHOLS, 
Secretary, Geelong).— Tweeds and Mditary 
Clothing. 



SADDLERY SPECIALITIES FOR LADIES AND GEfiTLEMEN. 

LEVEL SEAT SIDE SADDLES. 

NARROW GRIP HUNTING SADDLES. 

Patent Safety Appliances for both. 

CIROOLABS AJiD P»ICJlSL\ LISTS ON APl'LICATIOiT. 

P. V. NICHOLLS & CO., 2, JElllMYN STREET, LONDON, 8.^ 



Victoria. 



191 



PENAIi DEPAR TMEN T OP VIC- 
OEIA. Melbourne (WILLIAM GORE 
BETT, Inspector- General). — Boota and 
othiiig. 

THOMAS, PAUL, 3 Collins Street 
agt, Melbourne.— Boots of all kinds of 
perior finish. 

Class XXXIT. 

ortahl« Weapons and Hunting and Shooting 
Instruments. 

BOARD FOR PROTECTIOlSr OP 
BORIGINES (CAPTAIN PAGE, 

Bcretary). — (1) Eepresenlatiou of a Carap 
' Victorian Aborigines, allowing the coustruc- 
ya of a Miii-mia or rude ehcltor, with models 
Natives from Life. (2) CJollection of Native 
'capons. 

Class XXXIII. 

Travelling Apparatus and Camp Equipage. 

CLARK, S. R., Furrier, Brunswick; 
ity Depot, Sydney Buildings, Flinders 
treat West, Melbourne.— Fur Wraps, 
ohci, BiigB, Caps, Coats, Vests, Mulfs, in 
otl), Kangaroo, Wallaby, Wallaroo; Black, 
Iver, Bingtail, and (Common Opossum. 

CUNNINGHAM, OLIVER P., Omeo. 
Stockman's Outfit, coneistiDpr of Saddle, Bri- 
e, Breaitplate, Leggings, Knife Sueuth, Pouch, 
ddlebag, Hobbles, Stockwhip, Valise nud 
raps. All mad., from locally - prepared 
tttber, 

CURTIS, JOHN, 95 Bourke Street 
Teat, Melbourne. — Portmanteaux and 
arvolling Bags. 

DAHLKE'S FILTER CO.; REU- 
EN THOMAS ADAMS, City Road, 
rinee's Bridge, South Melbourne — 
he Traveller's Syphon Filter. 

JONES, GEORGE THOMAS, Maflfra, 
brth Gippsland, Victoria. — Travelling 
ig, made from 920 tanned Opossum tails. 

PAUSACKER, EVANS & CO., 8 and 
) Loncdale Street West, Melbourne. — 

) Traveller's Sample Case (Commercial), 
n) Lady'g Trunk. (3) Gent's Trunk. All 
i^ of Viotoi iau leather. 

PENAL DEPARTMENT OF VIC- 
ORIA,Melbourr.e (WILLIAM GORE 
EJJ1?T, Inspector-Cteneral). — Leather 
ork, Despatch Bags, &c. 

SCHOPIELD, J.. ^ CO., Yarra 

■late.— Fur Rugs. > . • . 

^VICTORIAN ASYLUM & SCHOOL 
OR THE BLIND, St. Elilda Road, 
luhran (the Rev. "Wm. MOSS, Buper- 
itendeat) Brushes of ul! kinds. 



ZEVENBOOM, JOHN & SON, Eliza- 
beth Street,' Melbourne, j- Culiectiou of 
Bruahware. 



y.^i 



DIVISION E.-TIMBER, WOOL, 
LEATHER, AND OTHER RAW 
AND MANUFACTURED PRO- 
DUCTS. 

Class XXXIV. 

Frodncts of ihe Cultivation of Forests and of 
the Trades appertaining thereto. 

ABBOTT, J. H., & CO., Market 

Square, Sandhurst. — Barks for Tanning 

purposes. ■ !«^. :^ 

3AIRNSDALE SHIRE COUNCIL 
(H. BREDT, Shire Secretary ).— Samples 
of Timber from Gippsland Foreat Trees. 

BARRY, JAMES MORGAN, AJpine 

Tannery, Omeo. — Bark for Tannin-;. 

BOARD FOR THE PROTECTION 
OP ABOillGINES (Capt. PAGE, Se- 
cretary), Temple Court, Melboiume. — 

Basket Work. 

BONETTI, GIUSEPPI, 130 Spring 
Street, Melbourne. — Examples of Coojiering. 

COSTIN, HENRY, Lydiard Street, 

Ballarat. — Assiatmeut of Timber. 

DEPARTMENT OF RAILWAYS 
(Secretary, P. P. LABERTOUCHE).— 

Three Sleepers of Ilod-gum, Iroubark, and Box- 

GEYER, GEORGE WILLIAM, St 

Amaud.— Products of the Australian Forest. 

JACKSON & BREARLEY, Bark 
Merchants, Bairnsdale. — Bark. 

JOHNSTON, WILLIAM, Tongio 

Station, Tongio. — Samples of ludigeiuMU 

Timber. 

MAFPRA SHIRE COUNCIL 
(GEORGE THOMAS JONES, Shire 

Secretary). — Two bundles Wattle Bark, por- 
tions of the trunk of a Eed Gum-tree. 

MUELLER, BARON von, M. & 
Ph.D., K.C.M.G., P.R.S., Government 
Botanist, Melbourne. — (1) Four Reposito- 
ries containing samples of 16»j ept^i^ of Au- 
Btrallan Woods in book form. (2) Three Glass 
Cases containing- 132 Articles manufactured <^ 
different kinds of Australian Woods. 

TECHNOLOGICAL MUSEUM (J. 
COSMO NEWBERY, Esq., B.Sc, 
C.M.G., Superintendent).— (1) A court 
formf^d of tho piineipal Victorian Timbors, 
comprising 200 specimens of the most valuable ; 
named and illustrated by pictorial epecimens of 
the fruit, leaf, and flower of eacTi. (2) Collcc- 



192 



Victoria. 



tion of Specimena of Woods, from the Trees 
and Shrubs of Victorio, arlnpted for economic 
piirpoBos. Prepared for exhibition by F. W. 
U irnard. (Tlie flowers and foliage painted in 
the Museum by Miss M. Vale.) 

APOIiliO BAY TIMBER CO., 
Limited (TEGE), Office, 54 Lydiard 
Street, Ballarat (CHABIiES SEAL, 
Chairman). — Assortments of Vict<->rian 
Timber, Seed Pods of Ulue-gum, and leaves of 
Blue-gum, Musk, Beccb, and Blackwood. 

UNITED SHI RE OP METCALFE 
(W. C. REEVES, Secretary), Shire 
Hall, Metcalfe. — Sample of Nalive Woods 
grown within the Shire of ^Ictcalfc. 

WIQHTMAN & SON. Blackwood 
Steam^ Saw Mills, Blackwood. — Speci- 
mens of Blo.o-gum, Blackwood, Strineybark 
Timber, and assorted sizes of Colonial Building 
Timber. 

WILLEY, R.. Avondale, East BeUe- 
rine.— Wattle Bark and Wattle Seeds. 



Class XXXV. 

rioducU of Ilantiiig, Shooting, Ftshinq, and 
Spontaneous Product*, Machineif ami Instru- 
vwnts connected therewWi. 

BRUMBY, ALFRED, Omeo.— Case of 
Natural History Specimens. 

BUCHAN, CAPTAIN JOHN, St. 
Leonards, near Sale. — Stuffed Native 
Animals: FlyujsFox, Flying Squirrel, Iguana, 
Native Bear, Native Cat, Opossum, Paddy 
Melon, Platypus, Porcupine, Itock Lizard. 



CAMPBELL, 
H. M. Customs, 



ARCHIBALD J., 
Melbourne. — Scientific 



Collection of Australian Birds' Eggs. 

CLARE!, S. R., Furrier, Brunswick 
(City Depot, Sydney Buildings, Flin- 
ders Street Weet, Melbourne). — Skins of 
Native Animals. 

FRENCH, CHARLES, Botanical 
Mxiseum, South Yarra. — Five cases con- 
taining Specimens of the Insect-Fauna of 
Australia, prepared for the Commissioners bj 
C. French, F.L.S., Department of Government 
Botanist, Melbourne. 



LUCAS, DR. T. P., Bank and Cec 
Streets, South Melbourne.— Exhibit 
Australian Birds' Eggs. Australian Lep 
doptora, ami Australian Colcoptera. 

MUELLER, BARON FERDINAHI 
VON, K.i3.M.G., M.D., F.R8., CJoven 
ment Botiuist, Melbourne. — Five o 
containing r,ine Albums with Dried Specimen 
of Plants il ustrativo of the llesoarrcs of Vir 
toriii, including some from otiier partt 
Australia. 

NATION^AL MUSEUM OF VIC 
TORIA (Director, PROFES80I 
McCOY, I'.RS., &c.).— A Collection ilia 
trating the nitural hist iry of Victorb. 

QUIN, JAMES, 104 & 106 Toor« 
Road, Sox »• \ Yarra. — Fur Rugs. 

SCHOlilR, HERMANN J. H., Omeo 

— Native Furs. 

STIRLING, ELIZABETH ANHn 
Survey Office, Omeo. — One case (Entom) 
logical Collection). 

WILSON & LINAKER, Briagalong 
North Gippaland. — Stuffed BirUa aa: 
Animals. 

Class XXXVI. 

Agricultural Products not used for Food 

ABBOTT, J. H. & CO., MarkJ 
Square, Sandhurst. — Beeswiix. 

BOSISTO, JOSEPH, M.P., Eict 
mond, Melboxirne. — Essential Oils, Gnns 
Resins, &c. (1) Essential Oil of Eucalyphue 
commerce, obtfiined irora the allied varieties o 
the Amygdalina species. (2) Essential Oil c 
Eucalyptus Amygdaliua. (3) Essential Oil « 
Eucalyptus Amygdalina. '4) Essential Oil i 
Eucalyptus Globulus (the Bine-gum tree of Tis 
toria). (5) Essential Oil of Eucalyptus Oleoa 
Rectif. (B\ Essential Oil of Eucalyptus Dnmoa 
Non-rectified. (7) Oleo Resin of Eucalypti 
(8) Essential Oil of Eucalyptus Citriodora. (I 
Essential Oil of Eucalyptus Fissilis, orMeS 
mate. (10) Essential Oil of (Joniocalvx- 
White Gum. (11) Essential Oil of Eucalypti 
Obliq a& — Striug/bark. Specimen samples oni 
showing the many aromas existing in ti 
family of plants. Thirty-three other exhili 
(all fully de&cribed in Victoria Court C*i 
logue). 



Ths Archbishops aud Bishops of the Church of £iigUiid, and many eminent Clergymen and Ministers, conear in reraiu£tt£i 

THE OXFORD BIBLE FOR TEACHERS. 

It Is israed iu Ton Size«, with the Toxt arranged in each oo as to correspond page for page with all the othen. 
etzes on beet Bag-made Pricting Paper, varying in price from 9b. to 46a. i'onz kiim on thin ^^taqua India Tip 
varying in prico Irom 7b. to 31b. ed. 

ThP. fllsliop or Mr.Mh fDr. BakbeTV: "Th* OXFOBW I Rer. C. H- Spnr*?' »nt "If jon wuit <o kar • S(« 1 
B1BI.E FOR TEACKEESii =jrn;4vt.» m.-*tT»lu«l.le C'li'.i.;! of liie null want the VtBYBESi;.* ■ ~ " 

Xfiglish Btbls avci preacateJ to tLe pu'ali:." | FQH TEACHEBS." 

SCLD 3Y AliL BOOKSELLERS. 



»nt 

.vrit« for a List <£ tbs OXFOBD 



London: HENRY FROWDE, Oxford University Press Warehouse, Amen Com*. E.C 



Vtctorich 



193 



FERQUSOW, JOSEPH, Bowman's 

'oreat. — Tobiu-co and Leaf. 

OUILPOYIiE, W. R., P.Ii.S., Di- 
Bctor Botanic Gardens, Melbourne.— 
ibre-yieldiiip Plants, and other Exhibits 
om the Melbourne Butanio Gardens. 

JACOBS, HART, & CO., 72 Queen 
Vfeet, Melbourne.— Cignra of all kinds, 
anufactured by Exhibitors iu Melb<iurne. 

MAPPRA SHIRE COUNCIL 
JEORGE T. JONES, Shire Secretary). 

-tiliiro Fibres, ni.ide iioiu inner bnrk of trees, 
und on Maeulister River, North Gippsland. 

MILLER, JAMES, Moray Street 
brth. South Melbourne. — Ropes, 
wines, Hessians, &c. 

MUELLER, BARON FERDINAND 
ON, K.C.M.G., M.D., P.R.S., Govern- 
ent Botanist, Melbourne.— Auatruliun 
esins, Kinos, and Gums. 



Class XXXVII. 

Chemical and Pharmaceutical Products. 

ATKIN, CHARLES AGEE, Che- 
ist, 41 & 43 Errol Street, North 
elboume. — Quinine Wine. 

CARWARDINE, WALTER 
ENRY, Charlton Road, Sandhurst. 

Srtniples of Tallow for export. 

DIXON, F. J., & CO., 32 Rosslyn 
■ireet, Melbourne.— Aerated Waters. 

ECKERSLEY, JOHN, St. Arnaud. 
Eucalyptus Oil, Ointment, Powder. 

PELTON, GRIMWADB & CO., 31 

33 Flinders Lane West, Melbourne. 

Chemical and Pliarmaceutical Preparations. 

KATTERSLEY, JOHN, Yackan- 

■•udah.— Soda Water. 

IJOHNSTONE, JEANNIE H., Corio 
prrace, Qeelong.— Dental and Detergent 
hP TabletB. ^ 

n^TCHEN, J., & SONS; and 
t)LLO COMPANY, Limited, 28 
aders Lane West, Melbourne.— 

rine Candles, Boaps (Household and 
Jncy), Soda Crystals. Refined and Crude 
lycenne, Oils, Soft Soap, Mutton and Beef 
■"ow. 

nCHINOMAN & CO., 270 Wel- 
.1 "^^-.^^eet, Collingwood.— Samples 
iiiu I'lexible Enamel for ships' bottoms, 
t-, on wood and irpa. 



LEWIS & WHITTY, Flinders Lane 
West, Melbourne. — Starch, WaHhing Blue, 
Borax Soap, Carbolic Soap, Borax Eucalyptus 
Soap, Borax, Extract of Soap, Blacking, Knife 
Polish. 

LOAN, LEWIS, Walhalla, Gipps- 
land. — (1) Aerated and Mineral Waters. (2) 
Fluid Magnesia. 

MILLER, JOSEPH, 123 Lonsdale 

Street West. — Disinfectants ; and Specifics 
for diseases of Vines, Fruit Trees, &c. 

MUELLER, BARON FERDINAND 
VON, M. & Ph.D., K.C.M.G., P.R.S., 
Government Botanist, Botanical Mu- 
seum, South Yarra. — Vegetable Products. 

SULLIVAN, JOSEPH, 16 King 
William Street, Pitzroy.— Bullet-formed 
Disinfecting Balls, made of a very hydroscopic 
silica and alumina sinter. 

WALKER, FREDERICK, Spring 
Street, Preston.— Glue. 



Class XXXVIII. 

Leaiher and Skins. 

ABBOTT, J. H., & CO., Market 
Square, Sandhurst. — Tanned and Curried 
Leather of all kinds. 

BARRY, JAMES MORGAN, Alpine 
Tannery, Omeo.-(l) Hides, tanned ; Rough 
Tanned Kip and Crop. (2) Tanned Kangaroo 
and Wallaby Skins. (3) Tanned Furs— Opos- 
sum. Emu, Dingo, Platypus, Wallaby, Kangaroo, 
Native Bear, Native Cat. :.< • v 

BRUMBY, ALFRED, Omeo.— Samples 
of Dressed Native Furs. 

CUNNACK, GEORGE, Tanner and 
Leather Merchant, Castlemaine. — Solo 
Leather. . ,. ., , 

HAYMAN, J. B., Tannery, Simp- 
son's Road Depot, Gertrude Street^ 
Fitzroy . — (IJ Shoe Leather, — Two Crop Butts. 
(2) Saddle and Harness Leather. 

JACKSON & BREARLEY, Bark 
Merchants, Bairnsdale. — Leather and 
Furs. 

MICHAELIS, HALLENSTEIN & 
CO., 30 Lonsdale Street East, Mel- 
bourne. — (1) Light Sole Leather. (2) Heavy 
Sole Leather. 

PENAL DEPARTMENT OP Vld^ 
TORIA (WILLIAM GORE BPJETT, 

Inspector-General). — Tanned Leather, corn 
sisdng of Calf, Kip, and Kangaroo. 





194 



Victoria. 



WOOL. 

Class A. • , 

Merino Wool, Wa»hcd. 

Bailoy and Wynne, Torrinallnm KflUito, Dar- 
lington, Victoria. 

lluHHcil, Tbo Hon. Pliillip, Camgham, Vic- 
toria. 

RiiBscll, TI108., Warrook, Rokewood, Victoria. 

Ituiwell, T., and Co., Barunali I'lains, Hettso, 
Victoria. 

Himson, llobert, Langikalkal, by Trcwalla, 
Victoria. 

Bailoy and Wynne, Tcrrinalluiu EHtato, Dar- 
lington, Victoria. 

Russell, T ., and Co., ISamnab Plains, Hewe. 

Bailey and Wynne, Tcrriuulhun Estate, Dar- 
lington, Victoria. 

ItuBstiU, Tbo Hon. Pbillip, Camgbam, Vic- 
toria. 

Russell, T., and Co., Parunab Plains, Hesse. 

Simson, Robert, Langikalkal, by Trewalla, 
Victoria. 

Bailey and Wynne, Terrinallum Estate, Dar- 
1 ington, Victoria. 

•: Class B. 

Merino Wool, UnwagJied. 

Owners of Soutb Brigbton Estate, Horsbam, 

Bailey and Wynne, Tcrrinallftm Estate, Dar- 
lington, Victoria. 

Bucbanan, Lieut.-Colonel, Titanga, Liamore, 
Victoria. 

BuUivant, Wra. Hose, Longercnong', Murtoa, 
Victoria. 

Curric, J. L., and Co., Larra, Camperdown, 
Victoria. 

Elder, William and N. G., Tbe Meadows, 
Rokewood, Victoria. 

Lewis, William, Stoncleigb, Beaufort. 

Russell, Pbillip, Camgbam, Victoria. 

Russell, T., and Co., Barunali Plains, HcsBC, 
Victoria. 

Wilson, Jobn, Galla, Lismore. "' ' ' 

Ayrey, Cbarles, Waranooke, Glenorcby, Vic- 
toria. 

Bucbanun, Lieut.-Colonel, Titanga, Lismore, 
Victoria. 

Currie, J. L., and Co., Larra, Camperdown, 
Victoria. 

Buchanan, Lieut.-Colonel, Titanga, Lismore, 
Victoria. 

BuUivant, Wm. Hose, Longerenong, Murtoa, 
Victoria. 



Currie, J. L., and Co., Larra, Camperdown, 
Victoria. 

Russell, T., and Co., Barunab Plains, Hc«p, 
Victoria. 

Wilson, Jobn, Galla, Lismoro. 

Ware, .Toseph, Miujab, Caramut, Victoria. 

Bailey and Wynne, Terrinallum Estate, Dar- 
lington, Victoria. 

Bucbanan, Lieut.-Colonel, Titanga, Lismore, 
Victoria. 

CuiTie, J. L., and Co., Larra, CamjierdowD. 

Wan', Josepb, Minjab, Caramut, Victoria. 

Wilson, .John, Galla, Lismore, Victoria. 

Bailey and Wynne. 

Bucbanan, Lieut.-Colonel, Titanga, Lismorp, 
Victoria. 

Currie, J. L., and Co., Larra, Camperdown, 
Victoria. 

liowis, William, Stonelcigb, Beaufort. 

llussell, Pliillip, Carngbam, Victoria. 

Wilson, Jobn, Galla, Lismore, Victoria. 



Class D. 

Long Wood, Unwathed, 

Clarke, Sir W. J., Bart., 27 Queen-street, 
Mell)ourne. 

Clark", Sii- W. J., Bart., 27 Queen-street, Mti- 
bourne. ,i^j .; 

A. 

Class E. "'i'- 

Scoured Wool. 

Halliburton, J. H., and Co., 100 CoUins-strcft 
west, Melbourne. 

Halliburton, J. H., and Co., ICO Collins-strfd 
west, Melbourne. 

Halliburton, J. H., and Co., 100 CoUins-stiett 
Tvcst, Melbourne. _ . 

Special Exhibit slimcn in handsome cate of Vif 
imian hlachicood by If. Gohhbrough and Co. 
Limited, Melbourne, containing samples tf 
tcool from the following growers. 

Curric, J. L., Eildon, St. Kilda. 

Degvaves, C. and J., Coliban Park, Elphii- 
stone. 

Russell, Hon. Pbillip, Camgbam, Victoria, 

Tbompson, G. W., Cballicum, Buaugor. 

Moleswortb andMatbeson, Morangbuik,Letl' 
bridge. 

Williamson, Walter, De Cameron, WimmcB 
East, Victoria. 

Carmicbael, George, Rctrcot, Costerton, Vi< 
torla. 



Sm JOHN BENNETT, 65 & 64, Oheapside, London. 
Watch, Clock, and Jewellery Manufacturer, by Appointment to Her Majesty. 

GOLD KEYLESS CENTRE SECONDS STOP WATCH. For Medical, Scicntitic,aJ) 
Racing Men. In stent 18-carat crystal case, i-plate lever, Chronometer balance, and Je <velle(l In l3actioni . 
sound useful Watch. £18, £ai, £26. 

GOLD KEYLESS f.PLATE CENTRE SECONDS HALF-CHRONOMETER STOl 

V\ ATCH. For Me licai,, Hciiiitific, and IUlIur purpowB. A flrst-class Watch, fully jewelled, vpith or wlUwut * 
double circle showing 2i^ o'clock, £3IS^, £J0, £35. 



Victoria. 



195 



Chrystal, Lo Fovro, and Co., Mowra., Englc- 
kltl, Cttvondish. 

DiiviB, Charloa Percy, IMount Carmcl, Rod- 
•iwtlo, Victoria. 

l)<)wlin^, Thou., and Son, Jcllalabod, Dar- 
n;,'tou, \ ictoria. 

llnyman, W. K., FuUmin, liiiliuuml. 

HuiniMlcn, lUchard, Druugbrunglu, Wannon, 
id Hamilton. 

Wi|,'bt, E. Byani, juu. 

Williiinison, vVultor, Do Caoieron, Wimmera 
Jast, Victoria. 

Dowlinp, Thoe., and Son, Jellolaba4l, Dar- 
in^ton, Victoria. 

UiiHsell, Hon. Phillip, CarnKbam, Victoria. 

Wi(j;ht, E. Byam, jun.. Spring Vale, via Bal- 
Doml. 

Williamson, Walter, Do Cameron, Vimmera 
Jaat, Victoria. 

Clirystal Le Fevre & Co., Englcfield, Cavcn- 

isli. 

Havman, W E., Hulliam Estate, Balmoral. 

Robcrtsou, William, Gringogalgona, Victoria. 

Willian?son, Walter, De Cameron, Wimmera 
last, Victoria. 

AuHtin, Joeirtb, Skclmorlic, Dandenong-road, 

!a>ilSclil. 

Special Ezhibils of Wool are aim gJiown by the 
following. 

Ware, Joseph, ]\Iinjfth, Caramut, Victoria. 
Metcalf, United Shire of, Coliban Park, 
ilpbinBton<\ 

New Zealand I<nan and Mercantile Agency 
loniimny, l^iniitcd, Collins-street west, Mcl- 
oume. 

The Australian Mortgage and Agency Com- 
any. Limited, Melbourne. 
Russell, Thomas, Esq., Yarima Station, 
dressy. 

Russell, Thomas, Esq., Wurrook Station, 
okewooii. 

Russell, Hon. Phillip, Carngbam, Victoria. 
Wilson, Sir Samuel, 9 Grosvenor Square, W. , 
ndoii. Samples of Wool grown on the Ercil- 
uue Estate, Victoria. (4 exhibits.) 



IVISION P.— APPAEATUS AND 
PROCESSES USED IN THE 
W MECHANIC AL INDUSTRIES, 

CAKRIAQES, HABNESS, &c. 



Class XXXIX. 



^'^Agricultural Implements and Frocetses used 
in the Cultivation of Fields and Forests. 

[BEARD & SISSON, Natimuk 
undry, Natimtik.— (1) One Stripping 
f,»cliine. (2) One Winnowing Machine 

LOOD, FItEDEBICE. 139 Iionsdale 

t West, Melbourne. — Floating Mill 

i Flood's Water-lift con^biued, fur watering 

hips, irrigating land, jr M sluicing on 

|er bauks, or any purpose wi i continuous 

'ply of water is required. 



EEIiliY «c PRESTON, Cr«8wiok 
Road, Ballarat. — Doublo-furrow Plough. 

PERRY, JOHN, 167 RusseU Stroel, 
and 86 JLonsdale Street East, Melbourne. 
— Tropbjr WheoU, Ilay Rakes, Axe, and other 
Huiidiufl of variouii descriptions, made from 
Autraliun timbers. 

TYNAN, JOHN, Ballarat, exhibited 
under the auspices of the liallarat 
Agricultural and Pastoral Sociefy.— 
Siugle-forroir Plough. 

Class XL. 

Apparatus and Procf*«es used in Agricultural 
iVorks and in Works for tltt Preparation of 
Food. 

CHERRY, EDWARD, & SONS, 
Gisbome. — Collection of Butter Churns. 

LANCE, GEORQE. Iiiebig Street, 
WarrnambooL — Combined Iron and Tin 
Cheese Vat. 

MILIiER, JOSEPH, 32 Collins 
Street West— Bcihives comimsed of Now 
Zealand stone. 

NOIiAN, liUKE, Park Street West, 
Brunswick. — Drain Pipes. 

Class XLII. 

Machines and Apparatus in general. 

PENAI. AND GAOIjS DEPART- 
MENT OP VICTORIA (WILLIAM 
GORE BRETT, Inspector-General), 
Melbourne. — Writing Machine, Sewing 
Machine, and Desk, manufactured by prison 
labour ut the Penal Establishment, Peutridge. 

TYRER, PETER, 425 King Street, 
Melbourne. — Samples of Patent opark Ar- 
resters, as made fi <r Locomotives and Portablu 
Engines ; also samples of Cork Extractors. ^ , 

WALLS, JOHN, Blacksmith and 
Carriage Builder, Camperdown.— Patent 
Clothes Washing Machine, with Wringer 
attached. 

WILLSON, R. J. PERMOR, Plunders 
Lane West, Melbourne. — Patent Washing 
Machine. - - _ " ' 

Class XLIIL 

Carriages and Wheelwright^^ WorJ:. — Carriages. 

PERRY, JOHN, 167 Rusaell Street, 
and 86 Lonsdale Street East, Mel- 
bourne. — Steam Bent Timber for Carriage 
Bailders' and Wheelwrights' work. 

PICKLES, G. P., & SONS, Mel- 
bourne and Sandhurst. — (1) Abbot's 
Boggy. (2) Brewster Pattern Buggy. (3) 
Convertible Boggy. (4) Broogham. 

2 



leo 



Victoria4 



ROBINSON & MORSE, Fairy Street, 
WarrnambooL— Open Hiuglo-aoatod Cou- 
oonl Buggy. 

STEPHENS BROS., CoachbuildeM, 
Liebig Street, Warmambool.— Victorian 
Sitiglo-Hcatod Open Conrord lUiggy, with pol» 
und leading bars, cloue plated Hilvcr uiountings. 

WHITE, DANIEL, Swanston Street, 
Melbourne. — Goddanl lJiit;gy, with innor 
hurrtl, patent wheels, and spring wanlier axles ; 
painted lake, and trimmed in brown cloth. 

Class XLIV. 

Uarneta and Stuhllcry. 

ALTSON, DAVID, & CO., 26 Bourke 
Street West, Melbourne. — (1) Buggy 
Harness. (2) Saddle, Pock. (3) Saddle, 
Australian Uorsc-broaking or Buck-jumping. 
(4) Saddle, Austriilian Stock, Patent Panel, 
open Gullet. (5) BridloH, Saddles, Australian 
Stock, two. (6) Water Bottles. 

KNIGHT, WIIililAM, & CO., Bath 
Buildings, Charing Cross, Sandhurst. — 
(1) Buggy Hiirness. (2) SaddloH, Lady's and 
(Tentltraiin's. 

PENAL DEPARTMENT OP VIC- 
TORIA.— Saddles. 

Class XLV. 

llailway Plant of all hinds 

CHJPPITHS, WILLIAM QBORaE, 
Newport Workshops, Victorian Rail- 
ways. — Model of State Kail way Carriage, 
constructed of Australian Woods, fitted with 
model Wood's patent continuous brake. 

Class XLVI. 

Telegraphic Apparatus and Processes. 

DEPARTMENT OF POST OPPICE 
AND TELEGRAPHS.— Eelay, Signal 
Key, Batteries, and section of Telegraph Pole. 

Class XLVII. 

Building Materials, Apparatus and Processes of 
Civil Engineering, Public Worlcs, and Archi- 
tecture, 

ARCHIBALD, JOSEPH, Curator of 
Museum, Kepler Street, Warmambool. 

■—Stone for building material. | 



BEEBE, WILLIAM, & SON, Mlt* 
ohell Street, Sandhurst.— Polished Granite 
Fountain of Harcourt (Mt. Alexander) Granite. 

BROWN, EDWIN, Shire Engineer, 
Benalla. — Improved Castors of brass and other 
metals. 



BROWN, JOHN WILLIAM, Made- 
line Street, Cailton.— Colonial Stono 
used in public buildings. 



at 



CORNWELL, EG AH, & STONE, 16 
Market Buildings, Flinders Lane West, 
Melbourne. — Patent Victoria llydruuiiof 
^>ee8tono. 

KARA KARA SLATE COMPANY) 
(J. ERACHE, Agent), 105 Collins Street! 
West, Melbourne.— Slates (roofing). 



KELSON, J. H., Mansflfc.d.— Freestone,! 
Kncrinital Marble. 

MELDRUM, JAMES> Sale, Gipps-I 
land. — Limestone and Lime. 

PBNDEROAST, JAMES, Mt. Lein-I 
ster, Hinnoomunjie Post Office.— Sampleij 
of Marble and Building Stones. 

THE HOFFMAN PATENTl 
STEAM BRICK CO., Limited. oJ| 
Queen Street, Melbourne.— Bricks of| 
various kinds. 

THE STAWELL & GRAMPIANl 
FREESTONE QUARRY CO. (P.| 
GALBRAITH, Secretary), Patrickl 
Street, Stawell. — Four blocks of Diesdl 
Grampian Freestone, specimen of the SM«I 
used in the construction of the New ParliamentI 
Houses, Melbourne. 

UNITED SHIRE OP METCALPJl 
(W. C. REEVES, Shire Secretary), MeJ 

calfe,— rolislied Column of liarcoui t Granittf 

WILSON, CORBEN & CO., 18 
Lonsdale Street East, Melboume.- 
Enamelled Slath Bath and Lavatory, ou 
Castlemaine Slate Step, and one EougU FiaJ 
The Enamelled Bath is manufactured frof 
Castlemaine Slate, of which the rough flag iBj 
specimen. 



St 

lia 

lUIll 

Ba 

] 

Mi 
[(I'a 

I 
12 

HJ 

(2) 
mat; 
Mai 
Bar] 



:^ « 

^ S CQ 



ESTAB. 
100 YEARS 



ESTAB. 



BAFTTOIL&JBOM^^ 

WINES, S PIRITS, and L IQUEURS. 

FULL DE TAILED PRICE LIST ON APP LICATION. 

For Abbreviated Particulars see Foot Notes on pages 21, 37, 168, 306. 



S ' 



c 

|Ian( 

■ c; 

|But 

. d: 

|TU1 
lel] 



Vtetona. 



107 



Class XLVIII. 

Navigation ntul Life-tnving. 

ROYAI. HUMANE SOCIETY OP 
AUSTRALIA, 41 Oelborne Chambers, 
Melbourne. — MiMlali and (JcrtiflcaU-s of 
Merit iiwurdctl by tho Koyal lluuiuiiu Society 
of Australia for Bavins humaa lifo, either oslioru 
or at sea. 

THIBKETTLE, W. J., Kyneton.-^ 

Models of Yachts 

WATTS, WALTER KEEVIL, River- 
side, St. Helliers Street, Abbotsford.— 
Model of Cutter Yachts. 

WILLSON, B. J. P., 90 Pllnders 
Lane West, Melboiimo.— Working Model 
of fcJteaiuer, 

CiiAss XLIX. 

Miilerialt nnd Apparatus for Military I'urposci. 

PERRY, JOHN, 167 Russell Street, 
and 85 Lonsdale Street East, Mel- 
bourne. — Spokea aud NavtB, BpocluUy miitable 
for GuQ Carriages. 

DIVISION a. - AGRICULTURAL 
AND OTHER ALIMENTARY 
PRODUCTS. 

Class L. 

Cereals, Farinaceous Products, and Products 
derived from them. 

ALLAN, GLOVER & CO., 26 King 

Street, Melbourne. — Wheat, Barley, Malting 
Barley, Cape Oats, Tartarian Oats, Pollard, 
und others ; Peas, Field (Dun and Grey). 

ARNOLD, JAMES, Loy Yung, near 
Bairnsdale.— Maizo (White). 

BRUNTON, T., & CO., Australian 

Mills, Melbourne.— (1) Wheat. (2) Flour 
(Patent). (3) Flour (Imperial). 

BURSTON, SAMUEL, & CO., 123 

-129 Flinders Street East, Melbourne. 
—(1) Barlty (Chevalier), Victorian grown. 
(2) Pneumatic Malt, made on Galland'a Pneu- 
matic system, (3) Amber Malt. (4) Black 
Malt. (All manufactured from Victorian-grown 
Barley.) 

CALVERT, JOHN, Bruthen, Gipps- 

land.— One balo Hops. 

CHANDLER, JAMES, Elm Farm, 

Rutherglen.— Wheat, Purple Straw. 

DEPARTMENT OP AGRICUL- 
TURE (D. E. MARTIN, Secretary), 
Melbourne.— Samples of Wheat, Barley, O^ts, 
reus, Linseed, Flax, Carraway Seed, Coriander 
Seed American Broom Seed, Sugar Beet Seed, 



Buck WheiOi Seed, Castor Oil Beana, Arrow- 
root (prepared), Almonds, Figa (dried), Olive 
Oil, LuiHeotl Oil, Olives (picklod). Wine (rod), 
Wine (white), Wool. Also Forest Tree 
Seeds. 

DIMBOOLA & NORTH WIM- 
MERA AGRICULTURAL & PAS- 
TORAL SOCIETY (J. FISHER, Seore- 
tary), Dimboola. — Wneet (one bushel). 

POSTER, HENRY, Omeo.— Ceronls 
(various). 

GEYER, GEORGE WILLIAM, St 

Amaud. — Wheat grown in Malleo country. 

GIBSON, JOHN, Hinnoomunjie, 
Victoria. — Wheat, Oats, Barley. 

GILLESPIE, JAMES, & CO., Patent 
Roller Flour Mills, Leicester Street, 
Carlton, Melbourne.— Flour, Victorian 
Wheat. 

GILLIES, DANIEL, Dry Diggings, 
P.O.— (1) Tartarian Oato. (2) Dun Poas. 

GORDON, HUGH, BaUyrogan.-(l) 

Fraiiiptuii Wheat. (2) Tartarian Oats. 



GORDON, PETER, 

Framptou Wheat. 



Ballyrogan.— 



HARVEY, THOMAS TBAGUE, 

Glenorchy.— Wheat, Purple Straw. 

HOPPNER, CHRISTOPHER, Swan 
Reach, Tambo, Qippsland. — One bale 
Hops. 

JOHNS, ALFRED J., Kerang.— 

Loddou Purple Straw Wheat. 

JOHNS, JOHN, Katandra.— (1) White 
Lamas Wheat. (2) Italian Battledore Barley. 
(3) Poland Oats (short). 

KIERATH, CHARLES, CMltera.— 

Purple Straw Wheat. 

LANAGAN, JOHN, Lallat Flqins 
Rupanyup.— Purple Straw Wheat , 

LEWIS, MINCHEN, Ballyrdgan.— 
a) White Frrtinplon Wheat. (2) Tartarian 
Oats. (3) Short Oats. 

LEWIS, WILLIAM, Shepherd's 

Flat.— Purple Straw Wheat. 

LEWIS & WHITTY, Flinders Lane 
West, Melbourne. — Egg Powder, Baking 
Powder, Curry Powder, Custard Powder. 

LONGMORE, THOMAS, Werona 
P.O., via Smeaton.— (1) Tartarian Oats. 
(2) Short Oats. (3) Field Peas (Dun). 

MAXWELL, DANIEL, Cohuna.— 
(1) Wheat. (2) Malting Barley. (3) Gardfu 
Peas, .•"»•«> .f.: -, . V v;. •i'.-f ,->..ruk 



198 



Victoria. 



MOODY, J. O., Flinders Ijane West, 
Melbourne. — (1) Five bales Taemanian 
Hops. (9) Five bales Victorian Hops. 



I/. 



MURTOA & CENTRAL WIM- 
MERA AGRICULTURAL & PAS- 
TORAL SOCIETY, Murton.—(l)Cbeva. 
lier Malting Barley, grown by diaries Langloy, 
sen. (2) Wheat, grown by Joseph McDonald, 
(Jarchap. 

Mcdonald, JOHN, Myall Flat, 
Cohuna.— Wheat. 

MoINTOSH, JAMES, Tahbilk.— (1) 
Wheat. (2) Oats. 

NAGBL, JACOB, Malmsbury.— (1) 
Wheat, in sheaf and grain. (2) Oats. (3) Ryo 
(4) Seeds. 

. NEW ZEALAND LOAN & MER- 
CANTILE AGENCY CO., Collins 
Street West, Melbourne.— Wheat, Oats, 
Barley, &c., &o. 

PATERSON & CO., Warmambool.— 

Farina. , , 

PE1«)ERGAST, PATRICK, Cooyal- 
meraug, near Bairnsdale.— (1) Barley. 
(2) Outs. (3) Maize. (4) Mangolds. 

POLSON, ANGUS, Ararat— Wheat. 

RIDGWAY, ANTHONY, Clyde, via 
Cranboume.— (1) Wlieat. (3) Oats. 

ROBERTS & PARRY, Pranklinford. 

—Short Oats. 

THOMPSON, HUGH, JUN., Dry 
Lake, Kerang.— Purple Straw Wheat. 

WALTERSON & TAYLOR, Omeo. 
— Floiur from Wheat grown on the Omeo Plains. 



WILLEY, ROBERT, East Bellarine, 
Port Arlington. — (1) Peas. (2) Beans, 
Broad Windsor. (3) Flax Seed. (4) Onion 
Seed. (5) Carrot Seed. 



YEAMAN, ARCHIBALD.-Yl)Whe8t 

(2) Oats. (3) Oats and Wheat, in sheaf. (4 
Twenty-four varieties Australian Native Grassei 

ZORN, EDWARD, Clayton's Road, 
Oakleigb.— (1) Curry Powder. (2) Cuirj 
Paste. 

Class LI. ;: , ■ . 

Bread, Biscuits, &o. 

GUEST, T. B., & CO., William Street 
Melbourne. — Fancy Biscuits, exhibited ii 
handsome trophy. (Samples on sale in Colonia 
market.) 

SWALLOW & ARIEL, 4 Queen 
Street, Melbourne ; Factory, Port Mel. 
bourne. — Fancy Biscuits, Cakes, Plum Pud 
dings, Mince Meat, Aerated Flour; shown ii 
handsomo octagon-shaped trophy. (Suraplei 
on sale in Colonial market.) 



Class LII. 

Fatty S%d}stances used (t» Food. 

CURRIE, JOHN, Little ColliM 
Street West, Melbourne.— Cheese, spe- 
cially manufactured and packed for export 
(On sale in Colonial market.) •"- • 

FOSTER, HENRY, Shire Valuer, 
Shire Hall, Omeo.— Dairy Produce. 

LONQWIRE, THOMAS, Werona.- 
(1) Salt Butter. (2) Powdered Butter. 

McMEEKJN BROS., WarmambooL 

— Cheese. 

ROBERTS & PARRY, Franklinford 

—Salt Butter. 



Class LIII, , 
Meat and Fish, 

LONGMORE, FRANCIS, Plinden 
and King Streets, Melbourne.— Mina 
Meat. 

THE MELBOURNE MEAT PBS 
SERVING CO., Limited (H. E 
CUDDEN, Secretary), 56 Queen Street, 
Melbourne. — Preserved Meat in tins. 



LUXURIOUS EASY CHAIRS AND DIVANS 

«^.„.T.i, MANUFACTURED BY ' ■*'^'^^" 

HOWARD & SONS, 

25, 26, & 27, BERNERS STREET, LONDON, W 



Victoria. 



199 



THE WESTERN MEAT PRE- 
SERVING CO., Iiimited, Oolac and 
Camperdown (O. M. FARRINOTOWT, 
Manager, Colac). — (1) Boiled Kabbit. (2) 
Curried Babbit. (3) Babbit and Onions. 
(Samples on sale in Colonial dining rooms and 
inarkete.) _ 

Class LIV. 

. .., ;!H Vegetables and Fruits. 

[Special ar range nients have been made for con- 
teying fresli vegetables and fruits to London, 
in refrigerating chambers, during the months 
the Exhibition remains open ; and these trill 
be on sale in the Colonial fruit market.'] 

BROWN, W. P., Dandenong Road, 
Malvern. — Conserve of Tomatoes. 

MARRINER, OEORQE, Colac— 
Native Bread, foimd at Cobden, near Ciimiier- 
down. 

MELLON, FRANCIS, DunoUy.— 
Dried Fruits : (1) Apples. (2) Currants. (3) 
Peaches. (4) Pears. (5) Almonds. (6) 
Prunes. 

PIERCE, W. C, & CO., Mclvor Road, 

Sandhurst.— Mixed Pickles, Mustard Pickles, 
Sultana Pickles, Tomato Pickles, Onions, &c. 

RED CROSS PRESERVING CO., 
Melbourne (D. C. McAUSLANE, 
Agent, Eastcheap Buildings, E.C.) — 
Preterved Victorian Fruits (various). 

ZORN, EDWARD, Clayton's Road, 
Oakleigh. — Conserve of Tomatoes, Pickled 
Tomatoes, Dried Herbs. 

■ ''' Class LV. 

Condiments and Stimulants — Confectionery. 

ABBOTT, J. H., & CO., Market 
Square, Sandhurst. — Honey. 

BARRETT, WILLIAM, Clayton 
Street, Ballarat. — Victorian Worcestershire 
Sauce. 

BILL SON, ALFRED A., Beech- 
worth. — Cordials, Bitters. 

BROWN, WILLIAM P., Dandenong 
Road, Malvern. — Tomato Sauce, Garden 
Sauoe. 

COMFORT, HENRY, Cheltenham- 
—Tomato Sauce. 

DILLON, BURROWS, & CO., La 
Tfobe Street, Melbourne.- Confectionery, 
Preserved Fruits, Citron Peel, Lemon Peel, 
Orange Peel. 

DIXON, P. G., & CO., 32 Rosslyn 

Street, Melbourne.— Cordials, Liqueurs, &c. 

HARRIS, RICHARD S., Liebig 
Street, Warmambool.— Tomato Sauce. 



HOADLEY, AHELt Burwood.— 

Tomato Sance. 

HOLT, ANDREW, 233 Swanston 
Street, Melbourne, — Tomato Sauce. 

HURST, EDWARD, & CO., Beeoh- 

worth. — Cordials, &o. 

KIERATH, CHARLES, Cornish, 
town, near Chiltem. — Tomato Sauce. 

LOAN, LEWIS, Walhalla, Oipps- 
land. — Hop Bitters and Cordials. 

LONGMIRE, THOMAS, Werona.— 
Honey. 

LYTTLETON, M., & CO., Dimboola. 

— Salt Table, gathered from lake in natural 

state. 

PALMER, RICHARD, Clayton's 
Road, Oakleigh. — Chutney, Mushroom 
Catsup. 

PIERCE, W. C, & CO., Mclvor Road, 
Sandhurst. — Chutney, Tomato, and other 
kinds of sauce. 

REID, JOHN, & CO., Market Square, 
Sandhiirst. — Federal Sauce, Tomato Sauce. 

REID, T. B., & CO„ 116 Drummond 
Street, Carlton. — Tomato Sauce. 

ROWLEY, JOHN S., Timor Street, 
Warmambool. — Hop Bitters, &c. 

SPINK, K J. & S., 147 to 149 La 
Trobe Street West, Melbourne. — Jams, 
Preserved Fruits, and Candied Peel. 

THE MARYBOROUGH FRUIT 
PRESERVING CO., Limited (P. J. 
OUTTRIM, Secretary), Maryborough. 

— Preserved Fruits. 

TROUETTE & BLAMPIED, Great 
Western. — Vinegar. 

ZORN, EDWARD, Clayton's Road, 
Oakleigh.— Tomato Sauoe, Oakleigh Sauce, 
and various other Sauces. • -_ - , ,. 

Class LYI. .;;;tei.i. 



Fermented Drinhs, 



> 



BILL SON, ALFRED A., Beech- 
worth.— Ale (bottled), Porter (bottled). 

BOYD & HEAD, Shamrock Brewery, 
Collingwood. — Ale from Victorian malt and 
bops, Ale (bottled). Trophy for beer. 

COHN BROS., Brewers, Sandhtirst. 

— Lager Beer, s|>ccially brewed on under- 
fermentation principles. } ;-^ J^ ^•\ 

HEDLEY BROS., Bridgewater, Lod- 
don.— Ale (bottled), Stout (bottled). 

HURST, EDWARD, & CO., Spring 
Creek Brewery, Beechworth. — Ale, 

Porter. • x y, .. t . .. t-*- 



200 



Victoria. 



LOAN, LEWIS, WalhaUa, Qippa- 
land. — Ale (bottled). 

MELBOURNE BREWING AND 
MALTING CO., Limitnd (EDWARD 
LATHAM, Managing Director), 
Carlton Brewery, Melboiime. — Runniug 
Ale, Stock Ale, Porter. 

McCRACKEN & CO., City Brewery, 
Melbourne. — Anstmliau Bitter Ale, in wood 
and bottled ; a Trophy formed with stand 
ousks, show cards, bottles, &c. The (iaska and 
etand are entirely made from Victorian wood. 

SHELDRICK, WALTER, & CO., 
New Brewery, Warmambool.— (1) Ale 
in bulk. (2) Porter in bulk. (3) Bottled Ale, 
Bottled Stout. 

WARRENHEIP DISTILLERY, Un- 
limited. Mount Warrenheip, Dunns - 
town (Office, 30 Lydiard Street, Balla- 
rat). — ^Whisky, Geneva, Kectifled Spirits of 
Wine. 

.v, - WINE EXHIBITS. 

In the Albert Hall Cellars and at the Bars 
and Dining Hooms. 

Australian Freehold Land and Produce Co., 
Limited, 131 Collina Street West, Melbourne ; 
and Chateau Tahbilk, Goulburn River. 

Joseph Best, Great Western Vineyard, Great 
Western. 

Thomas Blayney, Goulburn Valley Vineyard, 
Nagambie. 

Bracbe & Co., 112 Collins Street West, Mel- 
bourne. 

E. Bronsiug, Erbslung Vineyard, Nagam- 
bie. 

Albert Bruhn, Emu Vineyaixi, Emu Creek, 
Sandhurst. 
Charles Buchanan, Viow.Bank, Beeac. 

F. Busso & Sons, Biorrabuimia Vineyards, 
Burrabuniiia. 

OaUlwell & Co., Melbourne. (London agent : 
Mr. H. Urquhart, 16 Water Lane, E.G.) 

Alex. Caughey, Mount Prior Vineyard, Goora- 
madda. 

Chateau Ycring Wine Co., 32 Eastern Market 
Cellars, Melbourne. 

John Currie, Little Collins Street West, 
Melbourne. 

Jolm Davis, Ngarvcno. Moonce Ponds. 

De Custella & Rowan, St. Hubert's. (London 
agent: Mr. Alex. Cumming, 24 Whitcomb 
Street, S.W.) 



G. de Pury, Yeringberg. 

A. W. Fox, Emu Creek, Bondigo. 

Hugh Fraser, "Olive Hills" Vineyaid 
Brown's Plains. 

Charles Fuller, Amphitheatre Vineyard, In 
verleish. 

E. Graham Fulton & Co., Echuca Vineyaid 
32 Collins Street East, Melbounic. 

John Gemmell, Fairlawn, Wooragee, nea 
Beechworth. 

Baptista Gianetta, Beuliba. 

H. M. Gooch & Co., ya Collins Street Ve«J, 
Melbourne. 

Graham Bros., Rutherglen. 

F. Grosse, Beiidigo Wine Cellars, 106 Cellini 
Stieet West, Melbourne. 

Lawrence Hanlon, Katapora. 

William Hughes, Rutherglen. 

Joachim Kahland, King Street, Sandliurst. 

L. Kitz & Sons, Chancery Lane, Melbourne. 

Robert Kurrle, Sunbury. 

M. Lang & Co., 83 Collina Street West, 
Melbourne. 

Lawrence & Adam, 61 William Street, Mel- 
bourne. 

David Mitchell, Burnley Street, Richmond. 

George F. Morris & Sons, Brown's Plaius. 

Oakley, Adams & Co., Flinders Lane, Mel- 
bourne. 

Joseph Pearce, Wahgunyah. 

E. Schroeder, Castlemaine. 

August Schwerkolt, Ringwood. 

T. K. Shaw, Goomong. 

Daniel Smith, Eversley. 

G. Sutlierland Smith & Sons, All Saints Vine- 
yard, Wahgunyah. 

J. & C. Smith, Bamawartha. 
Robert Suart, Goorainadda. 
Albert Trinkaus, Wintergarden, Muckleford. 
Tronette & Blara fried, Great Western. 
Sir Samuel Davenport, Champagne, made by 
Exhibitor from South AustraUan grapes. 



DIVISION H.— HORTICULTUEE. 
Class LVn. 

Consei'vntorles and Horticultural Apparatut, 

ALCOCK & CO., 132 Russell Street, 
Melbourne. — Twelve Garden Stats. 

McEWAN, JAMES, & CO., Elizabeth 
Street, Melbourne. — Tliree Rustic Garden 
Seats, One Rustic Garden Table, all of Colonial 
Woods. 



BURGOYNES AUSTRALIAN WINES. 



The "TIMES.** — "These are fine wines to keep, as English 
buyers are beginning to discover.*' 



Victoria, 



201 



Class LVm. 

Species of Plants and Examples of Culture. 

PLATOW, MRS. JOSEPH, 45 Made- 
ae Street, Carlton, Melbourne. 

OUILPOYI.E, W. B,, P.L.S., Direc- 
ir, Melboiirue Botanic Gardens.— Col- 

(tion of Victcriau Grassea from tho Port 
lillip district. 

KIDSON, ADELE MARIE, 2 Park 
errace, St. Kilda. — Australian and New 
>aland Ferns, prt'ssod, dried, and mounted on 
rdboard in album, all botanically named. 

MUELLER, BARON P. VON, M. & 
h.D., K.C.M.G., P.R.S., Government 
otaniBt, Botanical Museum, Mel- 
3urn.e.— (1) A Todea-Fern (Osmunda bar- 
ra. Thunberg), weighing approximately 
00 lbs. (2) Group of young Fun-Palma of 
ppsland. 

ROBERTSON, PRANK, 21 Eliza- 
ith Street, Melbourne. — Dried Orna- 
mtal Grasses, Ferns, and Everlasting Flowers. 

ROYAL COMMISSION POR VIC- 
ORIA AT THE COLONIAL AND 
roiAN EXHIBITION, LONDON, 

}88.— Fern Gully, representing a common 
ture of u Victorian forest. 

STIRLING, JAMES, Survey Office, 
meo. — Two Volumes Dried Plants. 

WATSON, EMILY MARY, Edwards' 
oathonse, Albert Park. — Picture of 
■esflcd Ferns. 

Class LIX. 

ikeds ami Saplings of Forest Trees. 

GUILFOYLE, W. R., P.L.S., & CM., 
oyal Botanic Society, London (Direc- 
r, Melbourne Botanic Gardens). — 

iiatralian Carpological Collection, specially pre- 
red for the Colonial and Indian Exhibition, 
mdon, from tho Melbourne Hotanio Gardens. 

IVISIO] I. — MINING INDUS- 
TRIES, MACHINERY, AND 
PRODUCTS. 

Class LX. 

Mining and Metallurgy. 

lAUSTRALIAN LITHOPRACTEUR 

limited (TELE), 31 Little Collins 

et East, Melboiime (T. TOLLEY 

)NE8, Manager). — Models of Dynamite 

Lithofriicteur Cartridges, and Drawings 

yariouB methods of using the same in 

aing, submarine, and other operations. 

BAND OP HOPE AND ALBION 
)NSOLS, No Liability (R. M. SER- 
' ' "fT, Manager), Skipton Street, Bal- 
rat,— Working Model of Mmiug Machinery, 



comprising three steam engines, winding and 
pumping gears, safety cages, pumps, working 
model of quartz-crushing battery with forty 
head of stampeis, stouo breaker, amalgamating 
apparatus, &c. 

CAMPBELL, W., late, M.L.C., of 
Victoria. — First speck of gold, discovered in 
Victoria by W. Campbell's party in 1849, on 
the site of the Port Phillip gold mine at Clunes. 

CAMPBELL, W., late, M.L.C., of 
Victoria.— Gold in Quartz, from Campbell's 
Creek, found early in 1851. 

JOHNSON & CO., Tyne Poundry, 
Yarra Bank, Melbourne. — Eock-boring 
Machine, with hose coupling, pole clip, and 
connexions complete. 

MINING DEPARTMENT OP VIC- 
TORIA (C. W. LANGT.R.EE, Secretary 
for Mines). — Collection of thirty-eight Fac- 
siinilea of Large Nuggets of Gold found in 
Victoria. 

MURCH, WILLIAM HENRY, 
" Ramnoe," Burwood Road, Hawthorn. 

— Plans and Specifications of Eotary Engine. 

Class LXI. 

Mining and Metallurgy. 

[The arrangement of the various specimens in 
this department lias been carried out under 
thepersonal superintendence of /''. W. Rudler, 
Esq., of the Museum of Practical Geology, 
Jermyn Street, S. IF.] 

BAND OP HOPE AND ALBION 
CONSOLS COMPANY, No Liability, 
Ballarat (R. M. SERJEANT, Manager). 

Blocks of Auriferous Quartz, samples in various 
stages of treatment. 

BANK OP AUSTRALASIA (THE), 
Melbourne. — Alluvial and Uetoited Gold, 
obtained from celebrated Australian mines. 

COLLIER, JENKIN, "Rockleigh," 
George Street East, Melbourne. — Block 
of Auriferous Quartz, weighing 8 cwt., taken 
from the reef, at a deptli of 1000 ft, in Mr. J. B. 
Watson's Kentish Claim, Sandhurst. The 
stone yields about 2 oz. of gold to the ton. 

CROSS, ANDREW WILSON, 
Herald Office, Albert Straet, Dayles- 
ford. — Collection of Minerals, Petrified Wood, 
&c. 

PINCHAM, GEORGE, Organ 
Builder, Bridge Road, Richmond, Mel- 
bovirne. — Sheet of Spotted Metal, for organ 
pipes, made out of Australian Metal. 

HORWOOD, JOHN WILLIAM, 
Castlemaine Bell Poundry, Castle- 
maine. — One 3a-inch Diameter Church Bell, 
with cast-iron gudgeon and metal wheel, and 
ioi^troved 8U8|ien8iou bolt and crown 



202 



Victoria. 



KITCHINGMAN, EDWIN L., 270 
WeUtngton Street, CoUingwood. — 
Mineral Ores, containing gold, silver, copper, 
nrsfmic, sulphur, and iron, from mines at 
Betliajjana, near Wodonga. 

MAFFRA SHIRE COUNCIL (THE) 
(QEORQE THOMAS JONES, Secre- 
tary), Mafifra, North Gippsland. — Fossil 
Wood, from tlie Tertiary drifts, Glcnmaggie, 
North Gippsland. 

MANNING, CHARLES, Rushworth. 

— Auriferous Quartz. . ■ , 

MOE COAL CO. (THE), Moe, Gipps- 
land. — Large Block of Coal. 

NOLAN, LUKE, Park Street West, 
Brunswick. — Samples of Victorian Clays, 
suitable for pottery and tile-making. 

PAGE, GEORGE H., Bridport Street, 
Daylesford. — Patent Improved Lever Car- 
riage-lifting Jack. 

PENAL AND GAOLS DEPART- 
MENT OF VICTORIA (WILLIAM 
GORE BRETT, Inapeetor-General).— 
Useful and Ornamental Tinware. 

PORT PHILLIP AND COLONIAL 
CO. (THE), Clunes (R. H. BLAND, 
Manager). — Auriferous Quartz. 

QUEEN'S BIRTHDAY QUARTZ 
CO. (THE), Dunolly (WALTER T. 
HANSFORD, Manager).— Auriferous 
Quartz Specimens, Cubical Pyrites, Quartz 
Crystals. 

ROWE, B. W. H., Fryerstown. — 
Auriferous Quartz Specimens, Crystals, &c., 
of rare form andbeauty,obtained at various levels 
from the mines of Kowe Bros., at Fryerstown. 

SCARLETT, WILLIAM, Mirboo, 
Gippsland. — Large Block of Coal from 
Mirboo. 

STIRLING, JAMES, Sui-vey Office, 
Omeo, Gippsland.— Geological Collection 
(rocks of the Australian Alps). 

STERRY, D. C, THE HON., M.L.C, 

Sandhurst. — Specimen of Rich Gold-bearing 
Quartz, from the Lady Barkly Gold Mine 
SandhTust. 

TECHNOLOGICAL MUSEUM 
(THE), Melbourne (J. COSMO NEW- 
BERY, C.M.G., Director).— Illustrations 



of the Clays and other substances fnunc 
Victoria, suitable for the manufacture of pot 
and porcelain, witli manufactured illuatrati 

LONG TUNNEL GOLD MI^ 
CO., Registered (THE), Walha 
North Gippsland (RAMSAY THC 
SON, Manager). — Tiophy, represen 
column of gold, rock minerals, &c., obtained i 
the Long Tunnel Gold Mine, Walhalla. 

MINING DEPARTMENT OP V 
TORIA (THE) (CHARLES W. LAI 
TREE, Secretary for Mines ; E. A. 
MURRAY, F.G.S., Govemment Qw 

gist). — (1) Geological Collection, inclu( 
about 800 specimens of the charncteri 
rock formations of Victoria, with fossils. 
Mineral Collection, including about 400 8[ 
mens illustrative of the different mine 
found in Victoria. (3) Economic Collect 
including large and conspicuous specimens 
the mineral products of Victoria possess 
economic value, or likely to become of n 
mercial importance, viz : — ores of gold 
silver, tin, lead, copper, p.ntimony, iron, mail 
nese, coal, lignite, infusorial earth, build 
stones, &c. (4) Collection of Cores, obtaii 
during boring with the diamond drilk- 
Collections f)f Fac-similes of Nuggets of G 
ibund in Victoria. 

NEW CHUM AND VICTORIA C 
(THE), Sandhurst (W. W, BARKE 
Manager, Albion Chambers, Sai 
hurst). — Auriferous Quartz. 

WHITE, THOMAS, Mana? 
Granya Pyrites Works. — Ores aud P 
ducts. 

SCHOOL OP MINES (exhibited 
THE), Ballarat,— Specimens of RoL-ks 
Minerals, collected in Western Victoria ; 
adjacent localities. After exhibition, to 
presented to the Museum of the Geologi 
Survey of Great Britain, London. 

DEPARTMENT OP MINES (TB 
(CHARLES W. LANGTRBE, Se« 
tary; REGINALD A. H. MURHi 
Government Geologist). — Geological I 
lection. Specimens of rocks, &c. 

The Tvhulc of the decorations of the Vict 
Cuurt have been carried out by Messrs. Gi 
& Co., of 406 Oxford Street, London, W. 



SIR JOHN BENNETT, 65 & 64, Cheapside, London. 
Watch, Clock, and Jewellery Manufacturer, by Appointment to Her Majestl 

GOLD KEYLESS QUARTER REPEATER, in massive 18-carat c«se, half-chronome 
Jewelled, movement repoatlng tbn hours oud quarters. Perfectly accurate and reliable. £30 lo £&0. 

GOLD KEYLESS MINUTE REPEATER, of the most perfect finish and style, jewd 
throDghoQt, of the highest quality. Repeating the hours, quarters, and mibutes. Ualf-cbrguometer movei 
A most ubefal, reliable and valuable Watch. £46, £56, £8B, £75. , . , ..^j,.. 



Advertisements. 



203 






■'i^, 



BURGON & BALL'S 



.;t. ^ 




CELEBRATED 

SHEARS, 




SBQtSTtMD 



m 






MARKS. 



iMJ 






li^l i 



AWARDED SIX MEDALS. 



M-INi BRIDGE, SHEFFIELD. 



^'■»w««irawi*w«Pi«B3wir^ 



20-i Advertisements. 



tes JPATENT WLE CO., LlHlTElj 

; LON DON AND LIVERP OOL 

JHE LARGES T CANDLEMAKER8 IN THE WORLB 

GOLD MEDAL PALMITINE, BELMONT SPERM, & other CAITOLES 

LUBRICATING and CLOTH OILS. 
PURE GLYCERINE for MEDICINAL PURPOSES 

Works : 
BATTERSEA, LONDON, 

AND 

B ROMBORO' POOL, BIRK ENHEAD, 
Home and Export Price Lists on Application 




( 205 ) 



SOUTH AUSTRALIA. 

nim of this preface is to give to tlie British public, la a concise manner, Bome informatioo 
lecting one of England's great Ar.tipodean Colonies. The importance of the Anstralian 
lements is apparent to anyone who has visited them, or who from a distance has had oocAsion 
ake himself acquainted with their advancement in national wealth, or to contemplate their 
ense natural resources — which at present ave only in the infancy of development. Tha vast 
portion of tiie British public, however, know little of Australia— the "Greater Britain" of 
Southern seas — and it ia hoped that the Handbook distributed by the South Au&tralian 
mission will lie helpful in disseminating practical information of service to all who arv^ 
irested in the triumphs of British colonisation, but particularly to those who may contemplate 
moval from the crowded populations of the United Kingdom to the attractive fields 
sented by Britain's Colonies. It will not be the privilege of the writer to draw npon a 
1 historic past for the story he has to lell. There may be open to 'aim no daring 
itary achievements to invest his story with the glory of national renown; there may 
no venerable institutions or relics, with inspirations of reverence and wonaer ; and 
re may bo no magnificent literature to command the attention or awaken the interest 
the student and the scholar. Scarcely fifty years have passed since South Australia was 
jclaimed a British Colony, and yet the record of this half-century is full of interest to all 
10 care to note the advancement of the Anglo-Saxon stock. The bold enterprise, the indomitable 
ick, the dogged perseverance, and tiie love of freedom, which form such striking characteristics 
the English race, have been culled into full operation in the peaceful subjugation of 
raeval wastes to the service of man and their rapid transformation into a hive of hnman 
lustry. Few pages in the history of Britiah colonisation are fuller of interest tli^n those which 
;ord the establishment and growth of these countries in the Southern Hemisphere, that are 
gutly known in Europe under the generic name of " Australia." The story of how n handfal 
Britons have, within the cycle of a century, founded countries that are rivalling Old World 
tions in wealth and power and in the elegances of advanced civilian tion is iustrucUve and 
spiriting. It spf aks of the vigour and genius of the old stock re-asserting itself in the younger 
rength and ardent effort of the offshoots ; and it shows how the same characteristics of courage, 
gacity, perseverance, industry, and prudence, which have made England what she is, are 
lerating in the development of these daughter-nations under the l-iouthem Cross. It. these 
iges special attention will be drawn to one of the seven Colonies that form the AnstralasiBn 
)S8e88ions of Great Britiin— The Province of South Australia. 

Ill the year 1831, Captain Sturt— one of the earliest Australian explorers— discovered the 

eat River Murray, which runs down into South Australia, and empties itself into the Soathem 

emu; and, on his return to Sydney, gave a glowing report of the fertile country he had seen 

a distance, but was unable to explore. In the early part of the same year a few gentlemen 

et it London to diacuss the propriety of founding, on the southern shores of Australia, a Colooy 

pon principles which at that time were advanced principles of Political Economy. The 

omoters opened up negotiations with the Imperial Government, but were not successful, and 

e project fell through. The matter was not, however, allowed to slumber very long. In 1834 

project was renewed, and in June of tliat year a meeting of gentlemen was held at Exeter Hall, 

ondon, to discuss the principles upon which the proposed settlement should be founded. Just at 

lat time a scheme of colonisation propounded by Mr. Edward Gibbon Wakefield was attracting 

tention. That gentleman, thoughtfully observing the course of events in the other Australian 

olonies, had come to the conclusion that land without the operation of capital and labour was 

selesB. He sought to give a fixed price to land ; to provide that land should only be sold, and 

ot disposed of by free grants ; and to apply the proceeds of waste lands to the cost of importing 

' ... ^. ^ . 



206 South Australia. 



labour from the crowded cities and towns of the United Kingdom. These principles oommea 
themselves to the promoter!<, who in 1834 secured the passing of an Act by the Impei 
Legislature authorising the Sovereign to erect one or more provinces in that i«rt of Auatn 
lying between the i32nd and Hist meridians of east longitude, and between the Southern Oa 
and the 2Gth degree of «nuth latitude. To the persons who should reside within the said provi, 
or provinces was accorded freedom of action— they were not to be subject to the luw or constitnti 
of any other part of AustraMa ; and furthermore it was provided— and the sagacity of 
originators in this respect is worthy of mention— that no criminals should at any time oruw 
any circumstances be traneiwrtcd to any place within the limits described. The cuBe 
couvictism therefore has never attached itself to the Provii co of South Australia. 

The first Commissioners appointed under tlio Act were eight in number— riz., Colonel Tom 
F.R.S. (Chairman), ar.d Messrs. W. A. Mackinnon. M.P., Jacob Montefiore, W. Hutt, M 
Geo. Palmer, Jun., Joha Wright, Geo. Fife Angas, and Samuel ^lills. Only one of tj^ 
Commissioners survives, and it is an interesting circurastanco that this survivor— Mr. Jk 
Montefiore— is one of the Hon. Commissioners for South Australia at the Colonial and ladi 
Exhibition in London in 1886. To him— in his advanced age— it must be a source of de 
gratification that he has been spared to see a Colony, in the inception of which he took ad* 
personal intereht, qualified to honouraLiy take her position among the colonies of Britain inl 
interesting and important Exhibition before referred to. 

The project of colonisation, however, almost proved abortive. The Imperial Act provii 
that a sum of £35,000 must be raised before the powers given under the Act could be exerei-t 
and the scheme hung fire. Just then, however, the lute Mr. George Fife Angas, who was ow 
the Commissioners, came to the rescue. Ho formed an association known as "The 8oa 
Australian Company," and resigning his commissioncrship, he assumed the chairmanship of li 
company. This company subscribed the balance of capital required, and the scheme of coloniotiT 
proceeded. The late Sir James Hurtle Fisher was appointed Resident CommiBsioncr in i 
Colony, and the late Colonel Light was sent out, as first Surveyor-Cieneral, to choose a site 
the atpital, and push on the survey nf the land for settlers. In August, 1836, Colonel Lijl 
arrived at Kangaroo Island, and thence he proceeded to the mainland east of St VinoenfsGd 
where he commenced his work, and selected the i)resent site of the capital— Adelaide. Inti 
following December the first Governor of South Australia-Captain Hindmarsh, K.N.-arriT, 
and took possession of the land in the name of the Sovereign of England, on the 28th Decern' 
1836, the anniversary of which day is always closely kept as a public holiday. 

Since the proclamation of the Province South Australia has witnessed macy change 
fortune, but through all her vicissitudes she has made substantial advancement. Some of ti 
other Colonies have attained wealth and imiwrtanco by the discovery of rich goldfieldi. ti 
development of which has enormously increased their resources, besides attracting — aa ft? 
other discoveries have the power of doing — a large und able-bodied population from 
distance. These resources of wealth and population, springing from adventitious ciicumstaDca 
have made the progress of some of tlie other Australian provinces quite phenomenal in ii 
character. The adiancement of South Australia, on the other hand,"^ has "been achieved h 
patience, endurance, industry, and enterprise. Although rich goldilelds have not been discorerei 
gold is found in many parts of the Colony, and the many productive copper mines have ponre 
out great mineral wealth. Indeed, on more than one occasion South Australia has made onwai 
progress, due to the rich yields of copper from the far-famed Kapunda, Burra Burra, Moonii 
Wallaroo, and other mines. 

South Australia is, with the single exception of Western Australia, the largest in area of tb 
Australian Colonies, and it stretches across the whole island continent frwm south to north. Ii 
southern shores are washed by the Southern Ocoau, whilst the waters of the Indian Ocean bv 
its northern coasts. It touches all the mainland Colonies of Australia, beiog contiguous to 2s\i 
South Wales, Victoria and Queensland on the east, and is bounded on the west by the exten»u 
Colony of Western Australia, extending from lat. 38° to 26'^, between the 121Hh and 14l6t men 
dian of east long., and from lat 26° to tiie northern coast, between the 129th and 139th meridiam 
Running right up through the centre of Australia, it covers an area extending from latilude 3^ 
to latitude 11°, and from the 129th to the Hist meridians of east longitude. Twice since tbi 
establishment of the Colony its limits have been extended. In 1861, a strip of land between tin 



South Australia. 207 

adaricH of South and Western Australin, south of Itit. 26°, was detached from Now South 
es and annexed to Bouth Australia by the Imiwrial Legislature ; and iu 1863, after tho 
enturoua journey of the gallant explorer, Joliu McDonall Stuart, across tho heart of tho 
tmlian continent, tho northern boundary of tlie colony, whicli was originally tlie 26th imniUel 

ititude, was shifted to the northern coast line, thus bringing within licr borders the Inrgo 

now known as " The Northern Territory." 

The area of South Australia (including the Northern Territory) is 578,361,600 acres, an area 
cb affords "ample scope and verge enough" for an extensive populutiou. At the present 
« (Jfinuary, 1886) 10,642,963 acres have been alienated; the remainder being available for 
icultural, pastoral, and mineral settlement. 

The area of mineral land, or laud held under mineral lease, is comparatively small ; so tliai, 
gbly speaking, the whole province may bo divided into country of two classes — agricultural 

(iBgtoral land. Of the alienated land, a very largo proportion is devoted to agriculture, 
ticulture, viticulture, market gardening, and like purposes, whilst tho balance is used almost 
lusivfly for raising sheep and cattle. Tiio lilxiralisution of tho lund lawn, some years ago, 
e an enormous stimulus to agricultural settlement, so that tho area now under wheat is 

cnscly larger than it was. 

Tho following information is from tho Statistical Register for 1884, tlie latest official record. 

Tlie increase of population during the year was, by births 70.")8, by immigration 1208, 

ing the total number on the Slat of December 312,781 persons, composed of 164,877 males, and 
,904 females. Iu 1875 tho population was 210,442, and in 1880 it was 267,573. During tho 
r 1884, 356 foreigners obtained letters of naturalisation, and thereby became British subjects ; 

hcse 44 were Kussians, 136 Germans, 114 Chinese, and the others made up of various nation- 
iea. The proportion of births per thousand of the population was 37 • 69, the proportion of 

riflgcs 9*40 per thousand, and the proportion of deaths 15 "24 per thousand. 

The area of land alienated from the Crown iu 1884 was 10,767,605 acres. In 1875 it was 
le over 6,000,000 acres. Tlie area under cultivation was, in 1875, 1,444,586 acres; in 1884, 
«5,490 acres. The area of land enclo.«€d in 1875, 20,286,007 acres ; in 1884, 53,444,411 acres. 
B production of wheat, the principal crop, was in 1875, 10,739,834 bushels ; in 1884, 14,621,755 
hels. In 1884 there were in the Colony— liorses, 162,420 ; horned cattle, 389,726 ; slieep, 
96,400; goats, 8159; pigs, 163,807; poultry, 927,909. The shipment of wool amounted in 
5 to the value of £2,066,-227 ; in 1884 to £2,618,626. The shipment of minerals amounted iu 
5 to £702,386, in 1884 to £491,950. The production of wine in 1884 was 473,535 gallons. 

The value of imports amounted in 1875 to £4,203,802 ; in 1884, £5,749,353. Tho value of 
wtts amounted in 1875 to £4,805,050 ; in 1884, £6,623,704. The proportion of imports from 

United Kingdom in 1884 was £2,983,296, the balance being from other places. The combined 
)ort and export trade of the Coluny -^as in 1875, £9,008,851 ; in 1884, £12,373,057. 

The arrivals of shipping were in 1884 — British, 708,301 tons ; foreign, 141,034 tons ; total, 

335 tons. The number of veesels belonging to Port Adelaide were — in 1875, steamers, 75, 
mage, 7443; sailing vessels, 212, tonnage, 24,948. In 1884, steamers, 88, tonnage, 10,665 ; 
hng vessels, 220, tonnage, 27,931. 

In 1875 the general revenue of the Colony amounted to £1,143,312; iu 1880 it was 
027,963, and in 1884 it amounted to £2.024,928. The expenditure in 1884 upon public works 
B £2,163,149 ; a large proportion was provided from loan funds. The amounts expended by 
rporations and District Councils was £114,537. The receipts from Government railwaj's were 
ring 1834, £424,416. 

The number of churches or chapels existing in 1884 was 928 ; the number of sittings pro- 
led, 200,1?3; the number of Sunday-schools was 727; teachers, 0729; scholars, 57,311. 

The number of public schools in 1884 was 227 ; scholars, 42,758 ; persons employed in 
iching, 1000. Cost of department, exclusive of expenditure on buildings, £76,879. In addition 
these there are 287 private schools with 11,296 scholars. Thero are over 112 country institutes, 

ich have libraries attached to them containing an aggregate of 98,688 volumes. 
In the year 1884 there were 1035 miles of railway open for traffic. The total i.umber of 
Bsengers conveyed since they havo been open ia 34,194,692. 



208 AdvertiaemenU. 



■ 

,;. ..r, .;,.;,;■ ;;■ ■.,'■■ <f^ ! '.V \: .1. * Ow' -< ,\^''' • 

'."«•-. r.., 1 :•. ' ""U r\': '.r.'.i J ''t/ii 7' ■ .' ■■'■I' '>'■;'. 

JOHN DIGKISON & GO. Lim 

65 OLD BAILEY, LONDON ; 
AND 7 NEW CHINA BAZAR STREET, CALCUTTA| 
HaiifactnTers for INDIA and the COLONIES 

^K. OF EVERY DESCRIPTION OF 

MACHINE-MADE PRINTINGS AND WRITINGS 

PLATE AND LITHO PAPERS, 

HAND-MADE WRITINGS AND PRINTINGS, TINTED WRITINGS] 

CABTRIDQE AND BLOTTINQ PAPERS, SURFACE AND ENAMEL PAPERS, 

CARDS AND CARDBOARDS, BOXED STATIONERY, NOTE PAPE«S 

AND ENVELOPES. 

,,; ,:,.,.- ,.' :,: '■'■ .•'^;t!■ 

r 



South AuitraUit. 



209 



GKOUP L— WORKS OP ART. 

Class 1. 

[Oil rnintingt. 

I. BEXHAM, MISS ANNTB M., 
hildei-fl Street, North Adelaide.— (1) 
rum Lilies, with old jug and fruit. (2) Fruit- 
ece— Pomegranate, &c (3) Start Pea. 

3. BOARD OP aOVERNORS, Pub- 
Library, Museum, and Art Qallery. 

Oil r.iiiitiugs by E. GouUiHmith. (1) Mom- 
g Scene on the Onkaparinga. (2) Marine 
lew, Port Adelaide. 

3. DAVENPOBT, SIR S., Beaumont. 

Oil Painting by R. H. Shaw : " Preparing for 
[>)rrobboree." (In the biuhnian's hut.) 

^. JAQOE, R., Semaphore.— Painting 
Fiflli ciiuglit at Kangaroo iHliind; very rare; 
pposed to be of Wrasse B|>ecieB. 

5, MILLER, MRS. K. ST. BARBE, 

"jaumont. — (1) Morning View 00 Ookapa- 
gn. (2) Evening View on Onkaperinga. 

S. SMART, MRS. R. K., Norwood.— 

I Paintinjr, " Eagle Hawk." 

WOODHOUSE, HERBERT J., 
UTie Street, Adelaide.— Two Oil Paint- 



ROWAN, MRa, London.— Painting 

South Australian Hora. Lent by the Ex- 
)itor to tlie South Australian Commission. 

STBAWBRIDQE, MRS.— Drawings 
the flora of Kangaroo Island, S.A. 



Class 2. 

Water Colours and Drawings. 

BROAD, ALFRED SCOTT, Han- 

L Street, Adelaide.— Water Ck)lour Paint- 

COMMISSIOITBRS FOR SOUTH 

JSTRALIA.— (1) Viow of Adelaide from 
lean near western end of Strangways Ter- 
B, North Adelaide, looking oouth-e^^s't. (2) 
w of King William Street, Adelaide (the 
icipal street of the city;, looking north. 



3- DAVENPORT, SIR a -Drawings 
illustrutiTO of the Anatomy of the Gmpo. 

4. ESAM, ARTHUR. — Two eketchet. 
" Australian Coaching." 

5. JOYNEB, W. O. P.~niuminated 
Addrora. 

6. SELIJ3, REV. A., M.A., Mitoham. 
— Tw< nty-fo'ir Water-Cobar Sketches of South 
Aui«tralian Scenery. 

7. SMITH. E. T.. M.P.. MarryatvlUe. 
—-* Group of South Australian Flowers," by 
M i£8 FiTeash. 

Class 3. 

Scttlplure^ Statuary, Artislie Modelling. 

1. COMMISSIONERS FOR SOUTH 
AUSTRALIA — (1) Plaster ca,i of MulU- 
way fishes. (2) Plaster cast uf South Australian 
fi-«he« (painted, natural tints, by A Sanpe). (3) 
Wax modela o*" Fruits grown in South Australia 
(made by Mrs. Grav, Melbo'irue Street, North 
Adelaide). (4) Plaster Casts of Merino Bam, 
and oue double profile cast of same. 

2. KENNEDY, WTLIiIAM, Noar- 
lunga — Carvin? on slate bv a self-taught 
workman, " Old England and the New." 

3. SAUPE, AUGUST, Adelaide.- (1) 
Bust of Sir W. P. D. Jervois, G.C.M.G., C.B.. 
ex-Govemor of South Australia. (2) Medal- 
lion of the Hon. Sir Henrv Avers, K.C.M.6., 
President I>>gislative Council. ' (3) Meditllion 
of late Kev. Jame;i Wav, Ltil.le Christian Minis- 
ter. (4) Medallion of Dr. Way. (5; Medallion 
of the late Dr. Charlf>3 Goese. (0) Hoh-relief 
copy of ThorwaHseti :* "John the Baptist preach- 
ing in the Wilderaess." 



Class 4. 

Photograph*. 

1. ANDERSON, GEORGE, Engineer 
and Manager of SourJi Australian Gas- 
Works.— Photographs of the Company's Gas 
works at Brompton, and other towns. 

2. ANGAS, JOHN HOWARD, Col- 
lingrove, Angaston.— (1) Photographs of 
Stock bred at Hill Biver Sfcition. (2) Pl~*o- 
graph of Prize Bam "Her-ulet*," for v„... 
1,150 guineas was paid by Exhibitor. 



lEOANT PKESENTS In every Style and Description of LSATHEIt BINDINGS 
and In New HECrlSTBSBD CASKS. ' ' 

M Prayer Books, *iu. or «m Hpns, A. and M. 

''8^111.'"'^"^ .'' *'"'*•' ?''*''* ^*^""* Bifdintcs added to the welt-known sap-riorlty of the Oxf-rd printed books, places 
Bpocim,r,s uf tasie and .ngc.iu.ty much abovo .be ordimuy standard of S. eentiitun Prajer Bui^X^S^ 

AT ATiTi BOCKS EIjIjERS*. 

London: HENBY FEOWDE. Oxford UniveraiJy Prca Warehouse, Amen Comer, E.O. 



210 



Souih AuBtralia. 



3. BROWN, H. Y. L., P.L.S., (Jovern- 
ment OeologlBt, Adelaide.— (1) Photo- 
grapim illuatrativo of Gcolofciciil features of 
South Australia. (2) PliotoKraplis illuutrating 
traoea o' "kcial action at Hallett'a Cuvo. 

4. COMMISSIONERS FOR SOUTH 
AUSTRALIA. — (1) Opnl pictures (by J. 
Hftininor, Kundlo Street! representing nnturul 
Bize fruits grown in tho colony. (2) Photo- 
graphs representing fruit and flower trees grown 
in South Australia Those arc shown in the 
handsome photograph stand desif^nod bvMr. E. 
J. Woods, Architect-in-Chiof. (3) Albums of 
photographs (by Cap'aiu Sweet) of scenes in 
South Australia; ptib.J works and buildings, 
private residences (interiors and exteriors), &o. 
(4)Albura of photographa (taken by tiie Govern- 
ment Printing Department) of public works and 
buildings, &c. 

5. DUNCAN & FRASER, Franklin 

Street, Adelaide.— I'hotographs of Railway 

Carriages, Tramciirs, Carriages, and other 
vehicles made by Exhibitors. 

6. FOELSCHE, PAUL, Palmerston, 

Northern Territory.— Set Views of Northern 
Territory Scenery. 

7. GEORGE & WALTON, Rundle 
Street, Adelaide.— (1) Six Frames of Photo- 
graphs of celebrities. (2) StRn<l (Gleopatra- 
noedle shape) with miscellauoous portraite. 

8. KRICHAUFF, P. C, Norwood.— 

Photographs of South Australian scenery, prin- 
cipally Views on the River Murray. 

9. LINDSAY, R., Carron Iron Works, 
Port Adelaide. — Photographs of 20- h. p. 
compound-surface condensing engines made in 
the colony by Exhibitor for the Marine Board of 
South Australia. 

la PRINCE, GEORGE, Mitchain.— 
Frame containing four Photographs of Mitcbam 
(by Captain Sweet). 

11. SCHOMBURGK, DR., Director 
of Botanic Gardens, Adelaide.— Views of 
Botanic Gardens (taken by Captain Sweet). 

12. SOUTH AUSTRALIAN CHAM- 
BER OF MANUFACTURES (INCOR- 
PORATED), Adelaide.— Photographs of 
various Industrial Exhibitions held in con- 
nection with the Chamber. 



13. 8TOTT, J. W., Alma.— (1) Pho 

graphs of Stump-iuraping Ploughs and 8a 
flers mndo by Exhil)itor— the orininnl miit 
(2) Photographs of Implements used in hot 
Australian husbandry. 

14. SWEET, MRS. S. W., Arcada, A( 
laide. — Six Frames, each containing 
Mounted Photographs. 

15. SUTHERLAND, GEORGE, i 
gas Street, Adelaide. — Engravings 
Prints pro<luoed by tho new process of ty 
photography, invented by Exhinitor. 

16. TODD, CHARLES. C.M.G.. Po 
master General, and Suporintend« 
of Telegraphs.— Photographs of Gem 
Post Office. 

17. WARREN, GEORGE, Springflel 
Mount Crawford.- -Photographs ofcoiim 
in interior of Australia, and Photogniphi 
country in District of Barossa. 

18. SCOTT, H. i., Norwood, B.i, 
Photographs of Mob of Camels imported 
Exhibitor. 

Class 6. 
Architectural Drawings and Model*. 

1. ELDER, SIR THOMAS.— Elevatp 

of Rcsidoncn at Mount Lofty, about teu mil 
from Adelaide, at an elevation of 2,OC0 ft, "^ 
sea level. 

2. QARLICK, D., & SON, Arcl 
tects, Adelaide. — Perspective Views 
Buildings erected from designs by Exhibit! 

3. WOODS, E. J., Architect-in-ChJ 
Adelaide.- Front Elevation of New Pari 
ment Buildings, in course of erection in A( 
laide, South Australia. Basement of gr«ni 
superstructure of marble ; both local matcrii 

4. MURRAY, A. J., Morlalta Chai 
bers, Adelaide. — Perspective View of 
Public Building. ^.^^^^^^^ 

Class 6. 

Engravings, Lithographt, (tr. 

I. SOUTH AUSTRALIAN OHA 
BER OF MANUFACTURES, In« 
porated, Adelaide. — (1) lUustralions 
Work by J. E. Brown, Esq., F.L.S., OoD=ei 
tor of Forests, on •' Tree Culture," litliogrsp 



SIR JOHN BENNETT, 65 & 64, Oheapside, London. 
Watch, Clock, and Jewellery Manufacturer, by Appointment to Her Majestj 

SILVER KEYLESS LEVER, in strong crystal glass case, jewelled in 13 aotiona, A serti 

•ble, accurate wad reliable Watch. £S, £4 , 

THE "OHEAPSIDE" SILVER KEYLESS J-PLATE LEVER, in atrongcrystalj 
cue. JeweUed in 13 actiona, chronometer balance dr, (Ump «od dwt tight; the cbe«pe«t Watch ever prw 
U, U, £T. 



South AiuUnlia, 



211 



tho Govornmont rrintinp Office, Adelaide. 
) Artiut's Dc«ign for Certificate of Merit, and 
ocoBses rf reproduotioii by lithography, by J. 

Sherring & Co. Nine platis in put'tt'oiio. 

2. SPILLBR, E., Government Printer, 
delaide. — SjM'cmenH of Iiithn;;raphy, 
iroino-iilbography, and Photo-lithography. 



Class 7, 

Mngloal and Literary Compmitiong, 

1. ANDBBWS, MRS. H. J., North 
lielaide.— Original Musical Coinpoaitions, 

2. BLACKMORB, E. G., Clerk AssIr- 
nt and SerReant-at-Arma, House of 
isembly, Adelaide.— Decisions of Uight 
Ml. the Speaker of JIoubo of Commona. 

R. COMMISSIONERS FOR SOUTH 
rSTRAIilA. — (1) Handbook of Routh 
istrftlia, prepared by John Fairfax Conigrave. 
) Hiblingraphy of South Auutralia, prepared 
■^Thomas Gill. 

|. GIBBS, J. G., Worth Road.— (1) 

iitiita, "l*riiico.s3 Alice." (2) Cantata, 
'houghti on tho Sondan." 

|. OEOORAPHICAIi SOCIETY OP 

JSTRAIiASIA (South Australian 

anoh).— Keports of the Society. 

J. GOVERNMENT GEOLOGIST 
R. H. Y. K BROWN, P.L.S.). — Re- 

rtd of Geological Deporlmeut. 

J. HAMILTON, E. W., Protector of 
wrigines, Adelaide.— <1) South Anstra- 
u Aboriginal Folklore, by late Bev, J. G. 
plin. (2) Tho Booandik Tribe of South 
istrulian Aborigines, by Mrs. James Smith. 
) The Deeyerie Tribe of Sonth Austiitlian 
lorigines. by T. Gason. (4) Manners and 
stnnu of the Aboritrines of Kncountor Bay, 
E. A. Myer. (5) Wonini-Pcpa Dieri Jau- 
i Worapala fa first reading book of Far 
•rth natives), by J. Fliert. 

HARDY, THOMAS, Bankside 

neyard, near Adelaide. — Notes on 
neyardd in America and Europe. 

I. MARSHALL, S., & SONS, Ruddle 
wet, Adelaide. — Musical Compositions 
■^lished by Exhibitors. 

0. SCHOMBURGK, R., Ph.D., Di- 

3tor of Botanic Gardens. — Reporta of 

tame Gardiii, Ad.laide. 

I.WORSNOP, THOMAS, Town 
M*K, Adelaide.— <1) History of the City 
Adelaide. (2) Guide Book to Adelaide. 



Class 8. 

Maps, Diagraim, &e,. 

I. BROWN, H. Y. L., P.G.8., Gov- 
ernment Geologist.— Mineralogieal Map of 
South Australia. Tlio coloured discs on the 
map are intended to indicate tho chief localities 
where metals liave been discovurcd and mined : 
Gold, vellow; copper, vermillion; silver-load, 
blue. Tho rock formations are indicated on the 
map as under:— Po»t Tertiary and Tertiary, by 
a green tint ; Cretaceous and Oolitic, by a 
brown tint : Silurian and Devonian, by a purple 
tint; Silurian Limestone, by a blue tint; 
Highly Metamorphic, by a purple tint with red 
bars ; Plutonic, by a pink tint ; Volcanic, by a 
rod tint. 

2. COMMISSIONERS FOR SOUTH 

AUSTRALIA. — Plan of Public School, 
Hindmarsli, near Adelaide ; drawn in Architect- 
in-Chiefs Department. 

3. CORPORATION OP THE CITY 
OP ADELAIDR— Photo-llthographed copy 
of Cadastral Survey Plans of the City of 
Adelaide, compiled from notes of Trigonometri- 
cal Survey made under tho direction of Mr. 
Charles \V. Smith, A.M.I.C.K., Hydraulic En- 
gineer's Department, Adelaide, ,,>!.) J, 

4. GOYDER, G. W., Sxirveyor-CJene- 
ral, Adelaide.— (1) Map of Adelaide and 
Subi.r s. (2) Map of South Austialia, show- 
ing lands alienate<l and lea-ed. counties, hun- 
dreds, railways, telegraphs, lighthouses, jetties, 
&c. 

GROUP II.— EDUCATION AND 
INSTRUCTION. 

Class 1. 

Scholastic E»tabli»hmentt for Primary, Secon 
dary, and Superior Education. 

I. HARTLEY, J. A., B.A., B.Sc, 
Inspector- General of Schools. — Ap- 
pliances, &c., used in public ^chool8. (1) 
Arithmetical Diagrams. (2) Map of South 
Australia (large). (3) Map of Australia. C4) 
Notation Box. (5) Co.at of "Course of In- 
struction." (6) Time-tables. (7) Calendar. 
(8) Programme of Lessons. (9) Two sets 
Education Gazette. 



Class 2. 



jtiijiti- 



Educational Appliances and Accetsorieg. 

I. BRUCE, J. D., Superintendent, 
Poonindie Native Institution. — (1) 
Three Paintings, in cone (nimes made by 
alKiriginals. (2) One Small Cone Cottage. (3) 
Cone Brackets. (4j Writing done by native 
children. All these are the work of nativies 
attending the Institvtion. 

r 2 



212 



South Australia. 



2. THREADQOLD, W. J., College 
Park. — *' Thr Gospel Ship ; " picture being an 
a11e;;ori('al representation of Religion and 
Chriatianity. This is intended purely as an 
educational object lesson. 



GROUP III.— APPARATUS AND 
PROCESSES CONNECTED 
WITH THE LIBERAL ARTS. 

Class 1. 

Print ing and Typography. 

1. BASEDOW, BIMER, & CO., Ade- 
laide.— The 38th Annual Volume of the 
AiL-^tralische Zeitung, a weekly German news- 
paptr, published every Wednesday morning, 
in Adelaide. 

2. BURDEN & BONYTHON, Ade- 
laide- — Bound copies (for year 1885) of South 
Australian Advertiser, South Australian Chro- 
nide, and the Express and Telegraph. 

3. DAVENPORT, SIR S., Beaumont* 
—(1) "South Australia," illustrated by George 
French Angas. (2) " Ampelographie," by 
Rendu. 

4. MOLINEXTX, A., Adelaide.— Bound 
volumes of Garden and the Field. 

5. MURPHY, C. A., Adelaide.— (1.) 

Bound volumes of the Lantern, a weekly satirical 
newspaper. (2) Collection of Cartoons pub- 
lisheil in the Ixiitern 

6. THOMAS, W, K., & CO.— Bound 
volumes ot S.A. Register, Adelaide Observer, and 
Evening Journal, for 1885. 

7. TODD, C, C.M.G., Postmaster- 
General and Superintendent of Tele- 
graphs.— Reprint of Postage Stamps issued in 
Houth Australia. 

8. SPILLER,E., Government Printer, 
Adelaide. — Letterpress, Lithography, Photo- 
lithojjiaphy and Chromo-lithography. 

Class 2. 

Boolibinding, Riding, Stationery, etc. 

I. ANDREWS, W. B. T., Registrar- 
General, Adelaide.— Set of Documents and 
Deeds iliuslrativu of operations in transfer of 
real property, under Real Property Act, known 
as ToiTciis's Act, an enactment first passed in 
South Australia. 



2. SPIIjIjER,E., Government Printe 
Adelaide.' — Account Books and Lettcrprea. 

3. WHILLAS & ORMISTON, Plii 
ders Street, Adelaide.— Presentation A 

dress Case. 

Class 3. 

Worl: !n Wood, Engraving, Turnery,, Toinery,( 

1. ADAMS, EDWARD ARTHU 
Hindmarsh Square, Adelaide.— Mod* 
of Cooperage Work, made by Exhibitor. 

2. CHAMBERS, A. O., Plinde 
Street, Adelaide.— Patent Washing Machii 
"ThePerfert Cure." 

3. COMMISSIONJirRS FOB SOUT 
AUSTRALIA.— (1) Specimens of Turu« 
from indigenous timbers. (2) Photograph Sbm 
designed by Mr. E. J. Woods, Arcliitecti 
Chief, and made to order by Messrs. MuDougi 
and Gow, of Adelaide. Tliis piece of furnitun 
mafle from South Austnilian blackwood— t 
metal brackets are manufiictured from 8o« 
Australian copper and Northern Territory 

(3) Cereals Stand, madfe by Messrs. McDoap 
an<l Gow, from South Australian blackwo 

(4) Table for wax models of fruit, made 
Messrs, Duncan and Eraser, from South .\i 
traliaii blackwood. (5) Tables for exhibit* 
Government Geologist, made by Messrs. 31 
and Co., from South Australian blackwo 
Northern Territory sandalwood, and milkwo 
(6) Wool cases for fleeces, front frames mi 
from South Australian blackwood and Northf 
Territory milkwood. 

4. HALES, HARRY, 53 CurrieStaree 
Adelaide. — Specimens of Turnery in Sod 
Australian woods— Walking Sticks, Cups, 4c 

K. HARVEY, S., and KING, WII 
LIAM, Flinders Street, Adelaide. 
Bcutwood from Australian tiraberi. 

6. KNAPTON BROS., Hindman 

Square, Adelaide.— Specimens of Tuna 
in Native Woods, Walking Sticks, Cup8,U«t 
&c. 

7. SCHROEDER, P. W. G., Low 

North Adelaide.— One dozen Walking Stic 
turned and carved from South Australian blai 
woml (9 Sticks) and olive woud, grown in t 
colony (,3 sticks). 



BARTON & CO., WINE & SPIRIT MERCHANTS & SHIPPER 

WEST END 0FFICE8-59, ST. JAMES* STREET, LONDON, S.W. 



Full Particulars on application. 



ghipments made to the Colonies and all parts of the world, on lowest Cash Tonni, 
BABTON & C0.'9 Bonded Stocks, which include the choicest vintages and lelectiona 



South Ausiratid. 



213 



i. WELLBOUBlfE, T. P., QilleB 
Teet, Adelaide. — Patent Propeller Dash 
lurus. 

Class 4. 

Uathematical and Philosophical Instruments. 

I. TEATE8, HORATIO, Pidteney 
reet, Adelaide. — (1) Small Induction Coil. 
) ImproveJ ibrm of Magneto-Electric Ma- 
icea, one in box and one under shade. 

Class 6. 

UlapSt Statistical Diagranu, &c. 

I. BROWN, H.YX., P.Ij.S., Govem- 
ent (Geologist, Adelaide. — Map ehowing 
) niiueral rusouTcca and discoveries of the 
ony, coloured. 

!. GKJYDBR, O. W., Surveyor- 
neral, Adelaide. — (1) Plan showing 
elaide, Port Adelaide, and surrounding 
ma and villages, railways, tramways, rescr- 
rs, 4c. (2) General Plan of South AtiBtralia, 
lading the Northern Territory), showing 
d land, pastoral leases, and explorers' routes, 
h descriptions. (3) Map of southern part of 
?incf, showing counties, hundreds, railways, 
egrapbri, lighthouses, jetties, &c. 

J. HARTLEY, J. A., B.A., B.Sc, 
ipeetor-Qeneral of Schools. — Maps and 
" used in Education Department. 

JONES, J. W., Conservator of 
iater, Adelaide. — ^Map showing the opem- 
D8 of Water Departiutnt. 



ROUP IV. — TEXTILE 
FABRICS, CLOTHINQ, AND 
ACCESSOBIES. 

Class 1. • • ' 

Woollen Fabrics, 

|1. SOUTH AUSTRALIAN 

OOLLEN FACTORY, Limited, 
JbethaL— Tweed*. 

Class 2. 
Clothing, 

I. PARKER & CO., King William 
Ireet, Adelaide.— Shirts, Collars, and Cuflfs. 

Class 3. 

Silk. 

1. CLELAND, dr. W. L., Resident 
sdical Officer, Parkside Lunstio 
Bylvim.— Silkworm cocoons. 



Class 4. 

Rope, 

1. HARRIS, G. P., SCARPE & CO., 
Gawler Place, Adelaide. — Manilla Rope. 

Class 6. 

Jeteellery, Watchmaking, dx. 

I. BRXTNKHORST, A. L., Rundid 
Street, Adelaide. — Silver Goods, Jewellery, 

&c. 

a. DAVIS, J. W., Rundle Street, 
Adelaide.— Silver Goods, Jewellery, &o. 

3. LORRAINE, P. J., King William 
Street, Adelaide.— Tweuty-lbur-hom Clock, 
of special construction. 

A. WENDT, J. IS.., Rundle Street, 
Adelaide. — Silver Goods, Jewellery, &c.. 
Silverware, Emu Egg Ornaments, and Malachite 
Ornaments. 



GROUP v.— RAW AND 
MANUFACTURED PRODUCTS. 

Class 1. 
Specimens of Forest Trees. 

1. BROWN, J. B., J.P., P.L.S.,P.R.O.S., 

Conservator of Porests, Adelaide. — 
(Jollection of Indigenous Timbers and Forest 
Flora. 

FORESTRY EXHIBIT OF SOUTH 
AUSTR.VLIA. 

BROWN, J. E., P.L.S., J.P.. p.R.a.a. 

Conservator of Forests, Adelaide— A 
work upon "The Forest Flora of South 
Australia " is now being published by the Ex- 
hibitor in quarterly parts. Each part contains 
five plates and corresponding descriptive matter. 
All the printing and lithographing in connec- 
tion with the book is done in the eAtablishment 
of the Government printer, Aiieluide. It is 
expected that the work, wliea completed, will 
consist of about tliirty parts. Of those issued, 
plates are shown iu frames upon the top of the 
trophy. 

2. COMMISSIONERS FOR SOUTH 
AUSTRALIA. — MyaU Wood, turned into 
pipes, kc 

3. DUNN, JOHN, Movmt Barker.— 
Iletlgura Plank, 15 ft. by 8 ft. by 2Jin.; also 
piece of sama French poltahed. 

4. GOVERNMENT RESIDENT 
(HON. J. L. PARSONS), Palmerston. 
Northern Ten'itory. — Herbarium Specimens 
of Timbers of Northern Territory, collected by 
Maurice HoUzo.- 



214 



South Atutralta. 



5. RAMSAT, J. G., & CO., Mount 
Barker. — Blocks of indigenous Tiiubt-r — 
Blackwood, Redgum, and Sheooak, forming 
stand for model of stripping machine. 



faisiir-i' 



Class 2. 



.B0>5tH IffiV/. 



Tannim) Materiuh. 

1. MOFFIjIN & CO., Cxirrie Street, 
Adelaide. — Mimosa Bark for Tanning. 

2. PPLAUM, P., & CO., Blumberg.— 

Ground Mimoiiu Bark. 

3. BEID, JOHN, & SONS, Hind- 
marsh. — Mimosa Burk. 

A. TATE, PROPESSOB TCATiPH, 
F.G-.S., Adelaide University. — Wattle 
Bark, and other illustrations of the industry. 

5. WILLIS, H., & CO.— Mimosa Bark. 

6. SCRIVEN BROTHERS, Hind- 
marsh. — Mimosa Bark. 

7. PEACOCK, W., & SONS, Hind- 
marsh. — Shecpukius tanned with Honeysuckle 
Bark. 



8. BORROW 

Tannin in liquid. 



& HAYCRAFTS. — 



t) \ 



Class 3. 

Pr-jduds of Hunting, Sfiooting, and Fishing, Jcc. 

X. COMMISSIONERS POR SOUTH 
AUSTRALIA.— (1) Ouo Leopard Sealskin. 
(2) Emu Eggs. (3) Ostrich Egga. (4) 
Native Peach Stones. 

2. DAVENPORT, SIR S., Beaumont. 

— Emu skins ; tuft of Emu Feathers ; tuft of 
Eagle Feathers ; Lizard Skin , Dinjeo Skin ; 
1 1 Emu Eggs ; 2 Ostrich Eggs ; GraBstrcc 
Flower Sterna; package S.dtbush Twigs; 
Native Peach Stones (3 varieties); wreatli of 
Everlasting Flowers from Caroona, Gawler 
BangcB ; Fossil Leaf of Eucalyptus, q . . 

Class 4. 

Aquatic Plants, du 

HAWKER, HON., Q. C, M.P., "The 

Briers," Midindie.— Collection of Seaweeds 
from Encounter Bay, South Australia (in port- 
folio), collected and moimted by the Exhibiior. 



Class 5. 
Wool and Pastoral Products, 

1. ANOAS, J. H., CoUingrove, 
ga^ton. — (1) Blerino ram (stuff ■*), bred 
Hill River Station. (2) Merinr .e (stuff« 
bred on Hill Biver Station. (3 Jlerino ki 
(stuffed), bred on Hill River station. ( 
Lincoln ram (stuffed), bred at Collingn) 
Station. (5) Lincoln ewo (staffed), bred 
CoUingrove Station. (6) Case of Wool SamiJ 
from Merino and Lincoln sheep. Number 
sheep shorn last season, G5,100. 

2. ANDERSON, JAMES, Whitt 
River, Port Lincoln. — One bale of Wc 
and eight Fleeces from Merino rums on Bai 
Station. Number of bheep shorn last seaa 
25,000. 

3. BOWMAN, EDMUND, Marti 
dale, Mlntaro. — Two bales of Merino Wi 
in the Grease, and eight Fleect-s from Men 
ewes on Martindnle Stiitiou. Number of shet 
shorn lust season, 9150. 

4. BOWMAN, E. & C. W., Wandlllal 
— Two bales of Merino Wool in the Grease,! 
eight Fleercs from Muiiuo ewes on Wan<iil!i 
and Mount Bryan Stations. Number of ahei 
shorn last season, 31,900. 

5. BRUCE, J. D., Port Llncoln.-Oi 
Fleece from a Merino owo at Poonindie Xatii 
Institution. Number of sheep shorn lastseSM 
2000. 

6. CROZIER, WILLIAM, Adelaidi 

— Six Fleeces from Merino ewes on Moon 
Station. Number of sheep shorn lust Kism 
C2,U00. 

7. ELDER, SIR THOMAS, Adelaide 

(1) Nine Fleeces from Merino ewes on Btl 
tana Station, 70,000 shee]) shorn laat 8»ia*i 

(2) Nine Fleeces from Merino sheep 011 Cordill 
Station, 35,000 sheep shorn last season. (J 
Nine Fleeces from Mount Lyndurst Stalioi 
89,000 sheep shorn last season. 

8. HAWKER, HON. Q. C, M.P., Bm 

garee.— (1) EigUt Merino Ewes' P'leeces. (S 
Samples of Wool cut from Stud Rums. (3) Si 
Fleeces from Merino ewes. (4) Six Flet« 
from Merino rams, bred on Buuguree Statioi 
Number of sheep shorn last aeason, 75,000. 



HOWARD & SONS, otiismL 

MAKERS OF ENGLISH PARQUET 

OLEVELAUD W0BE3 ; and at 25, 26, 27, BERNIRS STBEEI, t 



South Australia. 



215 



9, HOGARTH & WABBEN, Mount 
rawford.— (1 ) Two bales of scoured Merino 
ool, and eight Fleeces Merino Wool from their 
ck. (2) Two bales of Merino Wool scoured, 
iJ foar Fleeces from Merino sheep on Strang- 
iv8 Sj)ring8 Station. Number of sheep shorn 
It season, 22,000. 

la KEYiraiS, B. R., Keyneton.— (1) 
gbt Slcrino Wool Fleeces. (2) Four Fleeces 
»m Merino rams. (3) Four Fleeces from 
erino ewes on Keyneton Station. Number uf 
eep shorn last season, 12,300. 

11. MURRAY, HON. A. B., MagiU. 

(1) Merino ewe (stuffed). (2) Twelve Fleeces 
)m Merino ewes on Wirrabara Station. Num- 
rot «/m{ sheep shorn by Exhibitor last season, 
00. 

12. MURRAY, JOHN, Murray Vale, 
oimt Crawford. — (1) Six Jlerino Fleeces 
m rams bred on Mount Crawford Station, 
uinber of sheep shorn last season, 27,000. 
) Six Merino Fleeces from wethers and ewes 

Capidda Station. Number of sheep shorn 
it season, 27.000. 

13. PRICE, MAURICE, Castambul, 
ar Adelaide. — (1) Eight Angora Fleeces 
essed. Mirket Brand " Castambul 1st Lustre." 
) Eight Angora Goat Skin Blats. (3) Group 
\ngora Goats (stuffed). 

14. RIDDOCH, JOHN, Yallum, near 
enola, — (1) Pure Merino Ham and Ewe 
luffed). (2) Two Merino Fleeces. (3) Six 
leeces from Merino rams, bred at Yallum 
ation. (4) Six Fleeces from Merino ewes, 
amber of sliecp shorn last year, G0,000, 

IS ROBERTSON, JOHN, Gtolden 

rove.— (1) Two Fleeces from Merino rama. 
i) Two Flef'ces from INTerino ewes, bred on 
olden Grove Station. Number of sheep ahom 
3t season, 2500. "'-' «-"- ' \""i^', ' '„/,, -y 

16. ROUNSEVELL, JOHN, Ado- 
ide. — (1) Case containing samples of 
enno Wool taken from sheep ranging in ago 
om one to four years ; ewes and rams. (2) 
our Fleeces from Merino sheep, bred on the 
lation, Corryton Park. Number of sheep shorn 
£t season, 3000. 

17. SALTER, B., Angaston.— <1) Four 
leeces from pure Merino sheep, bred on Mamre 
rook. Number of sheep shorn last season, 
WO. 

18. SANDERS, JAMES, & CO., Oa- 

owie. — (I) Merino Ram, Canowio bred 
luffed); 2 years old; bred by Exhibitors at 
»owie, 125 miles north of Adelaide; pad- 
•cked and grass-fed only ; 54,000 sheep shorn 
' Exhibitors last season, and averagejwoight of 
seces, 9 lbs. 12 J oz. (2) Bales of Merino Wool. 
') Eight Merino Fleeces from stud rams, bred 
I Canowie Station. Number of fhoep shorn 



last season, 54,000, and the average weight of 
fleeces was 9 lbs. 12J o.s. 

19. SEFPELT, B.,, Seppeltsfield, near 

Qreenook. — (1) Six pure bred Merino Fleeces 
from Seppeltsfield Station, near Greenock, S. A. 
Number of sheep shorn hist season, 738. 

20. SMITH & SWAN, Fowler's Bay, 
Adelaide. — (1) Two Merino Ewes' Fleeces; 
weight, 13^ lbs.; two years. (2) Two Fleeces 
of pure Merino sheep, bred an Fowler's Bay 
Station. Average number of sheep shorn yearly 
is 120,000 ; and the average weight of fleeces 
is 7 lbs. 10 oz. _ _. 

21. STIBLING, MESSRS. E. O. & J. 
L., Nalpa, Adelaide. — (1) Bale of Wool. 

(2) Eight unskirted Fleeces of Merino Wool. 

(3) One bale of Merino Wool in the grease. 

(4) Eight Fleeces of Merino Sheep, bred on 
Nalpa and Highland Valley Stations. (6) Ouo 
sample case of Wool specimens. Number of 
sheep shorn last season, 9769. 

22. DUFFIELD & MAKIN, Adelaide. 
— (1) Four Fleeces Merino Wool, from Sheep 
bred on Koonoona Station. (2) Two Bales 
Merino Wool in the Grease. 

23. CIiELAND, MBS. J. P., Beau- 
mout. — White Kangaroo Skin Muff. 

24. ELDER, SIB THOMAS, Birks- 
gate, near Adelaide. — Two Camels (stuffed) 
bred in South Australia. 

2S MALCOLM'S OSTBIOH PABM- 
ING CO., Limited, Gawler and Port 
Augusta.— (1) Ostriches bred in South 
Australia. (2) Ostrich Feathers, Eggs, &o. 

26. REID, JOHN, & SONS, Hind- 
marsh. — Wool Mats. 

27. SOHLORK, P. H., & CO., Gawler 
Place, Adelaide. — (1) Specimens of South 
Australian Wool, dyed in various colours. (2) 
Mats, &c., from South Australian wools. 

28. WATSON, J. J., Adelaide.--Ram'8 
Head encrusted with Salt. Bones, sticks, and 
other articles placed in salt ]|^ns in some 
portions of the Colony become speedily 
encrusted with saline particles, which form 
into beautiful crystals similar to the speci- 
men. 



.(inua 



Class 0. 



Leatlter, Skins, Furs, dkc. 

1. COMMISSIONERS FOB SOUTH 
AUSTBALIA.— (1) Furs and Skins of 
Native Animals, and Manufactures therefrom, 
including rugs, mats, duchesses, capes, muffs, 
caps, &o., made by Mr. S. Lawrance, Adelaide, 
and Mr. H. Lush, Kingston. (2) Stuffed 
Specimens of Kangaroos, Emus, Wallabies, 
Dingoes, and other Native Animals. 



216 



South Atutratia. 



2. DOWIB, ALEXANDER, Hind- 
marsh. — Leather. 

3. aiDDINGS, W. J. P., Norwood, 
South Australia. — Flowers made from 
Native Birds' Feathers. 

4. HELD, JOHN, & SONS, Hind- 
marsh.— Leather. 

c SCHIiORK, P. H., & CO., Gawler 
Place, Adelaide.— South Australian Ostrich 
Feathers, dressed, curled, and dyed. 

d. SCIIIVEN BROTHERS. Commer- 
cial Tannery, Hindmarsh. — Drcssiug 
Leather. 

7. WILLIS, H., Hindmarsh.— Leather. 

8. PEACOCK, W., & SONS, Hind- 
marsh. — Sheepskins Tanned with Honey- 
suckle Bark. , 

Class 7. , •, , ,,;,;vp; 

Vegetable Productt. ' 

t. GOVERNMENT RESIDENT 
(HON. J. L. PARSONS), Palmerston, 
Northern Territory. — (1) Gum Arabic. 
(2) Gum Acacia. 

2. HARDY, ARTHUR, M.P., Mount 
Lofty. — Cork (^Quercus suberoea), grown at 
Mount Lofty. 

3. MOPPLIN, W., Si CO., Currie 
Street, Adelaide.— Gums. 

Class 8. 
Climnical and Fharmaceiitical Products. 

1. BARTON Ss CO., Haoknoy, near 
Adelaide. — (1) Baking and other Powders. 
(2) Brunswick Block. 

2. BICKPORD, A. M., & SONS, 

Currie Street, Adelaide.— (I) Six dozen 
Cough Elixir. (2) Six dozen Sea Spray. 

3. BRADDOCE & SONS, Brompton, 
near Adelaide.— (1) Samoka Printing Inks. 
(2) Gold La<i|Jaer. (S) Pure Benzole. (4) 
Eucalyptus OiL 

4. LOWRY, MICHAEL, Gawler 
River. — (1) Annealing Fluid for softening 
cast iron. (2) Boiler Fluid, to prevent incrus- 
tation onstcaui boilers (18-gnllon cask). 



5. SEPPELT, B., Seppeltaflelj 
Greenock.- -CI) Spirits of Wine, the prodn 
of South Australian grapes; strength 6d'o 
over proof. (2) Extract of Wattle Flowerg, fo 
perfumery purposes. 



...; Class 9. 

Tobacco. 

1. ARMBRUSTER & UHLMAWI 
Rimdle Street, Adelaide.— Tobacco 
Oigars made in the Colony. 

2. DIXSON, ROBERT, & CO.,Ligh 
Square West, Adelaide. — Manufacture 
Tobaccos. 

Class 10. 

■ ?., •!'. ■:^- Tallow. 

MOPPLIN, W., & CO., Currie Street 
Adelaide. — Tallow. 



Class 11. 

Portable Weapons, and Hunting and Shootini 
Equipments. 

1. BOAPJD OP GOVERNOEal 
PUBLIC LIBRARY, &c.— Native Mi n 
or Wurley, with figures of aboriginal 
lubra, and piccaninny. 

2. COM'JfflSSIONERS POR SCUTE 
AUSTRALIA.— (1) Figure of Aborigia 
in Primitive Canoe, Spearing Fish, modelle 
from life, by Mr. A. Saup(>. (2) Figure 
Aboriginal m iking Fire by Friction, modelle 
from lite, by Mr. A. Saupe. (3) Naiive Basketi 
and Native Mats. (4) Spears from the Northoi 
Territory. 

r DAVENPORT, SIR S., Beaumont 
— ^Native Baskets. 

4. JONES, J. W., Conservator 01 
Water, Adelaide. — Collection of Native 
Weapons. (1) 7 boomerangs and 4 spears 
from Diainantina, north-east corner of the pro 
viuce. (2) U boomerangs ; 1 bhield ; 3 slipper 
for concealing track; 1 bag containing cbarmi 
&c.,U8ed in tlie ritet> of circumcision; 1 paioe 
of stoue ornaments; 1 woomcra, for throwiiij 
spears ; 3 native bowls, for carrying water fron 
Charlotte Waters to north-west comer of pr» 
vince. 



Ueguttnd Ttud* Murk /or lamr*, 
"PAIRY." 
BInmped vm nrrt txtrnf. 



CLARKE'S (New Patent) 

'Fairy' Lamps and ' Fairy' Liglits. 



iicyiWtr.d Tr.>,l* M'.rk /ur in!* 
"FAIR Y." 

SttrntfifJ t/H rVrrf j.fjfM. 



KB.- 



1 hon Takii* >t« made eiitlraly of Obw, enrarln^ ataaolata 8»r«ty from Flra and drop|iliit of Qnmm. 

rSK WKaU OUT: wkuii buruliix tbey lull; nmUta tliair title iif "Falrjr UkUU." 

Tlio Patent "Fiilry" liight« tjlvu it liviiiiiiAil si>n, Httxulr lii;lit, and roqnira no Mttintlon aftar lighting. 

ixtiivmlabeil \>y titt of tim "Katrjr KttiiiKuUliar •uppllod wl ' 



They mioit* no Cl«aiiui(, < 
Tbe7 can Uutnit 



wltb svarjr l«nip, and readily ntUKiitad. 
•Ik* " JVitry " loa^ md " ^i<ry " Lifhlt ■<rt f.iitnltd in lfre.it HriLiitt, t'rjnee, tltrtfiHu, UtlniitM, Aiutria, md Uu Umtti 5<ala 
Tht TnuU Marie un alto lit^/ultrtd tn all tkt ufxim t'omUritM. 



SAKUEL CIiABKE, Patent Pyramid and Fairy Lamp and "Light Works, 

CHILD'8 HILL, LONDON; AND NEWARK, NEW JERSEY, U.a.A. 



South AuBtralia. 



211 



E. PROTECTOR OP ABOBIQUTES, 
olaide.— Waddies, shield, epear-tbrowing 
icks (woomeras), boomerangt:, clubs or hwords, 
ears, bags or wallets of native l\emp, from 
ipperamana, Cooper's Creek, Far Nortli. 

6. WILKINSON, W. B.. Pirie Street, 
delaide.— 14 Barbed Spears; 4 Stone- 
aded Spears; 4 clubj and 1 woomera, for 
rowing spears — weapons made and used by 
origines of Northern Territory. 



7: 



OERBARD, E., Camden Town, 

W.— Natural History Scene. 



v/ 



ROUP VI.— MACHINERY, 
APPARATUS, AND PRO- 
CESSES USED IN THE ME- 
CHANICAL INDUSTRIES. 

Class 1. 

Agricultural Implements. 

-^ COMMISSIONERS FOR SOUTH 

[JSTRALIA.— {1) Seed Sowers used on 
^uth Australian farms — (a) Mr. A W 
ibbie's ; (b) Mr. H. B. Hawke's. (2) Stump- 
iiping implements used in cultivating rocky 
jd 8tumj)y land— (a) Scarifier, invented and 
We by Messrs. J. W. Stott & Son, Alma; (b) 
.b80il Plough, made by Mr. S. Bracegirdle. 
lithburgh, Yorke's Peninsula. 

t MARTIN, JAMES, & CO., Limited, 
iwler.~One South Australian Stripper. 

3. RAMSAY, J. a, & CO., Mount 
irker.— Model of Stripper used in South 
istralia to reap and thresh crops of wheat, 
rley, oats, fee., leaving the straw standing on 
e sroimd, to be either burned or gathered at 
sure. 

Class 2. 

Farm Appliances, Accessories, Ac, 

1. HODDINOTT, HENRY HER- 
tRT, Tea-tree Gully, near Adelaide. 

ment Helf-regulating Incubator to hatch 
C eggs, invented by Exhibitor. 

2. ROBERTSON, J., Adelaide.-Col- 

! fon of Apiarian Appliances made from 
iligenous timbers. 

Class 3. 

Misctllaueoua Machinery and Models. 

r. aiBBES, WM. KENTON, Victoria 
|uare, Adelaide. — Bottling Apparatus; 
f atent outside Stopper Bottle for aerated 
ters, AVme, Spirit, and Beer Bottles. 



2. MILLER, JAMES, West Terrace, 
Adelaide.— Working Model of Automatic 
Apparatus, proposed to be applied to sea-going 
vessels, or vessels on rivers or canals, for the 
purpose of enabling masters of vessels during 
the night to aicertain the course. 



Class 4. 

Work in Metals. 

1. DOBBIE, A., W., Qawler PlacQ, 
Adelaide.— Specimen of Lobby Name-plate 
Frame, nickel plated. 

2. FULTON. 3. E., & CO., Kilkenny, 
near Adelaide.— Iron Castings and Patent 
Water Meter. 

3- OBAY, W. P., & CO., Qawler 
I'laee, Adelaide.— Zincwork ventilator, as 
used in the Government schools. 

4- REVELL, ADAMS, & CO., Free- 
man Street, Adelaide.— Iron caatiugs. 



Class 5. 

Carriages and Wlieelwrights' Work. 

1. BARLOW, THOMAS, & SONS, 
Hmdmarah Square, Adelaide. — Small 
Wagonette, made chieflv from indigenous 
woods. 

2. CLARKE BROS., Franklin 
atreet, Adelaide.— Buggy made from woods 
indigenous to South Australia and Northern 
Territory ; leather and iron also manufactured 
in the Colony. 

3. RAY, W. H., O'ConneU Street, 
North Adelaide— Carringe made from in- 
digenous woods, with patent lug and shaft 
attachment, invented by Exhibitor. 

Class 6. 

llarneas and Saddlery. 

1. COLTON, J., & CO., Currie Street, 
Adelaide.— Saddlery. 

2. GENERY, W., Hundle Street, 
Adelaide.— Camel Saddle, as made for the 
use of explorers, surveyors, and otiiers travel- 
ling in tlie interior of South Australia. 

Class 7. 

Railway and Tramway Apparatus. 

I. CHAMBER OF MANUFAC- 
TURES, Incorporated, Adelaide.— Mo- 
del of Tramoor in use in Adelaide. 



218 



South Ausiralia, 



Class 8. 

Navigation, 

X. FLETCHER, H. C, Port Adelaide. 
— (1) Photograph of new graving dock in 
course of construction at Port Adelaide. (2) 
Photograph of ship Albany being lengthened 
on pateut slip, the property of the Exhibitor. 

Class 9. 

Militanj Appliances, &c. 

1. SIMPSON, A., & SON. — Electric 
Contact Mine (Torpedo), with circuit clober, 
unloaded ; manufactured in Adelaide by t'ae 
Exhibitors. 



Class 10. 

Brushware. 



,rir>vi4 V 



1. INDUSTRIAL SCHOOJu FOR 
THE BLIND, Brougham Plaoo, North 
Adelaide. — Brushwaro and Matfj, made by 
blind workers. 



GROUP VII.— ALIMENTARY 
PRODUCTS, 

Class 1. 

Cereals, Farinaceous Products, and Products 
derived therefrom. 

1. ADELAIDE MILLING & MER- 
CANTILE CO., Limited. — Two tons of 
flour. 

2. ANGAS, J. IL, Collingrove. ~ One 
bag Laiumas wheat (254 lbs.) ; one bag purple 
straw wlieat (26G lbs.) ; one bag Tuscan wheat 
(259 Ibu.) ; ozie bushel purple straw wheat ; one 
bushel Scotch wonder wheat, and part buslud 
rye ; also one bushel Lammas wheat, and one 
bushel Tuscan wheat. 

3. CUSTANCE, PROFESSOR, Agri- 
cultural College, Roseworthy. — Cereals 
in the straw. 

4. DELAND & CO., Homley Bridge. 
—One bag flour (200 lbs.). 

5. DUNN, J., St CO., Freeman Street, 
Adelaide. — Flour and Grain. 



8. HAT, ARCHIBALD, of "Th 
Glen," Bremer. — One Bag Wheat, grown i 
ihe Bremer, purple straw variety; weigh 
•36 Ibii. 14 ozs. 

9. HILFERS. O., &• CO., Gawler.- 
One Bag of Flour (2C0 lbs.). 

xo. MALCOLM, WILLIAM, Cm 
Street, Adelaide. — Flour. 

11. MeCOLL, A. & J., Richman 
Creek. — One Bag of twenty weeks' Whei 
(4i bushels). 

12. ROBERTSON, JOHN, Golde 
Grove. — (1) Chevalier Barley. (2) Ca] 
Barley. 

ClzVss 2. 



HiF 



6. PINCK, 
bag flour. 



C. H., Greenock. — One 



7. GOVERNMENT 
(Hon. J. L. 



RESIDENT 

gton. J. L. PARSONS), Palmerston, 
orthem Territory. — (1) Tapioca. (2) 
Arrowroot. 



"J; Fatty Substances used as Food, <fec. 

1. BARNARD, G. L., WalkerviU 
near Adelaide. —Olive Oil in bottle. 

2. CORPORATION OF THE GIT 
OF ADELAIDE.-01ivo Oil (5 gals.), pn 
duced in Soutli Australia, from fruit grown i 
the City of Adelaide pluntatious. 

3. DAVENPORT, SIR SAMUEI 
Beaumont, near Adelaide.— Olive Oil. 

4. GOVERNMENT RESIDES 
(Hon. J. L. PARSONS), Palmerstoi 
Northern Territory. —(1) Peanut, Sefiaim 
Castor and Cntton Oils. (2) One bag Dhol 
(3) Ground Nuts, Sesame Seed, prepared b 
Maurice Holtze. 

5. ROBERTSON, J. Adeiaide.-Oliv 
Oil. 

6. NORTH, BENJAMIN, Adelaide.- 
OliveOil. 

Class 3. 

Meat and Fish. 

1. CONRAD, LEOPOLD, Hindle)| 
Street, Adelaide. — (1) Six tierces Cornei 
Beef, each containing 300 lbs. (2) Five( 
assorted Preserved Meats, each containii 
96 lbs. net. (3) Twenty-Four Mutton Ham. | 

2. KITHER, WM., Rundle SI 
Adelaide.— (1) Eight tierces Beef. (2) Ti 
barrels Pork. 

Class 4. 

V~>* Condiments. 

I. BARNFIELD, TURNER, & CO 
London Condiment Works, East Adi 
laide.— Pickles, Sauces, Powders, Baaenct 
Brunswick Black, &o. 



South Awtratta. 



219 



3. BAHTON & CO., Hackney, near 
Adelaide. — Tomato Sauce, Pickles (assorted), 
lUces, Culinary Essences, Condiments, and 
ilmen's Stores. 

3. POEBES, AliEXANDEB, An- 

ftston. — Fruits in Preserve, Jams, nnd 

allies. 

4. HANTON, HENKY B., PuHarton, 
ear Adelaide.— Jams, Jellies, and Jlorma- 

des. 

5. MARGBTTS, C, Parkside.-Tomato 
luce. 

6. MoEWTN, GEORGE, & SONS, 
len Ewin, Teatree Gully.— Assorted 

ms. 

•7. MURRAY, ALEXANDER, & 
ONS, Coromandel Valley.— Jams and 

iUies. 

8. ROBERTSON, J., Adelaide.-C.)ndi- 

Butfl, Vinegar, &c. .;...».«,- 

9. 8EPPET.T, B., Seppeltsfleld.'— Pure 

hite Wiue Vinegar, made from Soutli 
iistraliun Wine. , 

O.WAVERLEY VINEGAR CO.,We8t 
Birace, Adelaide.- -Tomato Sauce, V'or- 
Bter Sauce. Walnut Pickles, Almoud Pickles, 
irry Powder, Plonr of Mustard, and Vinegar, 
mufactured by Exhibitor from Soutli Austia- 
n grown seed. . 



; *''■,-■,/ fii.-j 



Class 5. 



Wines, SpiriU, Beers, and other Beverages. 

I. AULD, WM. P., Auldana.-(1) One 
se Auldana Ruby, No. 1 ; name of viueyard, 
Jldana; extent 100 acres; colour, ruby; 
arocter, dry, light; vintage 1S71. (2) Ono 
se W lute, A ; colour. amber; cLaracter, liglit, 
y; vintage, 1873 ; names of grajjes from wliieh 
nu IS made, Verdeillio, Palomino, Blanco, 
iradilla, and Gouais fermented together. 

s. AULDANA VINEYARD PRO- 

tSJ?£Sv,'^'^<1*"* (Agents, P. B. 
IJRaOYNE & CO.). -(1) Auldana 

I ♦ ,o*' ^^ ' °"™® °* vineyard, Auldaua ; 
tent 120 acres; colour, ruby; character, 
^lum dry; vintage, 1883; name of grapes 
m which wme is made,Mataro and Shiraz ; 



quantity on hand, 20,000 gallons. (2) Auldana 
Rtiby. C; colour, ruby ; character, medium, dry; 
vintage, 1883 ; gropes from which wiue is made, 
Shiraz, Mataro, and Carbinet; qnuntity on 
hand, 30,000 gallons. (3) Ruby Cup; cofeor 
ruby; character, full-bodied, sweet; vintage. 
1883 ; name of grapes from which this wine is 
made, Phiraz and Mataro ; quantity on hand, 
15,000 gallons. (4) Auldana Ladies' Pride; 
colour, white; character, full-bodied, sweet; 
yintngo, 1883; name of grape from which wine 
is made, Gronaohe. (5) Auldana Cup ; ooloor, 
white; character, light, dry; vinlage. 1883; 
name of grapes from which wine is made, Ver- 
deilho, DoradillK, Riesling, nnd a few Muscatels ; 
quantity ou hand, 10,000 gallons. (6) Auldana 
Riesling; colour, white; character, light, dry; 
vintage, 1883 ; name of grape from which wirfj 
18 made, Riesling; quantity on hand, 2000 
gallons. (7) Auldana Muscatel ; colour, white; 
character, light, dry; vintage, 1883; name of 
grapo from which wine is made, Muscatel; 
quantity on hand, 2000 gallons. 

3. DAVENPORT, SIR SAMX7BL, 

Beaumont, near Adelaide.— (1) Saateme; 
name of vineyanl, Beaumimt; extent, 25 ai-res; 
colour, white ; charaiter, light; vir.tage, 1883; 
name of gmpefrom which wine is mad.-, Seroial. 
(2) Dry Sauterno Winu ; quantity on hand, 100 
gallons; othor particulars as above. (3) Chateau 
Beaumont Wine; colour, red; chart\cter, fall- 
bodied, sweet ; vintage, 1871 ; name of grapes 
from which wine is made, Grenache and Shiraz, 
Mataro, and Gouais ; quantity on hand, 4000 
gallons. (4) Chablis Wine; colour, white; 
character, light : vintage 1884; name of grape 
from which wine is made, Doradilla ; quantity 
on hand, 200 dozen and 500 gallons. (S) Shiraz 
Wine; colour, red; character, liqueur ; vintagp, 
18G8 : name of grape from which this wine is 
matle, Siiiraz. (6) Port Wine ; colour, red ; 
character, full-bodied ; vintage, 1883; name of 
grape from which wine is mdde, Grenache; 
quantity on hand, 500 gallons. (7) Claret; 
colour, rod; character, light; vintage, 1884; 
name of grapes from which this wine is made, 
Shiraz and Carbinet (8) Cr«me d'Alicanto 
Wine ; colour, rod ; character, liqueur: vintage, 
1883 ; name of grape from which this wine is 
made, Grenache; (8) Hermitage Wine ; colour, 
red ; character, full-bodied ; quantity on hand, 
1500 gallons. (10) Vin Ordinaire ; colour, red ; 
character, light; vintage, 1885. (11) Madeira 
Wine; colour, white; character, full-bodred; 
vintage, 1875 ; name of grape from which wine 
is made, Sercial. 



BU RG QYNE^S AUSTRALIAN W i N ES. 

Dr J. THOMPSON, Leamington.-" The * Tintara ' and 'Hijrher- 
>mbe seem to me to be Hkely to be of use to invalids ; the former 
au extremely agreeable wine with great bouquet. I shall have 
uch pleasure in recommending them." 



220 



South Austtalid. 



4. ISIiDER. SIR THOMAS, Qlen 
Osmond. — (1) Madeira Wine ; nam© of vine- 
yard, Birkugiite, (lieu Osmond, near Adelaide ; 
exk-nt of vinoyani, 17^ ai-res; colour, white; 
cliaracter, sweet; vintage, 1882; name of grape 
from which wine is made, Madeira. (2) Port 
Wine : colour, dark red ; character, full-bo<lied ; 
vintage, 1880 and 1881 blended; names of 
grapes from which wine is made, 8himz, 
Mataro, Black Portugal, and Carygiianc. (3) 
Sherry Wine ; colour, white ; character, full- 
bodied, dry ; vintage, 1880 ; names of grapes 
from which wine is made, Gouais, Verdoilho, 
Tokay, and Doradilla. (4) Burgundy Wine; 
colour, dark-red; character, fiiU-boilied dry; 
vintage, 1880; name of grape from which wine 
id made, Shiraz. 

5. QUiBEKT, WTTiTJAM, Fewsey 
Vale. — . 1) Riesling Wine ; name of vineyard, 
Pewsey Yale ; extent, 28 acres ; colour, white ; 
character, light, about 18 per cent.; vintage, 

1878 and 1879 ; name of grape from which wine 
is made, Biesling; quantity on hand, 20,000 
gallons. (2) Carbinet Wine ; colour, red ; 
character, light, about 18 per cent.; vintage, 

1879 and 1880; names of grapes from whicli 
wine is made, Carbinet aud IShiraz ; quantity on 
Lnud, 20,000 gallons. 

6. HABDT, THOMAS, Adelaide 
(Agents, P. B. BXTHGOYTTE & CO.)— 

(1) Oomoo Red; colour, red; character, light ; 
vintage, 1882; names of grapes from which this 
wine is made, Carbinet and Shiraz ; quantity on 
hand, 5000 gallons. (2) Tintara Red ; name of 
vuioyard, Tintara; extent, 500 acres; colour, 
red; character, light; vintage, 1884; name of 
grape fnim which this wine is made, Matarn ; 
quantity on hand, 15,000 gallons. (3) Carbinet ; 
name of vineyards, Tintara and others ; colour, 
red; character, light; vintage, 1870; name of 
grape from which this wine is made, Carbinet. 
(4 J Doradilla; name of vineyard, Tintara; 
colour, white; character, light; vintage, 1884; 
name of grape from which this wine is made, 
Doradilla; qunntity on hand, 5000 gallons. 
(6) Riesling; name of vineyard, Wangolere; 
colour, white; character, light; vintage, 1882; 
name of grape fn^m which this wine is made, 
Riesling. (6) Sherry ; name of vineyard, 
Angaston; colour, white; character, full- 
bodied; vintage, 1880; name of grape from 
which this wine is made. Sherry. (7) Ver- 
doilho; name of vineyard, Bankside; extent, 
GO acres ; colour, white : character, sweet ; 
vintage, 1880; name of giupe from which this 



wine is made, Verdeilho. (8) Shiras ; 
vineyard, Bankside; colour, red; chandi 
BW(>et; vintage, 1883; name of grape frq 
wliicli this wine is made, Shiraz; quuntity« 
hand, 10,000 gallons. (8) Sauvignon UUot 
name of vineyard, Tintara; extent. 500 acie 
colour, white; character, full-bodied; vinttgi 
1883 ; name of grape frum which tb ic wine 
made, Suuvignon Blanc. (10) Tintara Bta 
name of vineyard, Tintara; colour, rod; 4 
ractcr, full-l)odied ; vintage, 1879; name ' 
gniix) from which thia wine is made, Hatu 
(11) Port; name of vineyard, Angaston; « 
tent, 100 acres; colour, red; charactei, fol 
bodied; vintage, 1880; name of grape ftn 
which thin wine is made, Shiraz. (12) Xa 
Clurut; nauM- of v;neyard, TiaUira and otli 
colour, red; character, light; viutairc. 18eii 
quantity on hand. 5000 gallons. (IS) Tintii 
Red ; name of vineyanl, Tintara ; colour, jti 
character, light; vintage, 1883; names 4 
grapes from which this wine is ma<ie, Mita 
and Shiraz ; qrintity on hand, 10,000 ;:allflB 

(14) Doradilla; name of vineyard, Tintan 
colour, white ; character, light ; vintage, 18$ 
name of grape from which this wine h mad 
Domdilla; quantity on hand, 5000 gaUng 

(15) Shiraz; name of vineyazd, Bankiidt 
colour, red ; character, sweet ; vintage, 18S 
name of gmi^e from which this wine is midi 
Shiniz ; quantity on baud, 10,000 gallomi. 

7. HAY, HON. ALEXANDEl 
M.I1.C., liinden, near Adeleid&— (1 
Tokay; name of vineyard. Linden; ext«n 
nine acres; colour, white; chf»racter, fail 
botlied; vintage 1878; name of grape fro 
which wine is made, Tokay. (2) Linden Ti 
kay ; vintage, 1883. (3) Linden Red ; Tint*;* 
1880; colour, red; character, full-bodied 
names of grapes from which this wine ia maii 
Grenache, Mataro, and Carygnane. (4) Lit 
den Claret; vintage, 1884; colour, red; clai 
acter, light ; names of grapt s from which ihi 
wine ' is made, Grenache, Mataro, and Can 
guane. 

8. JACOB, •WTT.T.TAM. Moo»)on» 
— (1) Riesling Wine; name of viney»ii 
Moorooroo; extent, sixty-five acres; cokai 
white; character, dry; vintage, 1879; DBuee 
grape from which wine is miuie, Biesling. (8 
Vepdeilho Wine; colour, white; chanrta 
sweet; vintage, 1879 ; name of grape from void 
wine is made, Verdeilho. (3) Red Wi» 
colour, red; character, dry; vintage 1881 
names of grapes from which wine is vait 



BURGOYNBS AUSTRALIAN WINES. 

CAN BE PURCHASED FROM EVERY WINE MERCHAN' 

IN THE KINGDOM. 
A **]iijRc;oirwK'' ow kyerit cork. 



South Auetralta. 



221 



trblnet and Shiraz). (4) One case, containing 
bottles Kicsling, 18ti5 ; two bottles Ries- 
\<', 1869; two bottles Hpanish, 1867; three 
itties Carbimt, 1H73 ; two bottles Verdoilho, 
73; and one bottle Verileilho, 1869 (special 
irtmeiit); the produce of Moorooroo vine- 
ad. ("To be submitted to exports to test 
«ping qualities of the wines."] 

ft pENFOLD & CO., Magill, near 
delaide (Agente, ALLT & CO.).-(l) 
[ontignac Wine ; naiuo of vineyard, The 
muge ; extent, 105 acres ; colour, red ; 
mractcr, full-bodied, swoot; vintages, 1876, 
81, and 1882; name of grapes from which 
ae is made, Frontignuc, Madeii-a, and 
Knacbe ; quantity on hand, 50U0 gallons. 
) Frontignac Wine ; vintages, 1882 and 188;{ ; 
men of gr.ipes from which this wine is miide, 
enacLe, Miwioira, Frv>iitignac, and Timprano; 
uutity on liand, 80,000 gallons. (3) Musra 
ne; c(»lour, white; character, full - bodied, 
eet; vintages, 1881 and 1882; names of 
apss from which wine is made, Muscat and 
idro Ximem-8 ; ijuautity on hand, 5000 
lions. (4) Muscadine Wine ; vintages, 1882, 
83, and 1884; quantity on hand, 20,000 
llona; of Cou&tantia type. (5) Grange 
wney; colour, tawney; character, sweet, 
U-bodied; vintages, 1870 to 1875; names of 
apes from which wine is made, Madeira, 
pntigLac, and (irennche ; quantity on hand, 
(Xt gallons. 6) Port Wine; colour, nd ; 
aracter, fuU-bodiod ; vintages, 187G to 1878 ; 
me of grapes from which wine is made, Gre- 
die, Shiraz, and Frontignac ; quantity on 
ml, 5000 gallons. (7) Constantia Wine; 
lour, r<-d; character, full-bodie<l ; vintages, 
79 and 1881 ; name of grapes from whioh 
is wino ie mude, Frontignac and Shiraz; 
antity on hand, 10,000 gallons. (8) Con- 
uitia Wine; colour, rod; character, full- 
died, medium, sweet; vintages, 1882 and 
8J; iiames of grapes from which this wine is 
le, Frontignac and Shiraz; quantity on 
id, 40,000 gallons. (9) Grenacho Wine; 
lour, red; character, full-bodied; vintages, 
76 to 1881 ; names of grapes from which this 
ine is made, Mataro and Grcnache; quantity 
Land, 10,000 gallons. (10) Grenache Whie ; 
Btagc3, 1882 and 1883; quantity on hand, 
,000 gallons. (11) Carbinet Wine; colour, 
d; character, dry; vintage 1881; names of 
•p*^ Shiraz and Carbinet ; quantity on hand, 
.000 galluns. (12) Carbinet Wme ; vintages 
81 and 1882 ; quantity on hand, 2000 gal- 
8. (13) Carbmet Wine; character, dry, 



light-bodied ; vintages, 1882 and 1883 ; quantity 
og bond, 20,000 gallons. (14) Kieding Wine ; 
colour, light white : character, dry, light , vin- 
tages, 1882 and 1883 ; name of grano, Riesling ; 
quantity on hand, 3000 gallons. (16) Riesling 
Wino; colour, white; character, light dry; 
vintages, 1881 and 1882; name of grape, Ries- 
Img; quantity on liand, 2000 gallons. (16) 
Tokay Wine; colour, white; churacter, fuU- 
Mdicd medium hock: vintages, 1882, 1883, and 
1884; names of grapes, Tokay, Tcniprano, and 
Pedro Ximenes; quantity on hand, 30,000 
gallons. (17) Tokay Wine; colour, white; 
character, full-bodiwl ; vintages, 1881 and 1882 ; 
names of grades, Tokay, Tomprano, and Pedro 
Ximenca ; quantity on hand, 3000 gallons. 
(18) Tokay Wine; colour, white; chiuracter, 
fuU-bodiod ; vintages, 1880 and 1881 ; names of 
grajMjs, Tokay, Tomprano, end Pedro Ximenes; 
(juantity on haul, 2000 gallons. (19) Pedro 
Ximenes Wino; colour, white; character, full- 
boflied, medium dry ; vintages, 1882 to 1884 ; 
name of grape, Pedro Ximenes ; quantity on 
hand, 30,0(10 gallons. (20) Pedro Ximenes 
Wine; vintages, 1881 and 1882; character, dry, 
full-bodied ; quantity on hand, 2000 gallons. 

10. K03S, HON R. D., M.P., Higher- 
combe. — (1) Red wine; name of vineyard, 
Hi^hercombe ; coloui', red : character, full- 
bodied; vintage, 1862. (2) Sherry; white; 
full-bodied ; 1866. (3) Frontignac ; white ; 
full-lx)died; 1867. (4) Sherry; white; full- 
bodied; 1867. (5) Sherry; white; full-bodie<l ; 
1868. (6) Funchal ; white ; full-bodied ; 
186'.>. (7) Burgundy ; red ; full-bodied ; 1869, 
(8) Burgundy; red; full-bodied; 1870. (9) 
White; white; light; 1875. (10) Claret; 
red; light; 1883. (11) Hermitage; red; 
light; 1883. (12) Amber; white; ligiit; 
1883. (13) Sherry; white; full-bodied; 1883. 

11. SAIiTEH, W., & SON, Angaston. 

— (1) Dry Sherry wine ; name of vineyard, 
Saltram, near Angaston ; extent, eighty acres ; 
colour, white; character, full-bodied; vintage, 
1879 ; name of grape from which wine is made. 
Sherry. (2) Shiraz wine ; colour, red ; charac- 
ter, full-bodied; vintage, principally 1868; 
name of grape from which wine is made, 
Shiraz; a quantity on hand. (3) Sweet Shti-ry 
wine; coloiu*. white; character, full-bodied; 
vintages. 1876 and 1878 ; names of gr.ipes from 
which wine is made. Sherry and other grapes. 
(4) S.A. Port wine; colour, red; character, 
full-bodied ; vintage, 1879 ; name of grape 
from which wino is made, Shiraz ; a quantity on 
hand; (5) Shiraz wine; colour, red; character. 



ALLT BROS. & CO., 

iUSTRALIAN AND GENERAL WINE MERCHANTS. 

Ag-ents for PEWFOI.» & Co. a nil K. l l¥, HVMCiVLT, 

38, NEW BROAD~STREET, LONDON, E.G. 

rrice Liata tent Jree on Application, 



223 



South Australia. 



full-bo<1ted, dry: vintftRe, 1879; name of f;:rapo 
from wbioli winu ia iiiudo, Hhimz. (6) Hhiraz 
wine : colour, red ; character, full-bodied ; vin- 
tage, 187i) and older; name of grapo from 
which wino ia made. Hhiraz. 

12. BEPFEIjT, B., Seppeltsfleld, 
Greenock. — (1) Alataru; name of vinoyard, 
Seppoltsfiuld ; colour, red ; clmro'-ter, light ; 
vintage, 1883. (2) SwootMataro; colour, red; 
character, fnll-bodiod; vintage, 1883. (S) 
Seppeltsfleld Re<l ; colour, red ; chnracter, fUll- 
bodied; viivtago, 1884. (4) (Uamt; colour, 
rod ; cliaracter liglit ; vintage, 1881. (6) 
Blanquette; colour, white; churaotor, light, 
drv; vintage, 1882. (6) Beppeltulield WJ»it«: 
colour, whito; churucter, light; vintage, 1882. 
(7) Biuuling; colour, whito; ohaiauter, light, 
vintage, 1882. (8) Sherry ; colour, white ; 
character, full-bodied, gweet; vintage, 1881. 
(9) Port: colour, rtd; character, fuU-boiiied, 
Bweet ; vintage, 1882. (10) Froatignao ; colour, 
whito; oharucter, full-bodied, uweet; vintage, 
1881. 

13. SMITH, S., & SOTS', Angaston.— 

(1) Frontignao wino ; name of vineyard, 
Yalumba ; colour, white ; cliaracter, light ; vin- 
tage, 1882; names of grapes from which wino 
is made, Frontignac and otiier good kinds. (2) 
Ruby wine ; colour, ruby ; character, swetit ; 
vintage, 1882 ; name of grape Irora which wine 
is made, Shiraz. (3) Muscat wine; colour, 
whito; character, sweet; vintage, 1882; name 
of gripe from which wine is made. Muscatel. 
(4) Sherry wine ; colour, light ; chanictcr, 
light; vintage, 1882. (5) Port wine; colour, 
red; charactr, full; vintiure, 1882; name of 
grapo from which wine is made, Sliirnz; quantity 
on hand, lO.OuO gallons. (6) Port wine; vin- 
tage, 1882. (7) Fronti>;nac wiue ; vinti>ge, 
1882. (8) Ruby wino; vintago, 1882. (9) 
MusCitt wine; vintage, lSb2. (10) Sherry 
wine; vintage, 1882. (11) Port wine; vintage, 
1876. 

14. WIQG, R. H., & SONS, King 
William Street, Adelaide.— (1) 8. A. Port ; 
colour, red; character, sweet; vintage, 1876; 
blendt'd wine. 1,2) Old Constantia; colour, 
ro<l ; character, sweet ; vintage, 1868 ; blemied. 
(3) Constimtia; colour, red; character, sweet ; 
vint«ge, 1877; blended. (4) 8. A. Sherry; 
colour, white; character, sweet; vintage, 1876; 
blended. (5) Tokay; colour, white; character, 
aweet; vintage, 1878; blended. (6) Fron- 
tignao; cohmr, white; character, sweet; vin- 
tage, 1878 ; blended. 



15. WRIGHT, EDMnin> W., Hon 
Park Vineyard, Magill (Agents, ALI 
Si CO.). — (1) Pwlro Wino ; extent 
vineyard, forty acres ; colour, straw ; 
racter, light ; vintage, 1882 ; name of graf 
from which wine is made, Pedro Ximenea. 
Frontignao Wino ; colour, light-red ; churacti 
fuU-bodie<l, sweet; vintage, 1882; namei 
grapes from which wine is made, Frouiign 
and Muscatel. (3) Hhiraz Wine ; colonr, 1 
charnoter, full-bodied ; vintage, 1882 ; uatoo 
grape from which wine is nwdo, Shiraz. ( 
Port Wino ; colour, red ; character, full-bodie 
vintage, 1882; names of grapes from wb 
this wino is made, Shiraz and Matara (I 
Burgundy Wine : colour, rod ; diameter, fol 
bodied; vintage, 1875; name of grape fn 
which this wino is made, Shiraz. 

16. YOXTRTO, C. B., Adelaide. -( 

Bed Wino ; namo of vinoyard, Kiinmuntn 
extent, thirty-tivo acres ; colour, red ; rharafti 
medium ; vintage, 1880 ; names of grapes fn 
which wino is made, Shiraz, Mutam, 
Greenochc ; quantity on band, 18,000 gidloni 

17. BICKFORD, A. M., & SOHl 

Currie Street. — Cordials— Limejuico Conlu 
Raspberry Balm, Raspberry Vinegar, Ging 
Brandy, Ginger Wine, Quinine Wine, Stomin 
Bitter!?, Orange Bitters, Curuooa, Hop Bilte 
Maraschino, and Noyeau. 



18. CROWDER 
Street, Adelaide. 

Waters. 



& CO., Tratikli 
- Cordials and Aenu 



19. GRAY, GUILDFORD B., Hyi 
Pai'k Brewery, Unley.— Bottled Ale u 
Porter. 

20. HALIi, GEORGE, & SONS, No: 
wood, near Adelaide. — (1) AerntedWate 
— Lemonade, Soda-water, Ginger-ale, Sara 
parilla. Tonic-water, and Seltzer-water. (S 
Cordiuls — T.imcjjnico Cordial, Raspberry Bate 
Ginger Wine, Ginger Brandy, SarsapariD 
Raspberry Vinegar, Peppermint, Clove.*, «n 
Lemon Syrup. (3) Bitiors — Orange, Stoinad 
Tannin Wine, Kent Hop, Fluid Magnesia. 

21. PHILLIPSON BROS., Hacknej 
near Adelaide. — Ale in bottle. Porter i 
bottle. 

22. ROSS, Hon. R. D., M.P., Higher 
combe.— (1) Sparkling Cider, made in Mij 



BURGOYNE'S AUSTRALIAN WINES. 



Memo.— About Nine-tenths of the Australian Wines imported int 
England pass through the hands of the well-known firm of 

P. E. BURGOYNE & CO. 



South Atutrtdia. 



223 



185 ; bottled in November, 1885. Thia awnple, 
ide from the fruit of one variety of apple, is 
a flrat sparkling cidnr made in Australasia. 
I) Rpurkliug and Still Cider, made in May, 
(85; bottled in October. 1885. Several va- 
Dtics of apples \n ro tised. 

a6. CHAMBEIIS& BLADES, Dragon 
rewery, Adeittiue.— Stout, bulk. 



Glass 6. 

BUouilt. 

AERATED BREAD CO., "Way- 
outh Street, Adelaide. — Biscuits, Ships' 
rend, &c. 

MURRAY, ALEXAWDBR, & 
0N8, Coromandel Valley.— Bisonits. 



CiiAss 7, 

Honey. 



J.QJX. 



I. COLEMAN & MAY, Fairfield 
piary. Mount Barker.— Extraeted Honey 
19 lbs.) ; and «'ight dozen Section Boxed, each 
lb. of Comb Honey. 



~un- 



^ROUP VIII.— AGRICULTURE 
AND HORTICULTURE. 

Glass 1. 

Farm and Garden Seeds, Ae. 

DUNN, JOHN, Mount Barker.— 
illeotion of Native and Exotic GniHst-s, Her- 
l^ea, and Bushes, grown at Mount Barker, 
ientiflcally classified by Dr. Schomburgk, 
ireotor Botanio Grarden, Adelaide. 

2. HAOBZBTT, 32. & W., Bundle 
Teet, Adelaide.— Seed:) and Grasses. 

3- HEYNE. E. B., & CO., Bundle 
wet, Adelaide.— Collection of Seeds. 

4- 8CHOMBURQK, Dr. B., Director 

otauic Gardens, Adelaide.— Herbarium 

1 4 vols.) of South Australian Plants. 

5- WILLCOX, CHABLE8, Way- 

outh Street, Adelaide.— Sh.af Wheattn 
ij and UTieaten Chaft*, as used for feeding 

raes. 



Class 2. 

Living Planta. 

I. SCHOMBUBOK. Dr. B, Director 
Be JUiio Otirdens, Adelaide. — (1) Four 
Fern T.^tM (To<Ua A/rieana), (8) Two Grass 
Trees {Xantorritxa). 



Class 3. 

Xaliee Plants, Grauci, Fil>roiu PlanU, Ae. 

1. BBXJCE, J. D., Superintendent 
Poonindie Native Institution, South 
Australia.— Collection of Native Grasses. 

2. COMMI8SIONEBS FOB SOXTTH 
AUSTBALLA. — (1) Grasstrees, Ac, for 
decoration of native Bce.ie. (2) Five bales of 
I'orcnpine Grass, for testing as a vegetable 
fibre suitable for peper manufacture. (3) 
Mullett's Fibre (^Lepidosperma), suitable for 
paper mannfactoie. 

3. ETiDEB, SIB THOMAS, Adelaide. 
— (1) F(xl<l«-r Phists (twenty-four varietioa), 
grown at C'opiillo run. South Australia, iu 
latitude aCT 40' S., longitude 140° 30' E. (2) 
Fodder plants (three varieticA), growu at Mount 
Lyndliurst, S<>uth Australia, latitude 30° 10' S., 
longitude 138° 35' E. (3) Foddi-r Plants 
(five varietiesX grown at Beltana, latitude 
30° 45' S., If-ngitude 13,^ 25' E. 

4. OOVEBNMENT BESIDENT 
(Hon. J. L. PABSONS), Palmerston, 
Northern Territory. — (I) Uplimd Cotton. 
(2) Kamee Rope Fibre. (3) Pineapple Fibre, 
prepared by 3Ianrioe Holtze. 



.•^'fi .J»". 'V* .Vi.-^-m-; 



•<4 ; 



Class 4. -> ♦^^^ 

VegetaUa and Fruit. 



1. AITLDANA VINBYABD, Pro- 
prietors ot, Mag:Ul, near Adelaide 

Fresh Fmits in season. 

2. COMMISSIONEBS FOB SOUTH 
AUSTRALIA.— Dcscert Raisins. 

3. DAVBNPOBT. BOBEBT, Ba- 
thunga, near Macclesfield. — Apples and 
Pear, Walnuts, and PotatctrS. 

4. DAVENPORT. LADY, Beaumont. 
— Zante Currants and Sultana Raisins. 



S DAVENPORT, SIR SAMUEL.— 
Zante Carrants, Sultana Kaisins. 



224 



South Atutralia. 



6. QOYDEK, O. W., WarrakUla, 
Aldgate. — Fresh Fniits in senaon. 



7. HAGUE, 

Dried CurruntH. 



EDWABD, Truro. — 



8. HARDY, THOMAS, Bankslde 
Vineyard, Reedbeds.— (1) Dried Fruits. 
(2) Froah FruitH in lonaon. 

9. MURRAY, HON. DAVID, M.L.C., 
Adelaide. — Hops. 



10. PASCOE, JOHN P., 
Weera, near Adelaide.— Fruitu. 



Eorra 



II. ROBSON, T. B., Eljrthorp, Hec- 
torville.— (1) Ono cwt. rudding llaisms. (2) 
Half cwt. Sultana Raisins. (3) Eighteen lbs. 
Dessert RaiHiiiH. 



12. ROSS, HON. R. 
House of Assembly), 
Fresh Fruits in Season. 



D. (Speaker of 
Highercombe.— 



GROUP IX.— MINING INDUS- 
TRIES-MACHINERY AND 
PRODUCTS. 

Class 1. 

Boring Apparatus, tfcc. 

I. JONES, J. W., Conservator of 
Water, Adelaide.— (1) Specimens of boros, 
&c., undertaken by the Water Consorvation 
Department. (2) Map of the Natural Waters 
in the Colony. 

Class 2. 

Collections and Specimens of Jtochs, Building 
StoH> , Minerals, Ores, Ac. 

1. BOARD OP GOVERNORS, Public 
Iiibrary, &c.— Collection of Building Stones. 

2. BROWN, H. Y. L., Government 
Geologist, Adelaide.— Specimens (in throe 
cases) of Rocks and Fossils. 



3. BXJNDEY, 
Gully Quarry. 
Column. 



WILLIAM, Teatree 
-Freestone Pedestal and 



(4) CHAMBER OP MANUFAC- 
TURES, AdeUide. — (1) Specimens of 
Strata upon which the city of Adelaide stands, 
obtained from a bore in the Waterworks Yard. 
(2) Cubes of South Australian Building Stones. 

C COMMISSIONERS FOR SOUTH 

AUSTRALIA.— Collection of South Austra- 
lian Minerals, prepared for thu Commission by 
T. C. Cloud, Esij., A.R.S.M., F.C.S., F.I.a 



6. DAVENPORT, 

Beaumont— Iron Ore. 



BIB SAMUI 



7. GOVERNMENT RESIDL 
(Hon. J. L. PARSONS), Palmerst^. 
Northern Territory.- -Speoimena of Copp 
Ore, from Daly Uivor Mine. 

8. HORN, T. S., Adelaide. -Silver ( 
from Eureka Mine, W oodsido ; taken Ir 
100 ft. level, \88ays ^ ozs. and 8} )Z8 of goll 
and 15 ozs. silver to t'lo tv)n of ^0 cwt. 

9. JANSEN, OLAP, Palmeratoa- 
Quartz Specimens, from various claims, at Ya 
Creek. 

10. KAPUND A MARBLE & BUILL 
ING COMPANY, Limited. — (1) Ti 
Blocks of LiKlit-gray Marble, froni Compunj' 
qunrries, at Kapunda. (2) One Pillar of Blaf 
Marble. 



11. KEMPSON HENli,Y, 
Gully, near Adelaide. — Kaolin. 



Teatrs 



12. MARTIN, T., Slate Quarrie( 
Willunga.— Roofing Slates and Flagging. 



13. MOLINEUX, 

Kaolin. 



A., Adelaide.- 



14. OLIVER, A., Port Victor.-Tm 
Blocks of Granite, forming pedestal. 

15. PROPRIETORS OP ELEANOB 
REEF, Pine Creok, Northern Terri 
tory. — Sixty-flvo ozs. Alluvial Gold and Auri 
ferous Specimens. 

16. SINGLETON, PRANCI 
CORBET, Adelaide.— Oro from AcIbIi 
Silver Mine, sitrated 80 mil':=u east of Adeiaidi 
taken from depths varying from GO It. to 113 ft 
This ore yields the following metals— gold 
fiilver, nickel, lead, zinc, antimony, iron an 
sulphur; the yield of pilver rangina; froi 
302 ozs. to 57 ozs. to the ton, and of gold froc 
3 ozs. to ISdwts. to the ton. 

17. STIRLING DISTRICT COUN 
CIL, Mount Lofty.— Blocks of Freestone. 

18. COMMISSIONERS FOI 
SOUTH AUSTRALIA.— Tin from Noi 
tliern Territory, smelted in Adelaide. 

19. JANSEN, OLAF, Eleanor Reefs 
Pine Creek, Northern Territory.-{l 
Specimens containing 65oz9. of Fine Alluvia 
Gold taken from reef. (2) Quartz Specimous. 

20. PARSONS, HON. J. L., Govern- 
ment Resident, Palmerston, Northen 
Territory. —(1) Specimens of Copper 0» 
from Daly River Mines. (2) Quartz Spcoi- 
mens from various claims at Yam Creek. 

21. COOK, T. S., Town and County 
Bank.— SpecimeuB of Alluvial Gold. 



South Australia. 



225 



Class 3. 

Cupper. 

1. THE ENQIilSH ft AU8TRA- 
lAN COPPEB CO., liimited. Port 
delaide. — lioflnod Copper. 

2, THE PROPRIETORS OP THE 
FALLAROO MINES, Limited. Ade- 

ide.— Trophy of Il»;tino«J Copper, niado at 
e Company's Smelting Woila, at Wollaroo, 
irke'a Ptininsula. 



GROUP X.— MISCELLANEOUS. 

1. COMMISSIONERS FOR SOUTH 
AUSTRAIjIA— (I) BiMhman'H Hut, with 
furuiahingH, used in South Austnilia in pioneer 
settlement. (2) Qrtiv trees, &o., for decoration 
of native scene. 

2. SOUTH AUSTRALIAN CO., 
North Terrace, Adelaide.— Pictures, Ac., 
IlluatruUve of Adolaidu in early yean. 

3. BANK OP SOUTH AUSTRALIA. 

— Collection of Tokens coinctl in Adelaide iu 
1852. 



I 



»^> 






njut 



v.^ iii>/ 



^ ,3xA.vi5M J '^ 



,v. o a y\ J 



~-t <«.^«V^ ■— V 



'1 



226 Advtrtisemcnli. 



- , ..tli/ 






WILLIAM BROWN & CO., 

Mbolesale /nanufactucing 



AND 



lEyport Stationers, dc, 
38-40 St. Mary Axe, and 4041 Old Broad Street, 

LONDON, E.C. 



Colonial and Foreign Indents carefully executed 



'■'■■.'(.*• , ,. 






( 227 ) 



QUEENSLAND. 

In a-cfmilnr Lwl, tlio Culony of Quooiwluutl ooinpl«t<Hl her twcuty-sixtli year; aud, as was tho 
ca*j with \ictoria, tliia, tho hvtost-born of tho Australian gioiip, wiia nam.d aftor Her Mo«t 
(iracious 5Iajo«ty. Tho Hoatti-rwl 2r).000 British subjiKsts who wor« thiw conHtituti><l an a soparato 
Colony at tlic cIoho of 1859, had assi-iUMl to thorn <;(;(*,22t square mil.-:i (127,(kJ.'{,300 acres) of then 
ilmost uuknowu territory, an area about flve^in.l-a-half times tho size of tho United Kiuffdom- 
md m the subscjueul twenty-six years tho i)opuhition has growr up to a25,000. or to thirt«H,'n times 

n '/, '^i^ " 1"'V*"' " «" T*"'^ ''^"- ^'''-'" "*• '' '"' ""' l>0P"lation of Queensluml is not ono- 
tenth that of London. But then, tho herds of eattlc< and the tlocks of .het,p «ho alr..adv possesses 
rnuld servo ofocHl two Londo^^^ aud from Queonsland h1uk>p. wool is now-a-.lav« clippe.1 

otho weight of some 50,000,000 lbs. auaually, worth aln.ut one-half tho entire wrx,! eiip of 1, 
Imted Kmgdom. Queensland is no longc-r the string of isoIaU.l settlements, surroumknl by an 
unpeopled wdderness. sho w.s in I860. It is true that tho Government havo as yot pirtcl 

I^ir^'n^T"™* ." T^ ?^"'i "'"'"'"'' '"'■^ ""' '^f ♦'''^ «'^^-^' 427,(;63,3tiO: but a further 
116.000000 uen^ have been leased as sheep and cattle runs; and thus it is that tho Colony is nn 

U.0,000 cattle Oy-onsulerably larger total than is in the i.^«.ion of all tho other Australian 

oIon.cs put togc^ther) and of 9,300,000 sh.H^p ; while the horsc^s numln^r 253.1 10. Hero of itselJ 

TTl-l T^'TZ ^r " ^'T. ""'* '"'"'"-^ '"^•'■""'"''' l-P^'-^tion. When Queenslaml was 

f ; itl /." * ?' •"' ri" "J '"" '"" '"'*'* "'"" "'"'-"""^ »'"»* "^f Tasmania, and only one-fifth 

ImtofHouth Australia; but though both these other Australian Colonics have grown ste.«Ulv, 

Jr T H,"7' T":^ "'""•. ^' r'" '" "''"^"' ^'"^^ (iuc^nsland possess,, other exceptiona 
.«« . o wealth bes.des her cattle aud sheep runs ; and the developnJnt of her rc^^mrees in this 
,a«t territory luts resulted in a groat aud iuoreiuing flow of British «M.ital au.l la»K>„r into tho 
..lony. But lalH,ur in the Old Country has not tho means of conveying itself to tho New; and s^ 
!; riTriwr'" i"" ""f •^"**" «^' "»" ^^"'""y '^-^vo tog..ther ex,..n.hd aln^ut £:].000.000 (including 
. ,0(,5,O()O in the j«,st four years) in assisting the working clasps t<. tho Colonv. In fact 

C;^''^\''Y""'^''\''^^^ from Great Britain than ali 

no rest of Australasia put together. 

Yet not so very many years ago it was thought that mud. ..f this north-east quarter of 

u mha W.IS unsuitable for K«rojK>an settlement. Tho present town of Kockhampton has btn-n 

-uiU just wihin the Tropic of Capricorn; an.l when^as at no ,K,int dm>s Queenslan.l extend s^ 

111""! "'/r ^«,!'-r""'"^"' this tropic. Capo York, the most nortlierlv ,!oint f t" 
-olonv IS more than &J0 miles within it. and a good deal of tho low-lving land is Lpical in o 
mmcter o its v^.getation. But a short distance inland the« am long mnges of mount«rns ofU^^ 
tr ching down to tho c^t, and attaining an elevation ut times of OOtrft. ; and it is^ "gely 

Whl\. ?^- 'tv.7'''''^"'' •''^*"™"y^"'= ^"* Queensland possesses this ndvantiuro ove 
«u hem Australia hat even m winter the vegetation is not altogether nrn>st,.l ; while a n^therly 
>md in summer will render both Adelaide and Melbourne hotter than Brisban^ is. At Bristue 
.csvenige temperature is 70°, the maximum tem,^tu«. in 1884 being 102«. and the minimum 40° 
.compared with i05-G°. and ao-2° in Melbourne, and with lioo ami 35= in Adelaide Zl 
l^zos ,n summer also tend to keep tho coast without excessive heat : and though to tho west of 
>e mountain raiu^vs a higher range of tem,Mmtun. is ex,x.rienc,Hl. it is not hotter than in tho 
^*teraareaso. New H,)uth VVah«. It may hero 1h< n-marke,! that after al>out 200 mil.* fnnn tho 
MWra e.^t, the rive« nio either fcmnd to flow north-w.-st into the Gulf of CanM-nfaria. or south- 
.*t .no the Darling Itivor, or into Central Mouth Australia. With tho exroption of tho Murmv 
^may U said that most of tho longest and (inest rivers in Australia take their rise in Queensland • 
M not a few of them, like the Fitzroy. Brisbane, Burdokin, Mitchell, Gilbert, Norman. Flinder*; 
■ Q 2 * 



228 



Queetuland. 



und Loichliardt rivers, arc situated wholly in Quecualand. With regard to the Darling, it may ]\ 
Htiid that its navigatiou do|M-nd8 ahnnst ontiroly upon the rainfall in Southern Quecnalund. 
along tlio oust roast of tropical Queensland at u varying di8tanct\ hut seldom luany miles fjrr 
shore, there stretches the Great Barrier Iteef, inter8|)erBC4l with numberless coral islets, and thi 
the force of the waves from the I'acifio is hroken. The entire eastern coast line is most pictun*ju 
with a succession of islands, i>old headlands and harliours, and with thelofty ranges of the nmiclai 
seldom out of sight. But in strong contrast with this is the coast-lino of the Gulf of CarpoDtah 
which is every wliero flat, and for some distance inland unattractive and often swampy. 

It is said that every kind of temperate and tropical product can bo grown in Quceiukb 
Uix>n the Downs, wheat, oats, and barley flourish, and arc grown for hay and green-food for catti 
as well as for grain. But a decidedly larger area is devoted to maize, from which an avctij 
crop of about 25 bushels iKT acre is obtainc«l. Botli PJnglish and sweet potatoes aro cidtivaU^i 
the growth and make of sugar is now represented by upwards of 40,000 tons manufacturiHl; \l 
arrowroot grown in 1884 was 574,768 lbs. ; and tobacco, coffee, cotton, oranges, peaches, praps 
l)ino-applos, bananas, and English fruit aro also cultivated. Tlte frait it has been found impossi!] 
to bring for exhibition here, but sugar is extensively siiown; and it will be seen it bears compaii'i 
with tho products of the West Indies and the Mauritius. So also are coflce, tobacco, rice, ifiw 
und flour, arrowroot, and cassava. Then, too, there is Queensland rum, jircparations from Quot-i 
land Eucalypti, and hundreds of exhibits of Queensland timlx^rs, some niauufactured, othf 
varnished, and others yet again in the rough. These will 8er\-o in a measure to show the numcm 
descriptions of vegetable products raiswl in Queensland. Tliey ulrea«ly give employmtut t< 
oonsidomble i)opulation, and the agricultural resources of the Colony will in time be giw-' 
cxtended. 

But no reference has yet been made to the Queensland mines. These are of altogiil 
exceptional richness, and have yet to be developed. The mineral collections shown bv 
Government, as well as by private enterprise, are of a ver>' complete character. Gold ore* i 
«|uartz ( f all descriptions, silver and silver-lead ores, coiil, tin, copper, manganese, clirome i 
ore, plumbago, stone from Queensland quarries, and clay and shale are all of them rej rosfnti 
and there is no section of the Australian continent so rich in regard to miuerals as Queeiwlaud 
111 us, as regards gold : — 



. -: ., ■ • . 


Quart X cru hcU 
in 18H4. 


Gold obUincd. 


Avcragw ix-r ton. 


,■ 


Tun#. 


ou. 


ois tlwt*. gr*. 


Queensland 


148,552 


259,254 


1 14 21 


Victoria » 


■616, mi 


432,997 


9 21 


Now South Wcles . 


52,759 


32,979 


14 10 


Now Zealand (1880)". 


08,460 


84,1S( 


17 12 



This is sufficient to show that the richness of tho Queensland quartz is far in excess of t) 
in the other Colonies ; and it may be mentioned that, in all, some tJOO or 700 tons of QucomU 
gold quartz have been sent home for exhibition, either in the Queensland Court, or forrrudii 
and treating by the gold-reduction machiuer}-. Tlie Charters, Towers, and Gympie gold fie 
uave now been connected with tho coast by railway, and tho extensions in progivss will brinj 
further largo extent of auriferous country within access of the port. Quito as important are ( 
sanctioned railway extensions to the great tin and silver dejiosits at Herberton, and to the wp 
mines of Cloucurry. It is the opinion of the Government geologist that the Cloncnrrv mp 
Imles are the richest yet discovered in Auotralio, if not in the world ; but a railway of 2'M) i 
is requisite to connect them with tho gulf of Carpentaria, and as yet the Colony places hut h 
copt)er in tho market In 1883 the value was £30,872, and it was less 'n 1884, works 1* 
pmcticidly at a standstill until railway ^communications are in a more Advanced state. Ta 

* Theic are the latest ciQciAl returns pubUabed. 



Qtueruland. 



m 



jund in more accessible localities, and the yield in 1884 was 3,383 tons, the value being set dowa 
t £130,460 at the place of production. At the port of shipment, however, it was £228,457, and 
he mldition fairly indicates the importance of improved communications. The value of the galena 
^Ivcr-lcad) raised in 1884 was £35,327; and this description of mining enterprise is also destined 
irgcly to extend, as the ores are very rich in silver. As yet, the quantities of antimony and 
langanette worked are not large; but the coal mines of Queensland in 1884 yielded 120,727 tons, 
nd this is a description of mining to which it is impossible to assign limits. At present almost 
he whole of this coal is misal in the Ipswich district, whence there is direct railway communica- 
ion with Brisbane ; but there is goo<l coal at Maryborough and at other places, specimens of 
liirh arc now l)eing exhibited hero. In this particular New South "Wales and Queensland are 
laced at a considerable advantage over the rest of Australia, in which coal is wanting. A goo«l 
eal of building stone is now being raisetl from Queensland quarries, including bluestone, free- 
lone, nnd some marble. It may bo safely asserted that the world is destined to hear a great deal 
lore of Queensland mining enterprise, i)osse8sing as she does all the most important known metals 
ml minemls in great abundance. 

Public works, including railways, telegraphs, roads and bridges, harbour and river improve- 
icnts. nnd reservoirs for securing water supply during dry seasons, have been pressed forward 
3 rapidly as is consistent with the influx of labour and capital. It has been pointed out that the 
iovemuicnt debt of Queensland now averaging £60 i>er head is as high, measured in this way, as 
liat of any country in the world, and a great deal higher than that of the mother country. But 
bis is an altogether misleading statement, for the debt of Queensland has been incurred, almost 
lie whole of it, upon reproductive works, and in fulfilling the duties of the ground landlorrl ; 
nd the eflfect of this upon the revenue is shown in the following figures:— 





Revenue per head in 1884-6, 




From Taxation. 


From services ren» 
dered (Govt, rali- 
way-i, Post Office, 
Teiegrapbs, fcc). 


Bents. 


Together. 


Queensland • 
United Kingdom . 


t s. d. 
8 12 7 

2 18 


£ (. d. 
3 4 3 

7 3 


i «. d. 
1 18 9 

3 


t t. d, 
8 15 7 

2 8 9 



The (lebt^ in fact, is incurrc<l with the direct object of inci^asing the contributions to revenue, 
nJ «t tlie same time opening up a territory of 1200 miles long by i*'^0 miles broa*l to the outer 
orlJ. In Queenslond there is not the same tendency to concentrate v t one centre as there is at 
ydncy, Melbourne, and Adelaide ; con8f>qucntly along the large extent of coast line (2250 miles), 
icre are a number of important ports— Brisbane, Rockhampton, Townsville, Maryborough, Port 
)ougla8, Mackay, Tliursday Island, Cooktown, Bundaberg, Cairns, Gladftone, and Normanton (on 
ic Uulf of Carjiciitaria\ being the twelve principal, and ranking about in the order named. The 
rrsent i^pulation of Brisbane approaches 50,000; that of Rockhampton is about 12,000; Mary- 
r>rough, 11,000; Townsville, 10,000; Ipswich, aliout 80U0; and Toowoomba, 6000. Tho 
luling exports are wool, gold, sugar, tin, hidee and skins, pearl-shell, tallow, live-stock, preservetl 
Kilt, iH-che-de-mer, and silver ore; while tho imports mainly consist of British manufactures, 
lie total value of the external trwle of Queensland imports and exports, which in 1860 was 
1,267,500, has now risen until in 1884 it reached £11,055,840. 

At the present time there are 1407 miles of railway in operaiion in the Colony, and a further 
msiderable mileage under construction ; there are 11,638 miles of telegraph vire — which is more 
an in any other Australasian Colony, except New South Wales ; there are 425 State schools, 
ith 1161 teachers; tho banking deposits to the 30th September, 1885, weio £6,815,763, apart 
om tho £1,340,255 in tho hands of the Government savings banks at the end of the yejir. These 
B statistics of a miscellaneous character, but they all testify to the growth and vigour of his 
sutUful Colony, 



230 



AdvertiBements. 



, .,._>',,. ..1 f 'if, -d,,,!, f>. 'j . n • '' r ," 

/, •'! > ■• ^^'•\ I-;. ,'1 ., • ;.'■",, X •■- ■ I ' /. . , . II . 

..I • ■{ If' j ifj I 11 . .1. ■!( '•■f r I' I. ;_ ; • ' 

I'.Mji ►«,!•■■''' :,■ t"-' ' ,. -i„'l:i-'i," I ■ I . i'' 1.4 / ■ . ' i..' 



'• ' ,i?'Ki 



f" ." 




SstabllBhed 1862. Telegraphic Addregi—"OBiaiNi^Ii, Manobeatt." 



JOHN CAMERON, 

iQYentor and Maker of the Origioa "GameroD" Pamp. 

ALU OTUEnS ARS SPURIOUS JMITATIOSS. 

These Pumps ara (iiie<l for fording bollcn of all kinds, both 
land and marint*. al«o in Cliemlcal Works, CoUUriRii, Mine*, Briiii 
Works, Water Works, Iron Works, &c. ; also Fire i'limpi fur 
Mill", fcc. Over 20,000 in n»<>. Madfi In nires from 2-liitli t« 
ao-lnci) Riiius. Sptcial Quolattuiit fur High I'rttturt rump* 

Alr<o Patenti'p tind Makrr ot the c<-l«braU'd Cam and Lever 
Punching' and Shearing' Haohine wliicli bits hnn 
uiiiversall.v adopti d in all tliu Ducks and Ship Yards botU nt liume 
and abroad. Also 
other Shii>buildi'r&* ^1 

'I'oola, Pliite Bend- '^^ 

Inglldllsk) take in 
Plates from 7 to 21 
fc t long; Plato 
I'laninR Machines 
to take in Plates 
Irom 10 to 2'i r<'et 
lon)( ; Horizontal 
Puncliini;, Shear- 
ing, and Angle 
• Cutting Machine!). 
'Kar Cutting and 
Plate Shearing Ma- 
clitnes. 

J'OJt riilCE LISTS, .{-c, ADDRKSS - 

JOHN CAMERON, 

OLDFIELD ROAD IRON WORKS, SALFOBD, 

MANCHKSTKIl. -i^irt*i«H^! _ 

Agent for London and District-PIIICE & BBLSHAK, 6S, Qtieen Victoria St., E.C 

t'thi-- ■^'U ft': "tn''< ' ■ i< ."f .:ai;'--'.'.'-; .• ' .^m^:-.' ' ,■ ,, <,,■>]■ i » »'. 
'! 'itf.' 1 ■• ■■ r ' '' '' "i.'i ,1?' I' •! ■' I • • "' >,.f . ( 
,>.!,■, ', 'l i,, J 'i , ■ •. ,.?^( . f.-if.f , .„,•;■ .ii/v'.; 

,...,,■ ' ' [1 ,i' f-'. • ' ' . .. I. i i' 1 ■''■'.( "^ r ■ vi^ i^i'i'v I 

.► ' . '' ', '> ' ' > ' ■. ■ " •' '.> ■ . •' -';• '<,i:' ' - ' ,-■•«••., .> ?-,.-^( ■.■ 
.■•-,■;'• , ' "'• !■! • ■•■-' ' " ■.(! ■ Jl • .■ r (, • i' , } ' / • , V'- • ;j '. 




t;i,i* ;,^ ■! ( I'l 



,» 'J tTf-i ,,,■ 1, It .t'-'>y 'VVi I'.ii 



ff*« <j^ 



■ ■ •'', \ ' '■'!. .•''■' \ '"'I ••• ,."^.; • 



Queetuland. 



231 



)uing to ioanl of $paeer it i$ not mraclieable to 
nice full parUcular$ hrre of all the ExhUnfg, 
hut these will l>c found in the Colony's 
termite Catuloijue.'] 



GROUP I.— PINE ARTS. 

Glass 1. 
Painlingt and Draieings. 

1. ALLOM, "W. J., Charters Towers. 
." Bowen, Port Deniaon." Oil painting. 

2. AUSTIN, WHjIjIAM, Brisbane.— 

) "BriB))ane from the North." Water-colour. 
) " Arrival of First Gold-Escort at Melbourne, 
52." Water-colour. 

3. CLARKE, JOSEPH A., Brisbane 
Orchids (1) Stenocarpu* tinxtaiut. (2) Den- 
obium biijibbum. (3) Dendrobium Valhouti- 
1(1. (4) Ifepenthes Demaytii. 

4. DEl«. riS, HERBERT, Brisbane.^ 

Anatomicak Study from Fluster Caut." 

6. EWART, WILLIAM, Brisbane.— 

I'ortmit of the Hon. Samuel Walker Ciriflith, 
.A., Q.C., Premier of Queensland." 

e. JENNER, "WALTER, Brisbane. 

■(1) "S.8. 'Konia' entering; SehasmiClumnol 
lur tlic eruption of Knikatoa." (2), "8.8. 
ioma ' oft' the remains of Krakat<m, stocriug 
)t Batavia." 

7. MILLS, THOMAS, Charters 

'owers.— (1) "Charters Towers Gold Field." 
il puiuting by W. J. AUom. 

8. BAMWELTj, WILLIAM, Gtold 
(Tardon, Etheridge. — Nine Water-colour 
icctcliog representing viowa on the Etheridge 

*old Field. 

Glass 2. 
Sculptures, Die'Sinking, and Eudtouing, 

Class 3. 

Arrhiteetural Drawingt and Models. 

8. CLARKE, J. J., Brisbane.— (1) 

ublic OtHccg, Brisbane. (2) New Town Iluil, 
trisbano (proiniated doaign). (8) Interior of 
rand Hall, Now Town Hall, Brisbane. 

10. QAILEY. RICHARD, Brisbane. 

~(1) Offices of the Brisbane New^spapcr Com- 
auy. Limited. (2) Treiksury Buibiings, 
Irislmne. (3) Girls' Grammar School, and 
*upilii' Residence, Brisbane. (4) Head Mivster's 
lesidenoo. Boys' Grammar School, Brisbane. 
6) Buildings, comer of Queen Street and 
Ubert Htree^ Brisbane. (6) City Brewery, 
lurgaret Street, Bristmne. 



11. HOEPPNER, HENRY, Bris- 
bane. — Design for a Villa Residence. 

11a. PUBLIC WORKS and MUTES 
DEPARTMENT, Brisbane. — (1) The 
Immigration Depot, Brisbane. (2) Immig^ra- 
tion Depot, Kockhampton. (3) Court Hou.se, 
Bockliampton (4) Court House, Mankay. (6) 
Court House, War.viok. (6) Hospital Mary- 
borough. 

12. STANLEY, P. D. O., Brisbane.— 

" Queensland National Bank," Brisbane. 



Class 4. 

Engravings, Lithographs, &c. 

Glass 5. 

ritotvgraphs. 

13. BANCROFT, THOMAS L., 
M.D., Gtoraldton. — "Geraldton and John- 
stone River." 

14. BERNAYS, LEWIS ADOL - 
PHU8, F.L.S., Brisbane. — - "Brisbane 

Water Kcstrvoir, Gold Creek." 

15. COBB ac CO., Brisbane. — Two 

Views of a " Cobb's Coach," 

16. CRAN, ROBERT & CO., Bunda- 
berg. — " Millaquin Sugar Refinery." 

17. FRIEND, HENRY, Sen., Glad- 
stone. — Kicvou Views of Gladstone. 

18. LETHEM, H. W., & SOUTH- 
ERDEN, R. W., Brisbane.—" A Ruilway 
Surveyor's Camp." 

19. LOMER, A., & CO., Brisbane.— 

Views of Briubauu and District. 

20- QUEENSLAND COMMIS- 
SIONH1R8, Brisbane. — (1) " Views of 
Brisbane." (2) " Uuttli Township and Station 
Life." (8) "Bushand I'lantationLife." (4) 
" Clermont and District." (5) " Cloncurry and 
District." (6) "Cooktown." (7) "Darling 
Downs." (8) "Etheridge (iold Field." (9) 
" Gladstone and District." (10) " Gympie and 
District." (11) "Ipswich and District." (12) 
" Lake's Creek Meat I'reserving Works." (13) 
" Beonleigh and District." (14) " Mackay and 
Diwtriot." (15) " Main Range, Toowoomba." 
(16) " Maryborough and District." (17) Mount 
Britton Gold Field." (18) Mount Morgan 
Gold Jlines." (19) " Quecnsliiud Aboriginals." 
(20) "Rockhampton and District." (21) 
"Roma and District." (22) "Squatting Life 
on the Darling Downs." (28) "Toowoomba 
and District." (24) " Yeppoon." 



232 



Queerulanel. 



21. BICABDO, PEBCY R., Bris- 
bane.— Brisbane in 1858, 1862, and 1885. 

22. SUTTON, J. W., & CO., En- 

gineers, Brisbane. — Views of the Exhibitors' 
Works and Machinery, Ships, Ac, constructed 
by them. 

23. TUCKER, Rev. W. F., Bowen.— 

Views of IJowen. . i- ■ 

Class 6. " 

Worlts of Art, not otherwise specified. 

24. ADDISON, E. li.. Manse, Bunda- 

berg.— Cushions. 

25. ALTERIETH, MISS, Maokay.— 

Basket, made from sieds f^athnred from trees, 
shrubs, and beans, growing in the Mockay 
District. 

26. DE JERSEY, MADAME, Bris- 
bane. — Flowers made of liurritiuundi Fish 
ScAles and Sheila. ^ , < • - 



GROUP II.— EDUCATION. 

Class 7, 
Appl 

School r nmituref and Bookg, 



Educational Appliances, Models of Schools, 



Class 8. 
Maps, Charts, and Plans. 






81. RAILWAY DEPARTMEirr.. 
Railway Map of Queedsland. 

32. SIRCOM, J., Oeorgetown.— Map 
theEtheridge Gold Field. 

33. THORPE, JAMES, Brisbane. 
Meteorological Map of Queensland. 



Class 9. 

Specimens of work done by pupils in school 

34-46. BRISBANR— Two hundred an 
sixty-two Exhibits. 

46. BOWEN.— Sixteen Exhibits. 

47 & 48. CHARTERS TOWERS,. 
Twenty-six Exhibits. 

49. GLADSTONE.— Seven ExhibiU. 

60-62. GYMPIE.- Fifty Exhibits. 

63-68. IPSWICH.~Fifty-sevenExhibi 

59 & 60. MACKAY.— Twenty-four E 
hibits. 

61 & 62. MARYBOROUaH.-EIg 

Exhibits. 

63&e4. ROCKHAMPTON,— Twentl 

two Exhibits. 

65 & 66. TOOWOOMBA. — Ten E 

hibits. 

67 & 88. TOWNSVILLB. - Twentj 

eight Exhibits. 

69. WARWICK.— Fourteen Exhibits. 



27. MoKBLLAR, J. A., Brisbane.— 
Map of Brisbane). 

28. POST AND TELEGRAPH DE- 
PARTMENT, Brisbane.- Map showing 
Postal and Telegraph routes. 

29. PUBLIC LANDS DEPART- 
MENT, Brisbane. — Map of QueenHluud, in 
six sheets. Edition 1885. Scale : Iti miles to 
the inch. Four other Maps showing Agri- 
cultural, Pastoral, Geologieal, and Mineral 
areas, &c. 

30. PUBLIC WORKS AND MINES 
DEPARMENT, Brisbane.— (1) Map of 
Day Dawn P.C, and Day Dawn Block Gold 
Mines, Charters Towers. (2) Map of Charters 
Towers, showing total yields Irom principal 
Mining Ijeases. (3) Map of Gympie Gold 
Field, showing total yields from principal Min- 
ing Leases. (4) Map of Rnvenswood Gold 
Field, showing total yields of principal luining 
Leases. 



• vt 



"* 



GROUP III.— STATISTICS. 

Class 10. 

Statistical Information of every Description. 

70. ARCHIBALD, JOHN, Ravew 
■wood. — Statistics of the Bavenswood Gol 
Field. 

71. McARTHUR, ALEXANDI 

Gladstone.— Statistics of the Gladstone Go!j 
Field. 

72. POST AND TELEGRAPH Dl 

PARTMENT.— Comparative Statistics, \i 
and 1885. 

73. QUEENSLAND COMMB 
SIONEHS, Brisbane.— Sheet of Genej 
Statistics of Quf>eu8land. 



Queensland. 



233 



74 SAM WEIiIi, WILLIAM, George- 
iwn. — Treutisn on the Etheridgo (jold 
eld. 



ROUP IV. — APPLICATION 
AND APPARATUS OF THE 
LIBERAL ARTS. 

Class 12. 

Printing, Bookbinding^ drc. 

75. BLACKMAN, F. A., Brisbane.— 

) "Adventures in Qneensland." (2) "Ronald 

alton." , 

76. GORDON & GOTCH, Brisbane. 

(1) Bailey's "Fern World." (2) Mrs. 
oolo's "l*<>eni8." (3) "PukIi'b Alnmiiac." 
) " Geogniphy of Oceania." (5) " Slater's 
Imanuc.'* (6) Coote's " History of Queens- 
ad," vol i. .. ,_.,. , . , 

77. HOGKINOS, ALBERT JOHN, 
risbane. — (1) Queensland Garden Manual. 
I) "Flower Garden in Queensland." 

78. QUEENSLAND C O M M I S - 
lONERS, Brisbane. — (1) Bailey's 
Synopsis of the Queensland Flom." f(2) 
alley's " Supplement to the Synopsis of the 
aeeiisland Flora." (3) Bailey's " Catalogue 

Plants in the two Metropolitan Gardens." 

Bemavb' "Cultural Industries." (5) 

oyd's "Old Colonials." (6) "Brisbane 

jrertory." (7) Brunton Stephens* "Poems." 
") Donovan's " Catalogne of the Queensland 
arliamentarv Library." (9) Gregory's 
Isplorationg " (10) Kerr's "Outlines of 
ustralian History." (11) " Queensland : its 
esouroes and lastitntious" (a aeries of descrip- 
ve Essays oa the Colony). 

79. REGISTRAR OP BRANDS, 

risbane. — Two " Brands Directories for 
ueendand, for 1884." 

80. WOODCOCK & POWELL, Bris- 

ano.— Specimens of Printing. 

81. THOMPSON, J. W., Brisbane.— 

The Land Question." 






Class 14. 
Scientific Information. 

82. FISHER, HENRir EDWIlf, 

Brisbane. — Universal (ra>an time) Sun-dial 
or Settlor's Clock ; will, when corrt<>tly set and 
kept properly regulated according to the equa- 
tion of time, show the mean time, withm a 
fraction of a minute, at all seasona of the 
year. 

READING ROOM. 

The Beading Koom will be supplied «ith 
flies of the following newspapers and period- 
icals : — 

AUora Guardian, Border Post and Stannom 
Miner (Stanthorpe), Brisbaite Courier, Booda- 
berg aud Mount Perry Mail, Buiidaberg Star, 
Civirns Chronicle, Cairns Post, Capricomiaii 
(Rockhampton), Carpentaria Times (Xorman- 
lon), Charleville Timeu, Christian Menpenger 
(Brisbane), Colonist (Maryborongh). Cooktown 
Courier, Cnoktown ludept-ndeat, Cunnamulla 
Express, Dalby Herald, Darlinjr Downs Gaiette 
(Toowoomba), Evangelical Standard (Bris- 
bane), Gladstone Observer. Gymple Miner, 
Gympie Times, Herbcrton Advertiser, Hogh- 
enden Ensign, Ipswich Advocate, Jonmal of 
Commerce (Brisbane), Logan Witness (Beoi- 
leigh), Mackay Mercury, Mackay Standard, 
Maryborough Chronicle, Morning Bolletiii 
(Rockhampton), Nord Australische Zeitung 
(Brisbane), Northern Avgus (Rockhampton) 
Northern Miner (Charters TowersX Northern 
Standard (Tov n^ville). North Rockhampton 
Times, Observer (Britbane). Prtlmcr Chronicle 
(Maytown), Planter and Fanner (Brisbane), 
Peak Downs Telegram, Port Denbon Tiioea, 
Port Douglas Chronicle, Port Douglas Times, 
Queensilander (Brisbane), Queensland Figaro 
(Brisbane), Queensland Gofxl Templar (Bris- 
bane), Queensland Leadisr (Brisbane). Queens- 
land Mercantile Gazette (BrisbaneX Qneens- 
land Times (Ipswich), Ravenswood Mining 
Journal, Roma Free Press, Sandgate Directory, 
Southern World (Brisban *), St. George Stan- 
dard, Telegraph (Brisbane), Temperance 
Record (Brisbane), Toowoomba Ctirunicle, 
Towers Herald (Ctiarters Towers), TownaYille 
Bulletin, Townsville Herald, Warwick Argus, 
Warwick Examiner and Tim»-8, Week (Bris- 
bane), Western Champion (Biaekall), Western 
Star (Roma), Wide Bay and Buntott News 
(Marybon*'), Wild River Times (HerbertonX 
SVinton Herald. 



ro ALL COLONIAL AND FOREIGN VISITORS. 

In connection with tbt* KxbibiUon, CITY COLONIAL ROOMS are thrown open (gratis) at LewlenbiVl BoiMinca, 

.C. (comerof I^eadenball Stnft and Umcechurch Street), for bunlneM apiiolntments; for r-ceiviog Irttn'ts; for the 
■ivate rxblbiiioaof Minerals Piecloas Stones, liyea. Woods, Fibres, Shells, Skins, Feathers, ftc., f»r whicli iatg* Shov 
i*t« are erected, and for uurjductious l>etween Colonials, ^MerotiaaiB,